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Dulath HERALD 



31:20 - 31:46 



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iDat s: 



May 1 



1913 



May 31 



85-12 :i'ol 



1913 



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Date: 
Nov 24, 1981 



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THE DULUTH HERAL 




VOLUME XXXI— NO. 20. 



THURSDAY EVENING, MAY 1, 1913. 



TWO CENTS. 



FREE LUMBER FIGHT 
N IN HOUSE -TARIFF 
ON WOOL COMES NEXT 



Leaders Are Confident Bill 
Will Pass House Un- 
changed. 



Tax on Motorcycles Calls 

Out Some Personal 

Exchanges. 



C. B. Miller Makes Verbal 

Attack on Stanley of 

Kentucky. 



W.ishlnpton. May 1.— The wood 
schedule. invoIviiiK the ftght of the 
an tl- free lumber advotat<'S, was the 
-ot of attat-k when the htiuse to- 
rfsumt-il d«'bate on (he tariff bill. 
Democratic leaders, however, expected 
to nuike jcreal progress In the readintj 
of the bill for amendment by the con- 
clusion of tonlght'8 session. 

The affrtcultui-al schedule. Involving 
the contentions of the minority that 
the majority has put almost everythinK 
that the farmer holds dear on the free 

list, the wool section, which will pre- 
• * the stru^'gle of the opposition 
raw wcKil. and the income tax 
lis graduated i^ystem that Is ex- 
ted to bririK Jli'tt.«ioo,(tOo Into the 
sury coffers annually, were in 
t when the Democratic leaders 
ii^i.-Wfd the situation as the discus- 
sion beKan today. 

Lraderw C'onfldent. 
The leaders were confident, however, 
that there would be no disturbance or 
the cati'u.^-approved bill, and the mi- 
norit; was wearying of the steady 
fltrht. with scores of constantly reject- 
^■1 .». MTidments. The sparring of the 
; f'»r political advuntaKe has 
1 Mt-t,;, furcd in the main, and an 
ikle of wit with clashes 
I,; ividual members has les- 
sen* d the monotony of debate over 
dry t'l- ti f. s 

R tative Sims of Tennessee 

w.iv ioning the reason for the 

i! motorcycles, and asked if the 

;ee regarded them as luxuries 



or necessilies. 

•'My boy has two 



of them," 



an- 



(Continued on paf?e 15, fourth column > 



RUSHING WORK ON 
THE PAKA&IA CANAL 



Big Steam Shovels Have 
Been Put on Twelve- 
Hour Shifts. 

W'ashinKton, May 1. — A great many 
evidences of a determination to hurry 
completion of the Panama canal are 
seen in todays reports from the 
isthmus. 

The nine mammoth steam shovels 
digginff out Culebra cut have been put 

Lon iL'-hour shifts, and working at such 
a rale would have a channel ready for 
>-hii ?• thruugii the most troublesome 
pan of the canal by the time the locks 
are ready. 
While the last official estimate of 
the earliest day at which ships could 
• pass through the canal has been some 
' time in Ctctober, the rapid progress of 

\the work with some a»ldltional rush of 
orders may make It possible for ships 
to go tlirough earlier. 

UNDERWOODMANAGSR 
! TO BE MADE JUDGE 



E.K. Campbell Will Be Nom- 
inated to the Court of 
^ Claims. 

■Washington. May 1. — E. K. Camp- 
> bell of Birmingham, Ala., for many 
years political manager for Repre- 
sentative Oscar Underwood, has been 
• t«-d by President Wilson for a 

_».e in the United .Stales court of 
' iaims. His nomination was expected 
to go to the senate today. 

When Oampbeii's name was first 
mentioned for the Judgeship It was 
polntefi out by some Alabama Dcmo- 
<rats that he had opposed instructing 
the delegation to the Baltimore con- 
vention to vote for Mr. Wilson in the 
event that Mr. Underwood could not 
be rion>lnated. 

Th»- selection of Mr. Campb«-ll for 
the Judgeship probably mean.s the ele- 
vation f>t Judge <'harles P. Howry of 
Oxford. Miss., to be chief Justice of 
the court of claims. His nfimination 
also was said to be scheduled for to- 
day. 

BUFFALOlfORE 

EMPLOYES STRIKE 



Demand $8 Minimum Wage 

and Other Concessions 

From Employers. 

Bufralo. N. v.. May 1.- Over 2,r)00 de- 
partment store employes, involving 
every s-tore of the kind In the city, 
went on strike this morning for In- 
creased wages and shorter hours. Em- 
I ployeH of hardware and 5 and 10-cent 
stores participated in the strike. 

The demant! is for a minimum wage 

I of JN foi- women clerks and $15 for 

I men clerks, with a minimum for boys 

I of |S and fc»r drivers and fhauffeurs 

I of $l^ per week. The employes also 

' demand an eight-hour workday, Sat- 

; urday lialf-hollday at full pay In June, 

Julv, August and September, and the 

in;; of the stores at 5 o'clock each 

• •ling. The present average weekly 

iwaite for girl clerks Is said to be 
oply 15. 
Pickets were placed at the entrances 
of all the str>res this morning: The 
\ strike vote taken last night was nrac- 
. tleally nnnnlmous and was closely 
\ obeyed this morning. The delivery 
1 system was tied up completely. 



HE SAYS AMERICA NEED 

FEAR NO INVASION 




ANDREW CARNEGIE. 

Who Spoke at the American Peace 

Congress in St. Louis. 



PUT INVADERS 
ON THE FARMS 



Andrew Carnegie Tells the 

Peace Congress How War 

Would Terminate. 



Ironmaster Praises Presi- 

Cant Wilson in Speech 

at St. Louis. 



St. Louis, Mo., May 1. — The fourth 
American Peace congress began a 
three days' session here today with 
delegates present from all parts of 
the country. 

The chief address of the morning 
was delivered by Andrew Carnegie, 
who told the congress why he believed 
fhe nations soon would reach the goal 
of peace, and by what road they would 

travel. He described the cost of war 
and warlike i)repai'ations, and ex- 
plained his confidence that the United 
Stales never need fear foreign inva- 
sion. President Wilson and his ad- 
ministration he predicted would gain 
immortal glory by dealing successfully 
with the (luestlon of world peace. 
Life In Servlre Mafent. 
The goal, said Mr. Carnegie, is al- 
most attained. "If a man wished to 
select tie safest life possible, the me 
freest from all danger of violent 
death, let him enter our army and 
navy. There is not a workman at- 
tending machin.ry or erecting build- 
ings, nor a railway train emplove or 
a policeman — the soldier of civillza- 
tion, whose duty Is never to attack 

(Continued on page 15, first column.) 

MELLEN DECIDES 
TO DEFEND HIS ACTS 

Head of New Haven Road 
Will Testify Before Com- 
merce Commission. 

Boston. Mass., May 1. — When the In- 
terstate commerce commission hearing 
was resumed today, It was announced 
that President Mellen had decided to 
appear as a witness later, with the 
purpose of defending his management 
of the New Haven railroad. 

Mr. Mellen heretofore has refused to 
appear as a voluntary witness and 
waive immunity, and the commission 
has declined to subpoena him. As late 
as yesterday It was said that he re- 
mained steadfast in his original deci- 
sion, but he has now decided that it is 
his duty to the stockholders, personal- 
ly to defend the New Haven system be- 
fore the commission. 



FARMER USES DEAD 
DOG TO CATCH THIEE 



C^rnnd ItniildM. Wis., >In} 1. 

Tlio M|niiKhterlii,( of an ol«| fam- 
ily doK mid the dresMliiK of the 
rarcRNN to roNemltlo inultt'n 
were the menim ri-N4irie(l to by 
a farmer IIvIiik uenr i'lttNville, 
aM a trap to cat< h tlileven yyho 
had been vlattinir hla nmoke- 
huune and taking <|iiantltlei» of 
meat from time (« time, 

F(»ll«M\inK (he dtMappt^arance 
of the "mutton" (he fiirm* r t<H>k 
opportunity to make n mil at 
meal time on a NiiMp«-ete«| nelicb- 
l>or, iind iipon iirrMlnB -,va*< nra<*d 
Ut join the family at dinner, he- 
Ing ofl'ered nM an indiieeineiit the 
proMpeot of n repHwt of "mutton 
■te^v." The visitor declined. h«M\- 
ever, nntl took ad^nntUKe to tell 
of the trick %%bl4-h he hud played 
the nlicbt liefitre. askiiiK If niiy- 
one nt the table had an idea an 
to the guilty party. The family 
appeared un<'<>nifortahIe. and 
niakinB ^nrlouM excuaea. left the 
table one by one for the bnek- 
yard. 



I 

o 



<, 



\ 



BRYAN SEES 
JAPANESE 

Secretary of State Visits 

Colonies of Orientals 

in California. 



Is Guest of Governor John- 
son on Tour of In- 
spection. 



"OLD AKOY IS NO MORE" 
HE WRITES, AND SENDS 
DULLET THROUGH HEART 



Sacrumeiito, t'al., May 1. — .Secretary 
of State Hryan, who came from Wash- 
ington to protest the passage of ati 
alien land law by the California legis- 
lature, has read and listened to many 
arguments since h«' came to Sacra- 
mento but the best argument of all, in 
the belief of Governor Johnson, Is yet 
to be presented. 

This morning the secretary was 
taken for a spin in the governor's au- 
tomobile to the towns of Florin and 
Walnut (Srove. a dozen miles distant 

from the capital, where two typical 
colonits of Japanese farmers have 
been started. tJoVi-rnor Johnson and 
AKsemblyman Hradford, who repre- 
sents tne district, will aciompany him. 
Tht y will point out the following 
concrete fai ts for his observation; i 

There are more than fi.oOJ Japanese 
subjects In Sacramento county, accord- 
ing to Assemblyman Hradford's com- 
putation from the IIMO census. 
Own Sooi^a of Farma. 

There are more than l.TiOO Japanese 
In the l-'lorln c<don: . where scores of 
big farms are owned and hundreds of 
acres leased. 

There are 42 Japanese children out 
of a total enrollment of 67 pupils in 
the Fl<)rln pub..c schools. 

In Walnut f^rove, Isleton and .Sierra, 
neighboring towns in the same com- 
munity, the number of Japanese chil- 
dren In the public scnools ranges 
from -10 to 50 per cent. 

(lovernor Johnson said he was 
pleased that Secretary Hrvan had ac- 
cepted the Invitation to see for him- 
self "('alifornia's best argument for 
an antl-allen law." 

Ileatrlotluna of Ilill. 

A close study of the Webb bill shows 

(Continued on page 15, fourth column.) 

SHEET TO DISCUSS 
RECLAMATION WORK 



WAGE DEMAND 
TURNDOWN 

Conductors' and Train- 
men's Appea for Higher 
Pay Is Refused. 



Eastern Railroad Managers 

Claim Public Interests 

Would Suffer. 



Water Users and Officials 

Invited By Secretary 

of Interior. 

Washington. May 1. — l»ifflcultles and 
differences of opinion between officials 
of the reclamation service and users 
of water from various government Ir- 
rigation projects are expected to be 
threshed out at conferences which be- 
gan here today. Secretary Lane in- 
vited the contending forces and inter- 
ested members of congref's to attend 
the conferences, over which he will 
preside at the interior department. 

It Is the announced purpose of the 
secretary to develop clearly the differ- 
ences between the officials and the 
water users over each proje'ct, that he 
may make such changes In the admin- 
istrative policy of irrigation and rec- 
lamation as may be shown to be de- 
sirable. 

James J. Hill of the Great Northern 
railway, whom the secretary invited to 
discuss the relative merits and cost of 
government and privately-owned Irri- 
gation projects, wired he would be un- 
able to be here today, but would be 
present probably next Monday or 
Tuesday. 

G. M. Bailey. Interested in Irrigation 
projects In Oregon, has proposed a 
plan to turn over the new lands to the 
department of agriculture for settle- 
ment after they have bten completed 
by the reclamation engineers. 



New York, May 1 -TJie conference 
committee of manac>/M '. of Eastern 
railroads declined trday to grant the 
re(iiic.^t8 made by their conductors and 
trainmen for higher w»p:es. The com- 
mittee, in a reply uem to the Order of 
Railway Conductors and Brotherho</d 
of Railway Train me'i, said that the 
present rates of wages are liberal and 
in many cases exct-ssive, and that lh<' 
re<iue'Jt for an increase is declined "in 
the Interests of owner? of railroad se- 
curities, In the interests of all railroad 
employes, in the Interests of the public 
as a whole." 

Would Mean »1 7,1100,000. 

"Tl-.e wattes and wnking conditions 
which vou reciuest," -•« v« the reply, 
"would' increase the pay of the 100.000 
conductors and trainmen of the rail- 
roads in tiie Hasteni district by ap- 
proximately |17.(iOt,000 or 20 per cent 
per annum. The Increase would be 
efiulvalent to placing on these proper- 
tics a Hen of |4 25.000,0p<^ of 4 per cent 

(Continued on paga 15, tlilrd column.) 

WOMAN MURDERS 
SALOON mW% SON 



Andrew Wold Ends His Life 

in Room in Axa 

Block. 



Shot Attracts Attention of 

Other Tenants of the 

Building. 



Despondency Over Recent 
Health Believed to Be 
Cause. 



Explains She Meant to 

Shoot the Father, Not 

the Boy. 

Chicago, May 1. — Clii-^^nre Mtirphy, 

.4fV, 



Ind.. ea- 

ttistantiv 

>l8 fath -; 'B 

Orace Smith, 

attempted to 



22 years old, son of h 

loonkeeper, was iiho* 

killed early today 'vhiU 

place of businrss by Mi 

35 3'earB old, when he 

eject her. 

Mrs. Smith (led :n an automobile to 

the home of her sister, MISS Lizzie 

Ct.lmar, In Chicago, where later .she 
was arrested. 

Arthur Greyson, 37 years old, was 
with the Mtonian w hen ««he was taken 
into custody. Tlieyf w^-re token back 
to Gary to be heli until the int|Urst 
has been concluded. 

The shooting followed a (juarrel be- 
tween Mrs. Smith and Henry Murphy, 
prtjprletor of the saloon, over atten- 
tions the saloonkteptr is alleged to 
have paid to an actress. Clarence 
Murphy ordered Mrs. Smith out of the 
saloon, and when he stepped toward 
her to enforce the command she drew 
a revolver from th"=i ffiKls of her dress 
and fired five shot;<. one taking efltct 
In his heart. 

"I meant to shoot old man Murphy 
and not his t-on," Mrs. Smith told th«- 
pcdice. "He treatCil me cruelly and I 
I wanted to get revenue." 



Old Andy Im no more. Fare«\eII to 
un«^ and nil. VourH lrul>. Old -Andy. 

After writing' the above note and 
leaving it on his dresser, Andrew A. 
Wold. 58 years old. took a 38-calib(ir 
revolver and fired a bullet through 
his heart In his room on the thir<l 
floor of the Axa building, 211 West 
Superior street, at 10:30 o'clock this 
morning. Despondency resulting from 
recent Ill-health Is believed to have 
been the cause. 

The shot attracted the attention of 
people In the building. A. R. Marshall 
of Minneapolis was passing through 
the opposite hall and glancing through 
the windows of the hall saw Wold 
throw his arms In the air as he was 
In his last death struggle, and then 
fall to the floor. He rushed to the 
room and opening the dooi' found him 
lying on the fU)or breathing his last. 

Mr. Marshall then notified the po- 
lice and the coroner, who came and 
viewed the body. Coroner Mct^onib or- 
dered the body moved to J. L. Craw- 
ford's morgue on Second street. No 
ln<iue8t will be held, it being ad- 
judged to be a clear case of suicide. 

Mr. Wold was a well known charac- 
ter in Inilutli. He was faiuillarl\ 
known as "Old Andy ' He was a 
bachelor and had lived in the city 
for the past twenty-eight years. For 
many years he wt.s engineer of The 



(Continued on page IB. third column.) 



WILSON MOUNTS THE 
NEW JERSEY STUMP 



Goes to Home State to 
Campaign for His -Re- 
form Bills. 

Washington. May 1 — President "Wil- 
son turned toward New Jersey today 
for the first bit of campaigning since 
pre-election days. He prepared to leave 
here at 3 p. m. for a two-day speaking 
trip In his home state, to ai'Peal to the 
people to bring pressure upon Demo- 
cratic mi-mbcrs of the state legislature 
to pass a Jury reform bill as well as a 
measure calling a constitutional con- 
vention. 

Those two proposals, written in the 
Democratic state ilatfonii by Mr. Wil- 
son himself while governor failed of 
passage in the legirslatiire. The efforts 
of Mr. Wilson, co-operating with Act- 
ing Governor Fielder, arc dlrec;ed 
toward ac< ompllshlng the reforms in 
the extra session of the legtslatu e to 
be convened within a week. 



"EVERY LITTLE MOVEMENT HAS A MEANING ALL ITS OWN." 



mmi 




AUSTRIA, 'lALY AND 
ENGLAN|MAY OCCUPY 
MO^II NEGRIN PORTS 



SAYS RAILROADS NL 



LU 



A) 
00 



HIGHER FREIGHT RATES 




Little Kingdom Replies Non- 

committally to Demands 

of Europe. 



Troops Are Reported to Be 
Moving to the Fron- 
tiers. 




DANIEL WILLARD, 
President of the Baltimore & 
Railroad. 



Ohio 



WOULD RAISE 
FREIGHT RATES 



Eastern Railroads Will Ask 

for 5 Per Cent Flat 

Increase. 



President Willard of the B. 
& 0. Tells of the De- 
mand. 



Arrangements for Peace 

With Turkey Are Being 

Made. 



4^ -^ ^ A^ A A A #^-1 

■^ ^ ^* ^ ^ ^ ™' -T- ^ 

* POWERS WITHHOLD H.4ND. 

M London. May 1.— The powerii 
^ \«lll not take NtepM to corrre 
-i^ Montenegro for fhe prewenf. The 
^ nniboMsadorN at their meeting; thin 
^ afternoon eanie to the conrlaMion 
■^ that ill \ Ic^v of thr c«n<'lllBtory 
if- nttlludf Nho««n hy Montenegro it 
!f- »\a»« unueceMMary to proce^'d ^vtth 
":> immediate nieaanreN of corrrion. 

'■ir w \k ^A T^ ^ W ' 






I 



London. May 1. — A proposal that the 
Mont< neg:rln f-eaports of Antlvarl and 
iMilclg-no Hhall be occupied by a Joint 
International force of Austrian, Italian 
and Brltiflh troops as a further demon- 
stration to King Nicholas that the 
powers are resolved to carry out their 
decision In regard to Sjcutari was mad© 
at today's meeting of the ambassadors 
In l..ondon. 

Should Austria-Hungary accept thl» 
middle course its adoption would allow 
time for further pressure on Monte- 
negro and for an arrangement to pro- 
vide her with compenBaiion of some 
kind. 

The reply of Montenegro to the de- 
maud of Europe for the evacuation of 
Scutari was received today by the 
powers. It lei non-committal In char- 
acti-r and keeps the doors open for 
further negotiations. 

Th^ little kingdom of "the Plack 
mountain" tellK its neighbors tsat it 
has the greatest deference for th«-m, 
and declares the (apture of Scutari to 
be in no way a defiance of tht-lr an- 
nounced decision to give the former 
Turkish fortress to Albania. At the 
same time Montenegro suggei-ts that 
tht-re is ioi-ni for dlfccusslon. r r.d re- 
Fe;ve8 lli« right of hrlnglngr ^'p the. 
quttitlor of s. uiari In the ''ourfte of the 
pea«.e i,t-»;v»iiations. 

Troops Are Movlngr* 

One hundr*-d thousand Austrian 
troops are now moving In the dirf'Cilon 
of the Montenegrin frontier, according 

(Continued on page 15, third column.> 

INDiANTPOiSOiTED 
BY LAND HUNTERS 



New York, May 1. — The railroads? of 
the Kastern territory, having discussed 
the freight rate problem, have decided 
to ask the interstate commerce com- 
mission to allow a f) per cent increase 
on freight of all character. 

This was made known today in a 
statement Issued by Pr^'sident Willard 
of the Balthnor* & Ohio. 

Mr. Willard Is the he.id of a commit- 
tee of railway presidents representing 
the principal lines in what is known 

as the official classification territory — 

that is, the district lying east of Chi- 

( ago and north of the Oliio river. 
To Keoi>eu i'n%r: 
For some tii.ie talk of a move look- 
ing to iiiereased freight rates has been 

in the balance, but today's statement 

Is the first coming from the roads and 

outlining tli^e procedurt- they purpose 

to follow 

interstate commerce 

he made In tlie form of an application j tion bv government agents for some 

to reopen the Eastern advance r.Hte [ time. Other arrests are expectt-d. 

According to government officials, a 
number of aged Indians have been in- 
duced to bequeath tlieir holdings for a 



Government Probe Leads 

to Arrests in Oklahoma 

Cases. 

Oklahoma City, Okla., May 1. — Wltl> 
fhe arrest at Hugo, Okla.. of V. Bro- 
nough and V.. I^ Reed, charged with 
having attempted to poison Elli» 
Wood, a Choctaw Indian, it developed 
, that an alleged py.stem of poisoning 
Briefly, the request to the i aged Indians that their lands might 
commission will j be acquired, has been under Investiga- 



i.vyy.v..\\.Vv^.V.'. 



vjvjbwy C/VV4 dvtT 



:*itVJ 



X>?ivVtR,I>EA^R, \ WAN! 




MOVING WOULDN'T BE 
50 BAP IF IT WA$>N'T 
FOR THI5- 



FIRST tafi^L \N THt KEW FUArr% 



-^^WST THE. WVVitR 



nn^icN In ^'oniinated. 

W'nhsington. May 1. — Among nomina- 
tion"?; bv President Wilson today were 
the following: Commissioner of cor- 
porations. .Toseph v.. navies of Wiscon- 
sin assistant coini>trollpr of the treas- 
ury. Walter W. Warwick of Ohio; col- 
le<tor of internal revenue. Third dis- 
trict Iowa, 1-ouls W. Murphy. 
. ^~ 

iSfrlke In Peoria. 

Peoria. 111.. Mav 1.— Four hundred 
building tradesmen have been ordered 
nut on a strike. Tlie strikers demand 
higher wages and shorter hours. 



I THE DAY IN CONGRESS | 

*■ •♦ 

^ SICXATE. ^ 

^ Met n« nooo. "^ 

^ I'reMident WIlMon Miilimltted a ^ 
*■ uiinth«T of nominatl«»nH. -iji 

if fawMrd Dupont rcMolntlon eull- -jjf 
^ IniC '«><■ report from necrrtarjr of ^ 
ift ^vnr on retired iiftteerN nud their 4lt 
« rl^ll employment. -^jt 

^ PaaMed llornh reHolntlon ealllaa: % 
^- on meeretary of war for report on ^■ 
^ oliarKeN of humnn ulavery In the ^ 

Phlllpplnef. ^ 

Went Into executive MeHHion to ^ 

eonMlder uonilnatlonM. j( 

HOI'KR. ^ 

y\ft tit 11 a. in. and reniiiued if: 

readluK of tariff hill for amend- * 

nieiit under five-mlnute rule. ^/^ 

KepreNentatlve lIohHon Intro, ik 

dnoed n bill for creation of the « 

"parental eourt of the I'nited • 

S<ateM" to have Jurladletlon over Ijk 

if: children under 10 year* of a^e. 4t 



FULL GREW LAW TO 
BE PUT TO THE TEST 



case, heard and passed upon by the 
( (unmtsslon in IPIO. 

•'When the matter of an Increase in ^ ^_ 

rates of freight was con.sidered three i ^ash^oonsfderation. a'ndVecVn7iN°"tweive 
years ago." says Mr. \\ illard s state- I Indians have mvsteriouslv disappeared 

ment, "it was proposed by the rail- | _ ^_ I 

roads to increase genen^lly the so- 
called clnss ratts and some of the com- 
modity rates. It was urgt d at the 
time by tliose opposed to the sugge»ted 
advances that a fairer and belter way 
to olitaln an incre.-tse. if necessary, 
would be by a small advance on nil 
rates instead of the laiger advance, as 
was proposed, of some "f the rates, and 
it has been clearly brought out during 
recent years, and particularly in the 
numerous complaints filed with the in- 
terstate commerce commission. that 
the relation <tf rates between localities 
i<- of much greater Importance to the 
shipping public that the act\ial rate by 
Itself. 

"With this in mind, the carriers now 
hope to obtain the consent of the com- 
mission for an advance of 5 per cent 
on freight of all characters, and It Is 
believed that such an advance, if grant- 
ed, will create little if any disturbatice 
in" commercial conditions." 



New Jersey Statute Is Criti- 
cized By the Rail- 
roads There. 

Newark, N. J., May 1. — The so-called 
full crew bill which was oppo8t<i so 
bitterly by the railroads went into 
effect through-^ut this state todav. 
The law provld.s that crews of freight 
trains of less than thirty cars shall 
consist of five men and of more than 
thirty cars of six men. On passenger 
trains of not more than three car* 
the crew must consist of five men. 
and on four or more cars of six men. 

On roads operating into Pennsyl- 
vania, it was necessary to employ 
only a few new men, owing to the fact 
that such trains were already manned 
with full irews, as required under the 
Pennsylvania law*. 

-•Ml the railroads affected, the Penn- 
sylvania, the Erie. the Delaware, 
Lackawanna & Western, the I.ehJgh 
Valley, the Central Kailroad of New 
Jersey and the Baltimore & Ohio, al- 
though they placed full »rew8 on their 
trains today, are planning to loin in 
concerted action to test the constitu- 
tionality of the law, possibly by In- 
viting prosecution under the penalty 
imposing 1100 fine for its violation. A 
test of the law in Pennsylvania ha» 
now reachtnl the supreme court in that 
state, and it is understood tliat the 
New York law. which goes Into effect 
Sept. 1. will be similarly tested. 

The law l.s intended' to Insure the 
safety of tile tiaveling public, but the 
railroads maintain that there are r& 
duties for the extra men to perform. 

TWO DIE IN FIRE. 

Healy House at Oswego, N, Y., Is 
Partly Destroyed. 

Oswego, N Y., May l._Two men 
vire burned to dialh early todav and 
three were fatally injured In a tire 
whteh partially destroyed the lloaly 
house, n three-story structure of brick 
and wood Tb.c dead are 

NATHAN TltlSKEY of Watertown. 

CYRTL WILl.ARr> of Oswego. N Y 
They were trapped In their rooms on 
the top floor. 

L<uke Healey, the proprietor, his sons 
and daujrbter were saved by a police- 
tnan, (\ 



I 



r 



J 




r 




Thursday, 



THE dul^[;th herald 



May 1, 1913. 



\V>«theri 0»*tierally cloudy touir 



1 Friduy. culdor tonight with tem- 
wcstprly to northerly winds. 




a 






a 



M 
M 
ri 

rl 

ri 

M 

M 
a! 



IT'S a pleasure to walk 
out in an OAK HALL 

Suit. Such clothes have an air 
of distinction that modestly pro- 
claims the man who chooses 
well his apparel. 

The best of fabrics are here from Scot- 
land, Ireland, England — also the finest do- 
mestic weaves in pleasing variety. 

Tailoring such as you'd like to have in the clothes 
you wear. Every yard of fabric thoroughly reshrunlc 
— hand tailoring that gives individuality; trimmings 
and linings the best. Clothes that give continued 
pleasure in the wearing ; priced in moderation, 
$15 to $35. 



Knox Hats 



Regal Shoes 



OAK H/\LL eUILDING 



i 






rl 



IVIARIIM E NEWS 

. I II I - __. — 

2,000 MEN 
GET A RAISE 



TWO BOATS 
ARHIEEDED 

Easton Will Be Started on 

North Shore Run Before 

June 1, 



STOP HERE 



TOO BRIEF 



#-u 




'mm. 



SAVINGS DEPOSITS 

Received or accounts 
opened on or before 

MAY 10th 

You Will Receive 

TWO MONTHS' IKTEf!EST 
JULY Isi, 1913 

At the Rate of 

% PER 
ANNUM 

Deposit Now and Secure 
Interest. 

\ orthern 
N ational Rank 



^ COAL PRICES 
ADVANCED 




h 



ALVVOKTH BUILDING. 

Tallest Mo.lern Fire-proof 
Bulldlriif in Minne*jta. 

I>.>ok Uf>^You Can't Miss It 



Increase of Ten Cents Per 

Ton Announced By 

Dealers. 



America Brings Back Party 

of Thirty Hunters and 

Trappers. 



Al! anthracite including egg, stove, 
nut and pea, was today advanced 10 
cents par ton. 

The advance, which became effective 
this morning, is the flrat of the month- 
ly increases in price, which will be 
made from now on until Sept. 1. At 
that time tlie rt-gular winter prices wil* 
become effective. 

During April there is a discount of 
50 cents made on every ton of coal. 
Tliis discount is now reduced to 40 
cents, which means a I'J-cent Increase 
111 tile total cost of a ton of coal. 

The April prices and those which 
a:e in force during May are as fol- 
lows. Dock pea, $5, no change; cargo 
pea, 16.50, advance to |6.»j0; nut, $7.75, 
aiivance to $7.85; stove. 17.75, advance 
lo $7.85; egg, $tJ.50, advance to $ii.60. 

The coal companies all report large 
.supplies of coal now on hand, includ- 
ing l)oth bituminous and anthracite. 



From pre.'iont indications the steamer 
Easton of the Booth line may start Its 
summer schedule before June 1. 

Charles VV. Turner of St. Paul, dis- 
trict manager of the line, who is in the 
city for several days, stated that the 
demands for freight have been so num- 
erous that in all likelihood the steam- 
er Easton will be started within the 
next two or three weeks. It was 
originally planned to start the Easton 
on Its summer schedule beginning 
June 1. 

"We believe that we can run both 
the America and Easton at a profit this 
earlv in the season," said Mr. Turner 
yesterday at'ternoon, in dl.seussing pros- 
pects for the season. "Last year we 
also started the Easton a little earlier 
than schedule time, and we lost con- 
sld.-rable on the venture. But this 
vear the demands have been so many 
that we believe that there will be a 
profit with both bo.ils in op. -ration." 

The steamer America, which lel't this 
morning for its second trip to the 
north shore, was compelled to go 
through a field of ice from Two Har- 
bors to Duluth. The boat made about 
ten miles an hour through the ice. 
There were about thirty hunters and 
trappers among the passengers who ar- 
rived here yesterday. They reported a 
ve-y mild winter on the north shore 
and a very successful trapping and 
hunting season. They all brought 
back large collections of hides and 

ARE SWMPED 
WITH GRAIN 



Duluthians Want New Pas- 
senger Steamer to More 
Than Hesitate. 



Increase in Wages for Em- 
ployes of All Coal 
Docks. 



Duluth merchants and business ""^'M VoluntanlV MadC BV Com- 

are very much opposed to the pro- / ' 

panies and a Surprise 



Buffalo Elevators Have 

More Than They Can 

Handle. 



ry mucti opp 
posed schedule of the new passenger 
steamer, North American, of the Chi- 
cago, Duluth & Georgian bay line. 

According to the arrangements al- 
ready made hv the ofilclals of the 
company the N'nrth .American will ar- 
rive in Duluth at 6:30 o'clock every 
Tuesday mornliiK a"d will leave a^ain 
at 9 o'clock the same morning. This 
will give the round-trip tourists but 
two and one-half hours in Duluth. 

The businesj men claim that the 
tourists should be given at U-ast half 
a day in the city, allowing them to 
take in the sights and also visit the 
stores. As it is they will have but time 
to get off th^f boat, eat a meal and 
return at once. 

The Duluth agent, who will have 
charge of the ( eorgian »)ay line in this 
city, has not yi-t been appointed. Lo- 
cal business m-'n are waiting for this 
appoiritmeiit and hope to settle the 
matter satisfactorily with the new ap- 
pointee. 

The steamer North American will be 
run exclusively for passengers and 
willbe one of the best-titted l)oats on 
the lakes. It v/ill leave Chicago every 
Saturdav, traV'illng along the north 
shore to Port i^rthur and then to Du- 
luth. The sta.- in Port Arthur, it is 
understood, will also be of short dura- 
tion. The boai. will begin its regular 
schedule within a few weeks. 



to Men. 




^* Correct Drets /or Women^^^^ and OirU 




ANNOUNCE 



• 



A Sale of Coats 



^At= 



Steamer Is Enrolled. 

The steamer Peroivai J. Roberts. Jr., 
of the Pittsburg Steamship company, 
was enrolled thl.s morning at the cus- 
toms office. Thu pspers were sent 
here from Two Harbors, where the 
steamer Is unloading coal. 

The boat is one of the three new 
ones the company built during the 
past winter. It is 580 feet long. 58 
feet beam and 32 f'^et deep. The gross 
tonnage Is givdn as 7,591 and the net 
tonnaj^e as 5,8 52. 

Capt. S. C. xLllea is in command of 
tlie boat. 

New Port on Lake Huron. 

With the construction of one of the 
largest stoae-rruahing plants on the 
Great I^akes, and large stone docks and 
a breakwater 1,500 feet long, a new 
port, to be known as Kockport, will bo 
f-reated on tht shore of l^ake Huron, 



About 2,000 dock employe* of the 
various coal companies at the Head or 
the Lakes were this morning given a 
voluntary increase of 2 Vi cents an 
hour. Salaried men and other em- 
ployes are not benefited by the raise. 

The raise came as a surprise to the 
laborers on the docks, it being entire- 
ly voluntary with the companies. A 
general agreement was made by these 
companies, according to one of the of- 
ficials this morning, to make this raise 
as soon as the marine season was well 
under way. 

The workmen, who formerly re- 
ceived 25 cents an hour, will now re- 
ceive 27 V4 cents, with 10 cents per 
hour additional for overtime work 
Those receiving 27 Vi cents will get i^i 
cent.s, while others receiving more 
will get the same relative increase. 

It is the aim of the officials to 
bring the wages at the coal docks on 
a level with other lines of work. The 
hiRh cost of living is also given as a 
reason for the Increase. 

FIRST BOATS 

AT TON AWANDA. 

North Tonawanda, N. Y., May 1 — The 
first vessel to reach the lonawanda 
ports from the Head of the L-aKes this 
season were the steamers Clyde and 
Veronica which came down the JNiag- 
ara river Tutsday afternoon and docked 
at the plant of the Tonawanda iron & 
Steel company at Ironton. 

The boats carried cargoes of iron ore. 
They wintered In Chicago and loaded 
at Escanaba. They reached Buffalo 
Tuesday afternoon, but owing to tne 
ice condition in the river they r.^niained 
back of the Buffalo breaKwall until 
yesterday morning. 

Railroad Is Libehd. 

Valentine A. Fries and Amsa Fries 
Chapin of Cleveland fthd '^ 1'''^/, *"^^ff " 
eral court Tutsday against the Canaman 



e, _ 

Pacific Railroad company, 

damage said to have been done to the 



just west of Wlddle island and twelve sifumer ■W'illium l^dwards in the La 
miles from Alj-. iia. What will be <>"« i ^hlne canal, Aug. 20, li>12, when a 
of the most complete docks on the I ij,.idge owned by the railroad company 
lakes In now li course of construction ^^^^ ,jyt gwung open for the vessel to 



BRYAN HOPEFUL AS 
TO CALIFORNIA LAW 




REJECT PAINTING 

OF_SLAVE SALE. 

New York, May 1. — A painting en- 
titled "To the Highest Bidder," repre- 
senting a negro slave woman with 
her child standing on the auction 
block, has be-n rejected by the 
Brooklyn institute because it might 
"tend to keep alive memories that 
had better be forgotten." The pic- 
ture" was painted by Harry Roseland, 
a well kniwn Brooklyn artist, and of- 
fered to the Institute by Charles A. 
Schier.'n. a former Brooklyn mayor. 



Could Not Sleep on Account 
oi Kidney Trouble 



I have been a resident of Couders- 
port for thirty years. My age is 52, 
and I wish to testify to the wonderful 
results of the use of Dr. Kilmer'a 
Swamp- Root. I have used it off and 
on in rny family for tho past twelve 
years, and always with Immediate 
benefit. 

About two years ago my husband 
had a .severe attack of kidney trou- 
ble, was unable to sleep and suffered 
great pain. Could eat no breakfast 
and became very thin in flesh. After 
he had taken half a bottle of Swamp- 
Root, he felt much better. The pains 
In his back left him and his appetite 
returned. I have never doctored 
•with the doctors bceause of my faith 
In Swamp-Root. 

I heartily recommend It to anyone 
In a run down condition from trouble 
•with the kidneya. 

Your.i very truly, 
MRS. JAMES MORAN, 

Coudersport. Pa. 

On this 22nd day of May. 1912, be- 
fore me a Notary Public in and for 
the County of Potter and State of 
Pennsylvania, personally appeared 
Mrs. James Moran, to me well known 
and in due form of law, made oath 
that the above and foregoing state- 
ment is correct and true. 

Witness my hand and Notarial seal 
ARTHUR B. MANN, ' 
Notary Public. 



Note of Optimism Marks 

His Dispatches to 

Washington. 

Washington, May 1. — Secretary Bry- 
an's latest dispatches to President 
Wilson contained a note of optimism 
over the situation in Sacramento. He 
is said to have telegraphed the presi- 
dent not to credit alleged misleading 
reports of the intent of the proposed 
legislation, expressing a belief in a 
solution of the difficulty satisfactory 
to the people of California and to the 
Feueral government. 

While no information was forthcom- 
ing aa to the administration's attitude 
on the pending Webb bill, a report was 
current that John Bassett Moore, act- 
ing secretary of state, did not regard 
the measure as a violation of treaty 
obllgdtlons, and that the original 
protest of the Japanese government 
that no specific discrimination against 
the Japanese be carried in the legisla- 
tion really had been met by the gen- 
eral phraseology of the Webb pro- 
posal. 



Buffalo is swamped with grain, ac- 
cording to advices received here. 

Cargo after cargo of grain is arriv- 
ing at Buffalo each day and ihe con- 
gestion la becoming greater right 
along. It is believed that this conges- 
tion will be taken care of by the end 
of this week and that the normal serv- 
ice will be given the ships entering the 

harbor. ^ ^, c._.. i.^.. 

The Schoonmaker and the bnyder. 
the two largest h'^'ats on the Great 
Lakes, arrived at Buffalo M'lnday^ be- 
ing the first of the grain fleet which 
left Duluth last week to get in tl.at 
port They carried 315,000 bushels of 
wheat. Many other boats have also 
irrived and it is estimated that there 
is at least 8.000,000 bushels of grain 
ready to be delivered at the elevators. 

The arrival of the Snyder carrying 
415,000 bushels of wheat almost broke 
the record held by the De Oraff. which 



for tht' Great I^kes Stone & Lime 
compAny, owners of the stone quarry 
at that point. The dock is to be 540 
f»>et long and is to be equipped with 
all of the most modern loading appli- 
ances. 

1 , 

Lightship Carried Away. 

The followii g notli'e is being sent 
to the members of thu Lake Carriers' 
association: 

"Lighthou.^p I partment advise Gray's 
Reef llghtsh' \l, reported driven from 
station by '. April 2R. Will be re- 
placed as soon as possible." 

PASSENGER SERVICE 
BEGINS ON LAKE ERIE. 

Navigation cut of Detroit on the up- 

sliore division of the D. & C. was 
opened with the departure at .'> o'clock 
Tuesday of the '-sttamer City of Mac- 
kinac II, Capt. Salem O. Robinson, 
master. 

A considerable number of passen- 
gers embarked for the first trip and the 
steamer also carried a good amount of 
freight, including a number of horses 
for Alpena and Cheboygan. 



$13.75 

$19.50 values. 

$19.50 

$25.00 values. 

$29.50 

135.00 and $37.50 values. 



Women's, Misses* and 
Junior sizes — Fine Serge 
Coats and Novelty Tweeds, 
some with yoke lining, 
others full satin lined, in 
contrasting colors. 

Fashionable Medici Coats 
in Eponge and good quality 
Bedford Cord; beautiful 
Messaline linmg; sizes 36 
to 42. 

Featuring several modeh 
in new draped etTects, repro- 
ductions of latest Parisian 
creations, introducing new 
hip lengths, as well as longer 
coats, in light shades as well 
as staple colors. 



Furs Stored and Insured 

Call Melrose 3135 or Grand 1246 



mw I.-VW.... . .Service on the Detrnit and Buffalo 

entered Buffalo carrying 4."i2,000 bush- division of tli#"-D. & C. commenced 

' ""*" ' yesterday, when the steamer Kastern 

•States left Detroit at 5 o'clock on the 
first trip of the season. The City of 
Cleveland III will make her first trip 
to Buffalo next Sunday. 



els This record has never been re- 
reated, but bids fair to be exceeded 
during the coming season. 

Grain cargoes are constantly leaving 
the' local port for Buffalo. 
I 



Several 



No Delay Granted. 

Sacramento, Cal.. May 1. — Requests 
by Senators Wright, Shanahan and 
Camlnettl for delay on the alien land 
bill in order that it might be more 
maturely considered met with no con- 
sideration from the majority, and the 
chair announced that the bill would 
come up in the regular course of busi- 
ness. 



FIXES OWN PAY 

WHILE LAWMAKER 



Eligibility of Commissioner- 
elect of Fargo May 
Be Tested, 

Fargo. N. D., May 1. — (.S-pecial to The 
Herald.) — R. B. Blakemore, who was 
elected a member of the city commis- 
sion yesterday, was a member of the 
last legislature which fixed the salary 
of the members of the commissions. 
Section 39 of the state Constitution 
says no member of the legislature can, 
for the term for which he was elected, 
accept either an elective or appointive 
i>ffice, the emoluments of which were 
Increased by a legislature of which he 
was a member. His eligibility may be 
questioned by nis opponents. 



arge cargoes have 1^" . ^^'""fvl" r^I'A 
the Canadian ports during the past 
few days, bound for Buffalo. 

FIRST PIG Iron load. 

steamer Beatty Takes It Down the 
Lakes From Marquette. 

Marquette. Mich.. May 1— J*^® 
steamer Charles Beatty of Falrport, a 
steel freighter of large dimensions 
arrived at the L. 3. A I. i"*?^/^,^"'^'^^ 
dock Tuesday morning, and loaded 
1 801 tons of the Pioneer Iron com- 
n'any's pig iron, the first shipment of 
the season. The electro-magnet cr.ane 
wa.s used In transferring the nietal 
from the dock to the hold of the 
steamer. The cargo is consigned to 
the I^high Valley Railway coriipany s 
docks at Buffalo. N. Y and from 
there will be distributed to various 
customers. 

SLOW W ORK O N LOCKS. 

Ice Delays Boats But Warm Weather 
Is Solving Problem. 

Sault Ste. Marie, Mich., May 1.— 
(Special to The Herald.)— Lockmen are 
having great trouble In locking 
through the boats since yesterday, 
caused by the large amount of Ice 
which Is coming down the river from 
the broken ice fields in the upper river 
and Whiteftsh bay. The upper ap- 
proaches to the canals are jammed, 
making slow work in opening the up- 
per gates. The Ream was delayed 
from 5:30 to 8 o'clock in the Canadian 
lock this morning. A stream of ice Is 
coming over the rapids. The Wf-attier 
is fine and warm and a few days more 
of present conditions promises to .see 
the end of the Ice question for this 
year. 



1. — 



Much Floating Ice. 

Sault Stft. .Marie, Mich., May 
Immense quantities of Ice coming over 
th(* rapids liere yesterday caused con- 
siderable trouble in the canals and 
steamers made slow progress through 
the locks. Do.vn-bound i)oat3 reported 
heavv fields still In Whltefish bay, but 
conditions we-e so far improved that 
several steam -rs with tows left last 
night for upper l#ke ports. 



mm THE LAKES 



Letter to 
Dr. Klliiior & Co., 
Binghamton, N. Y. 



Prove What Swamp-Root Will Do For You 

Send to Dr. Kilmer & Co., Bingham- 
ton, N. Y.. for a sample bottle. It will 
convince anyone. You will al.so receive 
a booklet of valuable Information, 
telling all about the kidneys and blad- 
der. When writing, be sure and men- 
tion The Duluth Daily Herald. Reg- 
ular fifty-cent and one-dollar size bot- 
tles for sale at all drug stores. 



TWO WORKMEN ARE 
ASKING HEAVY DAMAGES 

Two personal injury actions in which 
an aggregate of 121.100 in damages is 
sought were filed in district court 
against the Oliver Iron Mining com- 
pany yesterday afternoon. 

Louis Pagorelez. employed at the 
Zenith mine, near Ely, alleges that ho 
sustained serious injuries when he was 
stru'^k by a heavy falling object while 
engaged In the work of retlmbering 
the drift in the mine on May 16, 1912. 
He i.s suing for $11,100. 

Frederick Valentini> asserts that ow- 
ing to a defective ladder which he was 
obliged to use he accidentally fell into 
the shaft of the Monroe mine, near 
Chisholm, on Aug. 8, 1912, sustaining 
serious Injuries, for which he wants 
110.000. 



LIQUOR HABIT 
PERMANENTLY 

CURED 



No need of going to a sanitarium 
when yi>u can be cured at home with- 
in two weeks time. Cure guaranteed 
or $500.00 reward in ca.se of failure. 
Charges within reach of anyone. Hun- 
dreds of testimonials from people 
you know. Treatment very pleasant 
to take with Immediate improvement 
therefrom. Come in for free consul- 
tation. Confidential. 

PROF. JOHN B. FISSFTTK, 

Anti- Liquor Cure, 
Fuc^re BUjck 100 Lake St., Cbi.sholni, 
Miuu. 



Members of the Society of Civil En- 
gineers will take a trip to Sault Ste. 
Marie and back on the D. & C. steamer 
City of Detroit III, leaving Detroit 
June 4. The trip is a feature of the so- 
ciety's conven':lon to be held at Detroit. 

• • • 

I'nlted States Inspectors of steam 
vessels were at work Monday on the 
steamer Emms. E. Thompson and sev- 
eral steamers of the Ignited States lake 
survey servict at Detroit. 

• • * 

With the tug Marlon E. Trotter and 
steamer J. E. Mills, the Trotter Tow- 
ing & Wrecking company of Amherst- 
burg was working Monday to release 
the old bargt W. .S. Calvert and tug 
Sarnia City, which went aground early 
Monday off the head of Orassy island 
in Detroit river. 

• • • 

Repair work on the White Star line 
steamer Owana has proved more exten- 
ttve than was at first antlcli)ated, and 
she will be off the Detroit-Toledo route 
until Saturday. 

• • * 

The Pittsburg Steamship company 
has Issued a circular letter to all cap- 
tains, to tht" effect that all first-class 
boats, with the exception of the Craw- 
ford. Filbert and House, will hereafter 
load for the Canadian lock at the .Soo. 
All second and third-class boats, and 
all with tow:» will load for the Poe 
lock. 

« • • 

Damage si ffered by the steamer 
Dlmmif'k, which was rammed by the 
steamer William H. Wolfe Just outside 
of Buffalo harbor early .'Sunday morn- 
ing, amounts to $10,000. Her stern was 
crushed In and her rudder badly 
.snjashed. ' 

• • • 

Copper bawj valued at $100,000 and 
consisting of 25^ tons were unloaded 
Tuesday at John .Stevenson's dock at 
l>»trolt, from the steamer Northern 
Wave. The package freighter carried 
a cargo of copper worth $'>00,000, tak- 
InR the reiVialning $400,000 worth to 
Buffalo. The arrival of tho Northern 
Whv«> niarkt d tho oi)enlng of the pack- 
age freight S'fasoii at this port. 

Navigation on the ui)-8hora route of 
the D. & C. Navrgatlon company was 
formally ^»p^ned Tuesday. when the 
steamer City of Mackinac II left De- 
troit for MacUlntc and way ports, with 
a full cargo and about 100 passengers. 
The steamer* Eastern States opened the 
Buffalo division whe-n she left Detroit 
for that port last evening. 



The petition charges the William Ed- 
wards, en route from Erie, Pa., to Mon- 
treal, wlilstled several times for the 
bridge to open. When It was seen that 
the bridge was not being operated, U is 
charged, th.- engines were reversed, but 
the swift current threw the stern of 
the vess.d against the side of the chan- 
nel, damaging the rudder and st.-rn 
post to the extent of $2,080. 
^ 

Supply Boat. 

A traveling supply house, which will 
■ell men's furnishings, candies, tobacco 
and newspapers to all the bouts in the 
Duluth and Superior ports is a new 
f.ature this year. Frank Blodgett and 
another young man have remodeled a 
small launch and furnished it with 
every imaginable article that a marin- 
er may want. They ply between the 
two ports and visit all the boats in the 
harbors each day. The supply boat Is 
fast becoming popular with the »oat 
men, who lind it a great convenience. 

Sault Passages. 

.Sault Ste. Marie. Mich.. May 1.— 
(Special to The Herald.) — Lp: I.iake- 
wood, 12;30 p. m. Wednesday; Butters, 
1- Alfred Mitchell, Kalkaska, Fryer, 
3:30; Meacham, 6:30; Merlda 8; Cle- 
ment 8:30; Herry, 11; Saunders, 1 a. 
m Thursday; Milinokelt, 3; steel Wolf, 
4 30; Arcturus, 6:30; Zenith City, An- 
geline. 8; Walter.s, Steel King, 8:30; 
Shenango, 9:30; Keewatin. 11; Sheadle, 
Paris, 11:30. _, ^ 

Down — French, Blxby, noon, Wednes- 
dav; Karling, 1 p. m.; Klrby, Hart- 
nell, 2:30; Ranney, America, 5:30; 
Adriatic, 6:30; Calumet. Verona, 7:30; 
Easton, Scottish Hero. 9; Amaaa Stone. 
10; Dundee, -Klnmount, 10:30; Boland, 
11:30; Maricopa. Rees, midnight; Cor- 
nell. 2 a. m. Thursday; Dickson, 4; Su- 
perior, LJvingstone, 5:30; Marutia, 7. 
Ream. 7:30; Howe. 8:40; Assiniboia. 
Neuona, 9:30; Wickwiro, 10; Palmer. 

noon; Odanah. 12:30 p. m. 

^ 

Passed Detroit. 

Detroit, Mich., May 1. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — Up: Mentor. 1:40 p. m. 
Wednesday; H. F.. Runnels, 2:40; J. C. 
Walalce, 4: Normanla. Robert R. 
Rhodes, 5; Coffinberry. C. B. Jones. 
ri-30; A A. Augustus, 5:50; Zillah, 
Peshtigo, Miztec, 6; Schoonmaker, 6:30; 
Natlronco (formerly Pioneer), 6:45; 
Champlain. 7; D. M. Whitney, 7:4r); 
Sherwln. 7:50; Andaste, 9:15; Sarnia 
City Calvert 9:30; Marlska, 10:15; Mo- 
hegan, Aloha. Mingoe 11; Hines, Ash- 
land, Case. 11:1,5; Manola. la. m. 
Thursday C. H. Green. Our Son, Genoa, 
1:50; Dunham. 2; Delaware, 2:40; Ti- 
oga 3- L. C. .Smith. Roman, 3:40; Hanna. 
.Ir 4 20; Blckerdike, 7; Advance, 7:30; 
Zimmerman. 8:30; Republic, 8:40; Per- 
seu.s, 11:40. 

Down Town.'send, noon, Wednesday; 
Maytham, 12:30 p. m.; A. D. Davidson, 
r Heffelfinger. 1:40: Hoover and Ma- 
son. 2:10; Saranac, 2:30; Berwlnd. 3:45; 
.Minneapolis. 3:25; Hartwell, 3:50; Al- 
gonquin, 6:10; Keefe, 7:40; .Sachem, 
8 10- Ro.semount, 8:15; Aggaslz. 10:10; 
Corvls, midnight; Harver 12:10 a. m 
Thuns^av: Anna Mlnch, 5:30; Cadwell, 
6:40; C. M. Prent, 11; Falrmount. 11:30. 

Port of Duiuth. 

Arrivals— Norway. F. Peave.v. H P. 
Mcintosh, John Stanton, ore; J. H. Bar- 



ton. William E. Reis. M. A. Hanna. 
coal- O. B. Leonard, Pa.iay, Onoko. 
grain; Northern Light. Buffalo, mer- 
chandise. /~.i.»„i„_ 
Departures— W. W. Brown, Charles 
Weston, Charles M. Warner Alex W. 
Thompson, grain; W. B. H'-hUler, J W. 
Gates. Renown, McQean, W. B. Layock. 
Henry Phlpps, H. H. Rogers H. G. 
Frlck, J. F. Durston, W U King, v\ . 
R. Linn, Mary C. Elphicke C. A. Cong- 
don Penobscot. Sinaloa, Senator, ore; 
Wis'sahlclon. Lakeland. Tlonesta, mer- 

chandiso. 

, •■ — ■ 

New Stephenson, Mich., Colony. 

Stephenson, Mich., May 1. — (Special 
to The herald.) — Peopled by German- 
speaking natives of Austro-Hunga.-y, a 
new settlement is springing up four- 
teen miles northwest of Stephen\jon, 



on the Wisconsin & MicUi^an railroad, 
at a place named Banat. Fifty families 
are there now, and more are expected 
from Europe this month. A mission 
of the Roman Catholic church has been 
established by Rev. Father Lledgens of 
Stephenson. 

ST. PAUL WOMAN 

DRO WNS HERSELF. 

St. Paul, Minn., May 1.— (Special to 
Th« Herald.) — .\fter futile attempts to 
take her life by gas and also by poi- 
son, Mrs. Rachel Rosenblum, asred %1, 
succeeded today when she threw herself 
In the river. The body was recovered. 

She was confined in an asylum about 
a vear ago for several months. 



Min-Dul Cuyuna Exploration Co. 

(INCORPORATED UNDKR LAWS OF MINNESOTA) 

DULUTH, MINN. 



Capital $100,000. 10,000 Shares. Par Value $10 

(FULLY PAID AND NON-ASSESSABLE^ 



Bloom of Youth 

Now Easily Attained 



(Frotn Popular Science.) 

You no longer need to "doctor" that 
sallow, freckled, blackheaded, rough, 
blotchv, pimply or over-red skin. You 
can remove It. Instead — easily, pain- 
lessly. Inexpensively. By a new scien- 
tific process, which any<me cati use 
without assistance, the dead and near- 
dead surface skin, with all its imper- 
fections, is gently, gradually absorbed 
. and a radiantly youthful and beau- 
tiful complexion comes forth! Go to 
vour druggist, get an ounce of pure 
inercollzed wax; at night apply enough 
of this to completely cover the face; 
dont rub It In. Next morning remove 
the wax with warm water. The result 
after a few days Is astonishing. You 
wonder why this secret wasn t dis- 
covered loiiR ago. 

Let the wrinklt d folks also take 
hope Put an ounce of powdered saxo- 
llte into a half pint witch hazel, bathe 
the face In the solution and — say! — 
there's nothing that will so effectually, 
so promptly, smooth out all those hate- 
ful lines. You'll And this lotion, as 
well as m-'rcollzed wax, works equally 
well on ne( k and hands. 



LEASE AND LOCATION- 

This Company owns a fifty-year mining lease, covering 
120 acres, lying in the heart of the Cuyuna range, the land 
being in Section 2, Township 46, Range 29. The lease was 
arrangeci for .some years ago, but was not operative until 
recently by reason of a defect in the title which has now 
been perfected. The lease provides for a low minimum out- 
put and due to its early origin, a very nominal royalty of 15 
cents per ton ; the lease also provides for the use of timber on 
the land necessary for mining purposes, of which there are 
ample quantities for extensive mining operations. 

INDICATIONS AND PROSPECTS OF ORE- 

There are very encouraging surface indications of ore on 
this land. Lines" of magnetic attraction are apparent, both 
directly north and south, as well as on the property itself. 
Further considering that ore has been found on three sides 
directly adjacent, and that several mines in the immediate 
vicinity (one-half to one mile) are already shippers or will 
be this year, the officers and directors feel extremely opti- 
mistic as to the results of the exploration work. 

ADVANTA6ES OF LOCATION- 

The property lying as it does on a section road which 
runs to the town of Crosby makes it easy and economical to 
commence drilling operat'ions without delay. The further 
fact that the Soo railroad is only one-half mile distant means 
no delay in future, should the property fulfill our expecta- 
tions. 

CAPITALIIATION- 

The Capitalization of the Company has been kept con- 
servative, simplv because this is not a stock jobbing propo- 
sition, but a mining venture, offering a fair opportunity to 
the investor to join in exploring a promising property. 

The officers' salaries have been limited to $1.00 per year 
and arrangements have been made whereby no other office 
expense will be incurred other than bookkeeping and minor 
incidental expenses such as stationery, stamps, etc. 

SUBSCRIPTIONS- 

In order that the Company may at once commence to 
properly drill and explore the property, a limited amount of 
.stock has been offered at 50 per cent of the par value to pro- 
vide funds for this work. While we do not at this time claim 
to have ore in sight, all available clues, guides and indica- 
tions point to the existence of ore on this property. For fur- 
ther particulars and information, apply to the following of- 
ficers and directors of the Company. 



CLARKNCE COLEMAN, 

ProsldtMit, 

IT, S. F.nglnper'M Oflloe, 

Duluth, Minn. 

GEORGE H. GAMBLE. 

Vice President, 

SIO Manhattan Bldg.. 

Dulutli, Minn. 



G. H. ANSON, 

Director, 

254 McKnlght BI(1«., 

Minneapolis, Minn. 

W. P. LAKDNER, 

.Soorotary and Tn^asurer, 

SIO Manhattan Bids.. 

Duluth, Minn. 




Tiiursday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



May 1, 1913. 



m ANNUAL SPRING SALE 

OF TRUNKS, BAGS AND SUIT CASES 



IS BONAFIDE NO SHAMS 
NO FAKES 




"CLEANUP WEEK" WILL i [ 
BEGIN MO NDAY MOV ING 



'"^ TRUNKS FOR 

YOUR EUROPEAN TRIP 

We have the above make of Trunk in three styles — either 

style will give you good service. 

REMEMBER, OUR OWN MAKE. 

NORTHERN TRUNK COMPANY, 



Health Commissioner Invites 

Every Loyal Citizen to 

Co-operate. 

Wants to Make Duluth a 
Spotless Town— Chil- 
dren Will Help. 



The week beginning Monday, May 9, 
has bofn designated as "clean-up 
week" by Dr. H. E. WebeUr, director 
of public health. 

Dr. Webster urges all residents of 
the city to freu their yards and lots 
uf the rubbish which has been accumu- 
lating for months past. 

The health director points out that 
not only are they unsightly but that 
with the approach of warm weather 
they are a menace to the health of the 
community as well as prolific breeders 
of flies. 

A number of extra sanitary Inspect- 
ors will probably be employed tern* 



Eilert Bros. 



228 WEST FIRST STREET. 




SPECIAL 

Tumbler Sale! 

sale Co- 

20c 



For today we put on special s^le^Co- 
lonial Tumblers, our No. 
409; per set of six, for 
\ only 

Our Colonial Tumblers, exactly like 
picture. No. 913 ; this is the 
very best glassware made; 
for set of six, only 

No Phone orders. Limit, one dozen. 



35c 



SAD IRONS 




porarilv to aid In the proprum which 
fuiH been outlined. Th/iTwHl be sent 
to all parts of tlio clt/lwlth instrue- 
th)nH to note the iondlil|n of all prop- 
erty. Where no lmiir«>vfiienl has been 
maile the houB«'holdor k\\\ h»> rtlrec tea 
to loniply with the orllnanc-s an<l It 
that l8 not done In a •<ft»onable time 
the oflUlal.s state that legal Bteps 
will be taken to ellrilnate all nui- 
sances. 

Dr. Webster plans to secure the co- 
operation of the school children of the 
city as has been done in other years. 
It "is believed that If tl e clean-up pro- 

fram Is explHln«-d to them by the 
eachers they will be a big factor In 
improving the app*arauce of the mu- 
nicipality. In hundr<>du of cases It Is 
the children who do most of the work 
of making the yards presentable. 

Dr Webster this morning i.'^HUed a 
statement asking the »ild of the puMlr 
In making Duluth as nearly a spot- 
less town" as posBlbl.;. The depart- 
ment appeals first to the t'lv c prido 
of the citizens and declares thai If that 
does not secure the dcidred results the 
department Intends to tee that they are 
olitalned from a sense of duty, it is 
pointed out that the uest results can 
be secured through the co-operation of 
the public and that on general pr'nc'; 
ples the residents of the city »hould 
take sufficient intwreet in the clean-up 
campaign to at least remove all of- 
fensive rubbish or refj*e, particularly 
those kinds which aflord a breeding 
ami feeding place for lies. 



RAILROAD SEHLES WITH 
THIRTY-THREE SETTLERS 



Pays $24,750 Damages in 

Famous White Iron 

Lake Cases. 



STEEL PLANT 
PANORAMIC 
AND OTHER 
PHOTOGRAPHS 
ADDED TO THE 

PICTORIAL 
EXPOSITION 

IN THE LOBBY OF THE 

REW ST. LOUIS HOTEL 

IN THE HEART OF DULUTH. 

SEE THE CITY YOU LIVE IN 
AND THE COUNTRY 

ROUND ABOUT 



il berstein& 

Company 



ond 



I' 



.$2.50 
$3.00 
$4.50 

.$1.25 



secretary, Mrs. W. B. Marr; treasurer, 
Mrs. J. N. Marr. 



HUNTED NEGRO JOINS 
RANKS OF PURSUERS 



The Genuine 
Dover, No. 
92, Sad Irons 
• — a 4 - p i ece 
set for only 



THE FOUR-PIECE ASBESTOS SAD IRONS, 

for only 

The FANSTEEL Electric Iron heats in one-half 
the time — holds heat twice as long 



• ••••• 



$1.65 
$3.50 



Toar 

Credit U 

Go«d. 




Coi»pIe<« 

MulIM* 

Farntklitrr*. 



202 mill 304 EAST SUPERIOR STREET. DILUTH. 



WILL NAME BOARD TO 
CONDUCT WORK FARM. 

The five non-salaried commissioners 
who will have charge of the work farni 
to be condvicted jointly by the city and 
the county will be appointed shortly. 
Three will be named by the chairman 
of the county board and two by the 
city commission. It is understood that 
one of the three men nam ... by the 
county will be a Duluthlan. The op- 
erntinK and maintenance expenses will 
be shared Jointly. The county has 560 



acres of land and the city has 400 
acres, a few miles back of the city on 
the Pike Lake road. 



iHbpentlng; Han School Farm. 

Ishpemlng, Mich., May 1. — (Spe- 
cial to The Herald.) — The board 
of education of lehpemlng has closed a 
deal for the purchase of four acres in 
the northern part of the city. The land 
will be tilled by school boys. Agri- 
culture is now being taught In a num- 
ber of schools of the state and the 
board has decided that It would be a 
wise plan to do a little experimenting 
in Ishpeming. 



r 





2Jt and 26 West Superior Street 

Near First Avenue IVcit 

\ Expansion Sale 
Now Going On! 



The real work has started, there is no time 
to lose. We must have the room to build our 
new addition, a larger and better store for the 
accommodation of the masses. 

More Drastic 

Reductions on High-Class 

Garments for Women 

and Misses 

That will tempt you to buy and supply your 
apparel wants for the season. 



«S 




Attorney Gets $8,250, and 

the Settlers About 

$500 Apiece. 

One of the lagest and most Important 
settlements which has been effected 
out of court In this county for years 
was brought about yesterday, when the 
Duluth & Iron Range railroad offered 
thirty-three litigants in the White Iron 
Lake Are cases the lump sum of $24,760 
in settlement of their claims for dam- 
ages sustained In a fire which swept 
their farms In the vicinity of White 
Iron lake during the dry season of 1910. 
The railroad company is charged with 
responsibility for the Art. and has been 
made a defendant In all of the cases. 

The offer was accepted at a confer- 
ence held yesterday at the courthouse. 
Among these present at the conference 
were Hon. William A. Cant and Hon. 
J. D. Ensign, judges of the district 
court, Baldwin & Baldwin, attorneys 
for the Duluth & Iron Range railroad, 
Joseph W. Reynolds, and Mrs I. C. 
Buell. attorneys for various claimanta 
in the fire cases, and between thirty 
and forty of the flre sufferers. 

The figure of $24,750 was consid- 
ered satisfactory by the 8«ttlera, who 

PETIT!ON DOES NOT 
A FFECT DULUTH 

Hotels Now Receive Their 

Mail on Sunday in This 

City. 

As the hotels In Duluth are all re- 
ceiving their mall on Sunday through 
the boxes at the postoffice. there Is not 
much Interest here In the monster pe. 
tltion before the postoffice department 
at Washington requesting for the re- 
establlshment.of the Sunday delivery 
service to hotels and theaters. 

The system at the local postoffice is 
possible under the present ruling be- 
cause Duluth is not a very large city. 

T>- . hotels can all receive mall on 
Su <lay by obtaining boxes at the post- 
.. rice and calling ^or the mall any 
dme during the day. The theaters If 
they wish to obtain mall on Sunday, 
can also do so by securing boxys. 

Tie petition at Washington has been 
signed by travelers in all parts of the 

covj n try 

The traveling men have had very 
little trouble In Duluth and It Is un- 
derstood that no nanies were sU^neA 
to the petition from this cMty. fchould 
the change be made at Was.ilngton, 
It would not materially affect the local 
system now In force. It might mean 
the reopening of the general delivery 
window on Sun day, however . 

ASSESSiS 
BEGIN WORK 



might be Bure there was no misunder- 
standing of the terms. As soon aa 
the nect'Ssary papers', are prepared, 
stipulations of dismistals will be lileil 
in thirty-three of the cases and thcT 
will be dropped from the court calen- 
dar. 

DlntrihutlnR the A^ard. 

The matti-r of dlntributlng- the lump 
sum among th« thirty-tlu't-e claimants 
will be left to a committee of thrr-e 
which will be selecteJ from the set- 
tlers themselves. The amounts will 
bo apportioned according to the dam- 
ages sustained. 

It was decided at thp conference that 
J. W. Reynolds, who In attorney in the 
cases which were seitled, should re- 
ceive a fee of $250 In each case. This 
arrangement met the approval of the 
Judges and also of the settlers. At- 
torney Reynolds will receive from the 
thirty-three cases the sum of $8,250. 
The settlers will receive arr' averagk 
of $500 apiece. 

Mrs I. C. Buell, attorney, who has 
nine cases against the Iron Range 
railroad Stated today that settlements 
had been made In three Instances and 
that the other six would probably be 
disposed of this week. This will clean 
up the whole matter of flre case litiga- 
tion and will dispose of one of the 
most famous series <»f damage cases 
which has ever come before the dis- 
trict court. 

None of the settlers who have al- 
ready brought their i^astis to trial or 
who have received \erdict8. whether 
favorable to theaiseUes or (^therwise. 
will be allowed to share In the prO' 
ceeds of the settlement. 

The railroad fares of the settlers 
who attended the conference which 
was held In one of the lourt room.s 
yesterday will be remittee ,o the set- 
tlers. It Was agreed tha\ the far«?» 
should be paid one ^^ay regardless of 
whether the terms of settlem.-nt were 
accepted or not and that If the set- 
tlement was effected, that th6 railroad 
fares would be paid by the company 
both ways. 



Murderer of Two White Men 

Escapes When Voice 

Is Recognized. 

Hampton, S. C, May 1. — After hiding 
all night In the swamps, Richard Aus- 
tin, the negro who yesterday killed 
two white men and wounded four of 
a posse hunting him for an attempted 
assault upon a young white woman, 
slipped past his pursuers today and 
escaped. 

Fires were built on the swamp's edge 
last night, and were kept going by 
neighborhood negroes. Austin walked 
out of the swamp unobserved and 
mingled with them until some one rec- 
ognized his voice. Then he made a 
break for another swamp. 

It Is believed he Is hiding only a 
few miles from where he made his 
first stand yesterday and shot to death 
Frank Bowers, a planter, and Mag- 
Istiate B. H. Edenfield of Allandale, 
S. C. The wounded include Dr. &. C. 
Moore, a physician; George Hanna. 
McTeer Bowers and an unidentified 
white man. 

Austin Is alleged to have gone to 
the home of a citizen of Luray and 
attempted an assault upon a young 
woman at about 4 o'clock yesterday 
afternoon. The woman's cries at- 
tracted pnssers-hy but the negro es- 
caped, armed with a shotgun and re- 
volver and a large supply of shells and 
cartridges. 

METHOD OFDEAT H 

IS COURT ISSUE 



A aearing-Out at the Linen Department 

Broken lines of Table Cloths a-nd Napkins will be sold 
at cost and below cost. 

PATTERN TABLE CLOTHS 

70x70-inch Pattern Table Cloths, assorted 
designs; our regular price $3.50; special, each 
70x88-inch Pattern Table Cloths, assorted 
designs ; our regular price $4.50 ; special, each. 
70x90-inch Pattern Table Cloths, assorted 
designs; our regular price $6; special, each. . 

BREAKFAST CLOTHS 

56x60 Hemstitched Unbleached Breakfast 

Cloths, regularly $1.75; special, each 

63x66 Hemmed Unbleached Embossed Breakfast Cloths, 
regularly ■t2.50; special, J1 T^ 

each -.,' 

63x79 Hemmed Unbleached Embossed Breakfast Uoths, 

regularly $3.00— special— C2 25 

each *^ 

HEMSTITCHED DAMASK LUNCH CLOTHS 

45x45-inch Hemstitched Lunch Cloths, assorted round 
designs, regularly $2.50; special, 

each 

54x54-inch Hemstitched Lunch Cloths, as- 
sorted round designs, regularly $3.50 ; special 
EXTRA SPECIAL. 

17-lnch Toweling, white with 
pink and blue borderH; reg- 
ularly 16c, 8pe- l^l/^P 
clal. yard -"-^ '^^ 



$1.65 

$2.50 



EXTRA SPECIAL. 

No. 60 Berkeley Cambric — 
our regular IBc value, .spe- 
cial, per yard, -j 91/>>/» 
at only ■■•^ '-^^ 



NOTIICE 

All inomber* of Duluth Lod»*. No. 505, ire 
requMted to attend the funeral of our late 
brother, Philip Allard. Member* will mert 
at the Moose hall. Friday morning at 8 
o'clock »han>. Slgnrd, COMMITTEE. 




City Assessor F.ott today started his 
deputies throughout the city to make 
the personal property valuation for 
the current year. 

He briefly repeated his Instructions 
to exercise the utmost care, In order 
that the assessment may be fair and 
Impartial. Each of the deputies has 
been supplied with a badge as a means 
of identification should any question 
arise Assessor Scott states that no 
one ' should hesitate to answer the 
questions of the men who are able 
to display the badges of the office. 
Should any one refuse to make any 
statement of personal property the 
dfoutv Is directed to report back to 
the office, but not to make any 
threats of any kind. They have been 
told to be courteous at all times and 
under no circumstances to lose their 
tVmners. P'requent reports of progress 
wlTl be made to the office at the city 
ha 1 that the work of the deputies 
may be c hecked up as they p roceed. 

PLANT TREES AT 

OLD SIBL EY HOME. 

Mendota, Minn., May 1.— Nearly flf- 
tv trees were planted today on the site 
of the Sibley house here by the Min- 
nesota Daughters of the American 
Revolution. , ^. . 

A Scotch pine tree was planted on 
the highest point on the SlhleT grounds 
to commemorate Henry HastlngH bib- 
ley, the first governor of the state. A J 



buckthorn hedge wasi planted around 
the grounds. "Governor's r6w" and 
"Regents' walk" com uemorate respec- 
tively the twenty territorial and state 
governors and nine women who have 
been at the head of th« D. A. R. of 
Minnesota. 

An elm tree was planted near the 
library window of Vto house to com- 
memorate MlsB Sarah Sibley of Detroit, 
Mich., the oldest living member of the 
Blbley family. 

The D. A. R.. the S. A. R. and the 
Minnesota Historical society Oach has 
a tree In Its honor. 

MILLERFJGHTING 
FOR HIGHER DUTIES 

Duluth Congressman Seeks 
Amendments to Under- 
wood Bill. 

From The HoraJd Wiihington Bureau. 

Washington, May :i. — Iteprtsentatlve 
Miller has prepared a number of 
amendments to the I'nderwood bill by 
which duties on agr cultural products 
would be retained at their present level 
or only partly reduced. He proposes 
to retain the present duty of 26 cents 
per bushel on potatoen and to place 
a duty of IB cents per bushel on wneat, 
instead of 10 cents as proposed In the 
Underwood bill. 

Mr. Miller will also try to have the 
duty on flour placed at 60 cents per 
barrel, an Increase of 25 cents over the 
present rate. The Democrats are 
standing firmly by the Underwood bill, 
however, and there is little prospect 
that the Miller amendments will be 
adopted. 

aitkin'studV club 
ends year's work. 

Aitkin, Minn.. May 1. — (Special to 
The Herald.)— The North Side Study 
club closed their yes.r's work Tuesday 
evening at the hon^e of Mrs. W. R. 
Marr, and re-elected th© following of- 
ficers: President, Mis. B. U Holllster; 
vice president, Miss Esther L. Seavey; 



Fraternal Order Resists 
Payment, Claiming Esca- 
naba Man Killed Self. 

Marquette, Mich., May 1. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — Whether the hu.sband of 
Anna Els of Escanaba was murdered 
or committed suicide Is the point at 

issue In a suit brought by the widow 
tu recover life Insurance of $l,r>00. 
The Protected Home circle Is the de- 
fendant. 

Defeated on her first attempt to es- 
tablish her claim, Mrs. Els has been 
granted a new trial by Judge R. C. 
l<'lannigan. The suit will be tried In 
the circuit court for Delta county. Els 
was found dead on the veranda at his 
home two years ago. His demise ap- 
peared to be due to suicide and the 
coroner's jury so decided. The evi- 
dence was, however, wholly circum- 
stantial and It Is the contention of the 
plaintiff that, as a matter of fact, the 
man may have met death other than 
by his own hand. The fraternal order 
Is resisting the payment of the policy 
held by Elg for the reason It Is spe- 
ciflcally provided In the contract that 
In the event of suicide the claim upon 
the company shall become null and 



void. The new trial la granted on the 
grounds error was made in the admis- 
sion of certain testimony bearing upon 
church customs. 

petersonIvould 
seek governorship 

Lee, Dunne, Rines and No- 
lan Also Have Designs 
on That Job. 

St Paul, Minn., May 1. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — James A. Peterson of 
Minneapolis, according to rumors cur- 
rent in political circles, has served 
notice on Bull Moose leaders w^ho are 
searching for a suitable candidate to 
go against Governor Eberhart, that he 
will run for governor next year re- 
gardless of what they do. 

With the primary coming in June 
next year instead of September, the 
campaign, Instead of starting next 
spring, will be well under way this 
summer, and with the close of the 
legislative season a number of tenta- 
tive booms began springing up. 

W. E. Dee of Dong Prairie, one of 
the candidates against Eberhart at the 
last primary, Is said to be planning to 
make another try. 

R C. Dunn of JPrlnceton, another 
man who has tried for the office and 
failed Is understood to be planning for 
another try. 

Speaker Henry Rlnes Is another who 
mav become a candidate for governor. 
He has been mentioned for state audi- 
tor, but Is said to be considering 
either one of the two places named, or 
running for congress in the new 
Tenth district. 

W. I. Nolan also Is said to have 
gubernatorial ambitions. 



The Most Healthful 

Food Known 

It Is perhaps not generally known 
among Duluth families that "Minne- 
sota" Spaghetti 18 one of the most 
healthful foods known. 

It is four times as nutritious as 
beefsteak, six times as nutritious as 
potatoes and, because It contains more 
proteids than most foods, It is more 
strength giving and less fattening. 

"Minnesota" Spaghetti gives the 
power of endurance without overload- 
ing the stomach and It should be free- 
ly eaten by everyone, and eepeclally 
by children, in place of meat. 

"Minnesota" Spaghetti is very eaey 
to prepare, hae a dellclously appetiz- 
ing flavor and costs only about one 
cent a dish. Adv. 



OPPOSE MOVING 

OF LIBER TY BELL. 

Philadelphia. May 1. — A resolution 
protesting against the removal of the 
Liberty bell from Independence hall, 
••for any purpose," was adopted by the 
general society, Daughters of the Rev- 
olution, at the final business session 
of the society's twenty-second annual 
convention. Minneapolis was selected 
as the site for the next convention, 
which will be held In June, 1914. 

• 

Two Aviators Killed. 

Darmstadt, Germany, May 1. — Lieut. 
Von Mirbach was killed and Lieut. Von 
Brunn injured, dying later, in an avia- 



tion accident here last evening. In an 
attempt to land, their biplane collapeed 
only a few feet above the ground and 
fell upon the aviators. 

SWEDISH VESSEL 

SUNK— FOUR LOST. 

Cuxhaven Germany. May 1.— Four of 
the crew of the Swedish steamer Flora 
were drowned when that vessel Kank 
today after a collision here with the 
British steamer Mozart. 

DYNAMITES STUMP; 

IS BLOWN TO BITS. 

La Crosse, Wis.. May 1.— Ofoar Ol- 
son aged 23, a farmer, was b.own to 
pieces on his farm at Big Creek, near 
here, yesterday while attempting to 
remove a stump with dynamite. 

FOR NERVOUS DYSPEPSIA 

Take Horsford'w Acid Phosphate 

Sufferers frcm fccld stomach nause* tr tjoii l'f*d- 
ache will And this tonic t)OTw««e a jrauifol rvllei. 

• 

South Dakota Bank Closed. 
Fort Fierrc, S. D., May 1.— The Citi- 
zens' State bank of this place was 
taken in charge by the state banking 
department yesterday. The bank l« 
owned by John Haye. 



THE AMERICAN PUBLIC IS DEMANDING BETTER AND MORE 

SANITARY REFRIGERATORS 

THE RHINELANDER 

WILL GIVE SANITARY AND SATISFACTORY REFRIGERATION. 



March 

April May^-Take 

Hoods 

Sarsaparilla 

Spring Medicine anl blobd purifier. 



RHINELANDER 

EIGHT WALL 

CONSTRUCTION 

Outside Wall of 

Hardwood. 

Specially Prepared 

Refrigerator 

Insulation. 

Dead Air Space. 

Insulation Paper. 

Mineral Wool. 

Paper Lining. 

Wall of Matched 

Lumber, 

Galvanized Steel 

Lining. 




A REFRIGERATOR 

is a machine as well as 
a piece of furniture. It 
must be artistic as well 
as producing results. 
There are other makes 
and brands which may 
cost less money to buy 
but. like other house- 
hold articles, they do 
not last, nor do they 
give satisfactory re- 
sults. To get a refrig- 
erator that possesses 
durability, effici e n c y, 
convenience and sanita- 
tion, get 

fl RHINELANDER 



Our Complete Line of Service Water Cooled Refrigerators at Factory Cost. 
You Have Seen Them Demonstrated, Now Get One at Your Own Price. 



A Rhinclamkr 

For 

Every Space 

and Need. 



COMPLEn NOUSEniRNISNERS 




A& 



SM0iidAvi.W.iB4FirttSt 




Rhinelanders 

Sold on the 

Easy Payment 

Plan. 



- 



i 



f 



I 







Thursday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



May 1, 1913. 



(■ 



i 



MAY DAY IS 
MOVING DAY 



Also the Date on Which 

Licenses Must Be 

Renewed. 



thol 



ture by the rebels of Tantoyuca. In tho i f^/^/^ ¥ A nTWp 
northorn part of the state of Vt-ru J V-/v/ 1-//* * *-* 

Cruz, after sharp flRhtlng Saturday. 
This is an oil region where many 
Americans are employed, most of 
whom are said to have fled to Tam- 
plco. 




Socialist Parade Will Be 

Only Formal Observance 

in Duluth. 



.M. I, Stewart Cuniitaiiy, 

Successors to Tliwlng-Stowart Co.. 
Printers, Desigrners, Llthotfraphers. 



Thnndrr Sturm. 

The first thunder-storm of the sea- 
son took place this morning between 
5 and 6 o'clock. It was hardly a storm 
at that, but bore some of the hall- 
marks of one. the noise for instance. 
Thunder at this time of the year is 
taken by most of the 'old-timers" who 
watched weather signals before there 
was a weather bureau as heralding 
warmer weather. 



May day was ushered In with clouded 
Bkies and threatening weather at an 
early hour, but later they gave away 
to warmth and avinshlne. The latter 
•vvaa especially gratifying to the house- 
wives, many of whom In all parts of 
the city were bu.sily engaged In the 
annual May moving. 

The first day of May has a great deal 
of significance to the people of Du- 
luth. Not only Is It the proverbial 
'moving day," but It is time of thu 
renewal of lloenats for saloons and au- 
tomobiles, dogd and vehicles. Aoday 
the city assessor begins his revalua- 
ti'Ou. ..... 

While March Is credited with being 
the first day of spring, May 1 Is gen- 
tirally marked as the tlma when the 
eprlng can really be enjoyed. In most 
of the Northern states this date marks 
the time for changing the underwear 
from the heavy woolens to the light- 
er gauzt>3. 

Although the day Is generally cele- 
brated bv school children with spring- 
time ^ames. the only celebration lo- 
cally that will be of any note will be 
held this evening by the Socialist 
parly. , ^ 

The celebration will Include a pa- 
rade commencing at 7 .SO o'clock. Ihe 
etart will be made from in front of 
the courthouse. From there It will go 
to Mesaba avenue then down to Su- 
perior street and east of Superior to 
Second avenue east and thence to the 
Armory. John A. .lohnson will be chief 
marshal and his .Jides will be Elmer 
8tonHwall C R. Carlson, James Brown, 
A Morin 9"'d A. Miller. The speakers 
at thf- Armory will be Mr. Johnson, 
chairman of the meeting; A. Miller, 
who will talk 111 Polish; Allen Strong- 
er .m.s. who will speak on "The Grave 
L>lsgrM-3 of Capitalism" and Matt Kainn 
who win talk iu Finnish. 

Morris Kaplan, local Socialist lead- 
er, will talk thirt evening at Eveleth 
and W. E Towne will speak at a sim- 
ilar gathering at Virginia. 

A number of musical selections will 
be given at the Armory meeting by 
the Finnish band ami choruses from 
the various Socialist clubs. 

mexigaOebels 
murder foreigners 

Refusal to Give Money to 

Aid Revolt Is the 

Cause. 

Washington. May 1. — The manager of 
a Bruish-owned mine at Matehuala. 
San L.ul3 Potosi. and several other 
foreigners have been put to death by 
Mexican rebels because they refused 
to contribute money to the revolution. 
Neither nam.-s nor numbers were 
given in the report. 

• 

American I« Killetl. 

Mexico City. April .3'J. — William B. 
A. Dingwall, an American citizen, thf^ 
owner of a foundry and director of the 
Santa Maria de la Paz Mining com- 
pany, was killed by the rebels In their 
attack yesterday on Matehuala, state 
of San Luis Potosi. according to re- 
ports which have reached here. 

Dingwall, who Is said to have been 
onr of the wealthiest residents of the 
district, was killed owing to his re- 
fusal to give up money to the rebels. 

• 

'^'111 Evacuate Joam. 

El Paso. Te.\.. May 1. — Federal 
forces are to evacuate Juarez, oppo- 
Blte this point, the most important 
port of entrv on the border, and ter- 
minus of the Mexican Central railway. 

Orders to hasten to Chihuahua city, 
the state capital, were received by Col. 
Juan N. Vasuuez, the Juarez garrison 
commander. 

The projected movement l.s In keep- 
ing with the general order Issued some 
davs a?o that all Federal forces In the 
state mobilize at Chihuahua city, 
threatened bv attack from the South. 
Already the Constitutionalists are 
pressing close to Juarez from the ter- 
ritory along the Rio Grande to the 

The movement to the state capital 
win be hastened by fii^aertions from 
the Juarez garrison to the insurgents. 

The Federals at Parral, the Amer- 
ican mining center southwest of Chi- 
huahua city, also were ordered to 
move to the state capital. 



Ucmovnl Notice. 

The Penn Mutual Life Insurance 
company, Henry I. Ilnnco, general 
agent, has taken offices in 602 and COS 
Providence building. 



I'ncle Sam Briusa ^nit. 

Thomas H. Martin and George W. 
Martin, who are doing' business under 
the firm name of Martin Brothers, have 
been made defendants in a suit for 
damages Instituted by the United States 
government in the Federal court. The 
complaint alleges that timber was cut 
from the government larul by W. O. 
Chandler and later converted Into pulp. 
The amount Is specified as 37 cords and 
72 feet, which at the market price of 
$7 a cord, fixes the damage at $263.93. 
The timber. It Is alleged, was cut from 
the southeast quarter of the north- 
west quarter and northwest quarter of 
the southwest quarter of section 4, 
township 4S, north of range 17. 



TO CLASSIFY 



One Cent a Word Each In.sertlon. 
No Advertisement Less Tlian 15 Ceiita. 

Fourth avenue west; all modern 
Improvements; no children. P. Bene- 
teau. St. Louis hotel, or Hoopes St 
Kohagen. 



WANTED TO RENT— TWO OR THREE 
furnished or unfurnished rooms for 
light housekeeping by responsible 
parties; any part of city. OC 475. Her- 
ald^ 

FOR RENT— BIGHT-ROOM HOUSE; 
modern except heat; 1128 liast Seventh 
street. Inquire 3. M. Kaner, 1123 East 
F ifth street. 

SITl^\TION WANTED BY WOMAN A3 
second cook. F 474, Herald. 



Combings made Into beautiful switches; 
$1.50 up. Marlnello shop. Fidelity bldg. 

Hair. Moles. Warts removed forever. 
Miss Kelly. 131 West Superior street. 



MARRIAGE LICENSES. 

Paul C. Chrlstonson and Mrs, A. M. 
Dillon. 

Elwyn Im Channer and Bessie O. 
Dass. 

SOLID GOLD WEDDING AND EN- 
GAGEMENT RINGS made and mount- 
ed to order at Henrlcksen's. 

WEDDING PICTURES ARE A SPE- 
clalty with Chrlstensen, 25 W. Sup. St. 



Settler Sues Lumber Flrn>. 

Evert Laaksonen, who owns a 160- 
acre farm on Prairie river claims that 
the Northern Pine company's dam on 
the stream which was opened during 
the .'reason of 1»12. caused his land to 
be overflowed, his hay crop ruined and 
roads from and to his home made al- 
most Impassable. In district court to- 
day, he filed suit against the company 
for $!)50 damages. 



Federal Term Poiitiioned. 

The opening of Federal court today 
ha.1 been postponed until May 29, as 
Judge Page Morris Is at present con- 
ducting court In Minneapolis. From 
there he will go to Fergus Falls and 
later to rit. Paul, before returning to 
Duluth. 



Deaths and Funerals 



Suea Auto Owner. 

Casslus H. Bagley Is made defendant 
In a lawsuit filed In district court 
yesterday afternoon by Frank A. 
Berg, who complains that he was 
knocked down and seriously Injured 
by the defendant's automobile. He 
claims that he was run Into by the 
machine while crossing from the 
south to the north side of Fourth 
street near Sixth avenue east on the 
evening of Dec. 14 last. He asks for 
11.600. 



New Location. 

Dr. H. E. Webster has moved his of- 
flees from the Providence building to 
309 and 310 Lyceum building. 



Junket to North Dakota. 

The trade extension committee of the 
Commercial club, at a meeting held 
yesterday decided upon another "get 
acquainted" trip early In June. This 
trip will be for a week Instead of the 
customary three days and It Is ex- 
pected that the excursion will go as far 
west at MInot. N. 1>.. on the Great 
Northern, returning by way of the 
Fargo-Surrey cut-off. 



MINER — Mrs. Mary Miner, 8(j years ot 
age, died at 5 o'clock this morning at 
the home of her daughter. Mrs. G. W. 
Davis. 1632 London road, of compli- 
cations due to old age. She had been 
a resident of the city for many years 
and will be mourned by a wide circle 
of friends and acquaintances. Th» 
funeral will take place tomorrow 
morning at 9:30 o'clock from St. Jean 
Baptlste church. Twenty-fifth avenue 
west and Third street. Interment 
win be at Calvary cemetery. 

GIBBa — Leslie, the 20-month-old son of 
Mr. and Mrs. L. J. Glbbs of 42& 
Eighth avenue west, died at St. 
Luke's hospital Wednesday evening 
of spinal meningitis. The funeral 
will take place from the family 
home. The services will be private. 

MONUMENTS — May 30 is Decoration 
day. Call and see the Northwestern 
Monument Co.'s display of monu- 
ment.s honest prices and first cla.s.s 
service. 231 West Second St., Duluth. 



MONUMENTS TO ORDER. DIRECT 
from the factory; no extra expenses; 
you save 20 per cent. Chas. Benson. 
2301 W. Second St. Phono Lincoln 334. 



Guilty of Larceny. 

In district court yesterday, Carl E. 
Grandell pleaded guilty to a charge of 
.stealing a quantity of copper from the 
Kreagei-Jamar shop «.t Fourth avenue 
east and Superior stropt on Friday 
evening last. He was paroled under a 
reformatory sentence. 



ComniiMHloner 111. 

CommlS3lon»^r Murchison, head of the 
division of public works. Is confined to 
his home with a severe cold. He hopes 
to be about again within a day or two. 

^. 

Ne^v Drinking FountainM. 

Sanitary drinking fountain.3, operat- 
ing on the same principle as those 
throughout the city, will be Installed 
In the city hall. Thoy will be an ap- 
preciated convenience, filling a need 
which has been felt for years. 



Northland Prlntery. 

Good printing. Call Zenith 494. 



Adv. 



BUILDING PERMITS. 

To Thomas Wood, double brick 
dwelling, Greysolon road 
between Twentieth and 
Twenty-first avenues $ 8,000 

To J. Klasne, wash house. Nine- 
ty-ninth avenue west 200 

To A. Halewskl, stone base- 
ment. East Eighth street be- 
tween First and Second ave- 
nues 400 

To P. Halvorsen, frame dwell- 
ing. Vernon street between 
Michigan and Pacific ave- 
nues 2,000 

To A. C. Gillette, brick dwell- 
ing. East Sixth street be- 
tween Twenty-fifth and 
Twenty-sixth avenues 16,000 



pany and the Eastern Railway com- 
pany are made Joint defendants In two 
actions filed In district court yesterday 
afternoon by Charles C. Hutzler. In 
the first cause of action, the defend- 
ants are charged with having built 
spur tracks on plaintiff's property and 
to have removed gravel valued at 
$3,300. In the second cause of action, 
$780 Is asked as damages for the burn- 
ing of 156 cords of Jack pine 



PERSONAL 



RebeiN Capture Town. 

Mexico City. May 1. — Confirmation 
has just been received here of the cap- 



GeologlNtN ComlnK. 

Prof. E. M. Lehnerts and twenty stu- 
dents of the University of Minnesota 
will visit Duluth and the ranges some- 
time between June 16 and July 12'. 
their object being to study the geologr- 
cal formations of the state, survey the 
water power resources and make other 
observations. Many parts of the state 
will be visited, but It Is expected that 
most of the time will be sp«nt on the 
iron ranges. 



Must illave Licenite. 

Before the Remedial Loan associa- 
tion can begin Its operations in the 
city It must first procure a license from 
the city clerk. This is required by 
the new state law and the license fee 
named Is $25 per year. The license 
must be renewed annually. 



Injured By Fall. 

Mrs. Maud Patton of 108 West Second 
street was taken to .St. Luke's hospital 
last evening .suffering from a fracture 
of the hip. She was injured by a fall 
on the stone steps of the canal pier 
Tuesday evening. 



TWO RESPECTED 

BUSINESS MEN 



Who Are Among the 
Live-Wire Boosters 
for Duluth. 



Real 



Dlcn From Borna. 

Hilda Oiya, an 8-year-old girl, died 
last night at St. Luke's ho.spltal of 
burns which she received several days 
ago at her home in Aurora. Her clothes 
caught fire while playing about a fire 
and before they could be smothered the 
child was terribly Injured. She was 
hurried to St. Luke's hospital In tins 
city, but despite every attention she 
succumbed last night. 



John and Charles Cirlson, who 
have been real Duluthlans from the 
early days of the city — then a town — 
and who have been In bualnes.s .since 
the "Bowery" was In its infancy, 
have built and opened a first-claaa 
buffet, called the Stockholm Buffet, 
at 513 West Superior street and, with- 
out exception, will be .second to none 
in excellence In the Northwest. The 
fu'niture and tlxtures of the place 
are about the last word In art. They 
are of the best and latest that money 
can buy. Aside from the attractive 
appearance of the place the .stock 
of wines, Uquora and cigars on hand 
18 to be kept up to grade and will 
be of the best and favorite brands 
uaed In the city. It will be the ob- 
ject of the proprietors to have their 
stocks in such condition that nobody 
In the city cannot be supplied with 
what they call for at the Stockholm. 

A first cla^s cafe Is In connection, 
conducted by D. J. Sullivan, former 
proprt'^tor of the Delmonlco cafe, 
who takes personal charge of the 
cooking, where the kitchen Is in full 
view of the public eye. 

The floors and walls are of tile and 
marble, the object of this being not 
only beauty but the provision of .san- 
itary surroundings. The electric 
chandeliers and other fixtures to 
match are of the very latest designs 
and add attractiveness and home-like 
air to those entering. 

The grand openln6| to the general 
public, for Inspection, will be .Satur- 
day. May 8rd. Everybody is welcome. 



For CareleHN Driving. 

The trial of Hjalmar Carlson, ar- 
rested on a charge of careless driving, 
was started in police court this morn- 
ing. Carlson Is said to have been learn- 
ing to drive an automobile and be- 
coming confused last Saturday after- 
noon ran Into the rear end of a wagon 
driven by Swan Olson, a foreman of 
the water and light department. Olson 
was knocked to the ground and badly 
Injured He was carried to his home, 
Flity-elghth avenue east and Superior 
street. In front of which the accident 
occurred and given medical attention. 



Foreclosure of Lien. 

In district court, before Judge Cant 
today, testimany Is being taken in a 
lien foreclosure case brought by T. P. 
Corey against the Range Lumber com- 
pany and others. The action Is one In 
which .the plaintiff seeks to foreclose 
a lien for $99 for materials furnished 
one Joseph Teller contractor, who 
erected a building for defendants at 
Buhl. 



Tien and PoleM Burned. 

Brush fires about fifty miles from 
Bemidji have destroyed a large quan- 
tity of ties and poles belonging to the 
Duluth^ Log* company. Officials of the 
company liave been unable to get Into 
communication with their men at the 
scene of the fire and have failed so 
far to learn the extent of their losses. 



The l«l«nd Lake Inn 

Opens Saturday, May 3. Good 
and fine fishing. 



J 

Mat Hayes of St. Paul Is registered 
at the St. Louis. 

John A. Healy of Hlbbing la at the 
St. Louis. , ^ , 

H. A. King of Virginia is a guest of 
the St. Louis. 

Charles Jesmore of Eveleth is in 
Duluth today. ^ _^ 

John Petella of Eveleth is at the St 
Louis. , ^ ^. 

F. A. Gaul of Toronto Is at the 
Spalding. 

R. M. Wolvln of Winnipeg, a former 
Duluthlan, Is In the city today. 

S R Wentworth of Portland. Or., a 
former resident of Duluth and known 
to many here. Is registered at the 

Spalding. ... . xw 

A. J. Rough of Virginia Is at the 

Spalding. , .., .,v . 

S. D. Dunn of Carrlngton, N. u., Is 
at the Spalding. 

Mr and Mrs. Hueston of Fort Will- 
iam are at the Spalding. 

H E. Shaw of Kansas City Is at the 
Holland. , ^ ^^ 

p F. Melville of Chicago Is at the 
Holland. 

W R Wenstadt of St. Paul Is at the 
Holland. „ , . 

Oscar Kaufman of New York la at 
the Holland. _ . ^ ^. 

C. M. Peterson of Hlbbing Is at the 
McKay. 

David Hogan of Gilbert Is at the 
McKay. , , .. , 

Dee Brown of Crosby Is registered 
at the McKay. ^ ,, 

Miss Marien Wlllcutts and Mrs. A. 
C. Wlllcutts of Holyoke are at the Mc- 
JKay. 

Dave Riley of International Falls Is 

at the Lenox. . .. , . ^^ 

Max Bloomstein of Eveleth is at the 

Lenox. ^ .,, ,, 

George T. Northrup of Minneapolis 

Is at the Lenox. 

C. F. Smith of Litchfield Is at the 

Lenox _ . , . ...... 

Walter Frye of Chlsholm Is at the 

Lenox. 

UNCLElAM 
AS DEPOSITOR 



A. L. Ordean, president of the First 
National Bank of Duluth. returned yes- 
terday from a trip to Southern Cali- 
fornia. , , ^ 

In discussing the decision of the sec- 
retary of t^ie treasury to demand 2 
per cent Interest on money of the gov- 
ernment deposited In banks of the 
country. Mr. Ordean declared that prob- 
ably the First National would surren- 
der govefTTYnent deposits, but stated 
that as the bank has as yet received 
no ofricial notice of action It Is too 
early to make any definite statement. 

Mr. Ordean declared that business 
throughout the country was good as 
a whole, especially in the Northwest, 
and that while some serious results 
might come from the tariff changes, 
he stated that very little change would 
be manifested here. 



roads 



SueM Contmctor. 

I..OU13 Lelmer teamster, has begun 
suit In district court against C. J. 
Frederlrkson, contractor, in which he 
seeks to enforce the collection of 
$C03.64, alleged to be a balance due 
him for the use of a number of teams, 
dump carts and wagons on a contract 
near Hope, N. D. 



RnilrnadN Sued for Gravel. 

The Great Northern Railway 



com- 



I 



May Term Calendar. 

The May term calendar of the district 
court Includes 296 cases, as coTnpared 
with 267 for March. Of this number 
142 have been continued and 154 are 
new actions. The cases are otherwise 
classified as follows: Jury cases, 151; 
cases for court only, 98; divorce cases, 
48. Of the total number of Jury cases, 
62 are new and 8'.) continued, of the 
98 court cases. 70 are new and 28 con- 
tinued, and of the 48 divorce cases, 10 
are new and 38 continued. 




Snap In 

ental R ugs 



^ 



We reserve the right to limit quantities. 
No phone orders accepted on Friday Bargains. 



Fift^ good quality Oriental 
Rtigs ; g...)(1^20 and $22.50 values 



—Willie it/jy 
Just ior 
Friday 



last— 





• ••••• 



"<\. 



$15.00 



_« 



Third Floor. 



\>, 



llnmatchable 



Bargains in V^ 

isses^ S hoes 



Siz^s llj^ to 2; odd lot Misses' 
Shoes formerly sold up to $2.50; 
good widths — 

Friday 93C ^^ 



n 



Dotted Swiss 

Extra Special — White 
Dotted Swis-ses, 27 in.; 
excelleni: quality for 
waists and dresses; al- 
ways 15c; 

Just for 

Fridaj, yd. 



lOc 



White Lawns 

Extra Special- -White 
checked and striped 
Lawns, striped voiles, 
for wai'ts, dresses and 
also for underwear; 
values up to 20c; 

Just for 

Frida3\ yd 



I2^c 



price 



9c 



Curtaiin Muslin 

Swiss Curtain Mus- 
lin, dotted and fig- 
ured; regular 
12j^c p<;r yard; 

just for 

Friday 

Third Floor. 

Rag Rugs 

Good Rag Rugs, size 
27x54 inches; regular 
price $1.25; 
Just for 0C« 

Friday, each.vSC ^ 

Third Floor. ^V 



It Pays 

to Shop 

at 

Freimuth*s 




Huck Towels 

Extra Special — 100 
dozen fine Huckaback 
Towels, 20x36 inches ; 
hemstitched, all pure 
linen; good wearing 
quality; value 35c; 

Just for 

Friday, each. 



24c 



Shirt Waist 
Boxes 

Matting -covered 
Shirt Waist Boxes; 
good value at $2.25; 

Just for Ol OC 
Friday .. yli03 

Third Floor. 

Easy Method 
Carpet Cleaner 

Fine for rugs or car- 
pets; regular price per 
can 4Sc; special 

Just for Oil I* 

Friday 9 Jv 

DaNeiiien 



argains 

g xtra es pecial 

T ravelers' Sample 
T rimmed Street 

Hats 

Chiefly Black 




Read All 

Frelmuth't 

Makat 

8ood 



A 



A 



J 



Trimmed with 
dashes of the latest 
colorings; there's 
just one hundred 
Stunning Street 
Hats, all up-to-date 
styles: regular $5.00 
to $7..50 values ; 
while they last 

Just for 
Friday 




Children's 
Stationery 

Stationery for the 
little ones, 24 sheets, 
ruled and embossed 
with pretty design, 24 
envelopes to match; 
usually sold at 19c and 
25c; while they last 
Just for ^-^ 

Friday, box f V 

stationer)' Section 

Men's Socks 

Men's fuie thin silk 
lisle Half Hose, double 
heels and toes, blacks 
and colors; ''run of the 
mill); the 25c kind 
Just for Friday OC-^ 
2 pairs for laQC 

Anuex. 

Men's Silk Socks 

Men's fine thread 
Silk Socks in black, 
tan, gray and navy; 
regular 35c kind; 



Silk-Lisle 
Hosiery 



19c 



Just for 
Friday, pair. 



Everett i Jf^^j 





1 9c 



.^unex. 



W'omen's very fine 
silk-lisle Stockings 
with all latest improve- 
ments for good service; 
fast black; the best 25c 
kind 

Just for 
Friday, paif. 

Hosiery Section. 

Women's 
Underwear 

Women's fine ribbed 
low neck sleeveless 
Vests, beaded crochet 
neck and arm-hole; 
sizes 4 to 9; extra spe- 
cial bargain 
Just for 111^ 

Friday, each.. lUU 

Underwear Section. 

Fancy Sateens 

36-inch Fancy Sateens 
for summer comforters 
pretty, neat pat- 



lac 



Special In 



terns; regular price 
a yard; 

Just for 
Friday, yd. . . 

Section. 



lOc 



Silk 



\=, 



Shirtings |peBestValneGivin|Ne!!KioT5!!!™ 



32-inch Everett Shirtings, 
dark and light grounds, for 
boys' shirts ; regular price 
12k c yard- 
Just for Fri- Q^ 
day, yard Ov 

1^^^ Domestic Section. 






% 



The great popularity of Our Friday Bargains 
has made Friday one of the busiest days of the 
week— the people of Duluth have learned to ap- 
preciate them- for it*s the most conspicuous once- 
a-week money-saving event in the city; every wom- 
an as a matter of economy should come here 
tomorrow and see the many other money-savmg 
offerings *'not advertised,** 



Shopping Bags 

Extra Special— Fine goat seal 
Leather Shopping Bags, new 
envelope clasp, silver and gun 
metal frames, small inner pvirse 
to match; regular price $1.75; 



Just for 

Friday .... 

saleswoman at the 
show you this bag. 



$1.29 



Ask the 
counter to 



3srrs53rrao50i5 




Toilet Paper 

Freiciuth's Special- 
Just for Friday, 

8 rolls for 



Cups and 
Saucers 

Cups and Saucers and 
Plates; gold lined or 
Delft blue; regularly 
$2.00 per dozen; special 
per set of 6 — 



C urtain S tretchers ^ighthouse /^ 



s/ 



Just for 
Friday . . 



54c 



nasement 




Ba«enaent 

Pitchers 

Decorated China 
Pitchers, 1-pint to 
2-quart sizes; worth to 
69c; 

Just for 00m 

Friday LoC 

Milk Kettles 

Enameled Milk Ket- 
tles, 3 and 4-quart size, 
worth 85c; 

Just for 
Frid.iy . . 




$2.25 
$1.75 
$1.00 



Wash Boilers 



All 
Boilers 
special 

Just for 
Friday 



copper 
worth 



Wash 
$4.50; 



$2.85 



naHCUicnt 



Just for Friday. 

Curtain Stretchers $1.79 

Curtain Stretchers $1.29 

Curtain Stretchers 68c 

Needful Things at Little Prices 

lOc Whetstones at, each 4c 

15c Tack Hammers, at each.. ..10c 
15c Garden Trowels at, each... 10c 

35c Hammers at, each 23c 

10c doz. Coat and Hat Hooks, 

per dozen 5c 

5c pkg. Tacks at, 2 pkgs. for 5c 

5c Garden Seed at 3c 

5c Scourall, 7 pkgs. for 25c 

Tea Kettles 

Royal Granite 
Tea Kettles; reg- 
ularly 95c; special 
Just forOA^ 
Friday. OOC 



Cleanser 

During this sale we 
will give 2 cans Light- 
house Cleanser and 1 
cake Milady Toilet 

Soap 

for 

Itanement 



lOc 





^ 



39c^ 



CARPET 
BIi;ATi:RS 

Rattan Car- 
pet Beaters; 
15c ktnd — 
Just for Fri- 
day, 9c. 



P erol 



ine 



Perolinc Sweeping Compound 
-rejjularly 25c — 



J 

Qalvanized 
Garbage Cans 



98c 



Lighthouse 
Washing Powder 

4-lb. packages; regu- 
larly 25c; special 

^"'*^°' 18c 

Basement. 



Friday . 



.SCRUB 
BRUSHES 

Values up to 
19c — Just for 
Friday, 5c. 
Basement. 



Dust Cloths 

Quality Antiseptic 
Dust Cloths; regular 
price 25c; special 
Just for 9Cm 

Friday, 2 for. fc3C 

naxement. 

Kimono Silks 

32-inch Kimono Silks 
in neat small patterns, 
dark grounds; regular 
price 75c a yard 
Just for CO A 

Friday, yd . . 3mU 
.Silk .Sei'tion. 

Crepe Voile 
Waists 

Stamped for embroi- 
dering; something en- 
tirely new, to be 
worked in Balkan col- 
orings; an extra special 
bargain 

Tust for CAa 

Friday, each. 3UC 

Needle Art Section. 

Glass Towel Bars 

Glass Towel Bars, 16 
inches long; regular 
15c kind 
Just for C|^ 

Friday, each...5IC 



XI 



BaNemen*. 



Just for Friday, 
per can 



15c 



L^ 



Ba.seinent. 




Galvanized Iron Garbage Cans 
worth $1.50 — 

Just for 
Friday. . . , 



$3.50 Garbage Cans- 
Just for 
Friday. . . 



Sail Soap 

Just For Friday 

22 Bars of Sail 
Soap for 



\>> 




$2b9o 



Limit, 22 Bars to Customer 

Baarment. 



^ 



> 



i 



TTSZ 



-ssc 



•m.j.A'-. .Ji-.JU.-i 



Vi'"^ '. 



PATCHING 
THE STREETS 



It 



Will Be Done System- 
atically in the 
Future. 



Oeorare J Bloedel, superintendent of 
street maintenance, ha-i begun to out- 
line his plans for the repair of streets 
durlngr the joiivlnar season. 

The funds for this work come from 
the street maintenance and repair 
fund, part of which Is supplied by the 
wheolage tax, which becomes due to- 
day. 

The first thorougrhfares to be put in 
shape will be Bast Flrai street from 
Sixth avenue east to Twenty-third 
avenue east and East Second street 
from Thirteenth avenue east to Twen- 
ty-third aVenue oast. The First street 
work will start at the eastern end 
of the oreo.-9ote block paving which 
will be laid this summer and the Sec- 
ond street repairs will oommence 
where the ]iresont tar macadam pave- 
ment ends at Thirteenth avenue. 

Work wi;l also be started shortly 
on Superior stte«t. .Supt, Bloedel states 
that the street car company will re- 
place the arlcks between Its tracks 
which are not In good condition and 
that the city will look after the re- 
mainder of the street. Considerable 



patching- was done on the city's main 
highway last season. The life of pave- 
ments 18 greatly lengthened by the 
repair work. Henceforth all streets 
win be closely Inspected and repairs 
will be made before any of the de- 
fects become aggravated, necessitating 
a much heavier expenditure. 

margareTwilson's 
chauffeur arrested 



New York, May 1. — William J. Green- 
wood, a chauffeur, was fined $5 today 
for driving Ml.ss Margaret Wilson, the 
president's daughter, and her e.scort, 
up Broadway at a speed of twenty- 
four miles an hour. 

The policeman who appeared against 
Greenwood said that when hte .stopped 
the taxicab yesterday evening Green- 
wood told him that his passengers 



Wi^re the president's daughter and 
Boyd Fisher, manager of the social 
renter, and that they were hurrying to 
a hotel to pick up a Princeton profes- 
sor who had to catch a train for 
Princeton. The policeman let the car 
proceed after summoning the chauf- 
feur to court today. 

Mr. Fisher was In court today and 
paid Greenwood's fine. 

PAYINGTAXES 
ON VEHICLES 



City 



ClearYourSkin 

Unsightly eruptions, plmple.s, face 
blotches are often cleared In a single > 
night by the mild, antis-ptlc w.ash. the | 
D.li.D. Prenorlptlon for Ee«*-mn. This j 
soothing remedy drives out impurities 
and heals the alUng skin a.s nothing 
elHe can. A GOo bottle proves It. ( 

For Eczema and Hh allied diseases, i 
D D.U. Is an absolutely reliable rem- j 
edy. There i« nothing else that we ; 
can recommeiiil more highly. ] 

Drop Into Abl)ett» drug store to- , 
day, and let them toll you the merits 
of D n.D. and of their .special money 
back guarantee backed by the D.1.">.1). 
l.aborato! led. Also a.sic them about the 
valuable cleansing powers of D.D.D. 

Soap. .... 

For sal* at Abbett s drug stores. | 



Clerk Is Kept Busy 
Receiving License 
Fees. 



$^35 which had been paid for wheelaga 
taxes. 

Some complaint has been made that 
the rate of flO per ton for auto trucks 
is excessive in comparison with th© 
charge of |6 for two or three-hors« 
vehicles. The claim Is made that one 
of the large trucks Is worth about 
three of the horse-drawn wagons and 
that on that basis the charge should 
be about |18 Instead of $30, the sum 
required \o be paid under the present 
ordinance. The commission may bo 
asked to amend the ordinance in that 
respect. * 

FEWER WOLVES 

BEING KILLED 



The 
taxes 

large 
clerk 
The 



announcement that wheelago 
became due May 1 brought a 
crowd to the office of the city 
to pay their license fees, 
tags which are handed out by 
the clerk to be attached to vehicles 
have not yet arrived: although or- 
dered some time ago. It Is expected 
that they will be received this after- 
noon or tomorrow. 

In the meantime those who have been 
coming to the office for their tags 
have been paying the fees required by 
th.^ ordinance. Each of them has been 
furnished with a receipt and the tag* 
win be forwarded to them without 
delay. This morning City Clerk Charles 
Palmer turned 



With the coming of summer the 
slaughter of wolves — which is a profit- 
able amusement for many of St. Louis 
county's settlers during the cold 
weather — has subsided. 

During the month of April County 
Auditor Halden paid out only $315 in 
bounties, there having been 
twenty-one animal!, brought In 
which bounties were claimed. 

During the preceding month fifty- 
three full-grown animals W're brought 
In In Februar;-, 1913. bounties were 
claimed for seventy and in Janu- 
ary eighty-one. 



but 
for 



over to the treasurer 



Before Retiring 

Unpleasant effects from a late sui>- 
per mav be quickly dispelleii and 
restful sle*p assured by taking a 

Beecham's Pills 

Sold Everywherp. In boxes lOc and 35«ki 



\ 



Thursday, 



THE DULUTH |IERALD 



May 1, 1913. 



GOT CLIENTS 
BYJYSTEM 

Details on ''Legal Protec- 
tion Bureau" Disclosed 
in Court. 




Duluth Attorney Claimed to 

Have Reaped Rich 

Profits. 



How Attornt^y Joseph De I^a Motte 
of this city operated a "It-gral prottc- 
tlon bureau" which entitled members 
for the sum of |5 each, to the privilege 
of consultlnK Mr. De La Motte when- 
ever litigation was needed, was related 
In district tourt yesterday afternoon 
to Judge Fesler and the jury which is 
trying the Harwood-De La Motte law- 
suit. 

The name of the "protection bureau" 
was the American Kmployes' Adjust- 
ing association. Hatwood and his wlt- 
iifsses brought out in their testimony 
that the owners of the stock in the 
company were: J. De La Motte, l*r. 
F. W. Gordon of Superior and himself. 
De La Motte, he claimed, owned the 
controlling interest, 

MemberB of the association were for 
the most part among the foreign 
workers on the range, who were liable 
owing to the nature of their work to 
become involved (n personal injury liti- 
gation, the testimony showed. It was 
also brought out that each of the mem- 
bers who paid $u also signed a contract 
which bound them to engage Mr. De La 
Motto as their attorney. 

Harwood. on the witness stand de- 
clared that De La Motte had realized 
about $12,000 in prolits from litiga- 
tion secured through the organization. 

Harwood Is suing i:>e La Motte. on 
the grounds of fraud. He is asking to 
be reimbursed for services rendered 
and expen.sies paid out while in the 
employ of De La Motte and the Amer- 
ican Kmployes' Adjusting company. 

The Jurv in the case was excused to- 
day and will report tomorrow. Today 
Judge Fesler l.<5 hearing arguments on 
the law points involved. 

SWlfClAN 



Rich and Poor, Enter Now 
—Think of getting Abso- 
lutely Free these beautiful 
Premiums — Everyone! 
Everywhere! This Contest 
is open 
to all. 




FREE $6,750 FREE 






:^^i^ 




IN VALUABLE AWARDS TO BE GIVEN AWAY BY MANUFAC- 
TURERS TO ADVERTISE THEIR PIANOS IN THIS VICINITY! 



This 

Lady's 

Beautiful 

Genuine 

Diamond 

Ring. 



Cfi 



YOU 



■ ■CAN SOLVE THIS GREAT 
LANDPUZZLElmU 



TRY 



y\lSJD WIM OME OF THESE BEAUTIFUL. PREMIUMS 



Every person solving this puzzle 
correi'tly will receive absolutely fre<> 
tlieir choice of one of the Beitutiful 
Premiums. 



REMEMBER 

A Beautiful Premium to Everyone 



M VALUABLE PREMIUMS HEREIN NAMED WILL BE GIVfN.«^ng 

P|P^ ABSOLUTELY FREE IFOR SOLVING THIS GREAT LAND PUZZLE ^^ 




FREE! 



100 Beautiful Sets Rogers' Guaranteed Silver Spoons 

100 Sets of Gentlemen's Gold and Pearl Tie Pins 

Cuff Buttons and Tie Holders 

100 Large Pieces of Beautiful Pressed Cut Glass 

100 Beautiful Pocketbooks 

100 Beautiful Art Pictures vjJrR'ir 



I 

I 



THREE-QUARTER SECTION OF LAND 



This 

Lady's 

Beautiful 

Gold 

Watch, 

guaranteed 

20 years. 






too Sets of Rogers' Spoons 



FREE 



IS KILLED 



Frank Sours, a switchman, was killed 
at 2:30 this afternoon by a Northern 
Pacific train at Twenty-eighth avenue 
west. The body was taken to Olson & 
Crawford's undertaking rooms. Sours 
lived at 3215 Tower avenue Superior, 
Wis. No particulars of the accident 
were obtainable up to the hour of go- 
ing to press. 



I OBITUARY 

Williuiu L. La Follette, only broth- 
er of Senator Robert M. I>a Follette, 
died at Madison. Wis.. April 30 of heart 
disease after a prolonged Illness. He 
was 66 years old. His wife died in 
Fehruary, 1911. Six children sur- 
vive. 

Mr. Ln Follette was active in the 
recent Wilson campaifcn in Wisconsin 
and uad been favorably mentioned for 
an important government position. He 
has held office as receiver of public 
mont-vs at the Chamberlain, S. D.. 
land office and as railroad commission- 
er of South Dakota, and was the Dem- 
ocratic candidate for lieutenant gov- 
ernor in that state in 1908. being de- 
feated In the Republican landslide 
Mr. La Follette had been editor ot 
the Missouri Valley (South Dakota) 
Journal, which he founded and the 
Mitchell, (South Dakota) Gazette. He 
died at the home of his s!stei% the wife 
of Supreme Court Justice Robert G. 
Siebecker. 

Mr«. GeoFKe W. Orhis 35 years old. 
wife of George W. Ochs. editor of the 
Philadelphia Public Ledger, died April 
20 at her home at Elklns park, Phila- 
delphia, after a brief Illness. 

Alton J. Palmer, Inventor of the 
modern humane stock car. a pneumatic 
churn and several sewing machine Im- 
provements, died In Detroit, Mich., 
April 20 at the home of his son. Mr. 
Palmer was S5 years old. He was born 
in Homer. N. Y. 

WANTS $15,000 FOR 

INJ URY T O CHILD. 

Four years ago little Ethel Shannon, 
then 11 years old, had one of her feet 
nearly blown off by stepping on a 
dynamlt* fuse cap. She was walking 
oh Oneota street, near Forty-seventh 
avenue west, at the time. 

Todav suit was started in district 
court against the Minneapolis, St. Paul 
and Sault Ste. Marie Railroad company, 
which i.s charged with responsibility 
for the accident. 

The suit, which is brought by the 
girl's father, D. Shannon, involves a 
claim for $15,f'00 damaees. It is 
claimed that employes of the Soo road 




100 Large Piei-e^; of Beautiful Pressed 
Cut GlatiS. 




PUZZLE: 



I 



FREE! FREE! 



100 S«-t.s of Gentlemen's Gold Fille<! 

and Pearl Tie Pins, Cuff Buttous 

and Tie Holders. 




Can You Solve It? 



A farmer owning the accompanying 

_ three-quarter section of land wishes 

to divide it equally among his four sons, so that each son will have a piece 
of land the exact size and shape as the other three sons. In other words, 
the farmer wishes to divide the three-quarter section of land in four 
equal parts, the size and shape of each part being the same. 

Divide the three-quarter section of land as described 
above with pen or pencil, on this or a separate piece of 
paper. Persons submitting correct answers to the 
above puzzle wnll be given their choice of the pre- 
miums named absolutely free. 

To every person submitting a correct 
solution of the puzzle the manufacturers 
who control and who are distributing this advertising 
appropriation will give free (besides the other pre- 
miums mentioned) a bona fide Manufacturers' Credit 
ypucher for $130.00, good only toward the purchase 
of any new Piano in our store. 

For many years piano manufacturers and dealers »-J- tried ^ reduce [Jj-^f^J'^^^^j;^^^^^^^ emiJ.nL^d 'nn§ 

solicitors, paying teachers' commissions f^^ eng:|i^ ng gr^at arUsts^t^ ^^^ possible vaJuc. TWs Is 

now It 18 a question of the best advertised P'»"»« ^«^"*i.X'',iri,,!l* t^ ^rket and Introduce their product is tx> 

fp^,;rthfa^.?rTr;Voner^^^^ demonstrators at fabulous 

eSpensrand maJiing the people pay for such irottiods by asldng a heavy price for the piano. 

RUSH YOUR ANSWER TODAY! CONTEST CLOSES TUESDAY, MAY 0, 1013, p. m. 




FREE 



This 
Gentle- 
man's 
beautiful 
Gold 
Watch 
guaran- 
teed 
20 years. 



FREE 

Pocketbooks 




100 Beautifid Pocketboolis. 



1 00 BEAUTIFUL ART PICTURES 



1414 

TowerAve. 

Superior, WU. 



ADDRESS MANUFACTURERS' REPRESENTATIVE, CARE OF 

WISCONSIN MUSIC CO 



1414 

TowerAve. 

Superior, Wis. 



Hi***- ■ 






a « 



?; 

f^ 




This Beautiful Chest of 
Silverware 



All contestants who call at our 
store and use their manufacturer's 
credit voucher and purchase a new 
piano, paying $25.00 or more cash 
down on the instrument they pur- 
chase, we will give absolutely free 
their choice of the above described 
premiums, namely, a Lady's Dia- 
mond Ring, Lady's Gold Watch, 
Gentleman's Gold Watch or a Chest 
of Silverware. 



[ 




in that vlclnty during the Bummer of 
1909 had left a number of the caps 
alon? the right-of-way and that chil- 
dren In the neighborhood had gathered 
them and had scattered them broad- 
cast. 

It Is stated that the fuse caps were 
of bright and shiny copper and very 
attractive for children. The one on 
which the little girl stepped is alleged 
to have been one of the many left by 
the defendant company. 



sented a demand for 15 per cent in- 
crease In wages, threatening to strike 
if the demand was denied. The mill 
closed at noon. There has been no 
trouble so far. New men likely wiU be 
secured at once. , ,,, 

The Mass Consolidated mine will re- 
open within a few days with an entire 
new crew, replacing 265 men employed 
Sp till the time of closing of the mine 
Saturday. 




coast, citing the present anti-Japanese 
agitation In California. 

When the sugar B<:hedule was reach- 
ed It became apparent that more ora- 
tory in large volumt; was clamoring to 
be let loose, and Representative Un- 
derwood following bis declaration that 
he Intended to put on the screws, 
secured an agreement to allow two 
hours debate on the sugar schedule and 
all amendments offered to it. Repre- 
sentative Boussard of Louisiana, rep- 
resenting the Democrats wh<> oPP/Jff 
the free sugar provlsron of the bin, 
joined the Republicans In the futile 
battle to alter the committee rates. 



May 1, 1913. 



PORTLAND MAN COUNSEL 
FOR RECLAMATION WORK 




TO THE PUBUC 

The Health Department desires to make this City as nearly 
a "Spotless Town" as possible— to this end we appeal to the 
public to enlist their co-operation. We cannot accomplish re- 
sults unless we have your support and co-operation. All good 
citizens ought to have sufficient civic pride at least to keep 
their places free from offensive rubbish or refuse of any kind, 
more particularly that kind of dirt or rubbish which affords 
a breeding and feeding place for flies. To delay in carrying 
out these suggestions means an unnecessarily early and large 
number of these pests. You will save yourself expense by 
doing this without a call from the inspector. We are de- 
termined to have this ''clean up" either from your sense of 
decency or because of our sense of duty. 

DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC HEALTH 



DAN GUPID IIS 

DOZINC ON JOB 



Wily Dan Cupid succeeded In lead- 
ing eighty Duluth couples to the mat- 
rimonial altar during the month of 
April, but he failed to come up to hla 
former record for tie month of show- 

l^'Tn April. 1912. hv registered ninety 

land during the fourth month of 1811 

there were elghty-s»!Ven permits to wed 

i^^DuHng March, 19151, there were sixty- 

1 four licenses Issued. The same number 

were called fur durinit the month ol 

February and In JanuaYy there were 

seventy. 



have been received here and are of 
high quality. 

CANADIAN FLEECED 
OUT OF HIS SAVINGS 

St. Paul. Minn.. April 1.— (Special to 
The Herald.)— Edward Barrett, aged 
31, is in jail here today charged with 
swindling Emanuel Peterson of \\aln- 
wrlght, Can., out of 1700. Peterson 
was on his way to Florida where he 
intended to purchase land, and ac- 
cording to his own story was inveigled 
into cashing a c heck for Barrett. 

WANTS FUNDS FOR 

STATE EXHIBIT 



CHURCHILL QUITS 

STA TE BA NK WORK 

St. Paul, Minn., May 1. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — W. W. Churchill, deputy 
state bank examiner, has resigned to 
become director and second vice pre."?- 
ident of a bank of Rochester, Minn. 
Kelsey S, Chase, state superintendent 
of banks, says Mr. Churchill has been 
one of the most efficient men in the 
department, Mr. Churchill prior to be- 
coming examiner was connected with 
a Rochester bank. 



St. Paul, Minn., May 1. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — Governor Eberhart today 
announced that he would ask various 
commercial clubs and civic organiza- 
tions throughout the state to aid in 
financing a Minnesota display at the 
Panama-Pacific exposition. The legis- 
lature, which just closed its session, 
failed to make an appropriation for this 
purpose. 



SAYS "KIDNAPED" BOY 
IS NOT HER SON 



Superior 



LINEMEN ARE 

OUT ON STRIKE 



The entire foroe of linemen and 
electricians of the Superior Water & 
Light company walked out on a strike 
this morning. The men demand higher 
wages and the recognition of the union. 



Officials of the company state that tliey 
have granted the increase but are hold- 
ing out on the question of recognition, 
or the signing of any scale. Both side* 
are in liopes of having th* difficulty 
settled within two days. 

BRU" sFrFI RES. 

Brush fires In the vicinity of Lake 
Nebagamon la»t evening destroyed the 
old camps of the Lake Nebagamon 
Lumber company and four buildings 
formerly occupied by the Hoiiklna 
sanitarium. It Is said that two set- 
tlers lost their lives. One of them was 
a settler named Johnson, and the ether 

is unknown. 

■♦ 

Amateur Production. 

Pupils of the Normal school have 
.lans for giving a vaudeville show the 
matter part of this month. The funds 
raised will be used to make up a de- 

flciency in the ^^^^^^''^m^^^rf^^f tha 
Coach George Keegan will ^'r^^t the 
Bhow, and Mise A. Curtis -will ha\ e 
charge of the musical part. 



K 



Prisoner Escapes. 



Charles Moore, a pr'soner at the 

workhouse escaped y^^}.*^;^'^^\,^r J\l 
is paralyzed on one side «"<»,. J^,y» 
escape surprised the . police o|«*^5^^«; 
The police are searching the city for 
him. 



D. H.. May 1. 1913. D T^^ 




RAIN FOLLOWING 

HOTJDRY SPELL 

Fargo, N. D.. May l.-(Speclal to The 
Herald.)— Thunder showers last night 
and this morning followed four days 
of high winds and hot weather. The 
temperature today is much lower and 
farmers say It Is just right to make 
new grain come out. 

DOLLArBAYWIRE 

JUDGE WILLIAM R. KING. fKOX CLOSES DOWN 

Washington, May 1. — iudge William 
R King (it Portland, Democratic na- 
tional committeeman from (Oregon, has Calumet, Mich., May 1. — (Special to 
been appointed chief counsel of the Herald.)— The employes of the 

United States reclamation service byri'^o neru.iu..» * ,,, .wi. '^mJ^ff nre- 
Secretary Lane. • Dollar Bay wire mill this morning pre- 



UNDERWOOD BILL 
STILL UNAMENDED 



Washington, May 1,— With the legis- 
lative machinery running smoothly and 
rapidly, the house today reached the 
first of the big rough places In the 
Democratic tariff bill, the sugar sched- 

Representative Underwood, at the 
throttle, drove the Democratic ma- 
jority steadily ahead, disposing of the 
last paragraph of the metal schedule 
and plowing through the lumber and 
wood schedules without allowing an 
amendment. A fight to restore to the 
dutiable Hat shingles, which the bill 
placed on the free list, provoked a 
wealth of oratory, part,lcularly from 
the representativcH of the North Pa- 
cific ooaat states. They made much of 
the "Oriental labor" troubles on the 



so 



Opelou.«.as, La.. May 1-— J^^^ Ander- 
Bon of South Carolina Called today to 
identify as her sor the child who re- 
cently was recover.Jd from a tinKer in 
Mississippi and laler ("lalmed by Mr. 
and Mrs. C. P. Dvnbar as their boy. 
who was kidnaped i^st /-uKust. W. C. 
Walters, the alleged kidnaper, had In- 
Bi»=ted that the child was Bruce An- 
derson and not the Dunbar boy. 

•■He's not mine," the reputed mother 
said today^ ^ 

SPENDS $2!i,0QO,000 
FOR ROLLING STOCK 



Bt. Paul, Minn., MarV 1.— (Special to 
The Herald.)— To provide adequate 
facilities for the movement of North- 
western orops for the year 1913, ap- 
proximately 20.00(i units ,of rolling 
stock Bhorfly w^ll be placed in service 
by three large ralln'aye <^enterlng In bt. 
Paul, at an initial expenditure of IBC.- 
000,000. The rocds are the Great 
Morthern, Northerr Pacific and Omaha. 

According to purchasing o^flcla s of 
the roads, the nov.- euvlpment will be 

of the latest type. 

— .* ' — — 

Mott, N. D., Brick Plant. 
Mott. N. D.. Ma> 1.— (Special to The 
Herald.) — A brick plant will be estab- 
lished nere this immmor as a result 
of the tests made by manufacturers In 
the East of the samples of clay 
shipped out. Specinaens uf the bricks 





'Clotlt'^ 



The distinctive kind. 



For sale in 
Duluth only at 




At Third Ave. West. 
Foot-Not©: Walk In Hanan Shoes. 



..V 



msses 




i<Hw> 





Thursday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



May 1. 1913. 



THE NEWEST IN MEN'S 

G SUITS 




A shipment of real "classy" 
Spring Suits, the very latest 
productions in Norfolks and 
English models, made up in 
the very finest materials, in 
grays, browns, fancy stripes 
and novelties. The critical 
dressers will tind their desires 
satisfied at this store. Our 
prices — 



$15 

$18 
$20 

—AND— 





LAKE AND RAIL RATES 
MUST NOT RE ARANOONED 



Decision of Interstate Com- 
merce Commission Vic- 
tory for Duluth. 



Railroads Fail to Justify 

Proposed Increase in 

Tariff. 



Decision Does Not Affect 

Duluth's *'Big Case" in 

Any Way. 



known as Mrs. J. Johnson," from 
Pittsburg to Chicagro. Oct. 15, 1910, "for 
Immoral purposes." and "In perpetra- 
tion of a serious crime." The fighter 
was in court when the Indictment was 
returned and Immediately entered a 
plea of not guilty. His trial Is set 
for next Monday. 



ntntisements 



HEARST SUED BY 

CITY OF N EW YORK. 

Now York. May 1. — The city of New 
York has begun suit against William 
R. Hearst to rfcover $.30,000 to cover 
damages obtained from the city by 
Mrs. Margaret Shay after thig^ deatli of 



her husband, a policeman, who was 
killed by an explosion of fireworks 
during a celebration on the streets 
ten vears ago. The corporation coun- 
sel holds that the fireworks were be- 
ing set off under the direction of a 
political organization controlled l)y Mr. 
Hearst and that Mr. Hearst and not 
the city was responsible for the po- 
liceman's d<'ath. 



Traffic Commission Hopes 

for Decision in It at 

Any Time. 



DULUTH— SUPERIOR— VIRGINIA 



YOUR CREDIT IS GOOD 

Pay as you get paid — 
it's the modern way. 




1879 




AHEfliCAS ^ 
EXCHANGE 
NATIONAL 
BANK 




1913 

Under Goverameot Sapervisloa 



True Americanism! 

The amount of your account at the bank makes no difference 
In the treatment you will receive. ^„,,o^- 

No matter whether your deposits are made in single dollars 
or big checks, we are glad to have your account and glad to 
have vou as a friend. . . . , 

Wo do not value a man by his wealth, but by his character, 
and we have just as much respect for the man who denies him- 
self pleasures to save a few dollars a week as for the man who 
h^s the knack of making money fast. 

We pay 37o Compound Interest on Savings Accounts. 
Safe Deposit Boxes for Rent — $3 a Year. 

AMERICAN EXCHANGE NATIONAL BANK, 

..j,.r(n..- ,i. •. i-!r'->"' '■v-'--. cvf-ry Saturday night from 6 to 8 o'clock. 



GLEANS THE HAIR AND MAKES IT 
BEAUTIFUL — 25 CENT " DANDERINE" 

In a Few RIomenis Your Hair looks Soft, Fluffy, Lustrous 
aad Abundant— No Falling Hair or Dandruff 



Surely try a "Danderine Hair 
Cleanse" If you wish to immediately 
double the beauty of your hair. Just 
moisten a cloth with Danderine and 
draw it carefully through your hair, 
taking one small strand at a time, 
this will cleanse the hair of dust, dirt 
or any excessive oil — In a few mom- 
ents you will be amazed. Your hair ^ ., 
will be wavy, fluffy and abundant , grow abundantly 
and possess an incomparable softness. , beautiful. 

piastre and luxuriance, the beauty and; You can surely have pretty, 
oHi»r,^,«r of true hair health ' lustrous hair, and lots of it. if you will 

'^B.riclLbeautifymg the hair, one I just get a 25 cent bottle of Knowlton's 
application of Danderine dissolves Danderine from any drug store 
every particU? of Dandruff; cleanses, 1 toilet counter and try it as directed. 



purifies and invigorates the soalp, 
forever stopping itching and falling 
hair. 

Danderine is to the hair what fresh 
showers of rain and sunshine are to 
vegetation. It goes right to the roots, 
invigorates and strengthens them. Its 
exhilarating, stimulating and life-pro- 
ducing properties cause the hair to 

long, strong and 



The traffic commission of the Du- 
luth Coinmorcial club has a large 
-share In a signal victory of North- 
western shippers over the railroads 
in a decision of the Interstate com- 
nieice commission d'?nying to the car- 
riers the right to advance the lake and 
rail rates from the East to Duluth and 
other Northwestern points. 

The decision of the commission Is 
made in two cases, one involving pro- 
posed advances in class and commod- 
ity rates from points in Trunk Line 
territory to the Northwest and the 
other involving advances in class 
rates from Pennsylvania and New 
York to Northwestern destinations . 

The tariffs In Question were issued 
some months ago and protests were 
immediately entered by the traffic 
commission of the Commercial club of 
Duluth, the Minneapolis Traffic asso- 
ciation and the St. Paul Association of 
Commerce. Francis W. Sullivan and 
G Roy Hall of the Duluth traffic com- 
mission attended the hearings at 
Washington on the proposed advances 
and presented Duluth's objections to 
the advances. 

The interstate commerce commission 
in its decision holds that the railroads 
have failed to Justify the proposed ad- 
vances, and determines that the pres- 
ent basis of rates must be maintained 
for a period of at least two years. 

Touching on the hrst case, the com- 
mission points out that the joint 
through lake and rail rates to the 
Northwest through the Lake Superior 
ports from Central Freight association 
territory east of the Indiana-Illinois 
state line, including the Ohio river 
crossings, have always been con- 
structed, theoretically at least on the 
combination local rates to and beyond 
the port of Cleveland, with the Pitts- 
burg rate as a maximum. 

•With the local rail rate up to the 
port we have no concern here," said 
the commission. "It is the change in 
local lake-and-rail rates to the West 
from Cleveland that has occasioned 
this controversy. . r i t;' i 

"A few points adjacent to Lake Erie 
ports other than Cleveland, have been 
exceptions to the general basl.s. those 
points taking joint through rates con- 
structed on the lowest combination to 
and beyond the nearest port, of local 
rates to the Northwest; but In the 
tariffs under suspension, It is now pro- 
nosed to make the through rates from 
these points by applving the clovelan'l- 
comblnatlon. 

Theory of Rate Making. 
"The theory has been that the lake- 
and-rail rale from both Cleveland and 
Buffalo to the Northwest were made 
on a relative basis with Chicago and 
the port-to-port rates from both Cleve- 
land and Buffalo to Chicago were 
made on a definite scale of differen- 
tials under the all-rail rates from 
Cleveland and Buffalo respectively to 
Chicago, the rail and lake rates to 
Minneapolis then being constructed on 
a definite scale of differentials over 
the port-to-port rates to Chicago from 
Cleveland and from Buffalo. It is con- 
tended by the carriers that these dif- 
fl^Jntlals'^w.re departed from prior to 
1911 hecaase of the operation of the 
Rutland Transit line from Cleveland to 
Chicago, which set up its own scale of 

'^-During the operation of this line 
none of the boat lines controlled by the 
triink line carriers made Cleveland a 
port of call. In 1907. the Rutland line 
?elsed to operate from Cleveland^ 
^ul^fseauently. a boat line controlled 
Sy one of the trunk lines began to 
Zke Cleveland a port «' f^^l^^^^"^.]^ 
not onlv accepted the scale of rates 
Prom Cleveland that the Rutland line 



The lake and rail rate cases Just de- 
cided by the interstate commerce com- 
mission leave Duluth just where It is 
now In relation Co lake- and rail rates, 
and the decisicn does not forecast 
what the result of Duluth's lake and 
rail case will be, according to G. Roy 
Hall, traffic coir missioner of the Du- 
luth Commercial club. 

Mr. Hall said today: . 

"The cases Jus: decided by the inter- 
state commerce commission involving 
rates for transportation by the raU- 
and-lake route from Eastern points to 
Duluth and the Twin Cities covered 
only the reasonableness of certain ad- 



TONIGHT'S ATTRACTIONS. 

LYCEUM — Kinemacolor Motion Pic- 
tures. . . 

ORPHEUM— Vaudeville and Talking 
Pictures. 

EMPRESS — "The Time, The Place 
and The Girl." 



Amusement Notes. 

r pi 
tht: 



"One case involved rates from points 
in the states of Pennsylvania and 
Maryland east of Pittsburg; the other 
covered rates from Pittsburg 



vances in these dates which were pro- 
uosed by the Interested carriers 

^ ■ '--fi rates from ^.w 

Pennsylvania and 
ot 
and 

points west fn Chlo and Indiana 

"The commission suspended ttie 
tariffs carrying the advanced rates and 
proceeded to in-julre into the reason- 
ableness of the advances, ^hey have 
now determined tnat upon the whole 
advances were r:Ot warranted, this de- 
cision being based upon the reasons 
offered by the cxrriers for making the 

'"^-'I^n'Th^ Duluth lake and rail case 

the Question of the reasonableness of 

^ - " f the territory east 

north 



the r^ktes from fU of the territory east 



of the indiana-niiiiols state and 
of the Ohio ani Potomac rivers was 
raised and also the discrimination In 
the rates to Duluth as c'Mnpared w th 
those through Duluth to the Tnv n 
Titles The cases just decided probably 
kive very little bearing upon t^e ques- 
tion of the reasonableness of the lates 
themselves to JJuluth and P[obably 
none whatever* Upon the question of 
discrimination 




S^^s '^y^ad-^^; in -^„^?j«^2^t 
lake to or from Duluth would have 
the effect of reiucing our natural ad- 
vanttgls. which arise wholly from our 
location upon the greatest inland wa- 

^^V.^^rs ^"de^cllloir^n'-no way forecasts 

ta^ice^^Tnt%lirc^e"n^w'% n^i/^raf 
had to do only with the published ad- 
vances, and the decision ffflne^^S^/t^h^ 
nollcv that would seem to indicate ine 
Character of the decision In our case. 
We are expecting a decision any day 
TnA are naturaMy awaiting it with In- 
lere.'^t." 



The new Kinemacolor program which 
opened yesterday at the Lyceum is 
the most interesting yet presented. 
"The Story of the Orange" shows the 
development of this fruit from the time 
that the small trees are planted until 
the fruit is wrapped for market. 
"Fifty Miles from Boston" is a West- 
ern story, with all of its scenes laid 
in Arizona, with cowboys. Indians and 
the old stage coach used consistently 
in a very interesting story. "Not for 
Mine." a Majestic comedy, telling the 
.story of a young girl who is to be 
married, but after visiting her married 
sister decided that married life is not 
for her. A newspaper story, "The Girl 
and the Grafter," is done in an ex- 
cellent manner by the Tanhouser com- 
pany and a comedy of country people, 
entitled "Boobs and Bricks," an Amer- 
ican film, is highly entertaining. 
m * • 
Tonight Mclntyre and Heath will be 
seen at the Orpheum in their old time 
favorite sketch "The Georgia Min- 
strels." 

For years Mclntyre and Heath have 
been trying to get away from "The 
Georgia Minstrels," not because they 
don't like It, but because they fear 
the public is growing tired of It. But 
the public shows no signs of being 
weary of the old classic. The now 
sketches such as "Waiting at the 
Church" and "The Man From Montana 
are received warmly enough, but the 
managers and the public still demand 
the old one. In voting contests which 
are held by the two comedians, "The 
Georgia Minstrels" is generally chosen 
as the act preferred, and the fact that 
the two comedians are now receiving 
more money for the old act than at 
any time in twenty-five years, shows 
that it still retains Its popularity. 

"The Georgia Minstrels" will be the 
bill tonight and tomorrow afternoon 
and night, and on Saturday the sketch 
for which the most requests have been 
received will be presented. The box 
office records indicate that "The Geor- 
gia Minstrels" will outdraw either of 
the other two sketches. 
• * • 
Boyle Woolfolk will present at the 
Empress today, Friday and Saturday, 
a comedy with music entitled "The 
Time, the Place and the Girl." During 
a run of 463 consevutive nights In 
Chicago this p'ece was received with 
such unequivocal approval by the 
theater goers of that city, that It not 
only ran this length of time but ex- 
ceeded in point of attendance any play 
that has ever appeared there. The rea- 
sons for this unusual success are 
ascribed by the management to the 
fact that the authors struck a new 
idea in musical plays and developed it 
with unusual skill. It Is a comedy 
with uni(iue characters and unique 
.situations. It would be interesting if 
there was not a song In It. But with 
pleasant accompaniment of at- 



r - ■ ■ ■ - ' — # 

THE STORE FOR SERVICE. 
118-11B-117-119 WEST SUPERIOR STR12ET, DULUTH, MINN. 

It Is Housecleaning and 
Moving Time 



necessary to pvt them on the Scranton 
hRsIs Furthermore, the carrieis ao 
SSt contend that the proposed advances 
are in OW wa> influenced *y the need 

•"^"The'^ca^rler, put forward the ad- 
ditional suggesitlon that Inasmuch as 
ThH rates from this territory were re- 
duced after Jan. 1. 1910. and that the 
nrono<»ed tariffs do not advance the 
rites to the ?ame level that was In 
ffect on that date, the burden is not 
up^ them to .ustify the proposed ad- 

''^"counsel for the .respondents admit- 
ted upon oral argument that he did 
not advance this theory with conil- 
dence, and the commission can not ac- 

'^"^UpJi'au'tT-a facts of record we are 
of UiT"opTnlon and mind that carreers 
have failed to lustlfy the aavan' es 
here proposed, and an order will be en- 
tered requirlr>g them to cancel the 
tariffs." 



soft. 



or 



HIGH SCHOOL BOYS 

ASKED TO JOIN PARADE 



High school boys have been invited 

t~ 'uin In with the old soldiers In the 

idtj which will be held on Memorial 

Marcus W. Bates, patriotic Instructor 
for the local G. A. R-. gave a short 
talk on the subject at Central high 
school yesterday. 

"We want to make this parade the 
b^'st ever." he said, "and we want you 
bov.-< to take t-nough interest in the old 



soldiers to come out and help." 

It will be remembered that last year, 
although Central high school boys 
were invited to participate In the 
street parade, none showed up. 

A few high school students from the 
Duluth Industrial high school at West 
Duluth were In the line, but none from 
the uptown school. 

♦ 

M'llMon Not (iolnte to St. Louis. 
Washington, May 1. — President Wil- 
son has telegraphed his regret at be- 
ing unable to attend the American 
peace congress at St. Louis. An ef- 
fort to get members of the cabinet to 
attend, proved futile as they said they 
were overwhelmed with work. 






WHY WE CU 

It takes a builder 
three or four years to 
i irn his trade thor- 
uu_;h!y. How long 

would It take him to 
Uarn all trades? 

The doctor who 
spends four years at 
a Medical College is 
Incapable of treating 
with success all the 
countless diseases of 
men. women and chil- 
dren. Ho knows a lit- 
tle of everything, but 
nothing thoroughly. 
We cure diseases and 
weaknesses peculiar 
to men. This is 

our sole field. The 
true specialist never attempts to do ] 
more than he can do WELL. His 
peratatent study, diligent research, 
and scientific Investigations are all 
on the line of a few diseases. A 
SINGLE CLASS OF THEM, on 
which all his efforts are con- 
centrated, and to which his entire 
practice is strictly limited. Hence, 
he becomes supreme in his chosen 
field. 

We do not pretend to know all 
about" disease, In fact, our knowl- 
edge is very limited and extends 
to only this one class — DISEASES 
OP MEN. If you are afflicted 
with any dl.=iease that la peculiar 
to men, STOMACH TROUBLE, 
SKIV DISEASE. BLOOD POISON. 
NERVOUS DEBILITY. RHEUMA- 
TISM, OR ANY OTHER DISEASE 

PROGRESSIVE MEDICAL DOCTORS, Inc. 

NO. 1 "WEST SUPERIOR STREET, DULUTH, MINN. 



OF A CHRONIC OR 
NEWLY CONTRACT- 
ED NATURE, we In- 
vite you to consult us 
and promise you a 
cure. Twenty-s 1 x 
years of hard and 
constant effort here 
have given us the 
means, methods and 
remedies to effect 
PERMANENT 
CURES. We assist 
every afflicted man to 
clear up and out of 
his body all poisons; 
we free him from his 
bad habits, we cure 
his maladies and re- 
turn him to per- 
fect health. 

We publish no names, though wo 
have the names of a number of 
men. many of whom had been giv- 
en UD as hopeless. Our prlnel- 
plen are HONESTY AND IMTECi- 
R.ITY We have no schemes to 
offer you. no "trial treatments." no 
cheap bargain-cures, but we DO 
offer you the advantage of our 
strict professional honesty, our su- 
perior ability and our successful 
experience. 

A personal examination of your 
case is most desirable, but If It is 
Impossible for you to call, send 
us an account of your trouble. 

Office hours: 9 a. m. to 8 p. m. 



had established and collected prior to 

retiring from that service, but it con 

tlnued to maintain its scale for four 

^®-!n"^i911 the local lake-and-rail 
rates from Cleveland were readjusted, 
and it 7s claimed that the boat line 
^hen 're-established on the lake-and- 
rail traffic the scale of differentials as 
between Buffalo and Cleveland here- 
tofore noted. „^,.„ not 

"The through rates were not 
chanjfld at the time of the increase of 
the focal lake-and-rail rates from 
Cleveland, and the purpose of the tar- 
^ffshere suspended was to increase the 
through rates by applying the local 
ral rates up to the port as factors in 
combination^ with the lake-and-rail 
rates made in i»ll ^^^^^'""^ the port. 
Increatte in Clans Ra**?. 

"As published in the tarift 
suspension, the proposed 

^l:S ta\l!ig^^Mtrnea%^Us^s a-^^^^^^^^^^ 
&^olu5nb^ui a^itrV-^i^ngsto^^J fs'fy'plcfi 

^°"As' e'x'plailfid"- by the carriers." the 
confmlsslon continued, -the in^^easej^ 
the through rates in the suspenoea 
tariffs will accrue entirely to the boat 
's n< 

rev€ 

ivai 

nter 

lefit , , 

Increase Is of course not concliislve 



REIiMDICT JOHNSON, 

Chicago. May 1.— An additional In- 
dictment, am.mdatory of a previous 
Indictment, wes returned by the feder- 
al grand Jury charging Jack Johnson, 
the negro prizefighter, with viola- 
tion of the Mann white slave act 
The Indlctmert alleges that Johnsor, 
broug t Belle Schrelber. "otherwls. 



under 
class rates 
the present 



the through rates in 

" will accrue enti », „«. 

lines. But there is no contention that 



Tneed of more revenue on this traf- 

./promptedThe advances, and the tact 

t ha? one of the interested carriers is 

o deceive the benefit of the proposed 

to rei-eivo w ^ conclusive of 



Use TIZ- 
Smaller Feet 

Sore Feet, Tender Feet and Swol- 
len Feet Cured Every Time 
by TIZ. 

Send at.Once for Free Trial Package 



of the 



advanced 
presented 



no 



the reasonableness 

rate. . 

•'The carriers nave . 
jusSficatlon of the advances here pro- 

''7f' T llnKg'up^'theTe V^ates^'o 
%'re! with tk7 thJ'ory under which 
thJy are alleged to have orlglnaUy 

been made." /-.... 

The Second Ca»e. 

T„ the second case the carriers pro- 

S.l'vTbeen'' /rtded up to t„. Lak, Bri,, 
""••I'lv tariffs that became effective Nov. 

wmKpo^t .0 M.nneapoU. U ,.a a. 





MISS JESSIE HOUSTON, 

With "T'he Time, The Place and The 

Girl" at the Empress. 



to 



!;frup^those%l\erwith-class rates by 
lake and rail from Albany and Syra- 



cusl It is also said that the reducUozis 
were made because c^'^taln a l-rall re 
ductlons had been made from that orig- 
inating territory to central freight as 

Hoclatlon points. rprords 

••Thi^ Is not made clear on recoras. 
The respondents admit, and the history 
.fthft rates shows, there has never 
"L.V^A /.^J rointion between the lake- 



xlsted any relation betwe 

;^h"e'-NorthwV;^ anT t'^^^uZ'^n ^. 
f?o^m^he7oin\s "of origin to points in 

'^^'^hI"olfir oThtr'"rtention .is .that 







Zt" o'^Jes^now^'m-effect, put Rcranton 
a Tower basis than Pittsburg.^ 



It Is 




No Need of Ileveniie, 

"Wp attach very lUtle weight to this 

ue^estUn because of the Indlre^ct and 

rm-ultous nature of the route through 

Pittsburg and for the reason that, on 

he eeneral theory heretofore noted of 

L^rUnS'the rates down_ to the Lake 



PittsburR 



f-H'^^'D^rts"^ the' rates from 
mlght^weli bear the slight reduction 



Everyone who is troubled with sore, 
sweaty, or tender feet— swollen feet- 
smelly feet, corns, calluses or bunions 
can quickly make their feet well now. 
TIZ makes sore feet well and swollen 
feet are quickly reduced to their nat- 
ural size. Thousands of ladies have 
been able tn wear shoe."? a full size 
.smaller with perfect comfort. R. H. 
Cheney, Grundy Center, Iowa, says: 
"I put on 8. new pair of shoes the 
first of the -week and have worn them 
every day since. I could never do this 
before using TIZ, and they are a half 
size smaller than I have been wear- 
ing." 

TIZ 18 th«> ojaly foot remedy ever 
made which acts on the principle of 
drawing out all the poisonous exuda- 
tions which cauae sore feet. Powders 
and other remedies merely clog up the 
pores. TIZ cleanses them out and 
keeps thorn :leari. It works right off. 
You will feei bteter the very first time 
it's used. Use It a week and you 
can forget you -ever had sore faet. 
Even if you should let yourself be 
fooled into taking a substitute for 
TIZ, you can't fool your feet. TIZ 
Is for sale ot all drug stores, depart- 
ment and general stores. 25 cents per 
box. or dlrgct if you wish. Money 
bock if TIZ doesn't do all wo say. For 
a free trial package write today to 
Walter Lutli«r Dodge & Co., Chlca- 
KO, III. 



tractive music, vivacious dances and 
pretty girls Introduced legitimately. It 
has all the attractive features of both 
musical and legitimate comedies. 

Briefly, the story Is that of a pleas- 
ant, whole-souled young "gambler," 
square as a die and on the level with 
everybody but himself, and with the 
descriptive name of "Happy" Johnny 
Hicks. He and his pal, Tom Cunning- 
ham, son of a rich man, get Into 
trouble through a fight which Cun- 
ningham has in a gambling house, and 
are forced to flee to a sanitarium in 
the mountains to escape arrest. Here 
they both meet their fate — Hicks in 
the person of a pretty trained nurse, 
and Cunningham in that of the charm- 
ing daughter of a thrifty farmer. All 
of these characters, and many others 
almost as interesting, and the com- 
plications ensuing are original and 
amusing to an extraordinary degree. 
The production is staged by Ned Way- 
burn, a master of his craft, and there 
i.s not a conventional singing or dan- 
cing number In the twelve numbers 
seen in the play. Thomas Wlffen will 
be seen as "Happy" Johnny Hicks. 

WILSON OUTLINES 

1914 C AMPAIGN. 

Washington. May 1. — President 
Wilson, according to Democratic house 
leaders, has proposed a cooperative 
plan for conducting the congressional 
campaign of 1914 so as to have the 
national and congressional Democratic 
committees work together. 

Development of this plan, It wafl 
said, was the main reason for post- 
poning the scheduled meeting of the 
Democratic congressional committee. 
The president's idea Is understood to 
be to bring about a welding of the 
forces of both committees so that each 
win have a definite line of work to 
carry out from now until the congres- 
sional nominations, and that there 
mav be no opportunities for claslies of 
authority or misunderstandings such 
as have occurred in former years. 



i 



J 




Almost every home needs to replace some of the 
old with new rugs, curtains, window shades, portieres, lino- 
leums and the like. Here are home needs of reputation, style 
and superiority of design and manufacture. For instance — 
the famous Whittall rugs are here — unexcelled in fineness or 
qualit> — made of imported Oriental wools and hand sewed. 

If Your Next Rug Is a Whittall You WUl Be a 
Constant Whittall User. 

\ New and Stylish Scrims for the Home 






We offer also the newest in scrim goods — by the 
yard — ready-made curtains and panels — the new scrim bed 
sets with curtains to match. These latter are very stylish 
and are exclusive. The bed sets sell at $10.00, $11.00 and 
$12.00; curtains to match, $3.75. 

Scrims With Guaranteed Sunfast Colored Borders, 

Price Per Yard 50c. 

A large assortment of popular priced hand finished 
Arabian curtains for the living room— all mounted on best 
French nets— no raw edges— 2>^ yards long— extra values at, 
per pair, $4.50, $5.00, $5.50 and $6.00. 

These for Dens and Living Rooms 

New effects in Arabian Marquisette— for dining 
room — music room — den or living room — very attractive and 
durable, at $5.50, $5.75, $6.50 and $7.50, and others up to $10.75. 

Choice Oriental Rugs Kf/S^'^^ 

A most careful selection of Oriental Rugs awaits 
you here — a few very choice room sizes in Mahal, Gorevan, 
Afghan and Kirmanshah pieces and a large variety of small 
pieces of all kinds — including Kirmanshah, Bokhara, Shirvan 
and Kazak mats— at from $6.50 to $18.00. These are excep- 
tional values in small pieces. 

From $22.50 to $85.00 our variety of medium size pieces cov- 
ering the entire list of Oriental makes is one of the best — for 
ever'y one is a personally selected piece — aud has our full 
recommendation. 

(]Sjote — No Orientals shown that we do not own. 

Cedar Chests for Use 
and Beauty 

For the storing of fine woolens 
and furs and as a thing of beauty the 
red cedar of Tennessee has no rival — 
a new shipment is just in — priced at 
$12.75 to $26.00. 

See our big value at $16.50— they're 
very artistic. ======== 

Are Your Shades Guaranteed? 

No! Then we have not made yours. But your 
neighbor has guaranteed shades— ask her what she thinks of 
our work. An estimate costs you nothing— phone for our 
shade man. 



TRAVELERS' 
GOODS 

If planning to leave 
the city, get our 
quotations on travel- 
ing goods. Ourward- 
robe trunk is a win- 
ner — the biggest 
value offered — all 
sizes. $27.50 to $60. 
Consult our Travel- 
ers' Dept., 3rd floor. 



The Basement Store Offers 

Housefurnishings for the Home and Garden 
Specially Priced for Friday and Saturkay. 

6-Quart Galvanized Sprinklers 
— special price Friday '>'l^ 
and Saturday O^C 

5-foot Perfection Step Ladders, 
with iron braces and shelf; QC^ 
special price ^%/V^ 

Dustless Mops (like illustration), for 

dusting and polishing hardwood QAp 

floors; special for two days ^Ol/ 

Guaranteed Garden Hose — 25 
or 50 ft. lengths ; complete with 
couplings ; special price, 1 Q^ 
per foot 1 V\^ 

Special Sale Rich Cut Glass 

The following pieces 

at Special Prices: 

Fruit Bowls, Celery 

Trays, Fern Dishes, 

8-in. Fruit Nappies, 

Nut Bowls. Mayon- 

aise Bowls; regular prices up to 

$5.00; special price — ^^ QO 

choice q>^.^U 

It's Time to Garden 

Extra good Garden Tools : 

Garden Rakes 25c to 50c 

Lawn Rakes 29c 

Hoes 25c to 50c 

Spading Forks 69c 

We have just included in our base 

lent a complete Ready Mixed Paint 

epartment, carrying all colors of 

the guaranteed Benjamin Moore's 

Paint, Floor Paint and Wall Tints. 





f 





m 



J. iw-.i. 



^^ 



i 




Thursday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



May 1, 1913. 





A collection procession wound its 
way through the city streets yester- 
day and today, headtd by an eltttrlc 
automobile carrying Mrs. Q Herbert 
Jones and Mrs. W. C. Winton, meinbrra 
of the board of diiettors of the CMl- 
dron's Home who were collecting th-i 
Sarments and articles for the rum- 
mage sale which will be held tomor- 
row and Saturday at 312 West Supf;- 
rior street. Following the automobile 
were open wagons carrying an assort- 
ment of donations ranging irom roik- 

Ing horses, sewing jviaihinos and l.ace 
curtains down to old shoes and car- 
pet rags. Following a short distance 
behind was a professional old clothis 
buyer and a salvation army wagon 
collecting garments and furniture. 

The store was a scene of much con- 
fusion yesterday with its piles of cloth- 
ing of all kinds and hats, chairs, books, 
dishes, shots, and odd pieces of fur- 
niture which we!"e being assorted by 
women of the board into departments 
ready for fumigation before the open- 
ing of the sale tomorrow. 

Many new garniei is and articles 
have been donated by stores and fac- 
tories and the women aim to give 
things of value at a low price so that 
the sale may be a benefit to the pur- 
chasers as well as to the Honie. 



WOMEN WILL HELP. 



Will Take Part in Memorial Day 
Services. 

Memorial services in the school this 
year will be participated In by the 
members of the women's auxiliaries of 
the G. A. K. posts as well as th^ G. A. 
R. Spanish war vt-terans, citizens' staff 
and Sons of \'eterans, who visit the 
schools each year. 

The services will be held Thursday, 
May 29. in all public schools In the city 
and the general Memorial services will 
of course be held on Friday, May 30, 
Decoration day. 

Ilev. Ralph Jones of Chisholm is sug- 
gested as a speaker of tiie day and tlie 
usual parade and decorating of the 
graves will be arranged. 

"There will be one change this year," 
said Oapt. Pressnell, "and that is that 
at the dinner which is so kindly pro- 
vided for those actively engaged in the 
program of the day by the women, only 
those holdng tickets will be admitted. 
I^st year there was a general rush 
and many who had taken no part in 
the certmonles secured their dinner, 
crowding out the veterans. The mem- 
bers of the G. A. H. and their families, 
the Sons of Veterans, the Spanish war 
veterans, the citizens' staff and those 
who assisted will be furnished tickets." 

BENEFIIXONCERT. 



Members of Clan Ste-wart Enjoy- 
ed Real Teat. 

Members of clan Stewart. No. 50, 
O. S. C. and their families thoroughly 
enjoyed a delightful entertaiimient of 
music and dancing last evening u; For- 
esters' hull, Fourin avenue west and 
First street, which was arranged by 
the benevolent committee of the clan 
lor the purpose of raising funda to 
carry on work by this department. 

An atmosphere of unity and si.ncer- 
ity is always felt at gatherings of the 
Scotch people and their programs are 
always heartily appreciated. 

Chief .\lexander Anderson presided 
aod an interesting feature of the e\e- 
nlng was the reading of an original 
poem. "My Violin" by R T. Staffi-rd 
who followed his poem by Ji solo 
played on a violin which has been a 
treasure in his family for over 300 
years. The number was full of btau- 
liful sentiment and was heartily ap- 
plauded. 

Philip Gordon Brown sang two num- 
bers. 'The Standard on the Uracs o" 
Mar" a^id "A Wee Bit Land' to both 
of which he was forced to respond witli 
encores, singing Grieg's "I Am A Scot," 
and another selection. A duet, "Bar- 
carolle* from "The Love Tales of Hoff- 
man" by Mr. Brown and Miss Glenn 
Bartholomew was also a popular num- 
ber. Miss Bartholomew also sang as 
a solo number. "The Land o" the Lsal ' 
and was encored. 

The Lavlck brothers in a violin duet 
and Henry Lavick In a violin solo were 
pleasing and were heartily applauded 
responding with encore numbers. The 
song, "Elegie," by Miss Dorothy Close 
was accompanied by >i violin obligate 
played by Henry Lavlck, with Miss 
Helen Close accompaning. Mrs. P. M. 
Young sang two vocal numbers pie.as- 
ing^ly and K. T. Stafford played Scot- 
tish airs on the violin which were ef- 
fectively done. 

Alexander F. Melrose added much to 
the pltasure of the evening with two 
character songs. "The Earrln' o' oor 
Door," with his daughter as accom- 
panist Joining in the chorus with her 
father. "Grandfather Sam" was also 
a popular song. 

John Galbraith, popular for his im- 
personations of Harry Lauder, sang "I 
Love a Lassie" and "A Wee D( och and 
Doris," being insistantly encored. 

Selections on the bag pir.es were 
played by Robert Mowbrav and Ken- 
neth McGregor with Ossian Macaskill 
drummer and after the singing of 
'Auld Lang Syne" by the audience an 
exhibition of Highland dancing wis 
given by Miss Helen McLeod, Jam. s 
G. Klfler, Robert Mowbrav. Robert 
Tuiloch and Ossian Macaskill. 

Alexander Guthrie made a short 
speech thanking the performers for 
their entertainment and telling of the 
plans of the ben»velont committee. 

.Accompaniments were plaved by Miss 
Lillian Macaskill, Miss Melrose, Miss 
'"lose. Miss Annabelle McLeod and Mrs 
H. George. 



ENTERTAINMENT 

AT HIGH SCHOOL 




certs of the Matinee Municalc last 
winter, and a criticism of that concert, 
appearing in the Musical American, has 
been used on these posters. 



SARA RUTH BATES. 

A program of readings by Miss Sara 
Ruth Bates, reader, of Minneapolis, has 
been arranged by the members of the 
classes of mathematics of the Central 
high school for this evening at X 
o'clock at the high school auditorium. 
Mrs. Charles Weyerhaeuser of St. Paul, 
formerly a resident of Duluth, who has 
been heard here many times In vocal 
selections, will assist Miss Bates with 
sevoral songs with Mrs. Robins, also 
of St. Paul, as her accompanist. 

Miss Bates has a widely known repu- 
tation at a reader of artistic ability 
and the recital this evening promises 
to be of general Interest. 

The proceeds of the entertainment 
will go toward purchasing pictures of 
noted mathematicians for the room of 
Miss Agnes E. Wells, mathematical in- 
structor. 



li!UiV!l¥IACE 




Wait for the rummage Male driven by 
the ladleM of the F^ndion M. E:. Church, 
Friday, May 0th, at 312 West First St. 



attendants were Miss Hulda Wick- 
strom and Gust Swanson. 

Mr. and Mrs. Voldstridze will reside 
at 18 East Sixth street. 



Appreciate Duluth. 

Duluth is receiving a little adver- 
tising as a city of good musical ap- 
preciation in a most attractive poster 
which Corinne Rlder-Kelsey and Claude 
Cunningham are using for their work 
this season. Both of these artists ap- 
peared in Duluth In a Joint song re- 
cital given as one of the artists' con- 



Farewell Surprise. 

Mrs. A. Itienkie wa.s pleasantly sur- 
prised yesterday afternoon at her 
home 215 South Fifty-seventh avenue 
west by a number of her friends, the 
affair being planned as a farewell 
party as Mrs. liienkie will leave next 
Week for Mankato to reside. She re- 
ceived two handsome pieces of cut 
glass and the afternoon was spent 
plaving five hundred, the prizes go- 
ing to Mr.'^. Roukie, Mrs. Rolan and 
Mrs. Rollins. The following guests 
wt're present: 
MesdanieS — 

Bingham, Bolan, Superior. 

Hagen, Braw, Superior, 

James Gilson, Roukie, Superior, 

John Flahertv, P. Nicholson, 

J. E. Foublster, P. Blais, 

V. Burdash, Fred Cameron, 

A. V Rogers. J. Netzel, 

Robert Burton, Dalter, 

William Wiehe, Edward Smer- 

Lester Rollins, gage, 

Jo.veph Chomas, Bourdwell, 

Mackel, Charles Harvey, 

Hugh, William Kllby. 

Sawyer, 

^F i fi g t* H 

A. Engberg, Lillian Flaherty. 

Tena GUson, Margaret Nlch- 

Ida Behgman, olson. 
Connor, 

Birthday Party. 

Mrs. Ciust Emanuelson was pleas- 
antly surprised by a number of friends 
yesterday afternoon at her home In 
celebration of her birthday anniver- 
sary. She was presented with (lowers 
and gifts and a luncheon was served 
to the following guests: 
Mesdames — 

C Ruden, A. Johnson, 

Sjosellus, O. Olson, 

Braff, Smadlan, 

T^indquist, G. Mack, 

Llndhall. O. C. Nelsen, 

A. Anderson, W. Johnson, 

C. Nelsen, Mainella, 

Hill, C. Nelsen, 

Bostad, Alfred Ruden, 

T. Anderson, A. Ruden. 

Mack, 

♦ 

For Card Club. 

Five hundred was played at five ta- 
bles yesterday afternoon at the card 
party" given by Mr.s. Joseph Cole, 1105 
Fifty-first avenue east at Memorial 
hall for members of the U. S. W, V. 
club. 

Mrs. J. B. McComb will be hostess at 
the next meeting of the club next 
Wednesday afternoon at Memorial hall. 

Hostess to Friends. 

Mrs. F. A. Summers of Winona street, 
Woodland, entertained informally for 
a number of her friends yesterday aft- 
ernoon and evening. Those present 
were: 
Mesdames — 

L. E. Barber. W. Ruedy. 

N. E. McDonald, 
Misses — 

Flora McDonald, Hazel Fischer, 
Rosl Summers, Myrtle Fischer, 
Wlnnifred McDon Kathryn McDon- 
ald, aid, 
• 

Linnaea Branch. 

The Linnaea branch will meet to- 
morrow evening at 222 West Fourth 
street at 8 o'clock. A full attendance 
Is desired. 



Church Meetings. 

The monthly board meeting of the 
Union church will be held this evening 
at the home of E. M. McAllister, 408 
East Fifth street, and tomorrow after- 
noon the women's organization of the 



TALKS ON THE "SUPE R-CITIZEN" 

Dr. Raymond Phelan Gives Interesting Address at 
Farewell Banquet in His Honor. 



To become the super-citizen, the 
Ideal citizen of the futur^ according to 
Dr. Raymond Phelan, principal speak- 
er at a banquet given in his honor last 
evening at the Commercial club by the 
classes In social economics which he 
has been conducting in Duluth as a 
branch of the University extension 
work, one will live happily, usefully and 
artistically and will govern wls;ely and 
justly. To asccomplish this the super- 
citizen will be one whose education is 
never completed, he will alwaye be a 
neighbor to his fellow beings and will 
be a politician not only on election 
day and budget days, but on every day 
of the year. 

Dr. Phean also spoke of the exten- 
sion work of the universities and a 
series of toasts was given with Cour- 
tenay Dinwiddle acting as toastmaster. 

Right Rev. Bishop McGolrick was the 
first speaker advocating the extension 
work as broadening and of value. 

Mavor Prince pledged the guests the 
willingness of the city officials for co- 
operation In social work and the solv- 
ing of social problems. 



Rev. George R. Gebauer was also a 
speaker using as his theme, the word 
"Duty," saying that every citizen 
should be trained to do duty at all 
costs. 

Eugene Van Cleef of the Duluth nor- 
mal school suggested a course In geog- 
raphy under the extension course next 
year and H. O'Conner of Superior, who 
is in charge of the extension work of 
the University of Wisconsin there 
promised the co-operation of Wiscon- 
sin in anything that Minnesota may do. 

B. C. Wade of the Y. M. C. A. re- 
sponding to the subject, ''Wise and 
Otherwise" brought up the need of 
proper care and the working out of 
systems for bringing up boys and girl.«t 
and R. E. Denfeld, superintendent of 
schools advocated the development of 
the social centers as rapidly as possi- 
ble. 

Charles S. Mitchell said that exten- 
sion work is doing for adults exactly 
what the schools are not doing — that 
they are giving the people an oppor- 
tunity to study what they want to. 

Miss Jean Polrier voiced the appreci- 
ation of the class in the work of the 
course this year. 



Bartz-Johnson. 

Mr. and Mr.«. J. K. Bartz of 515 
Ninety-ninth avenue west New Duluth 
announce the marriage or their daugh.! 
ter. Grace to George Johnson of the 
firm of Johnson Bros., whi( h took place 
Tuesday afternoon at 3 o'clock at their 
home. Rev. R. J. .Stenberg officiating. 
Mr. and Mrs. Johnson left for a trip 
to Woodville. Minn., and will be at 
home at New Duluth after June 1. 

Dinner for Visitor. 

Mrs. A. W. C.'rawford of the Belvi- 
dere flats entertained at dinner last 
evening for Mrs. A. D. Rice of Hough- 
ton, Mich., who left for her home to- 
day after a visit here. Covers were 
laid for twelve at a table pretty with 
a centerpiece of carnations and ferns. 
• 

Quiet Wedding. 

The marriage of Gunhilda Elmqulst 
to ^>seph Voldstridze of Willow River. 
tooK place yesterday afternofm at the 
residence of Rev. J. A. McGaughey, 
2100 West Second street. He per- 
formed the ceremony at 4 o'clock. The 





By PEOG Y PEA BOD Y 




Examine the 

Everett and 
Emerson 

before making your piano 
purchase. 




104 Oak Hall Bldg. 




Many Wives Fail in Their Duty 
to Husbands. 

Isn't It possible 
for a woman to be 
an equally good 
wife and mother" 
I heard a woman 
declare that It was 
not — that when the 
time came every 
woman would find 
that she must sac- 
rifice something to 
one side or the 
other. If a woman 
must be remiss In 
one, 1 presume 1' 
is better for pos- 
terity that she err 

on the side of being a devoted mother, 
yet the question arises with love In 
her heart for both, why should she 
not encompass both? 

Most women fall, not so much In 
their duty to their children, as to the 
husband and father. That we all see, 
that we all readily excuse because 
children are a constant care, calling 
for repeated and ever Increasing sac- 
rifice, and because If only they shall 
received devoted mothering, we are 
pretty consistently of the opinion that 
this gradual divergence of Interests 
between husband and wife. If not nat- 
ural. Is then something that cannot 
be helped, save In exceptional cases. 

A woman who must bo exceptional 
comes to mind as I write, though she 






Established 18S7 



First St. and Third Avenue West 



Buy ifi& 
Machine 



^^vn^id^ 



GOOD 




^Fl/i^f/ITl/I^£ 



Try a 

Huntley 

PneU" 

matic 

Sweeper 



Do Your Friday and Saturday Shopping Here! 




will be sold Friday at 
only 



Fine Red Gedar 
G bests 

Built of beautiful knot- 
ted Tennessee Red Cedar, 
finely finished. Most use- 
ful for protecting your 
furs and garments from 
moths. Can be used at 
the same time for a com- 
j fortable window seat. We 
have a few of these copper- 
trimmed chests which 



$12.00 

Matting Covered Utility Boxes ^Q C%^ 

attractively trimmed, will sell for ir^* ^-^ 

NEW SPRING FABRICS for your Sun Porch are 
here in abundance. A host of sunfast goods and fig- 
ured linens in very effective patterns, 50 inches wide, 
will sell from 85c TO $1.35. Don't forget our Up- 
holstery Repair Shop when you make the changes in 
your home this spring. 





Printed Linoleums— Kc^uldr 

70c qualities in a variety of line pat- 
terns are offered, per yard, at 

Floor Oil eioth — Regular 45c ] O/^/^ 
quality. Your choice of a number of >■ ^^%^^^ 
good designs, per yard ) -^ 

Ru^s and Other Floor Coverings always 

demand attention at this season of the year. Our 
Third Floor Rug Department is overflowing with 
values of interest to every housekeeper. Critical buy- 
ers are supplying their wants here from our extensive 
stock. We can supply your wants also if you'll give 
us an opportunity. Let us advise you on the proper 
floor coverings to use for your home. 



■ 




lO-IN. WHIXGEKS. with 
1%-inch rolls and hard- 
wood frames, solidly pu«^ 
together; reg- 
ularly $3,215. . 



$2.10 



SPFCIAIi L.ARGE SIZE 
CLOTHES BASKETS — 

Friday and 
Saturday. ...... 



69c 




SPECIAL HARDWOOD 
ROLLING PINS— 

while they last. . . 



8c 




BOHN SYPHON REFRIG- 
ERATORS HAVE BEEN 
ADOPTED BY THE PULL- 
MAN COMPANY AND ALL 
AMERICAN RAILROADS. 

ONIONS AND MILK CAN 
BE PLACED SIDE BY SIDE 
IN THESE REFRIGER- 
ATORS WITHOUT DAN- 
GER OF CONTAMINA- 
TION. 

To introduce this line, we offer 
100-pound capacity Refrigera- 
tors like picture; hned wit^i 
Porcelain, guaranteed not to 
chip or crack; insulation so ex- 
ceptional that ice economy is 
assured, so dry at all times that 
matches can be lighted on their 
interior lin- ^ ^ ^ /^ /"^ 
ings, for... A^tim^f^ 



Bread and Cake 

Cabinets; like 
picture ; will 
sell for only — 




-4* 







Good size, well 
constructed Flour 
Sifters ; surely you 
need a new one — 



/5c 



All CopperTNickcl 
Plated Tea Ket- 
tles — large size — 
regular $1.35 
— special for 
this week — 



98e 




church will meet w 
West Second stree' 
cho-wsky, president 
will have charge. 

Members of the 
clety of the Pllgrl 
church will enjoy { 
evening tomorrow a 
of one of the mer 
sota avenue. Park 
people win meet a 
at 6 o'clock. 



1th Mrs. Cutllff, 731 

Mrs. A. C. Gro- 

of the organization. 



Young People's So- 
m Congregational 
L supper and social 
t the summer home 
abers, 3081 Minne- 
point. The young 
t the aerial bridge 



Woman's Council. 

The May meetin 
Council will be he 
Ing at 10 o'clock t 
room with the pre 
Burris, presiding. 

A report on the 
hlblt will be given 
ness will be taken 
tine reports. 



? of the W^oman's 
Id tomorrow morn- 
t the library club- 
sident, Mrs. W. H. 

Civic W'elfore ex- 

and soipe new busi- 

up beside the rou- 




AUDITORIUM 

ROLLER RINK 

2nd ANNIVERSARY 
FRIDAY EVENING, MAY 2 

LA BROSSE'S BAND. SKATING AND 
DANCING PARTY. ADMISSION. lOc 





TONIGHT. LADIES i^DMlTTED FREE 



of Winnipeg have returned to their 
home after a ten days' visit here with 
Mr. and Mrs. William Clifford of 1917 
East First street. Mrs. T. Stack of 
Minneapolis is now a guest of Mrs. 
Clifford for a few days. 

* • • 

Miss Margaret Day of 418 Twelfth 
avenue east fell yesterday afternoon 
on her way home from high school 
and broke her left arm. She is at 
home for a few days from the effects 
of the Injury. 

« * • 

Mrs. Thomas W. MacLean of 1510 
East Fourth street left today for a 
vLsit In St. Paul and Minneapolis and 
Chicago before going to her summer 
liome near the latter city for the sum- 
mer. 

* * • 

Mr. and Mrs. H. H. Myers of 2505 
E:ast First street left today for a trip 
on the range In their motor car. 

* * • 

Mrs. W. C. Winton of 1609 East First 
street has as her guest her sister, Mr-s. 
Kreutzer of Wausau, Wis. Mlus Stew- 
art who has been her guest for a few 
(lavs left last evening for her home at 
Virginia, Minn. 

Mrs. Courtenay of Bralnerd, Minn., 
is spending a few days in Duluth a 
guest at the Spalding hotel. 

* 

Save*) Autos May Die. 

Detroit, Mich., May 1. — Risking his 
life to avoid running into a light auto- 
mobile Driver Tim Shea of Fire Squad 



PRINCESS FREE 



WITH HER KISSES 



would deny the allegation. The truth 
remains, however, that she is a good 
mother to three sturdy little sons, as- 
signing herself their mother, com- 
panion and confidant; that she is an 
able housekeeper on an executive as 
well as a working basis and that she 
is a very great help and inspiration to 
j her husband and also his companion, 
much as she was before the little boys 
came to encroach upon her time and 
ministerings. 

When I attempt to study her mid her 
' modest surroundings subject to the 
j same perplexities that affect most 
wives and mothers, 1 have invariably 
} come to the conclusion that she has 
succeeded because she is such a su- 
perbly natural mother. She has the 
mother Instinct for every one. Com- 
bined with this Is the desire to keop 
young, to progress and keep In touch 
with human events. 

She has also made it n point to 
dress becomingly and daintily, as 
much that her children might be de- 
lighted and the gainers by her ex- 
ample ns that her husband should find 
her charmin,? and a woman to take 
pride in. Most women lavish every 
cent upon their children and make the 
cost of dressing them and the care of 
them their excuse for very plain, if 
not actual slack and dowdy attire. 
This is not fair to children, husband 
or wife. It teaches the first to be 
selfish oftentimes, and is a source of 
chagrin and disappointment to the 
husband. 



Personal Mention. 

Miss Caroline McEvoy of Chicago is 
visiting her brother and sister-in-law. 
Mr. and Mrs. J. A. McBvoy of 632 V4 
West Third street. 

• >» • 

Mr and Mrs. J. C. H. Engel and chil- 
dren,' Dorothea and .Tohn, have taken 
a cottage on Park Point for the sum- 
mer. 

• » * 

Mrs J. H. Harrison and daughter, 
Mi.ss Nora Harrlscn. returned yester- 
day from Washington. D. C, where 
they spent the winter, the latter study- 
ing piano music under John Porter 

Lawrence. 

• • * 

Miss Stella McFadden left last eve- 
ning for a visit with Miss Mary McFad- 
den and Miss Agnes Taafe in Minne- 
apolis. She will le away two weeks. 

• • ♦ 

Mr and Mrs. J. ^V. Lyder. Jr.. of 2111 
East' Superior street have returned 
from Southern Ca.ifornla, where they 

spent a month. 

• * « 

H S. Patterson and daughter, Grace, 
of 4703 Regent street, have returned 
from California, where they spent the 
past four months. 

• • • 

William Phlpps and Fred Campbell 



No. 34 steered his truck into an elec- 
tric pole and received injuries, which, 
physicians say, will result In his death. 
Fireman Keal Collins was seriously 
hurt and ten other firemen received 
painful injuries. 

ELEVEN HURT IN 

BI G FOU R WRECK. 

Middletown Ohio May 1. — Two men 
were injured, probably fatalHy. and 
nine other persons more or less seri- 
ously hurt when Big Four passenger 
train No. 25 ran head on into a freight 
train a few miles north of this city 
early today. The probably fatally in- 
jured are: 

Hedge Hitchcock, fireman on pas- 
senger train. Columbus, Ohio. Intern- 
ally Injured: and Louis Gumbinner of 
New York, concussion of brain and 
multiple bruises. 

WILL REJECTED ~ 

FOR B AD FORM. 

New York, May 1. — The will of 
James Cooper Wheeler, an author, has 
been denied probation because it was 
not properly witnessed and failed to 
recite that it was his last will and 
testament. Wheeler died in Chlcagci 



last September after he had gone there 
to contest the will of his daughter, 
who died under unusual circumstances 
on a lake, leaving her estate to her 
fiance. 



NATIONAL BANKS' 

DEPOS ITS LESS. 

Washington, May 1. — Reports of the 
condition of national banks in response 
to the call of the comptroller of ttie 
currency on April 4, show a large In- 
crease in loans, but large losses In 
cash and deposits as compared with 
the previous call on Feh. 4. The loans 
increased $53,067 213; the cash de- 
creased $45,133,495; deposits decreased 
$16,645,250, but showed a gain since 
April 18, 1912, of $256,735,956. 

The total reserve of the banks on 
April 4 was $1,475, 797, €74. or $36.l.*26.298 

above the amount required by law. 
^ 

Aeroplan^M Burned. 

Hempstead, L. I., May 1. — Five of the 
big hangars on Hempstead Plains avi- 
ation field, wiiere some of America's 
foremost aviators learned to fly were 
destroyed today by fire. 

Five aeroplanes were burned and 
several aviators and mechanicians had 
narrow escapes when the buildings 
collapsed. "The loss is estimated at 
$25,000. 



A Skin of Beant>' Is a Joy Forever. 



D 



R. T. FELIX GOURAUD'8 
Oriental Cream or 
Magical Beautlfier. 




Style 



Remives Tan, Pimples, Fipclc- 

les, Moth Patches, Rash and 

Skin Discatet, tn I avaiy 

blemkh en boiniy, and At- 

^j«.ft«» (litfL-tlon. It hn itood 

/^'UL* toil ol (^ )ear», »nd li lo 

^yliaimlcit wa tA«U it lo b« 

iure ll U properly mid*. Ac 

r«ptno countirfali nf •tmllar 

n.iine. Dr. I.. A. S«vre »ald 

i<i « itiljp of th« I lutton (« 

rsteulli "Ail vou'tdlci will 

u«c thcni, 1 recommend 

'.OURAUD'S CRI-AM' at 

■ « l«tM' hirmful of *ll the 

>. iti I ra >arailoRt. ' For lala 

v »ll drufff(1tt> hrA Pancjr 

r.aod* D«Vlers In the United 

ntate«, Canada and luiopa, 

r«rd. T. Bopkiu. Prop.. 37GfMtiMef St. Vcw York 




PRINCESS ILEANA. 

How would you like to have a prin- 
cess stop you on the highway and de- 
mand a kiss? Sounds like fiction, 
doesn't it? But that Is Just what hap- 
pens to a good many Houmanians at 
lUicharest. However, the princess wlio 
takes these liberties with her grand- 
fnther's subjects is only a little girl — 
the voungest of the daughters of the 
crown prince. Ileana Is her name and 
.she was born Jan. 5, 1909. Her mother 
who was Marie of Saxe-Cohorg and 
(lotha Is a born flirt and Ileana comes 
by her coquettlshness by Inheritance. 
N^hen Ileana receives the kisses she 
demands, she say.s: "I know whv you 
kiss mo. It is because I am so cnarm- 
ing. Mother says so." 




The Newest 
Ideas in 
Popular Price 
Millinery 

Our ability to give SPE- 
CIAL VALUES is due to 
the fact that we buy the 
best materials direct from 
the manufacturer at con- 
siderable saving. The re- 
finement of styles, quali- 
ty of materials and the 
high character of workmanship engage the attention of every 
woman who admires attractive millinery. The prettiest, dain- 
tiest, smartest hats you ever saw at the most reasonable prices. 
You will be thoroughly pleased with one of these hats. Pic- 
tured is one of the new Dutch sailors, trimmed in many dif- 
ferent ways. Prices range from 

$5 <" $12. 95 

Make This Shop Your Downtown Stop 



E>^CL^USIVEr 



OF» 



105 and 107 West Superior Street 



i' 



mammsmmm 



m 






i 




Thursday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



May 1, 1913. 



THIS WAS ANOTHER ONE OF BUN'S SALAD DAYS 




REMEMBER NOW, TO 

H/NNGTHE BASKET 

ON THE KNOB AND 

RUN.f 




I'T'ISMT QUITE AS 

T^STY AS LETTUCE I 

BUT IT WILL DO 
^ 





I BRING TH&- \ 
FINGER- 50WL 
GAR<;ON ^J 





AW BETH CANT 

Iyou forgive- 
\ a hungr y bun?) 



1 





SERVES 

YOU 

RIGHT 





PETE 6AY5 Give- 
HE LIFE- CAUSE- 1 
CAKT DODGE THE^ 
OTHER THING" 





CW$ Cllcek's Sunday Scbool Lmoa 

YvmirrsN for the hhhalo »y mv. j. s. kirtley. o. i>. 




St>D\Y SCHOOL LESSON: MAY 4. 

GeneiU xxxlx. xl: Joseph Interprets 
Uremiui. 



was at school preparing for his life 
work, and was storing up treasures of 
iklU and experience and knowledge. 
But all this power did not lessen his 
sympathy or his delicate tact, and es- 
pecially It did not lessen his sense of 
dependenc^^ on his Ood. 

He had hard luck with his own 
dreams and most of us would have lost 



WHAT OTHE R CITIES ARE DOING 

Activities; of Other Municipalities, Which Might or 
Might Not Be Copied in Duluth. • 



CONNECTION. 

Wo i'aw Jos.'ph sold his brothers to 
the Mldianltf merchants who had been 

■couring the country for any thing , u. ,^...o „.... ,^. „. --- „„^,,,,,i__. ^ig^ 

they .-ould sell to the rich Egyptians - faith In dreams and everytMng else 
and now he is in prison in Kgypt for , The Egyptians w.nt by ^| earns as aU 
the simple reason that ha was a true | Oriental people hax o always ^lone^ 
man. The monhants sold him to ! Ood has always t'-^'ated peop e on the 
Potlpher chief of police, and he won plane of their knowledge and expeTl 
fhe'resi^ct and ..oxffldenca of his mas- | en. e ^and, o^ften ^^i-" /^f^-.^'^^j^^J'^'^n^ 

We could hardly expect Him 

In 

In 

and 



ter and^va8 put in charge of his house- of the future or of their duty 



hold affaira. Unknown to him. his 
rnast-r's wife became infatuated with 
htm and shocked him by her brutal 
declaration of herself. "When he re- 
sisted and insisted it would he a base 
betriival of trust her love turned 
to hatred, and we know that reversed 
love is the wor*t kind of hatred. Her 
false accusations led her husband to 
put him In th^ king's personal dun- 
geon. But there he displayed the same 
qualities that had won out everywhere 
and soon the Jailer put him In charge 
of evervthing. Among the prisoners 
were the king's head baker and head 
cup hearer. 

THE LESSON. 

I. 
The Dream of Life, xl, 0-15. 

"AriLl the chief butler t Id his 
dre im to Josei)h. and said to him. In 
my dr» am. behold, a vine was before 
me: and In one vine were three 
branches; and It was as though It 
budded, and Its blossoms shot forth; 
and the clusters thereof brought forth 
rlp'' »?rapes; and Pharaoh's cup was 
In mv hand; and I took the grapes, 
and i)re.-»sed them Into Pharaoh's cup. 
and I gave the cup Into Pharaoh's 
hand And Joseph said unto him. 
This is the Interpretation of It: the 
three branches are three days: within 
yet three days shall Pharaoh lift up 
thy head, and restore thee unto thine 
oftl>-M and thou shalt give Pharaoh's 
cup into his hand, after the former 
manner when thou wast his butler. 
B'lt have me In thv remembrance 
■when It shall be well with thee, and 
show kindness, I pray thee, unto me. 
and make mention of m© unto Pha- 
raoh, and bring me out of this house; 
for Indeed I was stolen away out of 
the land of the Hebrews; and here 
also have I done nothing that ^ they 
should put me Into the dungeon." 

1 SYMPATHY. — Joseph should have 
Fulked and slouched and grouched in 
prison, because he was brutally treated 
and he .should have felt ugly toward all 
the world, including the rest of the 
prisoners and especially the jailer, but 
he did nothing of the kind; he was so 
confident in the purpose of God to 
accomplish som>-thlng for him and for 
others through him that he smiled 
and kept cheerful and helpful. He mas- 
tered himself; no. he was mastered 
by God and that gave him mastery of 
others. People instinctively reposed 
confidence In him. He had been given 
complete charge of all the prisoners 
and no man did anything without his 
consent. The prisoners felt no resent- 
ment but trusted him as a friend. He 
■was a leader bv nature and training 
and experience. When he went In where 
these "officers" were and saw them 
so sad and Inquired Its cause, they felt 
he was a friend and told him their 
dreams, knowing it would not do them 
harm and hoping he could help them. 
2. HOPE. — He gave the butler hope. 
He had been getting Information from 
these men about the conditions at the 
palace and that was giving him greater 
opportunity. All this adversity was an 
opportunity, as adversity always Is. He 



dreams. 

to do that way with us. 

Notice that Joseph's confidence 
himself was based on his confidence in 
Go" who had given the «lream and 
would Interpret It. His ^onAdence In 
himself and his forethought and kind 
ness and tenderness were all nurtured 

'''^s'sElfFiRi.SPECT. - Joseph never 
cons^^nted for a moment to confess to 
wrongdoing and he lost no opportunity 
to show that he was there i«n Justly 
His confidence that God would defend 
and use him for high purposes did not 
keep him from watching for every 
chance to set himself right and ffet out 
of the prison. He didn't depend on God 
to do for him what he could do for 
himself. So he asked the b.itleT to re- 
member htm and try to help, him get 



out. but that butler was released 



In 



three days and forgot all about Joseph. 

The nream of Death, lrt-23. 

"\nd when the chief haker saw that 
the Interpretation was good, he said 
unto Joseph. I also was In my dream, 
<ind behold, three ba.skets of white 
bread were on my head, and In the up- 
permost basket there was of all man- 
ner of baked food for Pharaoh; and the 
birds did eat them out of the basket 
upon mv head. And Joseph answered 
and said This Is the Interpretation 
thereof— the three baskets are three 
davs; within yet three days shall Pha- 
raoh lift up thy head from off thee and 
shall hang thee on a tree And the 
birds shall eat of thy flesh from off 
thee. And it came to pass the third 
dav which was Pharaoh's birthday, 
that he made a feast unto all his scr 



-ants: and he lifted up the head of the 
>hlef butler and the head of the chief 
haker among his servants. Apd he re- 
stored the chief butler unto his butler- 
ship again; and he gave the cup into 
Pharaoh's hand: but he hanged the 
f-hlef baker, as Joseph had Interpreted 
It to them. Yet did not the chief but- 
ler remember Joseph, hut forgot hlrn. 

1 DISAPPOINTMENT. — When the 
baker heard that the butler's dream of 
the vine and the three branches meant 
that In three days he should agalti 
pre.ss the Juice from the grapes and 
offer them to his master, he told his 
dream of the three baskets of bread 
foods on his head from the top oC 
which the birds ate the food, and he. 
too. hoped for a favorable interpreta- 
tion The court baker was an impor- 
tant person. He was an artist able to 
make all kinds of delicacies for the 
king and he must be trusted, too. as it 
was easy to put poison into the food. 
Th«y kneaded dough with the hands, 
b\itwhen it was made in such large 
quantities it was kneaded with the 
feet. The baker was doomed to disap- 
pointment. 

2. FIDELITY. — It hurt Joseph to tell 
the man his dream meant that In three 
days the king would lift up his head 
-IS he -would that of the butler, but 
would lift it with a rope, the other end 
of It tied to a tree. It was a hard fate 
The birds would eat his body and that 
was a dreadful doom to an Egyptian. 
We know how thev tried to preserve 
the bodies of the dead, so that when 



their souls returned after 3.000 yea^^ 
of wandering they could re-enter their 
old bodies again, as their religion 
taught them, and begin a new exist- 
ence, 

3. FORGOTTEN. — The baker was 
killed as foretold and the butler was 
freed. Joseph had baaed his request 
lor help in getting out on the gjouna 
that he ■was unjustly imprisoned and 
had been unjustly sold into Egypt, oi 
'stolen" as he called it. He blames no 
person and thereby shows he is free 
from vindictlvene?.s. Why did the but- 
ler forget him? Selfishness, or fear or 
being punished by the king, or a busy 
mind or self-importance that regards 
all kindness as his due — one of these 
may have been the reason. 

MTHAT THE MASTERS SAY. 

In Oriental countries, as a general 
riile. there is not that disgrace con- 
nected with imprisonment as In other 
countries. The prisoner Is generally 
regarded as an unfortunate man. most 
probably Innocent of the crime Imput- 
ed to him. but whose fortune may at 
any time cliange. and the prisoner of 
to(iay mav he the court favorite to- 
morrow. Hence It Is very common for 
prisoners to confide In one another 
and to promise mutual aid, whoever 
first obtains his liberty being pledged 
to use his influence for the release of 
the other. Unfortunately. It Is also 
very common for feeble human nature 
to forget In the day of prosperity the 
promises made in the adversity. — Long. 
The prison Is light when God l.s 
there, and chains do not chafe If H^i 
wraps His love ar lund them. Many a 
prisoner for God since Joseph's time 
has had his experience repeated, and 
received tenderer tokens from Him in 
a dungeon than ever before. Paul, the 
prisoner, John In Patmos, Bunyan in 
Bedford' lail, George Fox In Lancaster 
oastle, Rutherford In Aberdeen, and 
many more have found the I^ord with 
theni. and showing them His kindness. 
— Maclaran. 

PERTINRXT dlESTIONS. 

1. — Why do th»' innocent so often suf- 
fer for the sins of others? 

2 — Why are one's sufferings an op- 
portunity to serve? 

3. — Whv does confidence in God re- 
quire kindness to men? 

4. — What are th-^ inlvantages of cheer- 
fulness In adversity? 

r,. — What is the special sin in ingrati- 
tude? 



T 



HE policemen of Lowell, Mass.. 
tire to be schooled In the pri- 
mary knowledge of physicians 
•nd lawyers. Members of these 
! wo professions are to give 

the police daily lectures so 

that they may be able at all 
times to give first aid to the injured and 
to decide witltout consultation, such 
matters as "WUfn does a man's homo 
constitute his (t&tle, and when does It 
not?" This Is jhe order of Mayor 
O'Donnell, who ailds that he Is going 
to have movihi? pictures taken of th« 
police In their workaday duties, and of 
the firemen as they answer their calls. 
These pictures will be shown in the 
local theaters lor the purpose of mak- 
ing the public familiar with the ardu- 
ous work of the men in uniform and 
of creating a popular .sentiment In 
their favor. 



Police regulitlons which are to be 
put into effect in Berlin April 13 will 
bar whistling and cane swinging and 
prohibits persons walking more than 
three abreast on the streets. Copies 
of the regulations Include these and 
other unusual restrictions, as foUowsr: 
Persons may not walk more than three 
abreast or sto-;* or congregate for any 
extended period of time. Persons with 
umbrellas or walking sticks must not 
carrv or sw^ing them in any manner 
likely to impe.nl the safety of passers- 



by No windows or doors of houses. | 
flats, shops or restaurants In which 
music is being played may be kept 
open. No whistling, singing, shriek- 
ing, shouting or loud talking of any 
kind likely to endanger the Quiet or 
the streets is to be permitted. Team- 
sters in charge of wagons, trams or 
trucks loaded with resounding metal 
of any kind are forbidden to drive in 
a manner calculated to cause ner'^e- 
shatterlng noises. No paper, remains 
of fruit, cigars or cigarettes may be 
thrown into the st/eets. The dragging 
of clothes of any kind— women s dress- 
es or anything else capable of produc- 
ing dust — is pro hibited . 

Lectures have been proposed ,for the 
Duluth policemen upon several occa- 
sions in the past but they have "ever 
been started. The men ^111 soon be 
supplied with indexed pamphlets con- 
taining all ordinances they are ex- 



pected to enforce. They will be n- 
structed to familiarize themselves with 
the requirements. Present ordinances 
are ample to prevent congregating on 
the sidewalks as well as noises which 
disturb the peace. The dragging of 
clothes, including women s dresses is 




TkcPoqtor^ 

d/^Z>r. le>y/s 3aAcr 



The questions answered below are 
general in character; the symptoms or 
diseases are given and the answer* 
will apply to any case of similar na- 
ture. 

Those wishing further advlcj. free, 
mav address Dr. Lewis Baker, CoUegj 
Bldg.. College-EUwood Sts., Dayton. 
Ohio, 'enclosing self-addressed, stamped 
envelope for reply. Full name and ad- 
dress must be given but only initials 
or fictitious nanfe will be used in my 
answers. The prescription can be filled 
at any well-stocked drug store. An/ 
druggist can order of wholesaler. 





FOR RENT 

Two or four rooms suitable for of- 
f let's; prlcos rea.-?onable; over Smith 
& Smith drug store, 101 West Su- 
perior street. Call at Room 1005, 
Alworth building. Melrose 1139. 



PAY INTEREST 

Secretary McAdoo Revolu- 
tionizes Fiscal System 
of Nation. 



Also Modifies Restrictions 
on Securities Demand- 
ed of Banks. 



sanitary. 



wourd accept for government deposits 
Instead of requiring that the national 
banks pecure treasury deposits ex- 
clusively with United States or pro- 
vincial government bonds, they w^lll De 
allowed^ in the future to secure .0 per 
cent with government bonds and tne 
remaining 30 per cent with high-class 
state, city and county bonds, accept- 
able to the secretary of the treasury 
to be taken as security at 75 per cent 
of their market value, but not to ex- 
ceed par. 

Overthrovrs Precedents. 
This is the first time In history that 
the treasury department has called 
upon the banks to pay Interest on what 
are known as active deposits or ac- 
1 cepted, except in periods of financial 
stress, security other than government 

bonds. . ^. „v.4„v. 

Active depositaries are those which 
conduct a checking account for the 
government, cashing checks of the dis 



ursing officers and replenishing the 
uthorTzed government deposits fro 



a 



A New 
Method 




of Baking 
Cakes 



SEASON FOR 
PIKE OPENS 



Fish Have Been Spawning 

in St. Louis River for 

Two Weeks. 



Season for Black Bass Will 

Not Open Until 

June 1. 



Washington. May 1. — The fiscal sys- 
te of the United States governing de- 
posits of Federal funds in national 
banks, has been revolutionized by Sec- 
retary McAdoo of the treasury depart- 
ment with an announcement that all 
government depositaries, whether ac- 
tive or inactive, will be required to pay 
interest at the rate of 2 per cent per 
annum beginning June 1, upon deposits 
of the goveri ment. 

Simultaneously with this action, the 
secretary authorized an immediate in- 
crease of $10,000,000 In government de- 
posits In the national banks, making 
the total $5J,649,9G4 from which the 
Federal treasiury will earn, under the 
new Interest order, $1,053,000 annually. 

There are indications that Secretary 
McAdoo Intends to place still more 
surplus money from the treasury 
vaults In general circulation through 
Increased de!)Oslt3 with the national 

banks. 

Statement by McAdoo. 

In a statement he said: 

"With the banks paying interest on 
government deposits, the secretary 
may be Ju.stitied In keeping larger bal- 
ances In the national banks, thereby 
Increasing tie volume of money in 
circulation, and to that extent reduc- 
ing the amount locked up In the treas- 

Mr McAdoo also announced a radi- 
cal change in the character of .securi- 
ties which the treasury department 



the! 

from 
customs and internal revenue receipts 
deposited with them. ,♦ , „ 
There are 900 inactive depositories 
each holding government funds Foi 
vpiro there has been agitation in ana 



did 



posits. , , , .u 

Secretary McAdoo declared he 
not anticipate any serious reslstanc^ 
on the part of the banks to the ne'ViF 
policy. 



Mrs. Nevada Briggs, the baking expert, says: 

•There is just one way to make your cakes rise high and evenly— 
give them time to rise before a crust is formed and the batter is 
BtiiTened by cooking." 

"If using a gas, gasoline or oil stove, light yonr oven when you put 
the cake in and keep the flame low until the cake has doubled in bulk; 
then increase the heat until it is evenly browned and will respond to 
the pressure of the finger. If using a coal or wood range, leave the 
oven door open tintil the cake is in; then turn on the drafts and by 
the time the oven is at baking temperature, the cake will have 
raised sufficiently." 



For rich, moist, feathery cakes Mrs. Briggs al v/ays recommends 

© Baking Powder 




It is double acting and sustains the raise. 
You can open and close the oven door, turn the 
tin around in the oven or do anything else 
necessary, without any danger of making the 

cake fall. 

Try your favorite cake next time with K C Baking 
Powder and see how much higher it will rise. Make it 
just as you alwava do, with the same quantity of baking 
powder. While K C is less expensive than the old fash- 
ioned baking powders, it has even greater leavening 
strength and it is guaranteed pure and healthful. 

Try a can and he convinced 



The season for taking pike in Min 
nesota opens today. 

June 1 it will become legal to take 
black oass from the rivers and lakes 
of the state. The trout season opened 
April 15. 

The pike have been running up the 
.^t. Louis river for about two weeks, 
seeking their customary spawning beds. 
Some have been taken with nets, out 
of season, but the number has not been 
very great. 

A few of the more enthusiastic 
anglers will get out with their tackle 
today to try their luck, but the big 
parties will not be out until Sunday. 
Should the weather be favorable the 
river and bay will be dotted with fish- 
ermen. The pike fishing Is not liable 
to be at its best for a week or two to 
come, however. The fish will not bite 
well while spawning but when that is 
over they will strike in a manner that 
sends the thrills shivering through 
even indifferent disciples of Izaak Wal- 
ton 



Signals o! D:s?ress 



Duluth People Should Know How to 
Read and Heed Them. 



POLICEMAN 

IS DISCHARGED 

Found in Saloon at 1 a. m. 

By Other Members 

of Force. 

Chief Troyer yesterday afternoon 
summarily discharged Patrolman Wil- 
fred Grandmaison from the Duluth 
police force. His action had the ap- 
proval of the commissioner of public 

Grandmaison was found In the sa- 
loon at 721 West Superior street at 
1 o'clock yesterday morning by other 
members of the police force. The po- 
liceman was tilting the lid all by his 
lonesome. The puzzle was explained 
when it developed that he had been 
furnished with a key bV the bar- 
tender who told him to help himself 
whenever he got dry. It Is claimed. 
The policeman has been disciplined in 
the past for alcoholic indulgences. 

Grandmaison would have completed 
fourteen years on the force had he 
served until today, having been ap- 
pointed May 1. 18!>9. He is the first 
policeman to be discharged since 
commission form of government 
I came effective. 



"Mason" writes: "For years I have 
been taking medicine to cure constipa- 
tion, liver trouble and the usual dis- 
eases that come from that source. 
Headaches, sallow skin, kidney trouble, 
dark spots before my eyes, dizzy spe.ls 
and twinges of rheumatism are getting 
worse." 

Answer: Take three grain sulpherb 
tablets (not sulphur). They are pactted 
in sealed tubes -with directions and are 
convenient, effective and highly cura- 
tive for such aliments as arise from 
chronic constipation. If you are dys- 
peptic, also take tablets trlopeptlne. 

* * • 
"MRS A, D." — Incontinence of urine 

can be cured by using the following: 
Tincture cubebs 1 dram; tincture rhus 
aromatic 2 drams and comp. fluid balm- 
wort 1 oz. Give from 10 to 15 arops 
in water one hour before meals. 

• • « 
"Oma W." writes: "I have suffered 

with catarrh of the head for many 
years This has become so bad that 
it has affected my blood, also my 
stomach and bowels to a very great 
extent I shall appreciate an Imme- 
diate answer as I suffer greatly." 

Answer: I would advise you to pur- 
cha.se a 2 oz. package of Vllane pow- 
der- take one-half teaspoonful of the 
powder and add to this a pint of warm 
water, snuff the water from the palm 
of the hand through the nostrils sev- 
eral times a day. Make a catarrh bilm 
bv mixing one teaspoonful of pow^der 
vvlth one ounce of vaseline, or lard 
will do. and apply as far up the nos- 
trils as possible. For the stomach 
Fori bowels and blood I would recommend 
the following tonic: Syrup sarsapanlla 

fluid balmwort, 1 

J ext. buchu. Mix 

bv shaking well in a bottle and take 

one teaspoonful after each meal and 

at bedtime. 

• ♦ * 

"Gloria" writes: "T would like you 

to prescribe a good hair and .scalp 

treatment. I am bothered with Jtohin? 

sell p and dandruff. My hair Is fad-d 

nd falling and none of the remedies 



nervous and debilitated. I recommend 
that you begin their use at once and 
continue regularly until your system 
is able to assimilate the fatty elements 
of vour tood; then you will grow 
plump and have planty of red blood., 
with color in your complexion and 
bright sparkling eyes of health. 

• • • 

"Sick M. G." writes: "I have been 
affected for some months with rheuma- 
tism and have taken much medicine 
in vain. Please give prescription that 
will cure." 

Answer: The most efficient prescrip- 
tion I have ever given for rheumatism la: 
Iodide of potassium. 2 drams; sodium 
salicylate, 4 drama; wine of colchlcuni. 
one-half ounce: comp. esstjnce cardlol. 
1 oz. : comp. fluid balmwort, 1 oz.. 
and Bvrup sarsaparilla comp.. 5 ozs. 
Mix and take a teaspoonful at meal 
time and at bedtime. 

• • * 

"Farm wife" writes: "You once rec- 
ommended a home-made cough syrup. 
I tried it and found it the best cough 
and cold syrup that I ever heard of. It 
was ^o prompt in relieving the severest 
coughs and colds and a pint bottle 
made at home lasted so long that I 
have forgotten the ingredients. Kindly 
publish again." 

Answer: The splendid InxatU'e. 
home made cough syrup is made by 
mixing a 2% oz. bottle of concentrated 
essence mentho-laxene with a home- 
made sugar syrup. Directions on the 
bottle tells how make and use. It la 
a fine, cheap remedy. 

• • • 

"Johnson" writes: "I am bothered 
greatlv with Indigestion. Things I iike 
to eat" nearly always cause ^ h^avy 111- 
at-ease feeling in my stomach, and my 
breath Is bad, while 1 am •i^^'^'^uj'. .Jf 
ritable and frequently cannot 3l?ep. 

Answer: A very excellent treatment 
which Is widely prescribed for its 
gradual curative action as 7/" .^^^ /*?« 
Tristftnt relief It affords. Is tablet* 
Inopeptine packed In sealed oartona. 
Take a plnk tablet after breakfast, 
white tablet after dinner and blue tab- 
let after supper. Continue and the 
curative agencies will soon reatore nat- 
ural digestion. ^ ^ 

C" writes: "I am recover- 
iong illness, but am very 



I have tried have done any permanent! t,te. Can you give me 

good •• tonic restorative treatment 

drueglst and Answer: Have the 



"Mrs. M. 
Ing from a 



weak, nervojis. sl^_<^Pl*'«f..»"l^*";« ^^'^ol 



the 
be- 




successful trips aft 

'"DuVuThians do not have the fighting 
hli, k bass within as convenient reach 
as the pike or the trout 

for 



They have 
them. There 



to ffo much further for tnem. ine o 
a^-e one or two lakes which contain 
bk,s within a day's trip, but they are 
not g^nerallv known. Those who are 
FamlUar wlti. them are "Ot advertis- 
ing them as It would be but a short 
"me before they would be fished out^ 
The most common places are the lake 
district in the upper part of Itasca 
county and the lakes about Deerwood. 
Doth of them are Ideal and offer good 
sport 



Disordered kidneys give many sig- 
nals of distress. 

The secretions may be dark, con- 
tain sediment. 

Passages are sometimes frequent, 
scanty, painful. 

Backache is often present day and 
night. 

Headaches and dizzy spells may oc- 
cur. 

Weakened kidneys should receive 
quick help. 

Don't deliy! Use a special kidney 
remedy. 

Doan's Kidney Pills are for weak 
kidneys, b;ickache and urinary dis- 
orders. 

Duluth evidence proves their worth. 

Mrs. T. Vint, 116 Twenty-sixth 
St, W., DuUjth, Minn., says: "I have 
ti.sod Doan's Kidney Pills and have 
found then, very good for my kid- 
neys. I had often read in the news- 
papers how Doan's Kidney Pills had 
cured Duluth peonic of kidney com- 
plaint and :: gave them n trial. Tho-' 
cured me of backache and pains m 
my sides and made me feel better in 
every way." 

For sale hy all dealers. P^ice 50 
cents. Foj.ter-Milburn Co., Buffalo, 
New Vork, sole agents for the United 
States. 

Remember the name — Doan's— and 
take no otiier. 



MINING MEN 

VISIT CUYUNA 




makes the hair glossy, wavy 
of intense natural color. 
♦ • * 

"Mvrtle" writes: "Owing to my ex- 
trerne thinness I am frequently embar- 
ra«»sec" bv slighting remarks of young 
people Can you prescribe a safe rem- 
edy to Increase my weight? 

\n8wer: I have so many gratlfyliig 
reports from the users of three grain 
Hvpo-Nuclane tablets that I .Y^^^ittt; 
come to regard these valuable little 
tablets as a specific and prescribe them 
to all who are aenemlc. thin, wasting.! 



Tohn R Mc asks: "Don't you think 
tt 1- wi^e to take medicine to redu^^a 
mv weVeht? I weigh about 55 pounda 
too much." 

Answer: I do think soj and a^yerv 




Thev are sa 

Send $1.00 for Dr. Lewis 
Book on Health-Beauty. 



Bak -r's 
Adv. 



started two fir^s earlier In the 



the largest ore contract ^\«l^-"\»f ^ '" ! He said he Uked to 
the T-nited States. He sold to the J;^^ ^a^j.-.g niake a run. 
Bethlehem St^^el corporation l^MOO conn a . _.,,.,_ 

tons of Chilian ores, which the cor- 
poration will put on a line of a^^^^"]^" 
which will come through the Panama 
canal. 



Nesrro Boy In Flrehug. 

Kansas City, Mo., May 1. — Ivy 



Nel- 




into the 
insane. 



day. 

watch the fire 

He was given 

charge of an inspector of the 



Heavy Snow In Canada. 

Winnipeg. May 1.— A heavy fall of 
snow was general throughout Alberta 

^ »-.>atrtrHnv according, 

work 



re- 

as 



nrovlnce yesterday, according to 
norts received here. Farm work 
r result was retarded. Seventy-f ve 
per cent of the spring wheat in South- 
ern Alberta is reported to be above 



ern Al 

the ground. 



Representatives of Furnace 
Interests Impressed With 

New Mines. 

Several out-of-town men interested 
In Iron ore and its smelting were in 
the city yesterday on their way back 
from a tour of the Cuyuna range. Thoy 
had taken the tour under the guidance 
of W H Locker and E. J. W. Donahue, 
and the party consisted of J X. M. 
Shimer of Shimer & Co.. Pittsburg. 
Pa • W W. Wilklns. general manager 
of the Lake Superior Iron & Chemical 
company of Ashland, Wis., and E. E. 
MarKhall of New York, representative 
of furnace Interests of the East. On 
the Cuvuna they visited the Kennedy 
mine the Thompson mine, the Armour 
mines, the Cuyuna-Duluth Iron com- 
pany's Ir.>nton mine, the Cuyuna-MUle 
Lacs mine, the Williams-Carlson prop- 
erty the Mangan Iron & Steel com- 
pany's property and the Pennington 
mine. . .. , 

"The Easterners exnres.ted the opin- 
ion that Eastern Interests have no 
idea of the extent of the tonnage 
available on the Cuyuna range and 
esn.^cially of the manganese feature In 
connection with It. They predict a 
great future for the range. During 
their stav Mr. Shimer contracted for 
20 000 toiis of the Cuyuna-Mille Lacs 
ore for the Bethlehem Steel corpora- 
tion and Mr Wilklns contracted with 
the "same mine and with the Cuyuna- 
Duluth for tonnage for the Ashland 

Mr. Shimer a few months ago made 



Your Saving Account 
a Silent Partner 



Keep a savings account growing at the 
First National Bank and it will be a silent 
and helpful partner in your undertakings. 

It will be a source of help and strength 
at the supreme moment when cash will 
clear the way to opportunity. , 

Friends may fail you — but a savings ac- 
count NEVER. Don't let another pay day 
pass without establishing this "silent part- 
nership." 



First National Bank 

of Duluth. 
Capital and Surplus $2,000,000 



,r> 



I 



*< 



] 







/ 



^ * ■ 



Thursday, 



THE DULU^H HERALD 



May 1, 1913. 



NEWS OF THE NORTHWEST 



HOLD MEET 



AT AITKIN 



Duluth District Methodist 
Woman's Home Mission- 
ary Society Has Session. 



Various Matters Pertain- 
ing to Home Missionary 
Work Discussed. 



Aitkin. Minn.. May 1.— (Special to 
The Herald.)— The Duluth district of 
the Methodist Woman's Home Mission- 
ary society met here yesterday after- 
noon and today In the Methodist church. 
Mrs. E. K. Copper of Duluth. wife 
of the district superintendent of the 
M. E. church, presided. 

Devotional exercises were conducted 
yesterday afternoon by Mrs. S. J. 

Waren of Aitkin and were followed by 
the appointment of committees, reports 
of officers of the district, mite boxes, 
supplies, literature and young peoples 
work. An hour was given over to the 
reports from the four deaconesses pres- 
ent. Mrs. Berry Longley of Minneapo- 
lis, who was to give an address, was 
unable to be present. 

Duluth MtulMter Lectures. 

Last evening Rev. W. H. Farrell of 
Duluth gave a higtily interesting illus- 
trated lecture on Mormonism. 

The program this morning Is as fol- 
lows: Devotional hour In charge of 
secretary of evangelism, Mrs. Jacob 
Dyson, Henrlette; election of officers; 
••How Shall We Keep Our Auxiliary 
Growing," Mrs. J. A. Johnson. Minne- 
apolis; "What Is the Best Thing You 
Have Done This Year?" Mrs. J. F. 
Plckard. Two Harbors; "Are the Mite 
Boxes Worth While?" Mrs. Lewis, Min- 
neapolis; "What Is Your Greatest 
Need? ■ Mrs. E. E. Satterlee, Brainerd. 
Those Present. 

The delegates and visitors present 
are: Duluth. Mrs. E. K. Copper, Mrs. 
Goodman, Miss Ritter, Miss Donahue. 
Miss Thompson. Miss Johnson, Mrs. J. 
C. Swan. Mrs. W. H Farrell; Brainerd. 
Mrs. E. E. Satterlee, Mrs. Grant, Mrs. 
Deakes: Two Harbors, Mr.«. J F. Pick- 
ard, Mrs. Moulton; Henrietta, Mrs. Ja- 
cob Dyson; Minneapolis. Mrs. J. A. 
Johnson and Mrs. B. N. Lewis. 



kotu and consequently a smaller per- 
centage of women of low character 
than In states where saloons are au- 
thorized under the law. 

This makes It less likely that crimes 
occur in which women are participants. 
One of the women In the penitentiary 
was sent up for manslaughter and an 
effort will be made to secure a pardon 
for her. The other two were recent- 
ly convicted on charges of white 
slavery. 

FIRES CHECKED 

ON RESERVATION 



One Settler on Fond du Lac 

Reserve Loses All His 

Buildings. 

CloQuet. Minn., May 1. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — Several brush fires were 
burning not far from the city yester- 
day, and Indian Agent Cross went out 
en the reservation and with a party 
of settlers helped check a fire that 
started near the James Shotley place. 
Forest Ranger Percy Vlbert was work- 
ing with a crew of men north of tlie 
city, on the north side of the St. Louis 
river in a closely settled ft^rming sec- 
tion. One farmer hy the name of Trib- 
bey lost all his belongings. 

CONTRACTORS" 

HELD LIABLE 



BUT THREE WOMEN 
IN PENITENTIARY 



North Dakota's Prohibition 
Laws Believed Respon- 
sible for It. 

Bismarck, N. D., May 1. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — There are only three 
women prisoners In the state peni- 
tentiary and until recently there was 
only one. It is said that North Da- 
kota has the smallest number of wom- 
en violators of the law of any stato in 
the union. This is attributed to the 
fact there are no saloons in North Da- 




THE PURPOSE 



"Tht pmrpeae of a joumev 
ta not onlu to arrive at thf 
goal, but t» find enjoyment on 
th« ecay "~H«nru Van Duke. 

Th»» dfscTib*. th« WlilU SUr 
romlalriD CaD.dlka SerTico by 
tha plrtarvs'iae. land locked St 
Lawroace ruate to Karope. 

SAILINGS TUESDAYS 

From Montreikl & Quebec 

BT Till 

Laroesiranadian Liners 

A»k th» nearest Agent 
For Particular* 



WHm ITflR- 
LINE 



DONINtON 



Roseau County Ditch Build- 
ers Must Pay for Bridge 
Flood Damage. 

St. Paul, Minn., May 1. — Contractors 
constructing drainage ditches Nos. 1 
and 95 in Roseau county, are liable 
for the damage done to bridges by the 
recent floods in that section according 
to a ruling made by the attorney gen- 
eral's office. 

The contractors contended the state 
drainage commission would have to 
appropriate additional funds for the 
repairs, but It was held that as the 
bridges had not been completed, the 
builders are responsible. 

The firms Involved are Foley & 
Gleason of Aitkin and the National 
Drainage company of Alexandria. 

DROWNS GE'ttTnG DUCK. 

Big Bay, Mich., Man Loses Life 
Falling Off Log. 

Ishpeming. Mich., May* 1. — Coroner 
Prin has returned from Big Bay where 
he investigated the drowning of Roy 
Crawford, aged 20. who lost his life 
while hunting ducks a few days ago. 

After Crawford had shot a duck he 
tried to get It by "walking" a log, 
which was lying on the shore, to the 
point where the bird floated 1,000 feet 
out In the lake. When he finally 
reached down for his quarry he slid 
off the log and into the water. Sev- 
eral persons on shore witnessed the 
accident and made every effort to save 
him. but before they could get a boat 
he had disappeared. Several hours aft- 
erwards the body was recovered by 
the use of pike poles. 

The young man is survived by but 
two relatives, his mother, with whom 
he lived at Big Bay, and a sister in 
Boyne City. He was the sole support 
of his mother. Crawford and his 
mother had made Big Bay their home 
for two years. 



TWO NEW BANKS 



WI TH SA ME NAME. 

Charlson, N. D., May 1. — (Special to 

The Herald.) — Two sets of people have 

decided to start a bank here and each 

claims the same name. A notice wag 

recently filed with the register of 

deeds that A. I. Volkmann, E. F. 

Volkmann, and B. H. Edmlnsted of 

Ffssenden had secured a charter for 

the organization of the First State 

Hank of Charlson. An application nad 

; been filed by Messrs. Livedahl and 

, Everson of Ray and Charlson, and 

I Benson of Charlson, for a new bank 

, with the same name. 

! « 

! Sumiifcer School at Velva. 

Velva, N. D., May 1. — (Special to The 
Herald.) — The summer school for 
-Mountraill, McHenry, Ward, Renville, 
iiottineau and Burke counties will be 



.■■".■«1'.B.'l*.B.*SM.'r.B.I 

After thellieatre 




UeaHamm 

Brewing 

Company 

STPAUL MINN 



■'.■".■.'■■.■•'■'.■."■'•■■■■'.■.'■".■s'B 

JAY W. ANDERSON 

Agent, Dnluth Branch 



Phones Zenith 1800 



DalDth, Melrose 1800 



lield In Vclva ayaln. Suine times Velva 
had It and again Minot. It was 
thought because the school was held 
here last summer that probably Minot 
would win this year, but the heads of 
the dlfterent county educational mat- 
ters were so pleased with Velva tliey 
are coming again. 

tax~exemptTon 

North Dakota Lessens Furniture Tax 
Burden on Poor. 

Bismarck, N. D.. May 1. — Under the 
new law enacted at the last leg'.><la- 
tive session the poorer people of North 
Dakota vvill again receive an exemp- 
tion on furniture. This will lessen tho 
taxes from ?2 to $4 on the poorer 
residents of the state and increase the 
burden on those more able to bear it. 

Years ago there was an exemption 
on houseliold furniture but that was 
eliminated and for some years every 
one had to pay whatever assessed by 
the assessor. Under the new meassure, 
after the assessors places a valuation 
of from 26 to 40 per cent on the fur- 
niture and turns in that amount, the 
county auditor deducts |50 from each 
assessment over $50. no matter liow 
large. This eliminates the poorer peo- 
ple. 

ED SMITH GOES ABROAD. 

Republican State Chairman Is Fa- 
tigued By Legislative Activities. 

Minneapolis, Minn., May 1. — Edward 
E. Smith, chairman of the Republican 
state committee and chief adviser to 
Governor A. O. Eberhart, left with 
Mrs. Smith Tuesday evening for Eu- 
rope, wJiere they will spend the sum- 
mer. Mr. Smith was fatigued by the 
activities of the legislative session and 
takes the Journey on account of im- 
paired health, expecting to spend much 
of the time at Carlsbad and other 
watering places. 

NORTH DAKOTA SECEDING 
IS MAK ING P ROGRESS. 

Fargo, N. D., May 1. — Seeding has 
progressed (rapidly during the last 
three or four days, and the hot winds 
of the first three days of the week 
dried off many fields upon which the 
farmers had been unable to go before. 
All the lowlands in the eastern part 
of the state have been seeded. As a 
result of the work being practically 
completed in this section many tran- 
sient laborers have gone to the west- 
ern part of the state where men are 
more In demand and higher wages are 
being paid. 

LONDON, MlfJN., P. 0. 
BLOWI\m^YEGGMEN. 

Albert Lea. Minn., May 1. — The post- 
office safe at London in this county 
was blown by professional yeggmen 
Tuesday night. A wrench was used to 
screw off the handle of the safe and 
nitroglycerin was poured in the open- 
ing. Bolts of cloth muffled the sound 
and the burglary was not discovered 
until 7 a. m. Sheriff Subby notified 
all surrounding towns but no clue has 
been found. All stamps and money in 
the safe were taken, but the amount 
is not known here. The safe was 
wrecked. 



DEMONSTRATION FARM 

Will Be Established By Northern Pa- 
cific Near Cloquet. 

CloQuet, Minn., May 1. — (Special to 

The Herald.) — The Northern Pacific 

will soon have In operation a small 

demonstration farm about two and a 
half miles from Cloquet, on the farm 
of Ramsey Smith, on the state road to 
the experimental forestry station, and 
one of the finest farms in this section. 
The Northern Pacific has secured six 
acres along the road, and it will be 
used to demonstrate the value of vari- 
ous fertilizers to the soil in this local- 
ity. One acre will be planted without 
fertilizer, and the other five each with 
a different kind of fertilizer. Iv'orthern 
Pacific officials who visited the farms 
around Clo<iuet were greatly surprised 
at the possibilities In that line in this 
section. 



SOME C OMPE TITION. 

implement Dealers and Farmers Tes- 
tify in Harvester Trust Hearing. 

Sioux Falls, S. D., May 1. — Twenty- 
two farmers and implement dealers 
testified yesterday at the hearing of the 
defense to the anti-trust suit of the 
government against the International 
Harvester company. 

Implement dealers from South and 
North Dakota, Minnesota and Iowa 
declared that they were not coerced 
into handling International products 
exclusively, and that competition of 
other companies was permitted them 
in purchasing their stocks of Imple- 
ments. 

The government brought out, on 
cross-examination of witnesses, how- 
ever, that from 85 to 100 per cent of 
binders, mow* rs and rakes sold in ter- 
ritory covered by these witnesses was 
of International manufacture. 



BRUSH FIRES BURN 

ARO UND C OUDERAY. 

Couderay, Wis., May 1. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — Forest fires are burning 
at a number of places all along the 
railroad track through this section. 
So far no serious damage of any kind 
has been done, but if no rain falls for 
the next two weeks or so, it will be 
very dry, although the grass has start- 
ed and there will not be any serious 
danger from the forest fires in this 
locality this spring. About twentv-ftve 
men were fighting forest fires " near 
Crooked Rapids yesterday afternoon. 

twelvFInjuredTn 
milwau kee c ollision. 

Milwaukee. Wis., May 1. — Twelve 
per.sons were Injured, two seriously, 
when a work train of the local trac- 
tion company crashed Into an east- 
bound street car filled with passengers 
at Fourteenth and Vllllet streets, Wed- 
nesday. 

Mrs. Lockmeyer 41 years old, and 
Charles Hartson. 27 years old, the most 
seriously Injured, were taken to a hos- 
pital. The others received treatment at 
a drug store. 



STATE OPERATES PLANT. 

Marquette, Mich., Penitentiary Over- 
all Contract Is at End. 

Marquette. Mich.. May 1. — (Special to 
The Herald.)— Ira Carley of Ingalls. 
E. C. Anthony of Negauneo and W. H. 
John.son of Ishpemlng. members of the 
state board of control are meeting at 
tho state penitentiary here closing the 
deal by which the state will take over 
the factory equipment and stock of 
material of Schauer Bros., who have 
had an overall contract in tho prison 
for several years past. The factory, In 
which nearly 200 men are worked, will 
hereafter be run on state account. 








n Its Favor Without a Flavor 

'When you eat a breakfast cereal you want to 
do your own flavoring or seasoning. That's the 
reason you will choose 

Shredded Wheat 

for your morning meal. It is a natural, elemental 
food made of the whole wheat steam - cooked, 
shredded and baked a crisp, golden brown. It is 
not flavored or treated or compounded with any- 
^ thing and hence keeps indefinitely in 
'^l the market— the standard cereal food 




L ^^ ^-: "^r'^t eaten all over the world. 

♦'. • •• •••v;:,*, \ 




For breakfast heat the Bi«- 
cuit in the oven a few mo- 
ments to restore crispness; 
then pour hot milk over it, 
adding a little cream ; salt 
or sweeten to suit the taste. 
It is deliciously nourishing 
and wholesome for any 
meal with stewed prunes, 
baked apples, sliced bana- 
nas, preserved peaches, 
pineapple or other fruits. 
At your grocer's. 



Made only by The Shredded Wheat Company at Niagara Falls, N. Y, 




and his funeral wafi held yesterday. 
He established the "Gordon pass" in 
1882, known as a favorite hunting 
place of Louis W. Hill of St. Paul. 
Since then there has not been a year 
that Gordon has not headed a Hill 
hunting party. 



ELECTRIC POWER 

FORJINING WORK. 

Marquette, Mich., May 1. — A. C. Har- 
rington, manager of the Marquette 
County Gas & Electric company, in- 
tends to make severfil mining compan- 
ies in the county projDosals for furnish- 
ing them with electric power for the 
operation of their lighting and hoist- 
ing plants. The company's plant is ca- 
pable of generating more than three 
times as much power as is now used. 
Mr. Harrington says the company is in 
position to furnish jDower for a num- 
ber of mines and car, give a guarantee 
of cheaper power than they can possi- 
bly secure through the operations of 
their steam plaitts. 

The company is prepared to extend 
its lines to the exvreme end of tht- 
county, if satisfactory contracts can 
be secured. 

HIRING SOUND MEN. 



Friday, May 16, the juniors will ban- 
quet the seniors. 



GLADSTONE BANK 
CASE IS TRAN SFERRED. 

Escanaba, Mich., May 1. — Judge 

Flannlgan has granted the motion of 
the defendants for a change of venue 
in the case of the people vs. David 
Hammel et al. in connection with the 
wrecked bank of Gladstone. The case 
has been transferred to Dickinson 
county. 



AVIU luNtail Duluth Pa«<or. 

Cannon Falls, Minn.. May 1. — Rev. 
C. O. Swan will be formally installed 
as pastor of Emmanuel Swedish Lu- 
theran church in Duluth on Thursday. 
Rev. P. A. Mattson, local pastor, and 
president of the conference, will make 
the charge to the minister and con- 
gregation. 



Drastic Michigan C 
Affects Munising 

Munising, Mich.. M 
The Herald.) — Due t< 
the employers' llablli 
compensation law, 
found to be much i 
Imagined at the time 
the managements of 
industrial plants hav 
of discrimination wit 
labor they employ. 

Alcoholics and th 
mentally unfit have 1 
ban. Men of this cl 
not be employed kn< 
who may now be on 
be weeded out. The 
an employe is entitle 
even though he be i 
carelessness resultin 
tlon or mental deftc 
the adoption of the 
matter of self-protec 
held that Irreapectlx 
own physical condlt 
responsible for his 
an injured man shal 
Ration for the full 
from work up to the 
he may demand for 



)mpensation Law 
Wage Workers. 

ay 1.— (Special to 

I the provisions of 

tiy and workmen's 
which has been 
nore drastic than 
of Us enactment, 
the various local 
e adopted a policy 
h reference to the 

e physically and 
>een put under the 
ass hereafter will 
)wlngly and thoFe 

the payrolls will 
official ruling tliat 
d to compensation 
njured because of 
g from intoxlca- 
•lency has cau.sed 

new policy as a 
tlon. It has been 
e of whether his 
on was primarily 
Inability to labor, 
1 receive compen- 
tlme he is absent 
maximum amount 

such' Injury. 



JUDGE STANTON TO 
ADDRESS GRADUATES. 



Pemidji, Minn., M 
W. Stanton will ( 
mencement address 
high school. The 
held May 29 and 
sennon will be preaf 
Sunday by Rev. S. 1 
Shannon will be va 
class as his averai 
years has been 89 
Anna Hedman, who 
87 per cent, will be 



ay 1. — .Tudge C. 
leliver the com- 
of the Bemidji 
exorcises will be 
the baccalaureate 
hfcd the preceding 
2. P. White. Don 
ledlctorian of the 
?e for the four 
per cent. Mis.s 

tiad an average of 
salutatorlan. On 



Pioneer Onlde Bnrled. 

Devils I-ake, N. D., May 1. — William 
Gordon, pioneer guide of hunters In 
North DaJcoU. died at hla home hero 



Men Welcome 

Mother's Friend 

A Duty thai Every N[an Owes to Those 
who Perpetuate the Race. 

It is just np important that men should 
know of progressive m.'thods in advance of 

motherhood. The suf- 
fi'ring incident to 
cliild-bearing can be 
easily avoided by hav- 
ing at hand a bottlo 
o;E Mother's Friend. 

This 5b a penetrnt- 
iiig, eitomul applica- 
tion that relieves all 
tension upon the mus- 
cloH and enables them 
to expand without painful strain upon the 
ligamentfl. Thus there ig avoided ncrvoua 
Bpells ; the tendency to nausea or morning 
sickness is counteracts, and a bright, hap- 
py disposition is preserved that reflects 
wonderfully upon the charetcr and tem- 
perament of the little one soon to come. 
You can obtain a bottle of "Mother's 
Friend" at any drug store at $1.00. It 
preserves the mother's health, enables her 
to make a complete recovery, and thus with 
renewed strength she will eagerly devoto 
herself to the care a)id attention which 
mean so much to the ^celfare of the chihl. 
Write to the Bradficld Regulator Co., 229 
Lamar Bldg., Atlanta, Ca., for their valu- 
able and instructive book o£ guidance fox 
expectaat luothers, 



DAKOTA BRIEFS 



Bismarck, N. D. — With a change In 
the police department in prospect, the 
new city commission has held two 
meetings and both times has adjourned 
without making any move. All other 
city officials were appointed at the 
regular meeting Monday evening. A 
fight is lieing waged against the pres- 
ent department chief, McDonald. 

Grand Forks, N. D. — Miss Ina Currle 
has left for Madison, Wis., to attend the 
meeting of the National Self-Govern- 
ment association, which is to be held 
at the state university there the last 
three days of this week. 

WilHston.N. D.— In a letter to E. C. 
Carney, replying to an inquiry, Sena- 
tor P. J. McCumoer says that the treas- 
ury department advises h'm that they 
expect to have plans completed and 
be in readinei'S to advertise for bids 
on the constriiction of the Williston 
Federal building some time next Octo- 
ber Or November. 

Grand Forks, N. D. — Edna Rusche, 
the 10-year-old daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. Clarence Rusehe of Skidmore ave- 
nue, died Tuesday. Pneiimonla was the 
cause of her death. The funeral was 
held Wednesday. 

Burlington, N. D. — Lightning struck 
a barn near Burlington and the barn, 
fourteen head of horses, six cows, sev- 
eral hundred bushel.^: of oats and a lot 
of hay, all belonging to J. J. Booth, 
were destroyed. 

Mandan. N. D. — The state bar asso- 
ciation will possibly find it necessary 
to change the dates of their meeting. 
Avhich was to be held at Mandan on 
Sept. 4 and 5, owing to conflicting dates 
with those of the national delegation 
meeting. 

Stanley. N. D. — The Great Northern 
railway has ordered the three elevators 
at Stanley moved on account of putting 
in more sidetracks to take care of their 
growing busines.s there. 

Bismarck. N. D. — P. M. Connoby. who 
for a number of year has been parole 
field officer for the penitentiary, has 
resigned, and W. D. Dopkin of Flasher 
has been appointed In his stead. 

Mandftn, n! D. — The baby girl of Mrs. 
James Ford, who lives thirty miles 
south of M.-indan, was poisoned from 
eating seed grain that had been treated 
with formaldehyde. 



at Washington at a salary of |6,299 a 
year. 

Marinette — When John Blovotsky, 
who was being held for an examina- 
tion for insanity, v;-as transferred from 
the county jail to a local hospital on 
Tuesday, he Insisted on kissing each 
of the fifteen inmates before he would 
leave. Aa the prisoners include two 
not unattractive girls the authorities 
think Blovotsky is not as insane as 
other acts indicate. 



city, and three sisters. Mrs. Charles 
Gee of Youngstown, Ohio, and Mrs. 
Charles Kuhn and Mrs. Harvey Green, 
of Marquette. 

Negaunee — The carpenters and 
masons are taking down the old Pres- 
byterian church that was purchased 
by the school board for the site of 
the manual training building. It will 
take three weeks mere to complete 
taking it down. 



PENINSULA BRIEFS 



MINNESOTA BRIEFS 



WISCONSIN BRIEFS 




Milwaukee — Midwives of Milwaukee 
may organize a protective association 
to prevent losses through patients who 
fail to pay their bills, if the plan of 
.Mr.«. M. lleinen, president of a similar 
a.ssoclation at Baclne, Is carried out. 

Marinette — The body of an unknown 
man found In the woods near Pembine, 
was burled toda.v. It is believed he 
becnme lost and died from starvation. 

Madison — A.^semblyman Peavy re- 
turned from his home at Washburn 
where he went to arrange for the 
calling of an election for his own re- 
tail as mayor of that city. Mr. Peavey 
.says that he called a mass meeting of 
citizens and that he was pleased with 
the outcome of his visit. The office Is 
purely honorary. 

Oconomowoc — John Williams, a 
farmer of Delafleld, Is dead as a re- 
sult of burns received In trying to 
put out flames In the straw in his 
wagon box. 

Madison — Eberhardt Keller, a har- 
nessmaker of De Forest, confessed to 
State Fire Marshal T. M. Purlell that 
he set fire to the harness shop and 
dwelling of his competitor, R. IL 
Hansen, at De Forest, lie was sen- 
tenced to servo four year.s at Waupun. 

Ractne — Judge Smeldlng sentenced 
Av gust Rrochat to ten days in Jail, 
but gave him a respite until May 13, 
In which to finish his seeding. 

Madison — Rnnsom a Moore, professor 
of agronomy at the University of 
Wisconsin, has been offered the post 
,oX assistant sccretaxy of agriculture 



Iron River — Some excitement was 
caused at Palatka by the discovery that 
the bakery firm of Nicolo & Visa had 
departed for parts unknown, leaving 
behind a number of good-sized debts. 
Those who have especially suffered are 
Calliarl of Palatka, Fregetto of Stam- 
baugh and Peter Dzanbazoff, caretaker 
at the Caspian clubhouse. 

Negaunee — John Snowden, a well 
known Negaunee man who has been 
visiting In England since before Chri.«t- 
mas has informed Negaunee friends 
that his mother, aged 70 years, passed 
April 2. 

Calumet — Tony Orsolano. miner. 50 
years of age, employed in No. 9 shaft 
of the .South Hecla branch of the Calu- 
met & Hecla mine, was instantly killed 
Tue.^dav morning. John Gastary and 
Joseuh'Loslch were slightly injured. 
A skip had jumped the track in the 
shaft and had knocked loose a heavy 
timber guide, which fell down the shaft 
striking Orsolano, killing him in- 
stantly. ^ . 

Marquette — The University of Chica- 
go will, it is said, vote against any 
proposal to admit the University of 
Michigan to the Western Intercollegiate 
conference. 

Houghton — The village council at Its 
next meeting will be asked by the pub- 
lic schools to defray the cost of estab- 
lishing two or more public bathing 
beaches for the youth of the village to 
be established and supervised bv the 
schools, with Physical Director Wagner 
in charge. 

Oalumet — A sixty-page booklet 
has Uist bten Issued by the coloniza- 
tion department of the South Shore rail- 
road, callinfr attention to the farming 
lands of the Upper Peninsula of Michi- 
gan and the opportunities that Clover- 
land presents to those desiring to fol- 
low the various branches of agricul- 
ture. 

Hancock — The funeral of the late 
William H. Roberts took place at 2 
Wednesday afternoon from the late 
home of the deceased, and from the 
Haricock Methodist Episcopal church. 
Henry RoV>erts. son of the deceaeed, 
arrived Tuesday morning from Ari- 
zona. 

Calumet — Mrs. Henry Sullivan of 
Tamarack street. Laurium, has re- 
turned from Duluth. where she has 
been visiting relatives for some time, 

Hancock — Ephralm Sanquist, the 
bartender of the &^vanson saloon, who 
disappeared from town simultaneously 
with the vanishing of a sum of money 
from the till in the saloon, was cap- 
tured Tuesday morning by Deputy 
Sheriff Vivian, after a search extend- 
ing over the counties of Houghton, 
Baraga and Ontonagon. Sanquist, it ap- 
pears, has been at Negaunee since 
leaving here. 

Marquette — Frank Murphy, aged 24 
a native of Marqu<>tte, died Monday or 
diabetis. Besides his parents. Mr. and 
Mrs. John Murphy of this city, he is 
survived by three brothers, Edward. 
Henry and Charles, the latter of this 



Ada — The Ada Commercial club la 
considering a county agricultural ex- 
pert, who shall put In his whole time 
advising farmers. It has been decided 
to write the business men of all vil- 
lages in the county to send representa- 
tives to a meeting to be held here to 
discuss means of raising funds to pa? 
the salary of an expert. 

Winona — Raymond A. Kent, super- 
intendent of the Winona public schools, 
will be connected with the University 
of Minnesota during the coming school 
year. He has accepted an assistant 
professorship in the college of educa- 
tion of the state institution. 

Waseca — This city is again a "wet" 
towTi. Seven saloon keepers were 
granted licenses today to soil liquor 
until July 1 and paid $500 each for the 
privilege. The Waseca city charter 
provides that all liquor licenses shall 
expire on June 30. 

Bagley — F. S. Kalberg. owner and 
editor of the Clearwater Crystal, has 
sold a power press, paper cutter, ar.d 
stapling machine to G. P. Jones of the 
Bagley Herald, and the report is that 
Mr. Kolberg is planning to sell out 
here and move West. 

Bemidji — After five dogs were 
found dead nnd several more reported 
dying, a search was made In the vicin- 
ity of Doud and Dewey avenue to find 
the cause, with the result that a large 
qountity of meat was found which 
was covered with strychnine. 

Little Falls — Henry Souer met with 
an accident at the Pine Tree mill Tues- 
day morn.ng which will probably re- 
suit in the amputation of his left arm 
below the elbow. His hand was drawn 
into a chain and mangled In such a 
manner that every bone in the hand 
except one, and both bones In the arm, 
were broken. 

Stillwater — The Rumely company la 
receiving additional orders for pas pull 
engines and a force of men are busy 
loading on cars for shipment. Two 
train loads were sent out Monday, one 
a train of thirteen cars with twenty- 
six engines, was sent to Winnipeg, and 
another train of ten cars with twenty 
engines, left for Brandon. 

Brainerd — J. P. Saunders, the local 
forest ranger, is engaged in s»-tting 
11,000 young trees in the Pillsbury 
forest reserve of 2,000 acrrs situated 
eighteen miles west of Brainerd In 
Cass county, west of Gull lake. 

Rochester — The members of the city 
council departed Monday night for 
their week's visit to Madison, Milwau- 
kee. Oshkosh and La Crosse, to make a 
study of paving. 

Moorhe.-^d — The Hopeman Construc- 
tion company of this city has pur- 
chased outright the plant of the Chll- 
son Concrete Supply company, located 
at Twelftn and Front streets, Fargo. 
The purchase includes the building. 
Northern Pacific leases, stock, tools, 
and machinery, with wagons and 
horses, and the Hopeman Construc- 
tion company will operate the plant, 
thus giving the company a plant in 
this city. 




for Infants and Children, 

Cast^ria is a barmlcss substitute for Castor Oil, Pare- 
goric, Drops aud Soothing Syrups. It is Pleasant, It 
contains neither Opium, jMCorpblne nor other Narootio 
finbstanco. It destroys Worms and allays Fcverishness. 
It cures Diarrhoea and "Wind Colic, It relieves Teeth- 
ingr Troubles and cures Constipation. It regrulates tho 
8toraa<>li and Bowels* griTinsr healthy and natural sleep* 
Th© Children's Pauocear-The Mother's Friend. 

The Kind You Have Always Bought 

Bears the Signature of 




1- 



r 




/ 



\ 



pa« 



10 



Thursday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



May 1, 1913. 



THE DEUTH HERALD 

AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER 

rubllMhed every evenluK e«eei>t Sun- 
day by The Herald Company. 

Both Telephones— Business Office. 324; 
Editorial Ro oms. 1126. 

Eurered m «c.nd-da« m.ttrr »' »»• jxriuth port- 
offlc« under the »cl of congreaa of March 3 IXfU^ 



OFFICIAL PAPER, CITY OF DLLUTB 



SUBSCRIPTION nATKS— By mall, pay- 
able In advance, one month. 35 cents; 
three months, $1; six "i^^^^^Ji *f; 
one year. $4; Saturday Herald. %l per 
rear; Weekly Herald. $1 per year. 

t>ally bv currier, city and suburbs. 10 

cents "a week. 45 cents a "i"^""}- „ 

Subiicrlberi will confer a fwur by making knnwn 

■nr ci'Miplalnt of servioe. , , 

Wien cliauglng the addreM of your papw, u i» 

Imp'irtAiit 10 give boih old and n«w addressea 

The Duluth Herald accepts adver- 
tising: contracts with the distinct Kuar- 
ttiity that it has the largest circulation 
In Minnesota outside the Twin cities. 



CITY GARBAGE COLLECTION. 

Dr. Webster, the new health offi- 
cer,— or rather an old one returned, — 
announces that he will urge the in- 
stallation of a municipal garbage col- 
lection system. 

The Herald, which has urged this 
reform for years, is with him, and 
Jiopes the city commission and the 
public will be with him, too. 

City garbage collection is in the in- 
terests of sanitation, of convenience 
and of economy. 

It will make garbage collection uni- 
form, complete and systematic. It 
will make possible important saving 
in the cost of the service, and it will 
also make possible important profits 
in the way of utilizing valuable ma- 
terial in the city's waste which now 
Is mostly lost. 

Municipal garbage collection is a 
reform to which the new government 
may well give its earnest attention. 
• 

How the times do change! Time 
•was when the secretary of war was 
the official peace angel. 



and that its purpose is to make trou- 
ble for the president of the United 
States in order to work out some ad- 
vantage for a political party. Nobody 
should believe such a thing until be- 
lief is inescapable. 

But it is hard to harmonize the 
character of the facts behind the 
California agitation with the formid- 
able character of what has grov/n out 
of it all. 

The Japanese in California are said 
not to exceed two per cent of the 
populition, and the number Is not 
greatly increasing, if at all. The Jap- 
anese own, it is said, less than fif- 
teen thousand acres in California out 
of a total land area of more than a 
hundred million acres — an acre in 
each six thousand. These figures are 
not alarming, and it Is hard to trace 
the connection between them and 
California's mighty uproar. 

And if it is anybody's intent to "p"t 
Wilson in a hole," we don't envy him 
the task. 

Considering the sentiment of the 
country at large, it seems likely that 
Governor Johnson and the state of 
California are very much more in 
danger of getting into a hole than 
President Wilson and the United 
States. 



THE OPEN COURT 

(Reftdera of The Herald aw invited to make free 
twe of this column to express their ideas about the 
topics of itPiieral Interest, but dl.viiaslons of aertarlan 
rillirIo<ia dlffi'renctM are barred, letters must not ox- 
reeil 3no words— the shorter the bettor. They must 
be xvritten on one side of the paper only, and they 
must b« accompanied In every case Ijy the name and 
addresa of the writer, though these need not be pub- 
lished. A sliried l«tier U alway* nions effective, how- 
over. ) 



The Cost of It 



Br Savoyard. 



THE BLUE SKY LAW 

AND COPPER STOCKS. 



Representative Slsson of Mississippi 
has been waving the bloody shirt In 
the face of Japan. Great ScottI Didn't 
the South get enough of war fifty years 
ago? 



PUBLIC BUSINESS AND PARTISANSHIP 

Hugh T. Halbert, who is a sort of 
spokesman for the Bull Moose party 
in this state, approves the Under- 
wood tariff bill and says everybody, 
no matter what his party affiliations, 
ought to get behind it and push. 

That's interesting chiefly as illus- 
tiating a viewpoint all too uncommon 
among party men, 

Mr. Halbert says the new bill is a 
consumer's tariff, and he's right. 
That's precisely what it is. And a 
consumer's tariff is what everybody 
—nearly— has been pleading for these 
half dozen years past. Therefore 
everybody— nearly— ought to be en- 
tliuslastic in his support of it. 

But it is not so. As usual, every- 
body— nearly— is for a customer's 
tariff on the things he has to buy, 
and for a producer's tariff on the 
things he produces. Of course that 
makes it much less easy to produce 
what the country needs and what 
everybody— nearly— has been clamor- 
ing for so long. 

Besides, there is altogether too 
much thinking in terms of party. Too 
many Republicans, just because they 
are Republicans, think it necessary 
to oppose the Underwood bill be- 
cause it is a Democratic measure, 
and to do all they can to delay it and 
discredit it and defeat it. Too many 
Bull Moosers. just because they are 
Bull Moosers, are guided by the same 
false and unpatriotic lights. 

Minnesota has acted wisely in rid- 
ding its legislative business of par- 
tisanship. It would be a blessing if 
congress, for once, could put pa- 
triotism and the instinct for justice 
above partisanship. Certainly, it 
would be a great help in tariff-mak- 
ing. 

— •- 

Sir Cecil Arthur Sprlng-Rlca ha.i ar- 
rived to represent England at Wash- 
ington. Here's hoping the gentleman 
falls to live up to his name. 



GOOD BUSINESS. 

Secretary McAdoo, the upstanding 
business man and manager of big 
affairs whom President Wilson placed 
in charge of the treasury department, 
announces that after June 1 govern- 
ment depositories will have to pay 
interest on government money at the 
rate of 2 per cent. 

This is so plainly a sound business 
move that it is a little startling to 
read that this is the first time in the 
history of the country that interest 
on government deposits has been re- 
quired. 

Banks receiving state deposits arc 
glad to get it for the consideration of 
a moderate rate of interest. County 
depositories and city depositories also 
pay interest to the public. So should 
government depositories. 

Another wise innovation announced 
by Secretary McAdoo is that 30 per 
cent of the securities furnished by 
government depositories may be in 
state, county and city bonds, the re- 
maining 70 per cent to be govern- 
ment bonds, which are now required 
to the full amount. 

It looks as though hereafter the 
banks will serve the treasury, instead 
of the treasury serving the banks, and 
this change is characteristic of the 
new order that came in with Wilson. 



To the Editor of The Herald: 

Now that our legislature has ad- 
journed without passing the much- 
needed "blue sky" law regulating the 
handling of so-called securities repre- 
senting shares in mining and other 
hazardous Investment propositions, It 
would be well to Inquire Why the Mc- 
Grath (senate bill) and Child's (house 
bill) measures were timed to be 
brought up at the eleventh hour and 
then .so cleverly killed. "Slick work' 
probably explains It to the satisfac- 
tion of those opposed to regulation. 

False quotations and flctltlou.s sales 
published In one of our dallies mean 
nothing If they are not Intended to 
fool the suckers and come-ons. Any- 
one acquainted with the local stock 
game knows tliat real tran.sactlons are 
few and far between, yet today's issue 
of a local paper carries the announce- 
ment that over 7.000 shares of stock 
changed hands on the curb on Tues- 
day. On investigation I And that those 
figures were furnished by one house 
that also furnishes quotations to "suit 
the occasion." 

Some steps should be taken to stop 
this nefarious work. The special ses- 
sion of the legislature should enact a 
law drawn along the lines of the 
measure passed by the New York as- 
sembly making It a felony to engage 
In such practice. 

Evidently the house furnishing the 
bald-fact'd misinformation referred to 
above believes that, in killing off the 
'blue sky" law, the legislature has let 
down the bars and invited all the 
scamps in the business to "go to it." 
Yours truly, 
ONE WTIO WON'T BE FOOLED 

AGAIN. 

Dulutli Minn., April 30. 



Duluth and The Herald 

Bouatieta and Brlrkbata from tha Stat* Preu. 



A Court for Justice Only 

Cleveland dispatch In the Milwaukee 
Journal: John Smith keeps a little gro- 
eery store. Among his customers Is 
Mary Brown, a widow with three chil- 
dren. She works in a department store 
for $7 a week. 

Usually Mary paid cash for her gro- 
ceries, but a while ago she started a 
charge account. Her bill ran up to $10. 
John Smith pressed for payment. Mary 
asked for time. He decided to go to 
law. In almost any other city, sub- 
stantially this would have happened: 

An Initial court fee usually of $4 or 
$5. Raillff sent to Mary's home with 
printed form with only a 



Washington, Mix 1. — (Special to Tho 
Herald.) — A year or so ago the coun- 
try wa.s startled by a declaration of 
Nelson W. Aldrtcli, who, perhaps, kn-'w 
tnore about It than anyone else, that 
there was an actual waste in the con- 
duct of the public business of our Fed- 
eral establishment of above $300,000,- 
000 per annum. That sum represents 
largely more than half the value of all 
the property of the state of Kentucky, 
real, personal and mixed, that was 
listed for taxation when Proctor Knott 
was governor o' the "Old Common- 
wealth." And peradventure some boy 
may read this, and let him learn that 
of our sisterhood of forty-eight, there 
are only four "o.Jmmonwealths" — 
Massachusetts and Pennsylvania at the 
North and Old Virginia and Kentucky 
at the South. All the rest are "states," 
except New York, where the writs run 
In tlie name of 'The People." Recol- 
lect that, young fellow, It may aid you 
some time. 

I was talking with a public func- 
tionary the other evening, a very In- 
telligent man connected with one of 
the departments. Our theme was the 
public business, and I mentioned this 
statement of Aldrlch. 

* • • 

My friend said the estimate was by 
no means extravagant, and then he 
cited these incidents that came under 
his observation, and he declared that 
they were only samples of ten thou- 
sand; 

The army post at San Antonio 
needed 500 barrels of salt, or said It 
did, which Is the same thing. That 
salt was purchased at Louisville, Ky., 
and shipped to San Antonio at a rail- 
road freight chrrge of $1.?5 a barrel. 
The salt could lave been obtained In 
the olty of San Antonio, within a 
stone's throw of the barracks, for less 
than the frelghi; charges from Louis- 
ville. 

• • • 

Apaln — the Sin Antonio barracks 
needed a mule. That mule was bought 
In Kentucky, shipped to San Antonio, 
and a fellow was hired to go along 
and take care cf the mule. His pas- 
sago was paid both ways — "A-comln' 
an' a-gwlne" — aad It was perhaps the 
ccstllest mule e'-en the American army 
ever bought, anc that Is saying a heap. 
Within a radluj of ten miles of the 
soldiers quarters at San Antonio a.s 
good a mule could have been bought 
from any one of half a score of ranch- 
men at half the cost the American 
people paid for that mule. 

And besides— "Ivoi-y" soap sells for 
the same price In the largest metropo- 
lis and at the umallest hamlet. It Is 
a standard article of domestic economy 
of universal consumption. The mili- 
tary post at Governor's Island. New 
York, wanted some Ivory soap. What 
was done? It vas bought In St. Louis, 



Still Yuuuis. 

Prtnceton Union: The Duluth Herald 
Is 30 years old and is becoming more 
frisky every day. 



"Well Co^-ered. 

Walker Pilot: Thanks to The Du- 
luth Herald the legislature never ex- 
perienced a chill during Its entire ses- 
sion. It was well covered all the tiine. 



AttrnetlDK Attention. 

Crosby Crucible: The new commis- 
sion government of Duluth Is being 
watched with marked Interest from all 
points — it being the first application 
of the commission law in the state — 
and it is already doing things that 
hold attention. 



Statesmen, Real and Near 



By Fred C. Kelly. 



Rlvht In Style. 

Mahnomen Pioneer: Duluth has a 
new form of government. One of the 
features Is a new lid that Is said to fit 
tight and will keep its shape. 

The Duluth ^Vay. 

Mankato Review: In Duluth the 
bartenders take the enforcement of the 
liquor laws in the right light and dif- 
ferent from those of other cities. 



Twenty Years A^ro 

From "Hie Herald of ttila dat«. 1893. 



Pretty Wine Now. 

Menahga Journal: That man Hlcken 
of the Duluth commission will know 
more about civic reform before he Is 
many years older. 



He Has the Tbroue, Though. 

Gheen Record: The Prince of the 
house of Duluth Is sitting on some- 
what of a shaky throne at present. 

Good Start. 

Sandstone Courier: The new com- 
missioners at Duluth have started out 
in fine style and show that they have 
some opinions of their own as to how 
a city ought to be run. The lid has 
been clamped down tight, and if they 
receive the support of the people they 
win show to the world what a good, 
clean city Is like. All hope that their 
efforts win be successful and that 
their good example will be followed by 
other cities where such reforms are 
needed. 



a writ, a priniea rorm wn-n umy «• ••— ' — I"'" ," ' i"^*' vr^:;;^ vnrV n\^^ the 
name or two filled in, but the bailiff Mo., and s^'l^Plj' ^^^^^^^^^^ ^"^,,^ut 
would receive a fee for writing the | government paid the freight. About 



A while ago California was crazy 
to get a visit from some American bat- 
tleships. Now she doesn't seem to care 
what flag they carry, Just go they come. 



CHEER UPI 

The sugar raisers — and the sugar 
trust — are suffering keenly from an 
ingrowing conviction that lower su- 
gar duties, with ultimate free sugar, 
spell RUIN. 

Yet when the sugar trust, by artful 
juggling with the custom house scales, 
brought in vast quantities of sugar 
free of duty, the industry was not 
ruined, or even harmed — except 
morally. 

Perhaps when the Underwood bill 
is a law, and the sugar duties are be- 
ing reduced yearly with free sugar in 
sight, the sugar industry will bear up 
under it nicely. 

Certainly ninety million consumers 
of sugar will find it easy to be cheer- 
ful under the infliction of free sugar. 



PUTTING WILSON IN A HOLE. 

A dispatch from Sacramento says 
that in talking with his "progressive" 
lieutenants Governor Johnson sail: 
•'To hell with President Wilson! 
Let's put him in a hole!" 

We find it hard to believe that 
Johnson said it. It might be that the 
unspeakable Blease would say such 
a thing if the mood stirred hiin to do 
BO, but the catalogue of possibilities 
ceases with him. 

It is hard to believe that Johnson 
§aid it not only because it was an 
unpatriotic and indecent thing to say, 
but because Governor Johnson, as a 
vice presidential candidate on a ticket 
opposed to President Wilson, should 
be the last governor in the country 
to say it even if he thinks it. 

It has been charged that Governor 
Johnson, in directing the anti-Jap- 
anese fight in California, has been in 
constant communication with Theo- 
dore Roosevelt, the creator of the 
party to which Governor Johnson 
belongs. It is known that Theodore 
Roosevelt loves disturbance and war. 
>Jobody doubts that if he had been 
president this country would now be 
lighting Mexico, if the fight wasn't 
over. He fought President Taft's 

f)eace treaties, and as Taft did noth- 
ng more creditable than his work for 
peace, so Roosevelt has never done 
anything more discreditable than his 
flnlster machinations against peace. 

It is not pleasant even to think of 
the possibility that Roosevelt may 
^e back ol the California disturbance, 



If every day is Sunday in one section 
of the hereafter, probably in the other 
section every day Is moving day. 



writ, one for handing It to Mary or 
putting It under Mary's door, and mile- 
age of five to twenty times the actual 
cost of his Journey. Mary would ap- 
pear. Judgment be entered against her. 
lier wage.s be attached and, under the 
rule prevailing in most places of em- 
ployment, she would lose her Job. 

Now, this is what happened in Cleve- 
land: 

John told his story to the clerk of 
the "court of conciliation," a new 
branch of the municipal court, paid 50 
cents for fees and was advised to 
•come In next Friday." The clerk 
turned to his typewriter, thumped out 
a brief note to Mary telling her of 
John's claim and advising her. too, to 
"come in Friday," and dropped this let- 
ter into the mall box, having first reg- 
istered it. 

Mary and John both stood before the 
Judge — no lawyers, no Jurors, no ste- 
nographers, no more court costs. 

The Judge asked Mary if she ad- 
mitted the debt. 

*'I do. your honor." 

"Then why not pay it?" 

"I Ju.st pulled through before I ran 
this bill. Then baby got sick. The 
doctor had to be paid, because I never 
yet have taken charity. The doctor 
wrote a prescription and that meant 
money for the druggist. And the fact 
is that, though I've tried hard, I haven't 
yet caught up." 

"Are you willing to sign an agree- 
ment to pay off this debt at the rate of 
$2 a month?" 

'Mary nodded assent. At first John 
was stubborn. But when the Judge 
told him an attachment on Mary's 
wages would only get him a part of 
the claim, because she had only $7 
coming, and would cause her to be dis- 
charged, throwing her three children 
into distress. the agreement was 
signed. Failure to keep it would leave 
the old way of Ju.^tlce still open. 

This court of conciliation has been 
In operation a month. Its aim Is to 
sift out from the regular municipal 
court the cases — about 60 per cent — 
which can be settled without a law- 
suit. No lawyers are allowed before It. 
It .saves perhaps 80 per cent of the 
pre.sent expense and gives both sides a 
full and fair chance to present its case 
without technicalities. 



The Voices of the Wood. 

New York Post: To some people the 
trees talk — If you are to believe the 
people. They dare not try to put what 
they get Into language, because they 
know that to do so will be to silence 
the trees. Living In cities they nat- 
urally get out of touch with trees, but 
put them back In the forest and, likely 
as not, they will be caught In a listen- 
ing attitude, a listening and watching 
attitude. That little ripple up toward 
the topmost leaves that a painter 
would have to paint golden or liquid 
or both. If It were the Impression he 
was after, delivers Its message to the 
one who understands. That urgent 
sweep of the strong gray wind going 
wp.stward communicates something to 
the trees and the trees pass it on — 
to the one who can hear. 

"Take me back to the wood," said 
Jeanne d'Aro, "and I shall hear the 
voices." 



The Flatlron Bnlldlng Sways. 

The Craftsman: Tliere are many In 
New York who regard the Flatlron 
building not only from the standpoint 
of a curiosity but from that of beauty, 
as the eighth wonder of the world. In 
the top stories of this building the pen- 
delum of office clocks sways so far over 
that It cannot come back of itself, only 
when aided by the return movement of 
the great structure. Ink is spilled from 
the wells with this ceaseless move- 
ment, for like the prow of a ship the 
"Flatiron" sways and gives with the 
elements. 



Startled the Monarch. 

Tit Bits: On the first consignment 
of seidlitz powders in the capital of 
Delhi, the monarch became deeply In- 
tere.sted In the accounts of the refresh- 
ing draught. A box was brought to the 
king In full court, and the Interpreter 
explained to his majesty how it should 
be used. 

Into a goblet he put the contents of 
the twelve blue papers, and. having 
added water, the king drank It off. 
This waa the alkali, and the royaJ 
countenance expressed no signs of sat- 
isfaction. It was then explained that 
In the combination of the two powders 
lay the luxury, and the twelve white 
powders were quickly dissolved and as 
eagerly swallowed by his majesty. 

With a wild shriek that will be re- 
membered while Delhi Is numbered 
among the kingdoms, the monarch 
rose, staggered, exploded, and. In his 
full ' agonies, screamed, "Hold me 
down!" then, rushing from the throne, 
fell prostrate on the floor. 

There he lay during the long-contin- 
ued effervescence of the compound, 
spurting like 10,000 pennyworth of im- 
perial pop, and believing himself in the 
agonies of death — a melancholy and 
humiliating proof that kings are mor- 
tal. 



Time In Sometimes Kind. 

Barnaby Rudge: Father Time is not 
always a hard parent, and. though 
he tarries for none of his children, 
often lays his hand lightly upon those 
who have used him well, making them 
old men and women Inexorably enough, 
but leaving their hearts and spirits 
young and In full vigor. With such 
people the gray head is but the Im- 
pression of the old fellow's hand in 
g^lving them his blessing, and every 
wrinkle but a notch In the quiet calen- 
dar of a well spent \\t^ 



A Solomon Come to JudKment. 

Kansas City Journal: King Solomon 
had notiiing on a Centralla Ju.stico of 
the peace before whom a colored man 
and brother was being tried for steal- 
ing a chicken. The prosecuting wit- 
ness thought It was his fowl, but was 
not willing to swear. It being near 
sundown the local Solomon let the hen 
loose and watched her going home to 
roost. Result, the negro was fined $50. 

• 

Still Hope. 

Llpplncott's: Mrs. McGInty had 
waited long and patiently for her bus- 
band to oome home on Saturday night 
with ills week's pay. Finally, she de- 
cided to take the matter in her own 
hands, and she sallied forth to the po- 
lice station to Inquire If he was there. 

"Is my Tim here?" she asked. 

"No," replied the lieutenant; "but 
sit down; we're exi>ectlng him every 
minute." 



that time the garrison at St Louis, or 
somewhere out there, maybe Leaven- 
worth. Kan., wtmted some Ivory soap. 
What happened then? It was bought 
In New York ard shipped to the West, 
and the people paid the freight 
« « * 
You see money grows on trees here 
in Washington. The government gath- 
ers It the railroads need It, and thf- 
paternal government makes business 
for the railroads In the way my friend 
narrated to me. It Is but Just to say 
that Secretary of War Dickinson saw 
some of this graft and socked the 
knife Into as much of It as he was 
In reach of. Eut, lor, there must be 
team work— all public officials must 
work together to er!ldlcate the graft. 
It Is estimated that the Spanish war 
cost $800,000,000 exclusive of pen.slons. 
Napoleon could have fought the war— 
Ri-smarck could have fought It— for 
$100,000,000. Ard It was a disgraceful 
war at that, in enterprise that no 
self-re.spectlng government would have 
entered upon. If Tom Reed had been 
president Cuba would have been freed 
without the fire of a gun or the Inter- 
n^ption of amicable relations with 
Spain. . 

To my mind there Is no more fas- 
cinating story than that of Spain. It 
Is a noble people, and to this day— and 
alwavs. even before the momentou.s 
vovage of Columbus— there Is a pride 
in the Spanish peasant that we can- 
not match in any state of our glorious 
Union Priestcraft did It^ felon work, 
beginning when that lunatic Philip II 
was on the throne. I yield to none in 
mv respect for the Catholic chnr-^h but 
I do wish Philip had never been born 
He drapTged Spain . down from first 
place among the nations. What a pity 
he was not a Henry of Navarre! 

There T was talking about one th.ne: 
and got off to another. But what 
would you have? Discussion Is the 
snlce of narral Ion— read Don Quixote 
If you don't think so. 

Mr. Morcran's Spectacles. 
Manchester Guardian: A story of Mr. 
Plerpont Mor^ran, Illu.stratlve of the 
.fcale of his domestic affairs, reaches 
me My correspondent was In a L,on- 
Son optician's ..hop when another cus- 
tomer entered, and. striding ^P to the 
counter, brusquely l^-"""^^. ^J^lJ?! 
make me another pair ^^^ ^^at? - 
presenting spe<:tacles of the f^^^^oJd 
type in tortoi:»e-shell rims and go d 
f James "Yes," said the optician. 'I 
can" '"Send tiem up to my place as 
soon as they're ready. You know who 
Tam^' were ihe laconic Instructions 
fflven'as the customer strode out of the 
fhotras quickly as he had entered. -The 
optician explained that that was Mr. 
Pierpont Morgttn. The spectacles were 
delivered and my friend, making In- 
ulrles in the matter, heard the end of 
he a^air from the optician. Plerpont 
Morgan returned to the shop. and. 
Tpeaklng more effusively than on the 
fi?st occasion, said: "Those specaces 
were very good— very satisfactory in- 
deed I shall want some more of them. 
I'm alwavs mH-slng my 'specs' after a 
chan-e of clothes. Let me see (paus- 
ing a"nd lookln? down on his waistcoat 
as If to interrogate It); I've eleven 
walstcoats-ye.. eleven. Better inake 
me a dozen pairs;" So a dozen tortolse- 
shell-rlmncd and gold-framed spec- 
tacles were supplied to the miUlona re. 
much to the satisfaction of the optician 
and rim-maker, who, between them, 
pocketed sixty guin eas. 

An Abrtdged Bible. 

GallipoUs Tribune: An abridged 
Bible Is being advocated- one that will 
contain only the vital parts of tiie 
great book, anl that omits hundreds of 
pages of matter now not read at all 
except by students. No doubt such a 
Bible would become Instantly popular, 
because It would all be Interesting and 
to the point. In this age. none except 
students will wade through very long 
books. Everybody wants the truth 
boiled down to the very shortest .spaoe. 
The great story of the crucifixion is 
told in very few words, and all th^ es- 
sentials of the : Bible for the average 
person could (aeily be covered in one- 
fifth the page.} required for the whole 
work. 



Better Than Gold. 

Better than grandeur, better than gold, 
Than rank and titles a thousand-fold, 
Is a healthy body and a mind at ease. 
And simple pleasures that always 

please. 
A heart that can feel for another's 

woe. 
With sympathies large enough to en- 
fold 
All men as brothers, is better than 
gold. 

r.etter than gold Is a conscience clear, 
Though toiling for bread in a humble 

sphere. 
Doubly blessed with content and 

health, 
Untried by the lusts and cares of 

wealth, 
Lowly living and lofty thought 
Adorn and ennoble a poor man's cot; 
For mind and morals In nature's plan 
Are the genuine tests of a gentleman. 

Better than gold Is the sweet repose 
Of the sons of toll when the labors 

close; 
Better than gold Is the poor man's 

sleep, 
And the balm that drops on his slum- 
bers deep. 
Bring sleeping draughts on the downy 

bed 
Where luxury pillows Its aching head, 
The toiler simple opiate deems 
A shorter route to the land of dreams. 



Better than gold la a thinking mind, 
That In the realm of books can find 
A treasure surpassing Australian ore, 
And live with the great and good of 

yore. 
The sage'.s lore and the poet's lay, 
The glories of empires passed away; 
The world's great dream will thus un- 
fold 
And yield a pleasure better than gold. 

Better than gold Is a peaceful home 
Where all the fireside characters come, 
The shrine of love, the heaven of life. 
Hallowed by mother, or sister, or wife. 
However humble the home may be. 
Or tried wltli sorrow by Heaven's de- 
cree, 
The blessings that never were bought 

or sold, 
And center there, are better than gold. 
— Father Ryan in the Irish Standard. 

« 

Ten Commandments for Young Lawyers. 

By Vice President Marshall: 

1 — Thou shalt not put the fee before 
a Just cause. 

2 — Thou Shalt not put before thee the 
god of money, to worship It. so that no 
fee can be large enough to cause thee 
to write a dishonest contract. 

8 — Thou shalt not tako thy profes- 
sion In vain, but teach thy clients to 
walk in the ways of peace. 

4 — Remember seven days In the 
week that thou shalt not chase ambu- 
lances, for a career is a worthy thing, 
and is not built in a moment. 

B — Honor thy profession as thou dost 
thy sacred honor; and in so doing thou 
wilt not seek, nor confound litigation. 

6 — Thou shouldst not accept contin- 
gent fees. 

7 — Thou Phouldst throw thy full 
weight against the allowance of coun- 
sel fees before the divorce cause has 
been brought to trial; for therein lieth 
the root of the divorce evil. 

8 — Thou shouldst use thy influence In 
favor of compelling one charged with a 
crime to testify in the cause; for the 
innocent man cannot thereby be 
harmed. 

9 — Thou mayest tako the part of the 
admitted criminal; but not to bear false 
witness against thy neighbor, only to 
see that Justice Is performed, and tem- 
pered with mercy. 

10 — Thou shalt not covet exorbitant 
fees, nor first Inquire of thy client's 
pocketbook. 



To Identify the Corpse. 

Llpplncott's: In the blanks which 
life Insurance companies provide their 
medical examiners for use In record- 
inp; the data of the examination of the 
applicant for Insurance, they provide a 
space for personal marks which may 
be used to Identify the Insured after 
death. A Western company recently 
received a report from an examining 
physician with the following In the 
identification blank: 

"He has a strong Cornish accent." 



Washington. May 1.— (Special to The 
Herald.) — Blindness does not deter 
Senator Thomas P. <^Jore from being a 
great lover of fine books. He is fond 
of books printed on high quality paper 
and handsomely bound. When he picks 
up a good book, he does It with an air 
little short of reverence. The fact 
that he cannot see It doesn't matter. 
All the time a book is being read to 
him he holds two or three more in his 
Ian, caressing them almost as a child 
mlVht caress a kitten. He thirsts for 
information, and Just to have hold of 
a book that contains something he 
wishes to know seems to give him a 
sort of satisfaction. 

• * • 
When he has some one to read to 

him, as he does every night until 11 
o'clock, he usually goes over to the 
bookcase and selects the books him- 
self. He knows the exact location of 
half the books in his library — and It Is 
a large library. Occasionally he will 
ask for a volume and nobody can find 
it. Then, like as not, ho can go and 
find it himself. 

• • • 
He wastes no tin.e on a book that 

does not fit his mood, and not Infre- 
quently he will listen to a dozen dif- 
ferent works In the course of an eve- 
ning. Maybe while lislening to a book 
on the Panama canal he will think of 
Mill's essays and will ask the reader 
to switch to that. In that way he fol- 
lows the line' of least mental resist- 
ance, and .with the book falling Into 
his mood, he remembers it all the more 
readily. 

• * • 
All his office rooms and his study 

at home are piled high with all kinds 
of reports and pamphlets on practi- 
cally every conceivable subject until 
the whole aspect of thin.^s Is that of 
the morning after a young tornado, 
with the wreck undisturbed until the 
insurance adjusters arrive. 
« * • 
When it comes to newspapers, a half 
hour's reading will give the blind sen- 
ator all he cares for. His secretary 
reads him the more Important head- 
lines and the index and the senator 
picks out one or two stories that In- 
terest him. He never reads anything 
pertaining to sports or any kind of 
police news, murders, suicides, and the 

like. 

• • • 
Before starting on a long Journey 

alone, Senator Gore usually stocks up 
a suit case with about all the books It 
will hold, and trusts to luck to meet 
people on the trains who will read to 
him. In this respect he has little 
trouble. He runs across a surprising 
number of poor readers — business men 
who cannot pronounce words that they 
ought to know, and others who have 
no sense of Inflection — but there are 
plenty who volunteer to read whatever 
he wants — though usually what he 
wants Is something serious that 
doesn't appeal to the average traveler. 
Senator Gore has always had his best 
luck at bumping Into good readers out 
through Iowa. But he says the best 
reader he ever met In his travels from 
coast to coast was a Pullman porter, a 
Jamaican negro. 

• • * 

Books, however, are relegated to 
second place as an educational factor 
in Gore's travels. He says he has 
learned more from people In the smok- 
ing compartments of Pullmans than be 
could have acquired in the same length 
of time from books. 

"There are thousands of specialists 
traveling about all the time." he says, 
"men who know a whole lot about 
some one thing. "UTien I have the 
good luck to find myself alongside of a 
specialist I try not to let him get away 
•til he has told me his whole story." 

• • • 
Senator Gore Judges character by a 

man's voice and laugli, especially the 
laugh. He says he can get a pretty 
fair idea of a man Just by the way he 
laughs, even without hearing him say 
a word. There is the frank, open- 
faced laugh, the overdone laugh, the 
laugh that runs by forced draft, the 
perfunctory laugh, and the hollow, 
mocking laugh of yillalns — and every 
one Is a character tip that Gore bas 
learned to tabulate almost automatic- 
ally. 

• • * 
A friend of Senator Warren, Icnow- 

Ing the Wyoming man's habit of set- 
tling things occasionally by a toss of a 
coin, sent him recently an English 
penny, which has a head on each side. 
"Wlien In doubt." suggested a friend, 
"make it heads you'll do what you 
really want to do and tails you'll do 
what the other fellow wants." 

• * • 
Representative Bartholdt of St. Louis 

started out from Brooklyn, N. Y., a 
great many years ago with the spirit 
of adventure leading him to the Far 
West. He got as far West as Phila- 
delphia, when he discovered, while 
sitting In his boarding house room, 
that he had Just 5 cents to his name. 
In order to make the slate clean, Bar- 
tholdt walked to the window and 
threw away the 5-cent piece. Then he 
started to hunt for a Job. Within a few 
days he had landed a place as proof- 
reader for a concern that published 
magazines In nine different languages. 
Bartholdt knew a smattering of one or 
two languages, and when he came to 
the others he had to read proof a let- 
ter at a time Instead of by words or 
sentences. However, It was a com- 
paratively lucrative position, and at 
the end of a few months he had saved 
up almost $7. 

• * * 
Though an approachable person. 

Senator Culberson of Texas has a quiet 
dignity about him that extends even 
to his less Important acts. Nearly 
every day he rises In his seat In the 
senate and says: 

"I move that the reading of the 
Journal be dispensed with." And he 
does so In much the manner that he 
might assume If he were about to 
make an exclusive announcement of 
the second coming of the Messiah. 
iCopyright. 1013. by Fred C. KeUy. AU rlgTiU resened.) 



• ••Grover Cleveland, president of 
the United States, surrounded by the 
members of his cabinet, by high offi- 
cials of the various states, by a nu- 
merous and distinguished representa- 
tion of lands across the seas, and by A 
mighty throng of American citizens, 
today pressed the button which set in 
motion the machinery of the World'* 
Columbian exposition at Chicago. 
Short speeches were delivered by Pre»» 
ident Cleveland and Director General 
Davis, declaring the fair open. 

•••L. O. Buckbee and Gust M'lckman 
have been appoint*,^! assistant asset- 



sors at West Duluth. 



•••At a meeting of the stockholders 
of the Land and River Improvement 
company of We.st Superior, held at 
New York today. President F. H. 
Weeks of De Forest & Weeks was de- 
posed. Mr. Weeks has made an as- 
signment for the benefit of his cred- 
itors. 



•••The Minnesota grand lodge, A. O. 
U. W., will open Its seventeenth annu- 
al session In Duluth tomorrow eve- 
ning, when addresses of welcome will 
be delivered by' Mayor d'Autremont 
and Charles A. Towne. 



•••Charles Kugler, aged 12, while 
hunting near the Catholic cemetery 
yesterday, shot himself in the right 
foot, and his companions carried him 
home. He Is not seriously hurt. 



•••Miss Ora Green returned yester- 
day from a trip to Florida. 

•••Mrs. R. A. Costello and daughter. 
Miss Kittle, are visiting at GracevlUe, 
Minn. 



•••Ex-Unlted States Senator A. P. 
■^"llllams and wife of .San Francisco 
are guests of Mr. and Mrs. L. P. Tot- 
man, 1429 East Second street. 



•••H. G. IngersoU left last evenin* 
for a Western trip. 



•••Edmond Stallo of Cleveland Is In 
Duluth, the gupst of Thomas S. Wood. 
He is a son of the former minister to 
Italy and son-in-law of Alexander Mc- 
Donald, one of the vice presidents of 
the Standard Oil company. 

•••George R. Stuntz and survrylnff 
party returned today from a three 
months' trip on Pelican and other 
rivers near the Mesaba range. They 
traveled about GOO or 700 miles on 
snowshoes. Mr. Stuntz reports the 
snow quite deep In the woods, some 
places yet having four or five feet. 



•••Grand Rapids has a sensation, 
Frederick A. Powers of Turner, N. D., 
having laid claim to the whole town- 
site and brought suit against every lot 
owner to clear title. By the treaty of 
1855 the Chlppewas became the ownerg 
of the land and Mr. Powers has pur- 
chased the title from the person who 
obtained the original patent. 

♦ 

The Charm of a Camp Fire, 

David Grayson In the American 
Magazine: Did you ever sit by a camp- 
fire and watch the flames dance and 
the sparks fly upward Into the cool 
dark air? Did you ever see the fitful 
light among the tree depths, at one 
moment opening vast shadowy vistas 
Into the forest, at the next dying down- 
ward and leaving' It all In somber mys- 
tery? And what a friendly and com- 
panionable thing a camp-fire Isl How 
generous and outright it Isl It play* 
for you when you wish to be lively, 
and it glows for you when you wish to 
be reflective. 



AMUSEMENTS. 



Not Yet Decided. 

Boston Transcript: "I want some 
sort of a gift for a young lady." 
"Yes, sir — fiancee or sister?*' 
"Er — why — »ihe hasn't said which she 
will be yet." 



Six Men Defeated Fifty. 

Roman Herald:. A remarkable Inci- 
dent during the recent operations In 
Kplrus is reported in the following 
semi-official communication: 

"A heroic encounter occurred on the 
Argyrocastro road, when a sub-lieuten- 
ant of cavalry, named Vouros. accom- 
panied by five troopers, meeting a de- 
tachment of fifty Turks, attacked them, 
and after a fierce engagipment twenty 
of the Turks were killed and the re- 
mainder made prisoners." 

. — ♦ — . 

No Flnser in Saunase. 

Perham Enterprise: Joseph Meader, 
the butcher employed by Robert Wel- 
kert. says that his finger was amputat- 
ed by a cog in the gasoline engine and 
not by the sausage machine, as stated 
in last week's Enterprise. The Enter- 
prise regrets that it was misinformed. 



"WHERE YOUR MONEY DOES ITS DUTY" 



empress 



TONIGHT, 
FRIDAY and 
SATURDAY 



Lovers of Musical Comedy With 

Pretty Girls and Catchy Music, 

Can't Afford to 31l»« 




With That Fnnny Fellow 
T H O »I A S W'l I ' F E .\ . 

MATINEE 

Daily at 2:30 

Nlirhts, 7i40 and OtlS. 10c and 20c 

MAY 4, 5, «» and 7 — Dnve Lew in 
••Don't Lie to Vour \\ Ife." 



Public Health Purchasable. 

Richard Barry In the Century: It Is 
the conten.tion of those that give their 
lives to the study of the subject that 
"public health Is a purchasable com- 
modity." The struggle, then. Is be- 
tween the death rate and the dollar 
rate. Contribute more money to the 
cause of public health and the death 
rate will go down. Forty thousand 
babies were saved In 1910 at an aver- 
age cost of $18. It would have cost 
more to bury them, as the cheapest 
sort of funeral costs $25. 

The appropriation for the rare of 
the p»ibllc health In New York is not 
niggardly; It Is larger than In most 
cities. Still, It Is not enough. Where 
the health officers ask for |1.B0, they 
get $1. The excuse Is that the rest 
of the desired tnoney is needed to im- 
prove parks and streets, for the police 
and fire departments, for the city 
government, the water fronts, eto. 
Besides, the people of this city are 
absolutely obliged to spend about 
$100,000,000 a year on automobiles, 
candy, theaters, alcoholic drinks, to- 
bacco, diamonds and such other ur- 
gent needs of life. What Is left over, 
after those necessities are provided 
for. goes toward the preservation of 
health. 



^^ NEW «^ Both mienaa 1410. 



9eoond Ava. E— t and •upirlor Straat 



MATINEES 

DAILY 

10c& 



NighU. 1 00, 2}«. 
SO* M< 75*. 



MclNTYREAHEATH^ 

COOMBg AND ALDW ELL 
ALBURTUS AND MILLER 



MR. AND MRS. 
00 RD N W ILOK 

THE FOUR ROTTERS 



G. S. MELV IN 

Orpheum Concert Oreh*«trm 



Thomu A. Ediwii'* talklai 
Movlitf PIctur**. 



LYCEU IVI 1 TODAY 

CONTINUOUS — t TO S P. M.| 7 TO 
H P. M. 



NEW PROGRAM TODAT. 

KINEMACOLOR 

**%torj of the Orange." 
"Fifty Mllea From Tombafone." 



FRICBW, lOe AND 20«. 





f 



J 





Thursday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



May 1, 1913. 



U 



% 



I 



He 

Earns 
Most Who 
Saves Most 

of His 
Earnings 



THE MAN who earns |10 a 
week and savea fl a- woek Is 
really better off than he who 
earns $20 and spends $20. 

Qet the savingr habit If you ever 
expect to get ahead. This bank 
will help you. Bring us your sur- 
plus — that part of your salary over 
and above your necessary expenses 
— we'll pay you 8 per cent Inter- 
eat and you'll be protected against 
loss. 

Why not open a Savings Account 
here today T 



The Clly 
National Bank 



Duluth, Minn. 






NOTICE! 

THE INDEPENDENT 
MEAT MARKET 

HAS MOVED TO 

26 FOURTH AVE. WEST 

Opp. City Water & Light Dept. 
Grand 609— Phone— 2483 Melrose 

Don't forget to send in your 
meat orders to the new tnarket. 



^-1 

CHRIST OLSON'S 

523 Wesf Michigan St. 

OPPOSITE UNION DEPOT 




OUR AIM 

La to conduct a flrst-class practice 
at reasonable prices. 




SET TEETH 

bit Ouartuiledd 

Gold Crown $3.00 

Bridge Work, per tooth $.'?.00 

(;<>ld Fillings up from $1.00 

•Silver FillljigrM 50o 

SKT OF TEETH $5.00 

NEW METHOD DENTISTS, 

DR. n. C. BROWN. Owner. 

2S W. Superior St.. Ov«r Bon Ton Bak- 
•ry. Next to Stack'*. Hours. 8:30 t) 7. 



CENTRAL 

BUSINESS COLLEGE 

30 Kast *»uperlor Street, Uuluth. 



Fifteen calls this week for our 
graduates. 

New term Monday. 

We want five young men to take 
positions. 

BARBER & McPHERSON. 



/ 



We invite our euMtoiiierM and 
frleuilM to call on uji at the 

EAST 
ST. PAUL RESTAURANT 

14 I:AST *il f KIllOll .ST. 

Lnder new manaKeraent. 

If A UK Y W«i\G, Proprietor. 



THE PALM ROOM 

At the SPA LDING 

MOST DELIGHTFUL AND LUXURI- 
OUS RE.STAURANT IN DULUTH. 



C"'CHESTER S PILLS 





tHA'VltSU ItRA.NU PILI.fi,' f r Sal 

ye4ii Wiijwn as Best. Sifeit. Alw»y» k/-li.il,l« 

SOLOBYORirjGISTSEVERYWHERI 



Mealth^Happiness 

ByDf.R. D. Scott. 



riilo, 
chll<i 
have 



Sanitarium Schools for tonsuinptive 
Children. 

There hag been a good deal written 
for this column on the subjects of open 
air schools, open window schools and 

prevention of tuberculosis In children; 
and. nlthnufrh some of the schools 
written about, such as the Elizabeth 
McConnlok school of Chicago, hfave 
features in common with sanitarium 
schools, they have all been established 
to deal with the prevention rather than 
cure of tuberculosis. They have, as a 
excluded the frankly tubercular 
during the Infective stages, and 
been perfectly Justified In so do- 
There are children, however, be- 
tween the ages of 5 and 14, who suf- 
fer with tuberculosis in the second and 
Infective stages that are not by any 
means hop«leasly doomed, and reiiuire 
sanitarium treatment, without being 
forced to fall behind In their studies so 
far that the time lost can never be 
regained. In recognition of this want, 
an open air school was opened in Ham- 
ilton, ont.. In January, 1911, for chil- 
dren afflicted with the advanced form 
of the disease, and a report coverln^i 
the first eighteen months' operation Is 
JMSt at hand, .showing some surprising- 
ly good results In the physical condi- 
tion of these pupils, while they were 
able to keep pace with the educational 
requirement of the public schools. 

In this school, it will be remembered, 
the treatment of the disease always 
held first place, the educational fea- 
ture being con.^ldered of secondary Im- 
portance. Except In a few of the far 
advanced cases, however, regular school 
work was rarely Interfered with, and 
the classes kept pace with similar 
classes In the city schools. In the 
period covered there were seventy- 
three patients admitted, and of these, 
foi^iteen have been discharged as ap- 
parently cured, fourteen have had the 
disease arrested, thirteen much Im- 
proved and only one died. Considering 
that these were all frank cases of the 
disease In advanced stages, the re- 
sults would seem to merit the trouble 
and expense. 

These children discharged as arrested 
or apparently cured cases were pre- 
pared to re-enter the open window 
classes of the city schools, and take 
llielr place along with other children 
of their own age, which is an ad- 
vantage that can hardly be overesti- 
mated. This school was a part of 
the mountain sanitarium and this in- 
stitution defrayed all expenses except 
the salary of the teacher, who was 
supplied and remunerated by the Ham- 
ilton board of education. 

The success of this enterprise, so far 
as the afflicted children were con- 
'•erned, amply repaid the trouble and 
the money spent, but the good de- 
rived from such a school does not end 
with the children treated. These chil- 
dren when allowed to attend the pub- 
lic schools were dangerous sources of 
infection to others and their removal 
to the sanitarium must be looked upon 
as a far-reaching benefit to the other 
children attending the schools from 
which they were taken. 

The idea of a sanitarium school 
-thnuld appeal to all interested in anti- 
tuberculosis work, as well as those in- 
terested In the education and welfare 
of children of school age; and in com- 
munities having a publicly supported 
tuberculosis sanitarium, the scheme 
should not be difficult to carry out. Dr. 
Holbrook of Hamilton, the medical su- 
perintendent spoken of, says: ''In the 
ise of these children, they are taken 
luring the period of greatest chron- 
iclty, and their education is continued 
when it had become impossible, or at 
1 -ast dangerous. In the city schools; 
and in addition to this, they are being 
taught what is to them of great im- 
!)ortance, namely, the means by which 
they may preserve their own health 
instead of allowing consumption of 
■arly adult age to take toll of their 
lives." 




DR. R. D. SCOTT. 



Hospitals for Consumptives. 

That the consumptive is better cared 
:or, that his chances for recovery are 
much Increased, and that he Is happier, 
in a sanitarium than at home, are facts 
seldom disputed by anyone who has 
ob.served sanitaria patients, or who 
knows anything about the waj' these 
institutions are operated. And to con- 
vince an early case, where the chances 
of recovery with sanitarium treatment 
are as high as S5 to 90 per cent, that 
ho is better off in a sanitarium is not 
often a difficult matter. In the ad- 



vanced cases, however, where no hon- 
est hope of complete recovery can be 
held out as an Inducement, it is some- 
times impossible to make the patient 
see that it is to his own advantage 
to enter such a hospital and that by 
refusing to do so he is endangering the 
lives of those nearest and dearest to 
him. Although the time may be past 
where recovery can be expected, there 
are many stages of more or less com- 
plete Invalidism which may be avoided, 
through the proper care of second 
stage cases. These patients are better 
fed In a hospital, have more fresh air 
and sunlight, learn to avoid secon- 
dary infections, and are relieved from 
many of the worries which are sure 
to bother them and retard progress 
when living at home. So, from the 
point of view of the sick one, the 
consumptive hospital Is the best place 
for even secondary or advanced cases, 
and from the point of view of the fam- 
ily It Is the only place; because it is 
constant personal contact with the 
consumptive which Is the dangerous 
thing in regard to infection. All mem- 
bers of a family can hardly escape 
Infection from an open case living in 
the same house, no matter how care- 
ful he may be; and such a danger 
should not be imposed upon children 
in particular who have, no doubt, in- 
herited a pre-dlsposition to the malady. 
♦ 

Questions and Answers. 

Water Drluklninr. 

H. S. writes: Is there any danger 
in drinking large quantities of pure 
water? I have a child who. If allowed, 
will drink a couple of quarts each 
day. 

REPLY. 

No. there Is no danger, provided it is 
taken in small quantities at a time, 
and is n-^ver very cold, or Iced. 
Fear of MenoiiuuHe, or tbe Changre of 
Life. 

D. R. C. writes: What can you sug- 
gest as a physical and mental tonic for 
a nervous person who is nearlng the 
menopause? 

REPLY. 

Cast fear aside. Live a moderate life, 
avoiding excitement and worry. Take 
dally outdoor exercise, and keep the 
mind occupied with congenial thoughts. 
Medicines are not necessary, and fre- 
quently do more harm than good. Con- 
stipation must be avoided, however, 
and this la best done through dietetic 
means. With a healthy body and mind. 
There is nothing to fear from the 
changes occurring at this period. To 
keep the body healthy, practice genera! 
hygiene and mental health requires 
constant occupation; above everything 
else, the cultivation of cheerfulness. 
Fever Soren on litpN. 

B. J. T. inquires what Is the cause of 
fever sores and what can be done for 
them. 

REPLY. 

FeV^er sores are due to absorption by 
the blood of poisons, usually of bacterial 
origin. Gastro intestinal disorders are 
the most common cause, although they 
appear regularly in some infections, as 
pneumonia and typhoid fever. For 
ordinary cases a thorough clearing of 
the intestinal tract is the best remedy. 
To relieve the itching and hasten their 
drying up, touch thorn frequently with 
strong spirits of camphor, or occasion- 
ally with aromatic sulphuric acid. 



WEST END 



Hernutn 



HRRALD BRANCHi 
Olaon. Manager. 1S2» We«t Superior Stre«t. 



ISSUE CALL TO 

REV. F. 0. HANSON 



Trinity English Lutheran 

Congregation Wants a 

Permanent Pastor. 

Rev. F. O. Hanson, pastor of the 
Trinity English Lutheran congregation 
for the past three months, who Is field 
secretary for the Augustana Synod of 
.Swe lish Lutheran Churches of Amer- 
ica, was extended an official call to 
become the permanent pastor of tlie 
congregation at a meeting held In tlie 
parlors of the Bethany .Swedish Lutli- 
eran church. Twenty-third avenue 
west and Third street la.st night. 

The call requests Rev. Mr. Hanson 




last fall. He returned on Jan. 1 to 
take charge of the pulpit for three 
month.s, and during tills time he has 
been Instrumental in assisting the con- 
gregation in the purchasing of a loca- 
tion for Its future home. This lot has 
been secured at the northwest corner 
^f Twenty-seventh avenue west and 
Third street. 

Preliminary plans for the construc- 
tion of the church were made last 
night. It was decided to build the 
basement this fall, which will serve as 
a meeting place for tlie congregation 
until next spring, when tjie super- 
structure will be erected. During the 
Intei-val the congregation will hold Its 
services at the Woodmen hall. Twenty- 
first avenue west and First street. 

Rev. Mr. Hanson will leave the city 
■within the next two weeks for the 
purpose of organizing congregations 
on the West coast. Provl.sion has been 
made by the synod to send a student 
to fill the pulpit until Jan. 1. 



REV. H. K. MADSEN 

Lecture In tbe IVorwoKlim lanKauge— 
".Norwaj'N GrenteMt .>Iau." 

TONIGHT 

nt the Flr«t NnrweKlnn-nniilNli >f. K. 

chureh, ::it!i .Vve. Went an^i Third St. 

AU>II*».S1(».\, 25 C1':.\T.S. 



Kaiey-Dickey. 



REV 



O. HANSON. 



to take the position on Jan. 1, 1914, at 
which time nis position as field secre- 
tary explre.=». While Rev. Mr. Hanson 
would not give out any official answer 
in reply to the call, he Intimated to 
some of the trustees that he would ac- 
cept, stating that he was becoming 
tired of roaming around the country 
with lis family. 

Rev. Mr. Hanson was Instrumental 
In organlzlngr the local congrecation 



Miss Minnie A. Kaley and Thomas B. 
Dickey were married at 9 o'clock last 
night at the parsonage of the Grace 
Methodist church, 310 North Twenty- 
second avenue west. Rev. George E. 
Silloway read the service. Tliey were 
attended by Miss Mary Woodard and 
Goldwin Branscombe. Mr. and Mrs. 
Dickey will make their home on West 
Seventh street. 



Birthday Party. 

Mrs. August Julen, 2105 We.st First 
street, entertained at a dinner party 
yesterday afternoon In honor of her 
birthday. The decorations were sweet 
peas, carnations and ferns. Covers 
were laid for sixteen guests. 



Madsen Will Lecture. 

"Norway's Greatest Man" will be the 
subject of a lecture to be given this 
evening bv Rev. Hans K. Madsen of 
Chicago, former pastor of the First 
Norwegian-Danish Methodist church. 
The lecture will be given in the 
cluirch. A program of music under 
the charge of A. O. Anderson will also 
be given. 

Rev. Mr. Madsen arrived In the city 
yesterday. He Is a guest at the home 
of Mr. and Mrs. J. J. Moe, 2207 West 
Third street. Ho will leave Immedi- 
ately following the lecture for Minne- 
apolis, where he will spend a day be- 
fore returning home. 

Rev. Mr. Madsen wa« pastor of the 



lipi-al oiuirch for sij; yeiir.M. During his 
connection with the loc'il congregation 
he was lnstiument.il In having the 
I>resent handsome edifice erected al 
Twinty-l'ourth a\enua, and Third 
street. 

Sacred Concert. 

At a meeting o:! the choir of the 
Zlon Norwegian Lutheran church, 
Twenty-fifth avenue west and Third 
street, plans were maile for giving the 
.second annual sacred concei't on June 
«. The program for the affair will be 
worked out during tlie next week. 
Some of tlie city's best musical talent 
will be secured for thu entertainment. 



Parents' Meeting. 



The monthly paients' and teachers' 
meeting of tlie Monroe school, Twenty- 
sixth avenue west and First street, 
was held in the ansembly liall of the 
building last night. The "prlncljial fea- 
ture of the meetlrg was addresses 
!,'iven by Mrs. Ca''ollne C. Amer on 
"Music in the Home" and by J. R. 
Hatchelor on "Oriranlzed Games for 
Boys." 

The program d'so Included bagpipe 
music and Scottish songs by pupil.s nf 
the fourth and fifth grades, a drama- 
tization by the firit grade pupils and 
drills by the secot d and third grade 
girls. Miss Minnie Milne, principal of 
the school was In charge of the pro- 
gram. 



Mothers' Club Meeting. 



"The Relation 13 
and the Home" wa 
address given yest 
Miss Katherlne Kli 
Bryant school befc 
the Mothers' club o 
district. Miss *TCln 
and better feeling 
ents and the teach< 
terest on the part 
the school work ol 



etween the School 
s the subject of an 
?rday afternoon by 
ig. principal of the 
ire the meeting of 
f the Bryant school 
g advocated closer 

between the par- 
>rs and a closer In- 

of the mother In 

her children. 



Spring I'estival. 



The annual sprln 
the young people o 
sion church, Twent 
and Second street, 
evening in the chui 
gram of music ar 
arranged. Rev. C. 
the West Duluth ' 
Rev. J. J. Daniels, 
church, will speak 



c festival given by 
f the Swedish Mls- 
y-flrst avenue 
will be held 
ch parlors. A 
id songs has 



west 
this 
pro- 
been 



V. S. Engstrom of 
dlsslon church <ind 
pastor of the local 



West End Briefs. 



Rev. J. H. Nervlg 
Norwegian Luthera 
this morning from t 
neapolls. 

The Young Peop 
Swedish Methodist 
tertained tomorrow 
home or Miss Dor 
Twenty-third avenu 

Mrs. John Eckniai 
street, entertained 
noon for the Ladles 
Trinity English Lu 

The Busy Bee Sc 
anv Swedish Luthe 
entertained Saturda 
home of Mlsn Myrt 
Twenty-eighth aver 

Rev. Elmer S. Lu 
preach this evenin 
Methodist church, 
west and Third sti 

Mrs. H. N. May. 
was hostess yester 
the Ladles' Aid Sod 
odist church. 

Rev. Milton Fish, 
tral Baptist church 
west and First sti 
"Christian Children 
Home" at the mld-v 
congregation this e 

The meeting of 
association, schedu 
evening, has beer 
poned. 

Mrs. Mary Ceas 
third avenue west 
Park Falls, Wis., w 
by the serious Hint 
'Nothing helps onr 
a thorough cleanli 
remedy each sprlnfi 
Tea Is the remedy 



pastor of the Zlon 
n church returned 
. short visit to Mln- 

le's Society of the 
church will be en- 
evenlng at the 
■X Nelson, 17 North 
e west. 

1, 224fi West Fourth 
yesterday after- 
Aid Society of the 
thernn church, 
iclety of the Beth- 
ran church will be 
V afternoon at the 
ie Holm. 126 South 
lue west. 

nd of Superior will 
g in the Swedisli 
Twentieth avenue 
■eet. 
2822 Helm street, 
day afternoon for 
ety of Grace Meth- 

pastor of the Cen- 
, Twentieth avenue 
eet, will speak on 
and Parents In th(3 
,'eek meeting of the 
/ening. 

the Adams Alumni 
led for tomorrow 
I indefinitely post- 

r of 119 Twenty- 
has returned from 
here she was called 
ss of her father. 

s health more than 
ig, purifying tonic 
r — Hollister's R. M. 

Lion drug store. 



FARI^ER OF ODANAH 
SUFFERS BY FIRE 



Others May Also Have Lost 

By Bad River Brush 

Fires. 

Ashland, Wis, May 1. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — The forest fire condition 
on the Bad river reservation Is prob- 
ably Improved. 

The wind has gon.^ down and a slight 
rain has set In. C'nly one farmer Is 
known to have bee:i burned out, John 
TL-^irto of Odanah, but several other 
farmers may havj suffered severe 
losses. 



STORM CAR BARNS 

AT ASHIEVILLE, N. C. 

Ashevllle, N. C, May 1. — A crowd of 
?.00 or 400 men and boys late last night 
attacked the barns of the Ashevllle 
Power & Light company, whose motor- 
men and conductors went on strike 
last Saturday for an advance In wages 
of 3 cents an hour. Several windows 
were broken by volleys of bricks and 
stones. The police charged the crowd 
several times and ai rested twelve men 
alleged to have been the ringleaders. 

The street car cornpaj.y operated six 
cars last night w.th strikebreakers 
under heavy guard. 



no true bill in 

chic;ago probe. 

Chicago. May 1. — Grand jury Investi- 
gation of charges of fiaud and col- 
lusion in connection with the award- 
ing of a million dollar contract for 
voting machines, has been concluded. 
After the examination of the last wit- 
ness, reports were clr(iulated that no 
indictments would be returned. 



Cripple Creek Gold Output. 

Cripple Creek, Colo.. May 1. — The 
gold ore outiiut of the Cripple Creek 
mining district for the month Just 
closed amounts to 80,852 tons, carrying 
a gross bullion price of $1,194,232. This 
production is :'2,000 tons In excess of 
the previous month and shows heavier 
tonnagn and highe: valuation than 
April, 1912. 



A Spring Health 

Mistake Many Make 



(Murtyn'3 Health Guide) 

"It Is a common ml.stake, made by 
mo.st people after the winter season, 
to think they can go through the 
summer enjoying good health with- 
out first ridding tlie sy.stem of the 
poisons and Impurities in the blood 
which cause most spring ailments, 
fever and sickness. To act properly, 
giving needed energy and nourish- 
ment to the body, the blood mtist bo 
pure. 

"Of all sprlng-medlclnes none 
equals the good old-fashioned homo- 
remedy mad*! by dl.vs^ilvlng V^ cupful 
sugar and one ounce knrdene (which 
can be bought at any drug store) fn 
^4 pint alcohol, then adding hot water 
to make a quart. It is easl'y made 
at Ruiall cost and a tablospoonful 
taken before meals will do wonders 
In purifying the blood, removing sal- 
lowness, pimples and re.«)tDrlng the 
liver to normal action. It restores 
perfect health and energ>' to a worn- 
out body — gives on<» vlffor, un appe- 
tite and strongthenf the body tissues 
of both old and youcig." 



K 



H 



You'll Do Better at Kelly's 



ousefurnishin 




ecials (?r ™^ 




On Our Third Floor, Daylight Department 





f'.^i ' ' ' 'T-^ 



CARI»ET BI':ATER.S. 

Heavy braided wire loop, fastened in strong wood handle; 
a regular 26c value — (not like cut) — I^O 



J0 

1 1 1 1 rvD 



Kelly's price. 



^=^ 



im-nr 



W 



MIIIRORS. 

Kitchen Mirrors — 8 % by 
10 Va 'h-; hardwood frames 
— just right to hang over 
kitchen sink — t Ai* 

Kelly's price X**^ 




GARBAGE 
CANS. 

Heavy Galvanized 
Garbage C a n .% 
with cover and 
bail — just right 
for the small flat 
— Kelly's 
price. . . . 



67c 





WATER 
GL.\SSES. 

Plain thin 
blown lead 
Glass Tum- 
blers; hava 
needle etched 
band — Kelly's 
price, dozen — 

^55c 




LUNCH SETS 

Blue and White Japanese Lunch 
Sets, contain 44 pieces; thin dain- 
ty china; nice for cot- ^Cj 7^ 
tage sets — Kelly's price. V*^* • *-^ 





DUST PANS. 

Heavy weight 
Dust Pans; good 
strong handles; 
brown finish — 
Kelly's 'Jf* 

price • ^^ 



FURNITURE 
POLISH. 

Your choice of several 
kinds of polish — l:ox- 
all, Lustre, Sunshine, 
O-Cedar, etc.; large 
bottles — Kel- 
ly's price. . . . 



19c 



BREAD 
MIXERS. 

Made of very heavy 
tin; riveted handles, 
cast Iron dasher, 
easily removed to 
clean; heavy tin cov- 
ers; cast iron clamp 
— makes from 1 to 
5 loaves — Kelly's 

price, Qfin 

each %:ro\^ 





TOWEL RACKS. 

Adjustable Towel or 
Clothes Rack — has 
8 hardwood arms, 
metal bracket to 
fasten to wall — Kel- 
ly's price, Q/» 
each *^^ 

fTjOor brushes. 

Oil mops for hardwood floors remove all dust and 
polish floor with same process. Every Qfi/* 

housekeeper should own one — priced J/Ot- 

Refrigerators 

To the economical house- 
keeper w^ho wants a good 
refrigerator at a reason- 
able price, one that is or- 
namental as a piece of fur- 
niture, and saving in the 
use of Ice, we can with a 
great deal of pride recom- 
mend our lines of Seeger, 
Traverse City and Ranney 
erators. 

We are offering 
this week a re- 
f r 1 g e r a tor, the 
outer case of ash, 
with raised panels, 
finished go 1 d e n, 
lined with galvan- 
ized Iron, good in- 
sulation, sliding 
wire shelves ; 
holds forty Mo) 
lbs of ice. "Kelly's 
special price, 
only 



Where 

Your Credit 

Is Good 



WASH TUBS 

Hea\y Galvanized 
Wash Tubs — heavy 
wire top; malleable 
drop handles. Your 
choice of three sizes 
— Kelly's prices — 

I^arffo, each 59c 

Medium, i^ich. . .49c 
Suiall, each 3tf c 

TOILET PAPER 

Very large rolls 
Japanese Toilet Pa- 
per of a good qual- 
ity; regular 10c 
good.s, Kelly's 7/* 
price, each. j. . . • ^ 

CARPET 
CLEANER. 

■'A sweeping com- 
pound that win ab- 
sorb the dust and 
brighten the carpets 
— makes sweeping 
easier; disinfects 

and kills germs — 
large package — Kel- 
ly's price, Q^ 
each ZtK' 



CURTAIN 
STRETCHERS 

Heavy. Wood 
Frame Curtain 
Stretchers; ruled 
and numbered; 
adjustable nickel 
pins — at 

$1.33 



i 



.1^: 



Ci^-i^iflSI^ 




BROOMS. 

Good Corn Broom 
— well wired to 
handle; light but 
substantial — Kel- 
ly's price, each 

21c 



Sewing Machines 




We want every woman in this 
town to become thoroughly ac- 
quainted with our sewing ma- 
chine department, wliere we show 
the most beautiful and highly 
Improved sewing 
machines in the 
world. We have 
set aside a special 
depart ment for 
sewing machines. 

This week we are 
offering as a special 
inducement a drop- 
head machine, guar- 
anteed ten (10) years 
and one that has all the 
latest Improvements; e 
wonderful value. You 
cannot afford to be 
without a sewing 
machine at the ex- 
tremely low price of 



$14.75 



$7.75 



AUTOMATIC Drop 
Head Sewing Machine 
in handsome case, 
made of selected oak, 

finished In rich golden 

color. Five (5) roomy 

drawers complete with 

box of attachments; this 

machine Is guaranteed 

I'or ten (10) years, has 

every new feature and Is a wonderful 

value at Kelly's 




re and Is a wonderful Ss27 CiCi 




^=^^^Q^mL^^^mm^ 



Where 
f Your Credit 
Is Good 



Penofl SoareM Diirglars. 

New Haven, Conn., May 1. — Henry 
Wedland and Alexander Drummond of 
Brooklyn, N. Y., were captured by R, 
Ia Davlsson of Dayton, Ohio, a Yale 
senior, at the point of a silver pencil, 
while ransacking his room In Van- 



derbllt hall on the Yale campus. The 
burglars thought the pencil levelled 
at them by Davlsson was a pistol. 



Quits for Laek of FiindN. 

St. Paul, Minn., May 1.— Dr. B. R. 
Hoag, In charge of the department of 



school hygiene for the state board of 
health, will cease his work next August 
because the legislature failed to ap- 
propriate sufficient funds to maintain 
this branch. Tills announcement la 
made by H. N. Bracken, secretary of 
the board. 




D. H.. May 1, laia. 




For a lesson, go to 

The Columbia 

The only Stein-Bloch Dealer in Duluth, 



At Third 
Ave.West 



• 



-S, 



AHi 



IlLJl i iMMii 



f 




12 



Thursday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



May 1, ldl3. 





nm 



The Latest 

News Published 

on This Page 




BASEBALL 




ifllBnia 



EqiTED 
BY BRUCE 




The Herald 

Sporting Gossip 

Is Reliable 




IHlEIBiDilSTME SPOiRTBia SIHIEEP 

mn ©OMS mw tme pope 



^©^^IL, IS SEEi BY 




FISCHEL AT WORK 



Ho the public and also those 
who own automobiles, this 
little drama has to do with 
two barbers and baseball. The 
man being shaved will be 
distinguished or tortured in the fol- 
lowing lines under the name of the 
Patient. The barber shaving hmi 
will be called, to avoid confusion, the 
Home Barber. The barber at the 
next chair to the right will be desig- 
nated as the Visiting Barber. The 
Home Barber is a Giant rooter, while 
the Visiting Barber is a Cub con- 
tender. 

Patient, entering red, white and 
blue door, smiling at the beautiful 
manicure girl with gold tooth and 
diamond ring, and removing collar 
and cravat: 

"Shave, please. Nothing more; 
hurry, have to make train." 

Home Barber prepares lather, 
strops razor and plays strictly to 
form by saying it is a nice day, 
though it is beastly cold and trying 

to rain. 

Patient closes eyes, crosses feet, 
folds hands and begins solving a 
business deal. 

Home Barber: "I seen where thj^s 
here Dcmaree is showing great forrn. 
Sav. this McGraw can pick 'em; he's 
the little white father of baseball. The 
Giants ain't leading now, but they is 
the best team, take it from me." 

Patient mumbles in an inarticulate 
manner and his mind reverts back to 
figure $278,464,025. 

Visiting Barber, after applying 
lather to nostrils and mouth of his 
customer: "Forget that, Frank: 
them Giants is false alarms, grab this 
from little me. Say me and Joe went 
down to Chi last July and see the 
Cubs knock this Rube Marquard out 
of the box in the fifth inning. You 
got the wrong tfope." 

Patient opens one eye and scowls 
which the Home Barber mistakes for 
a smile, thus gathering fresh impetus. 
Home Barber, leaning on the chest 
of Patient and shaking the lather 
brush in mild protest until it spatters 
over the dark blue serge of victim in 
Visiting Barber's chair; "Forget that 
stuff. Mat. Ain't it Shakespeare that 
writes about one swallow. One series 
ain't the whole season. Who won the 
pennant. Mat? Just pipe up quick 
with the little answer, cause it's little 
me that's askin' you." 

Patient squirms free and looks at 
his watch. 

Visiting Barber, placing elbow, un- 
intentionally to be sure, on the wind- 
pipe of Victim: "Mebbe so; mebbe 
so — but Frank Chance was ter the 
hospital and all them Cubs was mad 
at Murphy. I took the Chicago pa- 
pers and I took particular pains to 
get the dope, believe me, Frank." 

Home Barber is silent for ten sec- 
onds, thereby establishing a remark- 
able record. 

Visiting Barber: "Them Giants is 
the biggest fourflushcrs in the two 
leagues; just grab that." 
Home Barber: "O— 
you why you, Say there 



manicured and used to heat, he glared 
at Mat and spake thusly: 

"You ought'nt to say them things, 
Mat. Baseball is honest and the 
Giants has the greatest team in the 
world. The Bostons beat them 
through luck. Try to be fair, and 
another thing Mat, you are so ex- 
citedvthat you ain't givin' that gent 
a good shave," 

As the Home Barber lifted h's 
hands a mere trifle to detect a speck 
on his diamond ring, the screams ot 
Patient filled the shop. Even the 
manicure girl, ordinarily a very blase 
and matter of fact young lady, gazed 
with surprise and a slight tinge of 
alarm on the parboiled countenance 
of poor Patient. 

A tenored voiced "damn," profuse 
apologies, and cold cream take the 
stage. Patient adjusts his collar and 
glances wrathfully at his lobster-like 
countenance. 

He leaves the shop in a rage. 

Home Barber: "Some day I hopC8 
that I can buy a farm and don't ha\e 
to take nothing from nobody.^ This 
waitin' on the public and kiddin' them 
all the time, ain't what it seems, now 

believe me.' 

• • • 

Johnny Kilbane should not com- 
plain over the fact that he received a 
draw. Jim Corbett picked him to 

win. 

• • • 

English critics state that Great 
Britain has what is believed to be the 
greatest all round athlete in the 
world. It is to be hoped that the 
illusion will be preserved by never 
allowing the boy to compete against 

the United States. 

• • • 

Dispatches state that eighty women 
are out for the co-ed baseball team 
at Madison. All charges of profes- 
sionalism and other of the protests of 
eligibility off color will please be 
preferred five days before the first 

game. 

• * « 

Rash is the name of one of the 
race horses entered at Lexington, Kv.. 
yesterday. Rash broke out of tne 
starter's gate and caused all of the 
other nags to fairly itch with nervous 

impatience. 

— « 

Propose Return Match. 

I.^s Angeles, Cal., May 1. — Negotia- 
tions were begun yesterday for a re- 
turn match between Johnny Kilbane, 
the featherweight champion ana 
Johnny Dundee, who fought a 20-round 




the world, has announced himself as 
manager for WlUle Hoppe. a local 
boxer who has the distinction of hav- 
ing knocked Wolgast down during the 
latter's last training eeason as a cham- 
pion. ^ . . , 

Ad ia seeking engagements for nis 
protege, whom he heralds as a com- 
er and is trying to attract the atten- 
tion of promoters. 



NATIONAL LEAGUE 



on Ainsmlth's single. PJank fanned 
twelve men to ten by Johnson and 
each gave only one base on balls. 

The score: K- ^■ ^• 

Washington 2—2 5 2 

Phlladerphla ...000000000—0 44 

Batteries — Johnson and Ainsmltn; 
Flank and Lapp. Umpires— DIneen and 
Hart. 



Won. 

Chicago 12 

New York 8 

Pittsburg 8 

Philadelphia 6 

Brooklyn 7 

St. Louis 8 

Boston 8 

Cincinnati 2 



Lost. 
4 
4 



7 
9 

12 



Browns Win Shut-out. 

St. Louis, Mo.. May 1.— Baumgardner 
and Gregg engaged In a pitchers' bat- 
tle here yesterday, the former having 
the better of the argument, St. Louis 
winning from Cleveland 2 to 0. Gregg 
was unsteady in the early Innings but 
always pulled out without being scored 
upon. St. Louis won the game in the 
efehth. J. Johnston singled to left. 
Williams sacrificed and was safe when 
Olson fumbled the ball. Both runners 
on Pratt's sacrifice and 



Pot. 

.750 

.667 

.671 

.556 

.638 , 

.633 advanced 



.26i) 
.167 



RICE DRIVEN FROM BOX; 
DOOKS LOSE TO BRONKS 



Millers Gather Six in First 

and Win By 9 to 8 

Count. 



Superior, Grand Forks and 
Winnipeg Are Other Win- 
ners of Day. 



Yesterday'* RenuKs. 

Minneapolis. 9; Duluth, 8. 
Superior, 12; St. Paul, 10. 

draw 'with him at Vernon Tuesday . ^ffn^nlpe^'g T wlnona^'o. ' 
night. The contest wa.s unsatisfactory v> mmpce. °, > 



NORTHERN LEAGIE 



Won. 

Superior . . H 5 

Winnipeg 4 

Minneapolis 4 

Duluth 3 

St. Paul 3 

Grand Forks * 

Winona 3 

Virginia 1 



ost. 


Pet. 


2 


.714 


2 


.667 


3 


.571 


3 


.500 


8 


.600 


4 


.500 


R 


.375 


6 


.167 



present season. Jarnlgan, the hurling 
star of the Flickertails, was on the 
mound, and he held the Ore Diggers 
to two hits. Faeth worked for the 
locals, and though hit harder than the 
visiting hlllman, he was effective with 
men on bases and kept the hits of the 
opposition well scattered. 

Brant scored the first run of the 
visitors by walloping the pill over the 
fence. Brant accomplished a similar 
feat yesterday and hopes to repeat the 
performance thlf afternoon. 

Jarnlgan scori d the second of the 
runs of the visitors by hitting, advanc- 
ing on an Infield out and then coming 
home on Lyman's clout. 

Weckler got the solitary local count 
through his own hit, two outs and a 
safe paste by Fjieth. 

The score: 

Grand Fks — A.B 
Altman, If 4 



pin't no use talkin' to you 

The Home Barber strokes swiftly 
and vehemently, as you have seen the 
tail of a cat indicate its angry ntiood. 
and the razor speeds across the 
countenance of Patient, finally tak- 
ing a large and perfectly healthy 
piece of skin off the cheek bone. 
Blood and towels add to the local 
color of the drama. 

Apologies and a piece of court plas- 
ter follow in the order named. 
Patient, mildly: "Please hurry." 
Visiting Barber: "There is a lot 
of luck in baseball. The Giants air.'t 
the whf le thing — don't get that idee. 
Charley Dooin with a little luck 
would have won the pennant, take 
that from muh, bo." 

Having finished shaving the Pa- 
tient the Home Barber strode over 
to the nickel plated, marble-tofped 
basin and permitted a towel to dang'e 
in the boiling hot water that poured 
from the faucet. 

He seemed to be in a daze. His air 
was abstract. He forgot to wring 
the towel out. He stepped back of 
Patient's chair, a beautiful white 
enamel thing, still engrossed in deep 
thought. 

Visiting Barber: "Tom Lynch 
really copped that pennant for tVe 
Giants: you can't beat 'em; it's all 
fixed, for McGraw." 

The Home Barber looked sad. Then 
his mood swiftly changed to anger 
hectic heat, as it were. He firmly 
placed the steaming towel on the 
face of Patient, and leaning on it with 
his two white hands, beautifully 



In every way, according to the news- 
faper commentators today. Although 
Kilbane led easily on points, the drav/ 
decision was commended on the ground 
that Dundee was the aggressor and 
coming In at all times, although 
usually covered up. 

Promoter McCarey and "Scotty" 
Montelth. manager of Dundee, ex- 
pressed the hope of putting on the re- 
turn match In two or three months, 
preferably July 4. 

It was the opinion among fight fre- 
quenters today that neither boy would 
make good against a lightweight — 
the often expressed ambition of each. 
Kilbane did not seem to have the 
nVi' V.Mi I knockout punch and Dundee, with his 
cii. *'-'"l peculiar habit of leaping into the air 
to launch a blow, also lacked a punch. 



Detrlck, 3b 4 

Foster, lb 3 

Chase, fls 4 

Brant, cf 4 

Grogan? rf 4 

Lyman, 2b 3 

Edmonds, c 2 

Jarnlgan, p 3 



R. 






1 





1 



H. 
2 

i 



1 


1 
2 



PO. 
3 
1 
1 

1 




A. 


1 


1 



3 
1 



E. 



1 



McCarty Outfights Moran. 

New York, May 1. — Luther >fcCarthy 
outfought Frank Moran, the Pittsburg 
heavyweight in a 10-round bout here 
last night. 

The fighting was at a fast pace for 
heavyweights, Moran did most of the 
leading and frequently the men stood 
toe to toe and exchanged freely their 
hardest blows, both receiving much 
Funl.«!hment about the body. McCarthy 
relied upon a hard left to the face, but 
often left his guard open, enabling his 
opponent to get In a strong left hook. 
McCarty had the better of the first 
round, but Moran evened it up in the 
next. In the third the fighters' heads 
came together In a mixup, slightly cut- 
ting Moran. In the fourth Moran 
landed a straight left, drawing blood 
from Mccarty's nose. The fifth was 
even, but McCarty took the next two. 
McCarty tied In the eighth, a left 
hook sending him to the ropes, and 
in the ninth Moran got In some more 
good blow.s. McCarty finished strong, 
landing often In the last round, while 
Moran, who kept boring in, was wild 
and missed most of his blows. 
* 

Gives Game to Buffalo. 

New York, May l.— President Barrow 
of the International league yesterday 
awarded the protested Buffalo-Balti- 
more game, played at Baltimore April 
28 to Buffalo by a score of 8 to 7. The 
Buffalo club had protested the game 
because of the umpires' refusal to allow 
a run to score In the tenth when, with 
the bases full, a wild throw by Pitcher 
Roth hit the grandstand. 

Upon investigation after the game, 
says President Barrow, it was shown 
that the grandstand in Baltimore Is 
considerably less than ninety feet from 
home plate Ifi which case the playing 
rules provide that a runner may scor« 
from third base without being "put- 
out." 



Gaines Today. 

Duluth at Minneapolis. 

Superior at St. Paul. 

Grand Forks at Virginia. 

Winnipeg at Winona. 
• 

Minneapolis. Minn., May 1. — The 
Bronks made six runs in the first In- 
ning of yesterday's game before Rice 
was sent to the dugout to think It 
over, and though the Dooka battled 
valiantly throughout the remainder of 
the game and overcame the large lead 
of the home team, Minneapolis finally 
copped the contest by the score of 
9 to 8. 

Rice didn't have anything but his 
glove and an earnest prayer for a 
change In the way things In gen- 
eral were breaking against him. ne 
was finally yanked, but not until after 
the damage had been done. 

Johnson went to the mound after 
the cruel riding of Rice and pitched 
some real baseball. Bush, a new comer 
to the Dooks, went In the last Inning 
and worked and showed some stuir, 
though Unglaub secured the single that 
won the game off the delivery of Mr. 
Bush from the bushels. 

It looked like a hopeless task for 
the visitors after the long lead ao- 
cumlated in the opening round. But 
the Sox were game and kept coming 
all the time. Comstock was chased 
from the hill in the sixth when five 
runs were gathered off his dellver>\ 
Rube Wadd;JJ came to the rebcue and 
finished the V^me strong. 

One of the features of the game 
was the hitting of Miller of the Dooks 
He got three blngles during his busy 
afternoon, one of his trips to the plate 
resulting In a triple. 

The score: ^ „ t,/-. a 

Minneapolis— AB. R- H. PO. A. 



Totals 31 2 7 27 8 1 

Virginia— AB. R. H. PO. A. E 

Bennett, If 4 1 1 

Shannon, cf 3 2 10 

Norvold, rf 3 

Anthony, lb 2 12 

Roberts, as .... .8 8 1 

Sharkey, 3b 4 2 

Weckler, 2b 4 1 1 1 3 

Hardgrove, 3 9 8 

Faeth, p 2 1 6 



Totals 28 1 2 27 13 3 

Score by Innirrgs: 
Grand Forks ... 1 1 0—2 7 1 
Virginia 10 0—1 2 3 

Summary: Home runs — Brant. Bases 
on balls — Jarnlgan. 3; Faeth, 1. Struck 
out — By Faeth. 8; by Jarnigan, 9. 
Paeaed balls— Hirdgrove, 1. Time, 2:00. 
Umpire — Werden. 

SAINTS LOSE SLUGGING 
MATCH TO SUPERIOR. 

St. Paul. Mi/in., May 1. — Superior 
scored four runs in the ninth inning 
of yesterday's frame and won the con- 
test by the sco-e of 12 to 10. 

With the Little Saints in the lead 
upon entering the home stretch it 
looked like a victory for the Joneses. 
Mike Kramer was on the mound when 
the explosion came, the visitors from 
the north cour.try falling on the de- 
livery of Michael and hitting him to 
several corners of the lot. 

LeClaire started for the home team 
and was found frecjuently throughout 
the contest. \\'lnters, the player Cur- 
tis obtained from the Kansas City 
Blues, was the hurler working for the 
Red Sox, and though he was hit hard 
he managed to remain and oop the 
game. 

A high wind blew across the field 
and seriously Interfered with tho 
playing. 

The score: 

St. Paul— AB. R. H. 

Thomas, if 5 1 4 



Brlere, ss 5 2 

Olson, cf /J } 

Doyle. If 6 1 

Unglaug, 3b 6 

Allen, c f ^ 

Chase, rf § } 

Lellvelt, lb 2 1 

Warner, lb 2 I 

McClure, 2b 1 

Cosgrlff, 2b 3 1 

Comstock, p * " 

•Sherrln J * 

Waddell, p 2 



3 
3 
1 
3 
2 
2 
1 


1 
1 
1 




3 
I 
8 
1 

9 


7 

e 



1 



2 



2 



1 

4 



2 

4 
2 

1 



Totals 44 9 18 33 16 

•Batted for Comstock In sixth. 



SH 



Insist on the 
ARROW 
label the 
mark of, 
and guide 
to shirt sat- 
isfaction. 

Si. 50 up. 



CI,tJKTT, PEABODY 
of ARROW 





Duluth— AB. 

O'Brien, 2b o 

McGraw, If * 

Miller, cf « 

Menlece, 2b 3 

Rhoades. 3b & 

Smith, rf 5 

Schreiber, 88 

McCarthy, c 9 

Rice, p 

.Tohnson, p 5 

Bush, p 



R. 
2 
1 
2 
1 






H. PO. 
1 4 



1 
3 

14 
4 
1 
2 

,4 






A- 
S 


1 

1 

2 

4 

S 
1 

6 




E. 
3 
1 






1 










YeMerday's Re«ult«. 

Chicago, 4, Cincinnati, 3. 
Brooklyn, 6; New York, 8. 
Boston, 2; Philadelphia, 1. 
St. Louis, 6; Pittsburg. L 

. ^ 

Reds Lose Close Game. 

Chicago, May 1. — The Cincinnati 
"Reds" with the return of their regu- 
lar playing paraphernalia gave the 
local Nationals a close call in the 
second game of the series yesterday, 
but lost, 3 to 4. , , 

Suggs and Pierce were opposed to 
each other In what proved to be a 
pitchers' battle but with the luck of 
tho game in favor of the Chicago 
fllnger. ,^, ^ 

The locals were credited with two 
homers, on drives which were mis- 
judged. Had these been played cor- 
rectly the outcome might have been 
different. ^^. 

In the fifth Inning -^fter one Chl- 
cagoan had been passed, Bescher mis- 
Judged Brldwell's liner to left center, 
and both the runners scored. Again in 
the next Inning, Marsans was not set 
for Mitchells hit and the ball rolled 
to the fence, the runner circling the 
iases. Bunched hits and a double steal 
gave them another. 

The visitors started a rally In the 
last Inning, when Pierce weakened, a 
single, an error and Almeida s clean 
drive to the clubhouse almost winning 
the game. ^, , 

Both pitchers were given sensational 
support In the fielding. Score: „ ^ „ R- 

Cincinnati 1 O'O 2— 3 

Chicago 00022 " x— * 

Batteries— Suggs and Clark; Pierce 
and Archer. Umpires — Owens and 

Guthrie.- 

• — 

Rally In Seventh. 

Brooklyn, N. Y., "May 1.— Brooklvn 
came from behind with a rally In the 
seventh inning and made it two out 
of three games in the series with New 
York. The score was 5 to 3, New York 
leading by 8 to 1 In the seventh, when 
with two out and men on first ana 
second and two strikes on Cutshaw, 
the latter banged a long double to cen- 
ter sending heme the tying run. Hits 
by 'Stengel, Wheat and Davebert sent 
two more runs across. 

Borth, Ragaix and Ames gave way 
to pinch hitters, Crandall batting for 
Ames and finishing the game Allen 
struck out three men In the last two 
innings. Ragan. however gets credit 
for the victory. A fine "n^ catch by 
Wheat, Stengel's batting and fielding 
of the pitchers were features. Man- 
ager McGraw was banished from the 
flild on the ninth by protesting strike 
decisions. Score: .,...,-,.» r ' {ft { 

New York 110001000 — 8 10 1 

SrXkfyn 10 4 x-6 9 2 

Batterles-^randall. Ames and Mey- 
ers- Wilson, Ragan. Allen and Miller. 
Umpires — Rig ler and Byron. 

Make It Four Straight. 

Pittsburg, Pa., May 1.— Pittsburg was 
unable to hit Steele to any extent yes- 
terday and lost the fourth straight 
gamtf St. Louis taking the first gatne 
of the series 6 to 1. Konetchy's single, 
a sacrfflce and McLean's single gave 
the visitors a run In the second. An 
error bv Vlox, a walk to Konetchy 
and singles by Mowrey, Gathers an& 
o"LeRry gave them three more in the 
thlfd O'Toole relieved Robinson in the 
fourth and pitched fine ball, only one 
run being made off him. Ferry pitched 
the ninth and allowed another lun^ 
Miller's single, an out and Butlers 
sngle gave Pittsburg Its only run In 
the^ nln^h. It was stated tof^y^^^f^ 
Hans Wagner mav be able to play \n 

^rSir ^' .^".'.0^8 foTo 1-f l| "^i 
pVttsburg ... 1—1 61 
^'Batte'rfes-Steele and McLean ; Rob- 
inson, OToole, Ferry and Simon, Kelly. 
Umpires — Brennan and Eason. 
* 

Play Eleven Innings. 

Boston. Mass., May 1.— Boston won 
Its third game of the season after an 
eleven-lnnlng pitchers' ^^ttle between 
T-^mes and Brennan yesterday, Boston 
ir"phllld?lphia 1. James a recrui 
tWlrler, has won ,two_of^ 'extra fn 



scored on Stovall's single to center. 
St Louis played perfect ball In the 

flt*l<5- T> T^ n. 

The Bcoroi R. H. E. 

Cleveland 00 00 000 — 6 2 

St. Louis 0000002X— 2 5 

Batteries — Gregg and Carlsch; Baum- 
gardner and Agnew. Umpires — 
O'Loughlin and Ferguson. 
♦ 

Chance's Men Lose Again. 

New York, May 1. — The Bostons 
showed real world s championship form 
yesterday and defeated the New Yorks 
8 to 1. They batted Schulz the first 
New York pitcher for fourteen hits 
and scored almost at will. Hoff held 
the visitors In the last two Innings. 
Bedient pitched a fine game for Bos- 
ton and received great support until 
the ninth Inning when wild throws by 
Speaker and Engel prevented the box 
man from scoring a shutout. 

The score: R H. E. 

Boston 21011030 0—8 14 2 

New York 00000000 1—1 10 1 

Batteries — Bedient and Cady; Schulz, 
Hoff and Sweeney, Gossett. Umpires 
— Connelly and McGreevy. 



team off its stride here yesterday J^ft- 
erhoon and the locals had I'ttle trou- 
ble In batting out a 7 to 1 victory. 
For four innings, Rhoades was able to 
evade disaster, but in the fifth an 
error, a single by Riley and Gardner's 
double, followed by a daring double 
steal gave the locals three runs to 
which they added four more off 
Rhoades and Zabel In the seventh when 
they bunched three hHs with three or 
the visitors' errors. James was In 
grand form, holding the opposition hit. 
less In every Inning save the first and 
ninth Score: B- H- EJ. 

Toledo 3 4 X— 7 10 8 

Kansas City .,,.10 000 00 0— 1 2 6 

Batteries — James and Krueger} 

Rhoades Zabel and O'Connor. Umpires 

— Chill and O'Brien. 

» 

Pitching Wins Ganoe. 

Louisville, Ky., May 1.— The masterly 
pitching of Powell proved a stumbling 
block for Milwaukee yesterday and 
Louisville won the opening game of 
the series by 4 to 8. Chapelle'a rnuff of 
an easy fly from Stansbury's hat al- 
lowed the locals to score their two 
runs In the first Inning. One-handed 
cat^ches by Chapelle and Hulswltt were 
features. Score: ^ ^ ^ „ „ . . ^ k 1 

Louisville 20000200X— 4 6 1 

Milwaukee 0000110 1—3 9 1 

Batteries — Powell and Clemmon*, 
Cutting. Braun, Nicholson and Mar- 
shall. Umpires — Johnstone and Con- 
nolly. 

BURMEISTER A 

LOVER OF GAME 




Milwaukee 10 

Indianapolis 8 

Columbus 8 

Minneapolis 9 

Kansas City 8 

Louisville 9 

St. Paul 6 

Toledo 6 



10 
10 



Pet. 
.625 
33 
33 
.629 
.500 
.600 
.375 
.876 



Yesterday's Results. 

Louisville, 4: Milwaukee, 3. 
Toledo, 7; Kansas City, 1. 
Minneapolis, 8; Columbus, 4. 
St. Paul, 11; Indianapolis, 0. 

— ^..— — ^ — — 

Indians Are Shut Out. 

Indianapolis, Ind.. May 1. — Five hits 
with a base on balls In the fifth inning 
here yesterday scored four runs for 
St. Paul and sent Schardt of Indianap- 
olis who had pitched a good game that 
far, to the bench. Harrington, who 
succeeded Schardt, did no better, aiid 
he was replaced by Merz whose error 
and wild pitch combined with a hit 
added another score to the visitors' 
total In the ninth. Karger was a mys- 
tery from the start, allowing but three 
hits. Score: R. H. E. 

St. Paul 00014023 1 — 11 16 2 

Indianapolis ..0000 00 000 — 8 6 

Batteries — Karger and James; 
Schardt, Harrington. Merz and Clarke, 
Vann. Umpires — Murray and Handiboe. 
. « 

Win Through Errors. 

Columbus. Ohio, May 1. — Timely hits 
mixed with passes and Columbus' er- 
rors gave Minneapolis eight runs yes- 
terday. Llbhart, after Bonnin had dls. 
located the first finger of Olmstead's 
left hand with a line drive In the 
fourth Inning, finished the game and 
did not allow the home team a hit. 
Each of thp Delehantys made saving 
catches for him. Score: R. H, E. 

Columbus 0202 000 0—4 4 5 

Minneapolis 3 10 2 110—810 6 

Batteries — Cole Maroney and 6 
Smith; Olmptead, Llebhardt and W. 
Srnith. Umpires — Westervelt and Ir- 
win. 

«. 

Mudhens Win Game. 

Toledo, Ohio. May 1. — The speed of 
the Toledo club threw the Kansas City 



New President of Northern 
League an Ardent Base- 
ball Fan. 

Minneapolis, Minn.. May 1. — John 
Burmelster, a well known lumberman 
here and also one of the greatest 
patrons of sports In this city, was yes- 
terday elected as the president of the 
Northern Baeeball league, succeeding 
George A. Barton, who was compelled 
to give up the office through ill- 
ness. 

For a long time Mr. Burmelster hai 
been not only an ardent follower of 
baseball, but of various kinds -of 
sports. A big man physically and 
mentally, a true lover of clean sports, 
a keen business man and one who 
knows baseball. It Is believed that he 
will prove a splendid executive for 
the new circuit. . »x. * 

It was only after he learned that 
It was the unanimous choice of thd 
directors of the Northern league that 
he accept the presidency that Mr. Bur- 
melster decided to accept the office. 
The salary of the executive offers no 
Inducement to the new head, as It Is his 
love of the game that was the pro- 
pelling motive of acceptance. 

It is expected that Mr. Burmelster 
will carry out the original Intention 
of Former President Barton and go to 
the Head of the Lakes for the open- 
ing of the season at Duluth and Su- 
perior. 

Coulon Scores Knockout. 



PO. 

1 
2 
1 



Glockner, ss .. ■ . 4 1 

Weldel. rf 6 1 1 

Jones, cf 4 3 2 2 

Reel, 3b .4 1 1 1 

Doyle. 2b 4 8 2 6 

Derusha, lb 5 2 7 

Pettit, c 3 i 8 

Le Claire, p 4 

Kramer, p 1 



A. 

8 

2 





E. 

1 

1 




1 
1 





tearn'B 'three victories, each extra In- 
ninK affairs. Boston's winning run 
was scored on MaranvUle's single, 



Totals 39 10 14 

Superior — AB. R. H. 

Perch, cf 6 8 

Cullis, ss » 1 

Vigerust, rf . . • • 6 1 1 

Monahan, If .... 4 1 1 

Curtis, lb 5 * ? 

Dunn, 2b 3 1 1 

McCauley. 3b ... 4 2 2 

Ford, c * 8 8 

Withers, p 6 3 8 



27 18 
PO. A. 

4 
4 

8 
1 
2 
1 
8 





IB 
8 

6 
2 



E. 

1 





2 




8 11 23 24 



Totals '*3 

Score by in"l"««;o ^ 2 1 5 0-8 
S^nnl'lpoils ... . . ..600 0020 1-^9 

Com^"?o"c!c''^UnJirug'rMc&'ra^;;:''Tre?: 
*^°"'"h It— Olson. Miller. Home run- 




Totals 41 12 17 27 28 3 

Summary— Two-base h'^s- X'^^m 
Three-base hlt;3 — Derusha, Ford, With- 
ers Home runs— Weldel, Doyle, Cur- 
tis." Stolen biises— Reel, 2: Jones, 4; 
Dovle, Derushi, Dunn and Ford, l. 
Hits off Le tlaire, 14. in e ght innings; 
off Kramer, 1. Hit by pitched ball— 
Monahan, by Le Claire; Perch by 
Kramer. Stru.-k out— By Le Claire 6 
Withers 6. Passed balls — Pettit, 
ScHfTe hits - Gl««^nf'p,^cCauley. 
Ford Left on bases— St. Paul, 7. Sti- 
perlor 7. Tlrae, 2:05. Umpire— Nel- 



P 
son. 



Capron's wild throw, a sacrifice and 
Mver^s single. Maranville's error made 
Philadelphia's only run possible. The 
visitors filled the bases in the e eventh 
with only one out. but James held them 

l.^^s'ton"" ^To 0000 00 10 1-2- I i 
?hflad"elphia .001000 0000 0-12 
Ratterl IS — James and wnaiing, 
Br^tVnan and KllUfer Umplres-Klem 
and Orth. 



AMERICAN LEAGUE~| 



Won. Lost. Pet 



727 
.727 
.667 
.656 
.470 
.429 
.294 
.143 



nlngs Bush, 2 In 1 1-3 »nn "gs^, Bases 
on bklls— Off Comstock. 41 Rice, 1; 
Johnson 2: BuBh, 1. Struck out-By 
Comstock 7: Waddell. 5; Johnson, 2; 
fluTh 1 Hit by pitcher— McGraw by 
Comstock: Doyle by Bush. Time o^ 
ga^e— 2:25. Umpire— Du nleavy. 

JARNIGAN HOLDS ORE 
DIGGERS TO ONE HIT. 

Virginia. Minn.. May 1.— Grand Forks 
defeated Virginia by the score of 2 to 
f yesterday in by far the best garne 
that has been played here during the 



Giants Get Bumped. 

Winona. Minn.. May ^1— Winona 
nla^-ed a ragg.d game in the field and 
Se^hlts of fhe MaroouB were bunched 
with rhe mlsplays of the home team 
Winnipeg proving an easy winner by 
Se score of 8 to 0. Thlelman, the new 
hurler recently secured bv Manager 
Tim Flood, WES on the rubber for the 
CVinucks and while he was bumne<) 
rither freely, he succeeded In keeping 
Ke hits of the Giants well Bcatte,-e| 

WuTnlpfr".*. . . .« a 2 2 2 0— 8 ■ lO' 'j 

Winona ". , . .0 0— 8 6 

Batteries— Thlelman and Bachant; 

Bell and Murphy- 

— »■ 

College Baseball. 

Princeton, N. J.. May 1.— ?' ?f- ^; 

Princeton i I ^* ^ 

Columbia ^ ^ ^ 

Eleven Innings.^ 

Woigast Is Manager. 

San Francisco, Cal.. May 1.— Ad W^ol- 
gast, former lightweight champion of 



Philadelphia 5 2 

Washington » g 

Cleveland *^ o 

Chicago *o 9 

St. Louis 2 g 

Boston . 12 

Detroit 2 12 

New York ^ 

Ye«ierday's IUmiuUs. 

rhicaeo. 8; Detroit, 3. 
Washfngton, 2; PhUade phla, 0. 
Boston, 8; New York, 1. 
St. Louis, 2 ; Cleveland, 0. 

White Sox Win. 



d defeated Detroit, H to ^-^ -.V;"' °'''_^: 
* ihorri Vilttlnir coupled with loose 




KNOWN THE 



WORLD OVER 




nrvnonred tO be a Clean bjiikik "y '- 

tffiinng shot near second Use and 
Quick tLow to first. Score: ^ ^ ^ 

in2l0121 — 8 11 2 
Chk^ago SSooOOllO-S 11 8 

Hildebrand. 

Pitchers' Battle. 

Philadelphia. Pa.. May 1.--A pJtch- 

s^£!°.'a^c^.°rt'^sl:"x'iriar.?fio'tfa 



talk with 
user five 
without hear- 
fine the new 
Try them 



YOU can't 
a Gillette 
minutes 
ing how 
Blades are. 
yourself. 

Two sizes of Packet— 6 Blades (12 
shaving edges), 50 cents: 12 Blades 
(24 shaving edges), $1.00. Dealers 
all over this city. 

GILLETTE SAFETY RAZOR COMPANY. BOSTON 



"V 



It 



m 



Windsor, Ont., May 1. — Johnny Cou- 
lon of Chicago, champion bantam- 
weight last night knocked out Tommy 
Hudson of Detroit In the fifth round 
of a scheduled eight-round bout. 
• 

Burns Wins Match. 

Burlington, Iowa. May 1. — Harry 
Hartman, a local wrestler, was de- 
feated last night by Farmer Burns of 
Omaha the former world's champion, 
who won two straight falls from him. 

Billiard Honors to Chicago. 

Pittsburg. Pa., May 1.— Chicago last 
night won first honors In the National 
Three-Cushion Billiard league on 
points a series of six games glvlns 
Chicago 288 points and Pittsburg 273. 
While both cities equally divided the 
series in games won. Chicago players 
totaled the greater number of points 



1 




i i 



Thursday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



May 1, 1913. 



13 



( 

( ^ 



In the playing: off of a tie to settle the 
thtirnpionshlp of the league. 
.u'^'^2^®* ^^®* played for Chicago In 
the final game last night against Jo- 



seph Wlroback and Charh-s McCourt 
of Pittsburg, defeating the local tnen 
50 to 4S. 8hea and McCourt had high 
runs of 4 and Wlrebaok 8. 



PRESIDENT BLUnilE SAYS 
DULUTH HAS A FAST TEAM 



crowd and a new attendance record 
for next Monday afternoon. 



LOCALIZING SPORTS 



White Sox Are Placed Ahead 

of the Twin City 

Clubs. 

Indications Point to Greatest 

Opening Day Crowd of 

City's History. 

Du- 



for any> of the twlrlora to strike their 
true gait. Kube Johnson is going 
about the best of the lot, aiul right 
now h* looks l>«*tter tlian last .season. 

"3t. Paul. Virginia and Minneai»oli« 
have provided cold weather for us, and 
until we strike some warm day.-* it is 
hard to tell what our pitchers will be 
able to do. O'Brien likes the staff and 
says wltliln a short time he will tiave 
all of his twirlers going at their true 
stride." 

Here It Is Wednesday — four (lays re- 
main between thi.s .semi-cloudy diem 
and the openliig of the season. 

Plans aro being perfected for the 
ushering In o^ tlie biggest opening day 
ot llie greatest baseball season in tlie 
history of the city. 

Ti,,,._„ t>i.,„, ^ ,, » - ., r^ There will be a paradt>. Mayor Prince 

Ha. ry Blumo, president of the Du- ,vill be the headliner in the honors at 

lutn Baseball association, returned to- the t)a8eball park, and there is to be 

day from Minneapolis. where ho '^ ba.seball contest between Duluth and 

watched the Sox perform In two of ''^ "P*' '''"'• 

the eamea iir-iin^r n.^ Minn^^.^^n^ Duluth fans will hardly know the 

me games agamst the Minneapolis old park when thev walk through the 

uronKs. gate next Monday afternoon. 

Ml of the teams of the North-srn The grandstand has been enlarged. 

league are experiencing some trouble ^^^ third base bleacher moved buck, 

wttli their oltiilirfiv* at fhivi .»«i-iv .i.t^- **"** other alterations and Improve- 

. ineir pitoiieia at tins eaily date. ,„Hnt^ made that sives this city one of 

?; . .u '^>"""'^- Ihls Is true of the the best parks In the new circuit, 

ii-erv club'"in\\';j''!Vr^'^.^ ^^^'"^ the tmseball talk goi..g the 

w/anier hft, h«Jn n LV? ^^ r ^"'* '■'?\'^ rounds It is believed that 5.000 fans 

for VhiL condi?b>n "" responsible ^ui witness the opening of 'tho local 

•O-Srlen has' a crack ball club, tak- «^'^^«''" ^' '''"^ Northern league, 

ing the players in all the positions Everybody. It seems. Is going to the. 

I have seen Virginia. St. Paul and '^P«?nl"K. and Superior is going to seni\ 

Minneapolis in action atid I am of the over hordes of fanatics, for the Hed 

opinion that the Dooks are stronger ''^'^'^ have been doing some grand worli 

ih.in any of these teams. *i'id are at the present time leading 

•The more I ste of the team the b«t- ^ho league, 

irrii^'**. ^"t field Impresses me. Elnu>r It Is time that the business men. 

Miller is Mlayijig the game of his life, every lover of baseball and the boost- 

Thls boy has sot his mind upon going ers for Duluth thought of going to the 

up tills season, and If he maintains game of Monday. 

be^oui'ol-'drfftei'""'''^ •*'""^'*' *''' ""''^ ^" «^^"* l'^"» awaited-that of the 

er^-^f'l'^r-f/rJ^'ki^ri.l^fr^al.V^-a ^e'li^-Zan^ro-u^dly^S^ .s\^ 1^:^ 
hither 'McGraw^snlavIn^ the L^t ^^ ^?'« emerged from the bushes and 

irtiole o?''b''a;ebairh.^'has^^evL;%S brand^°"oV '\°/,tV. ?r;^^''^*, '^* ^*^"r.^ 
ua. an.l wh^n Miiirtriv- la i-icri.V th^fl t)rana of baseball to mingle with 

a?-e 7ew Vetter^'b^l?' pl^ye^s'Sn 'u^: i^n^u^rst^r;'""^"'''" ""^ ''' ''''''' '"" 
minora. '""u* siars. 

•Rhoades to date is playing an good ^ "*"""' park almost has been con- 
a game at third as Leoer ever played structed. Money without stint has been 
with the Sox. Sclireiber covers more spent to put this town In the class 
ground than Sours, though It is too of baseball that will compare with any 
early as yet to say wliether ho is tho minor in the country — and Monday is 
hitter that the Bull Durham collector the opening day of the home season. 
«'*>*• ,,»,.,. ^ Carpenters are working at the park 

Menlece Is not and will never be today, putting the finishing touches on 
the great n.lder tl-.at Blulim was with the grand stand, bleachers and flnlsh- 
ua. but he Is hitting the ball harder Ing the construction work on the ticket 
than the player wltli the Toledo club, stand and gates. Bv Monday after- 
••^^ood^ iooks like a real pitcher, I noon, when the first fan flies through 
bat he Is wild and has to cut out a lot the new turnstiles, the last nail will 
of stuff In the etYort to get the ball .have been driven, the final detail com- 
somewhere near the plate. \Ve let I pleted. and all will be in readiness for 
\\orman go a.s we believed the pitch- i the tossing of the conventional first 
Ing st^tf did not need the services of ball. 

If the weather man will but do the 
right thine: by us and only smile, 
present Indications point to a capacity 



The Proctor baseball team yesterday 
defeated the Roomerois by tlie score of 
8 to 2. The contest was a nioat peculiar 
one, two home runs by eacli team and 
an additional run by Proctor provln^f 
the only counters of the game. tJaid- 
ner and l^vnch pitched some great 
baseball and tho game was one of the 
best that has been played In Proctor 
In recent yeara 

♦ ♦ • 

The Franklin school defeated the 
Lowells yesterday by the score of 7 to 
6. Smith and I'nden worked for the 
winners and Davis and Donaldson for 
the Lowells. 

• • • 

Chris Person, a well liked and 
gentlemanly wrestler who formerly 
made Duluth his home, reached hero 
yesterday. Chris has been in North 
Dakota during the past year and won 
the title of champion of the Fliclier- 
tall territory. Like wine, thl.s old l)oy 
Improves with age, for he never looked 
better In his life. 




lei 



rhi 



IS 



Seaso 



n's 



Collar 



May Fine Cobb. 

Chicago. May 1. — The belief that Ty 
Tobb would be reinstated with but a 
nominal fine was expressed last nlxrht 
by thosH who had interviewed members 
of the national baseball commlHslon. 
which met here yesterday. The coui- 
misslon took up only routine matters 
at yesterday's session and adjourned 
until t(»day when the Cobb case is to 
be considered. The commission Is also 
expected to take up the proposed In- 
vestigation of charges that profession- 
al base' \11 constitutes a trust. 



Aviator Wins Prize. 

Paris, May 1.— Ernest M. Culllaux. 
a French airman, with his aeroplane 
flight on Sundav last, when he trav- 
eled from Bairrltz, France, to Kollum. 
Holland, a distance of nearly 1,000 
miles, won a prize of $10,000 and the 
Pommery or single day distance cup, 
which was decided at" sundown last 
night. 

Competition for the Pommery cup, 
valued at $1,500, Is open every six 
months and the prize Is awarded to 
the aviator making the longest flight 
In a straight line between sunrise and 
sunset of the same day. 



COUNTY AID 
TO BE ASKED 



The most recent arrival at your, 
dealer's, the newest, the latest, as 
yet the unlmitated among famous. 
Ide Silver Collars, i The 

SUSSEX 

— a shape unapproached in other 
American collars — has the Eng- 
lish smartness. None dispute its 
ncjwness, its distinctiveness* It 
is summer comfort. 



the Veteran 

weather has made it difficult 



"Cold 



^i^^' 



6% 



^. 



'ii 



*' Yes Sir! Studebaker wagons are 
made to back up: a reputation^ 

**l knov^, because wagons of every make 
come into my shop for repairs, and I have a 
chance to see how few are Studebakers." 

That's the opinion of thousands of blacksmiths 
who knovtr the quality of Studebaker wsigons. 

The owners never regretted that they bought 
Sludehakers, 

Tested materials, accurate workmanship insure a 
wagon unequaled for durability, and this careful selec- 
tion of wood, iron, steel, paint and varnish has been a 
fixed rule with the Studebaker Company for sixty years. 
That is why a Studebaker wagon runs easiest and lasts 
longest. It is built on honor. 

Whether you live in town or country, there is a 
•S/u^e&a^er vehicle to fill your requirements for business 
or pleasure — and harness of every description made 
as carefully as are Studebaker vehicles. 

See our Dealer or voriU ui 

STUDEBAKER South Bend, Ind. 

NEW YORK CHICAGO DALLAS KANSAS CFTY DENVER 

MINNEAPOLIS SALT LAKJ5 CfTY SAN FRANCISCO PORTLAND. ORK. 



>Mk'-<»i >;^rf.3t*-^ •.,-, '•*■ 



WHEN YOU NEED TO STORE GOODS 

When you intend leaving the city for a time — when your fu- 
ture plans are uncertain — when you contemplate changing your 
quarters and haven't decided just where to locate — when you have 
articles not in use and in the way — then is the time our furniture 
storage department can serve you best. 

DULUTH VAN & STORAGE CO 

18 FOURTH AVENUE WEST. 



The Rock Island is the Direct Route 





IT 



Rock Island— Davenport— Moline 

Frequent and convenient through sleeping: car service from Minneapolis and 
St. Paul. Request your agent to route your ticket Rock Island. Tell me the 

point you wish to reach and I will send you folder and through 

schedule from your home station. 

GATLORO WARNER 

Assistaot General Paaseater A^eoJ. RoeW Islaod Liae« 

1018 MtlropoIiUa Life Buildiai, Miaoeapolia, Miaa. 




Appropriation of $1,500 for 
Employment of Agricul- 
tural Agent Wanted. 

Effort Will Be Made to Or- 
ganize District of North- 
ern Counties. 



An appropriation of $1,500 to be 
used to employ an agricultural agent 
for Duluth and vicinity will be sougnt 
from the county board at Its meeting 
next week. This was decided upon 
last evening at a meeting of the agri- 
cultural committee of the Duluth Com- 
mercial club. C. P. Craig and W. C. 
Sargont were delegates to wait upon 
the county board. 

The committee will make every ef- 
fort to secure aid not only from the 
county but also from the state and 
Federal government in raising funds 
to permit of the placing of agricul- 
tural agents In this section. The com- 
mittee has Intertisted other counties in 
the work. 

Mr. Craig was auhorlzed to make ap- 
plication to Dean Woods of the state 
agricultural college for state aid for 
a county agent and to secure the co- 
operation of other counties In forming 
a district, so that Federal aid could 
be requested. 

^u*^'^®.. '*'^'''ou9 clvlo organizations in 
the city will be Invited to co-operate 
with the Commercial club in providing 
a products and livestock exposition 
for Duluth to be held In connecfon 
with an industrial show. A B llos- 
tetter was delegated to confer with the 
Rotary club, the Rt-tall Merchants' as- 
sociation and other organizations. 

Q. G. Harley. GeorgQ-^E. Stone. A. B, 
Ho.stetter and C. P. Craig weie ap- 
pointed a committee to confer with tho 
city council with regard to the estab- 
lishment of public markets and suitable 
places for the care of farmers' teams 

Those who attended the meeting of 
the agiicultuial committee last eve- 
nlng were C. P. Craig. A. B. Hostetter. 

^- l(M.n°'*'"'^"' ^' ^- Sargent and J 
G. M llllams. 



5 




Idc Silver 






Collars 







5 
1 

HI 

5 

a 
s 
s 

a 

5 



a 
s 
a 
5 



5 

a 
1 
ai 
a 
a 
a 
a 

ra 

a 
s 

a 



The SUSSEX — with its broad cut-a-way lines — may have 
competitors next season, but it's dictator in style right now. 

It has the Ide exclusive Linocord Unbreakable Buttonholes. 
They make Ide Silver Collars last longest, and retain their 
shape and fit._ You may easily prove it for yourself. Try 
the SUSSEX. 2 for 25c. '4 sizes. 

GEO. P. IDE & CO., Troy, N. Y, Makers also of Ide Shirts^^Good Shirts 



m 



JiM^g^lMilgl^glMllilllllllglllfaEifaEuaEifaii^ 



CIGARETTE STARTS 
FIRE FATAL TO TWO 

Helping Hand Annex at 

Kansas City Burns— One- 

Armed Man Hero. 

Kansas City. Mo.. May 1.— Twenty- 
three men were trapped in a fire that 
destroyed the Helping Hand annex, a 
mission lodging house, occupying an 
old four-story building at 403 Wvan- 
'ioito street. Two aro dead. Theyare 

f-KED WATKIXS. 38 years old; body 
not recovered. ' 

JOSEPH SANDERS, 55 years old 
died from burns after being taken to 
the hospital. 

Twenty of the men. employed about 
the place at night, w.ire asleep on the 
third and fourth floors when the Qrt. 
broke out. To Peter Kllnk. a one- 
armed Inmate, Is due credit for having 
saved the lives of several of the lodg- 
ers. He dragged a half dozen of the 
sleepers from the rooms and aroused 
others barely in time to effect their 
escape. 

A cigarette dropped from a window 
in the rear of the building set fire to 
a transfer company's stables The 
;^tables, with four horses and the lodjr> 
ing house, were destroyed in less than 
an hour's time. The property loss la 
estimated at $50,000. 

Fred Watklns was a graduate of Ox- 
ford university and had a master's 
rertincate in the British merchant 
marine. 

wouldcommute" 
walkfr sentence. 



Washington, May 1. —Attorney Gen- 
eral McReynolds has recommended a 
eommutatlon to one year of the five- 
year sentence imposed on I. B. Walker 
vice president of the Union National 
hank of Dallas. Tex. Senator Sher>- 
pard of Texas, who had recommended 
a pardon, announced that he exi)ect0d 
to see President Wilson on the ease 
next Monday. 

Walker, who borrowed money for 
himself from a Chicago bank with 
which the Union bank did btislness 
did not exhibit the transaction In tlie 
bank's statement. In his trial tho 
borrowing was shown to have l)een 
done with tho consent of the directors 
of the bank. 

Walker's sentence will begin Imme- 
diately If I'resldent Wilson does not 
delay It or Issue a pardon. 



MEETING OF 
ODD FELLOWS 



State Convention of Three 
Bodies in Duluth Begin- 
ning June 16. 

Rebekahs and Encampment 

Will Meet at Same Time 

as Main Lodge. 



On June 18 and for several days 
thereafter Duluth will be flooded with 
Odd Fellow^s, Rebekt.hs and members 
of the uniform rank or encampment. 
It is estimated that about 1,200 to 
1,500 visitors will come to Duluth from 
all parts of the state during the period 
mentioned for the state convention of 
the order. 

It la estimated that the encampment 
will furnish 200 delegate.s; the Re- 
bekahs will furnish between 500 and 

fiOO and the Odd Fellows proper will 
furnish about 500 more. Besides these 
there will be many visit or.s. sucji as 
the families of the de/egates and mem- 
bers of tho orders, not delegates, but 
Interested In the lodge legislation. 

The Odd Fellows met h(>re the last 
time In state convention just twenty 
years ago. At that :line Duluth was 
somewhat smaller than it Is now and 
liotel acconimodat!(jin ware not so 
prood nor so plcnUful. The result wa.s 



WE DO 



EXTRACT AND FIX TEETH 
WITHOUT PAIN OR DANGER 




No better^offices are to be found in the West. Our pleascH patients are increasing at 

the rate of 1,000 per month. Think"^ of 
what this means to us in a business way! 
It allows us to give you absolutely reliable 
guaranteed dentistry at a saving of more 
than half. Our prompt services save you time. 
and our new exclusive methods save you pain 
and discomfort. 
Special service to out-of-town patients. All work guaranteed ten years. 

NOXJE THESE PRICES: 




Gold Crowns f^oV."fT.*!..^"T*^^^^^ 



Bridfi^C Work beauty and quamy has S3. 00 

viiH^w ■■»■■% never been excelled..."*'"''*' 



Silver Fillings pr^ ^":!:''.'.f".':... JOc 
Whalebone Plates !ir '•■^^^°°$5.00 

WE SPECIALIZE IN GOLD INLAYS— GOLD AND ALUMINUM PLATES. 



■ UNION P AINLESS DENTISTS, "S,;'JlS'yj|lf.J §?; K 

^^■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■i Open from 8:80 a. m. t« 7 p. m. Sondajra* !• to 1. 1M^^^^^^ ^^^^^— . 




CROWIN 



that the Odd Fellows and their affill- 
alod boillos had a hard time of It to 
obtain places to sleep. Private houses 
had to open their doors to the dt'lo- 
^■ates ana help out tho Bhortapre of 
liotel accommodatlon.s, and in gt-neral 
the situation was (Mnbarra.sslng: to the 
local cominlttoe. This time the com- 
mittee In chavKre, wliich is headed by 
\j. A. Simonson. la having an easier 
lime of It on that f*<ore, and hotels are 
belnfv Interested In the matter at 
Ijresent. 

Just now the committee l8 Interested 
chlclly In the choosing- of a plate for 
the mectluf^s. The committee has un- 
der consideration the Auditorium, the 
Armoi y. Coffin's academy. Woodmen 
hall at the We.st end and onu or two 
other places. Tlie meetinu: places will 
be dc( id»d upon very soon, for all ar- 
rannoments must be niaiit' (julckly, as 
tlurn 1» only a montii and a half be- 
tween now and the time tho conven- 
tion will meet. 

It Is believed that tho Duluth con- 
vention will he one of tiu> Iarij:est the 
Odd Fellows aud their afliliatid orders 
have ever held In point of attendance. 



merce. The Imports have run up to 
more than $5,000,000 a day. The sta- 
tistics are for the first nine montlis 
of the fiscal year. 

Great Britain has proved the best 
customer, having- bouplit on an ave- 
rage of $3,7f>0,000 worth of goods every 
day. a Rrnnd total for the nine months 
of S4T8.408,725. 

Canada and Ocrtnany each have 
bouKTht about $1,000,000 wortli a day 
and the fourth best customer was 
France, whose purchases in the nine 
months were $120,7Sfi,3l4. 




EXPORTS NEARLY 
$7,000,000 A 



DAY. 



F. DAVIS & CO. 
OuluUi. Mina. 



Washington, May 1. — The TTnlted 
Htates has been exporting merchandise 
at tho rate of almost $7,000,000 a day 
BO far thl.s year, as shown by figures 
announced by the department qI com- 



SULZER'S PRIMARY 

BILL IS BEATEN 



Governor Still Hopes to Get 
Stock Exchange 
Laws. / 

Albany, N. T.. May 1.— /■io.ernor 
Sulzer's direct primary bill was de- 
feated In the senate late yesterday by 
a vote of 8 yearg to 42 nays. 

Despite thla ovorwhclmlng defeat, 
Governor Sulzer will not oppose the 
plan of legislature leaders to end tho 
regular session this week, provided a 



prohibiting disoriminati':.n"n'u;;*pri'„"t* 
Ing or engraving of .- L" "»^ t"»»t- 

certlrtcates. 

The 



oonds or stock 

senate finance committee h«a 
agreed tentatively to report adverseW 
to the senate Governor Sulztlr',. ...ti'^ 
Itmtlon Of John Mltc!u'll.'*fi"rm7r heTfl 
of the I nited Mine Workers, for sta 
labor commissioner. 



LaU 



HanaoB <ilvr« Boad. 

I^avenworth. Kan. M«v l._M X 
Hannon of Scranton. Pa., found gniltr 
at Indianapolis of conspiracy to trans- 
port explosives illegally, an.! sentenced 
to three years* Imprisonment, was re- 

Mf^'^r/'"''"' **"* Federal prison hera 
this afternoon on a $.S0,000 bond 



ALLEN'S 
FOOT-EASE 

The Anlisentic powder shaken into 
theshors—Tbe Standard II em* 
edy for the Feet tor a quarter 
century. .W.OOO testimonials. Sold 
everywhere, 25c, Sample FREB. 
Address. Alien S. OlmsfM, Le Rov. N. Y. 
Tlic Man wlu> put Cite ££• la FSEZ^ 





w- 



e-Miirk 



J^am 



i ' 




I 



14 



Thursday, 



THE DTJ[LUTH HERALD 






May 1, 1913. 



ON THE I 




RANGES 



OFFICIAL MAP OF THE WEATHER 



BUHL MEN IN 
GUN AFFRAY 



NASHWAUK SCHOOL THAT 

WILL BE MADE LARGER 



Shift Boss at Whiteside 

Mine Is Probably Fatally 

Wounded. 



Another Is Wounded, and 

Dominick Gilbert! Jailed 

After Chase. 



a »;>:>(<. >^i> 



^■fe. 



Buhl. Minn.. May 1.— (Special to The 
lleriiUl.) — In a nhootlniar affray follow- 
ing a drinking bout here last night in 
which bad blood was engendered, Peter 
Serratore, 40 years old, a shift boss 
at tlie White-side mine, was fatally 
shot and Dominick Pabatolo was slight- 
ly wounded by Dominick Gilberti, em- 
ployed by Butler Bros., stripping. 

Serratore and Pabatolo were re- 
moved to the Shaw hospital. Serra- 
tore is shot through the abdomen and 
will probably not live through the day. 
Pabalolos wound is in the breast and 
is of a su^ierhcial nature. 

Following the shooting, which oc- 
curred about 11:30 last nifiht, just as 
Sirratore and Pabatolo were boarding 
a street car for Lucknow. Gilberti made 
an attempt to escape. He was cap- 
tured after a cha.se of about twenty 
minute.';, in which the police were aid- 
id bv a large posse of citizens. Gil- 
berti" ran across the Butler Bros, dump 
and ^^as Jinally captured in a diserttd 
shack, where he had taken refuge. 

Gilberti Kxprensen lleRret. 
- In jail h>re this morning he ex- 
pressed r.'grtl for the shooting of Ser- 
ratore, but indicated that he was not 
sorrv for the shooting of PAbatolo, 
with whom he ha<l a feud of some 
years' standing. I'abatolo and Serra- 
tore came to Buhl last night to meet 
a couple of countrymen who were com- 
ing from Pittsburg to take employ- 
ment in the mines. They met Gilberti 
In town and with their friend."?, who 
came in on the evening train, did more 
or less drinking to celebrate the ar- 
rival of the newcomers. Gilberti tried 
to Induce them to take employment 
with Butler Bro."., stripping, where he 
is ernploved. and Serratore and Paba- 
tolo insi'9t.<i that they take a place 
at the Whiteside mine, where they are 
irnnloved. Ther was a dispute, but 
apparently the five were the best of 
friends when they left to take the 
street car. 

Just as Serratore and Pabatolo were 
preparing to board the car <Tilbertl 
opened flre. discharging four shots. He 
then took to his heels and in his haste 
to make a getaway knocked a woman 
standing on the sidewalk nearby from 

Gilbert! has l»een a resident of Buhl 
for about three years. He ha.s been 
in trouble before and had tne 
reputation of being a gun- 
toter. About a year ago he paid a fine 
of $100 and costs for shooting a neigh- 
bor's cow. He will not have an ar- 
raignment until the condition of Serra- 
tore is detlnitely determined. 

HIBBINGJOY 

RIDERS HURT 



-Sj- 






Vtty^-- 




11^^ V '*^^' 



^^^^■itt 






FOUBC.\ST TILL 
FKin.W 

Pi r Pulmh, Superior and vicinity, 
Im-ludine ihe Memifia and VeriniliC'n 
Iron ranc's: Generally cloudy to- 
uliilit ami Kridai ; colder tonlslit 
witti lownt teiniirrature about 30 
deg. ; moJ;>rine to brisk westerly to 
iiorllierly >iinda. 



came on 



Obeer%-atioM tiUcn at 8 a. m., sevcnty-fifih meridian lime 
PMS through po nts of equal temperature; 
the win.l. Fust figures, ...mpcrat.ire; ttorM_pr;^£V^^^ 



•"EXPLANATORY NOTES. , , - , • 

Air pressure reduced to .ea level. IsoB.r. (conlinuon._lioe,) V^^it^^ey^V^'::^'^^!:'^^^ 



clouil)'; 



dra^rn o, !y for zero, freezing, 80°, and 100°. Q clear; © partly cloudy 

^ of .01 inch or more for past 24 hours; third, maximum wmd vtloeity 



IsotoiKJis (dolled linei) 
S Enow; M report missiag. Anowe fly wilh 

...^_ : '. dLi 



NASHWAUK HIGH SCHOOL, TO WHICH TWO WINGS WILL BE 

ADDED THIS YEAR. 



Hippie sustained bruises of a minor 
nature. 

Smoke Obnciirea Il«ad. 

Wood files w«rt- riinniiig in the 
country near Keewatin yesterday and 
smoke drifting; across the highway in 
thick clouds almo.st completelv ob- 
scured the road for a considerable dis- 
tance. The automobile containing Mr. 
and Mrs. Dear and their little son. 
Raymond, driven by Morris Hosteller, 
was returning from a trip to Swan 
lake when the smoke was encountered. 
Mr. Hostetler was driving at a moder- 
ate speed when the other machine, 
driven by Mr. Hippie on its way from 
Hibhing'to Nashwauk with Mr. l>lck- 
inson was encountered. Mr. Hippie 
was driving at a high rate of speed, 
Intenoing to make a sudden dash 
through the smoke when the collision 
occurred. The occupants of both ma- 
chines were thrown from their seats 
and both cars were badly wrecked. 
The Hippie machine was able to pro- 
ceed under its own power and hurried 
back to Hibblng with the members of 
the party most severely injured. All 
the party got a bad fright and that 
more serious consequences did not re- 
sult is considered extremely fortunate. 



Sunday afternoon and evening. A 
movement is now on foot to request 
the board to take steps while the 
weather is warm. 

It is also asked that a number of 
open air concerts be given two or three 
times during the week niglits on the 
main business street as this would 
draw a number of people from other 
towns. 



BRUSH FIRES ARE 
CLOSELY WATCHED 



SAYS VIRGSNiA 

NEEDS Y. M. C. A. 



Old 



Two Drummers and Two 
Waitresses Narrowly Es- 
cape Serious Hurts. 

nibbing, Minn,. April 1.— (Special to 
The Herald.) — Two automobiles were 
in collision on the road between Hib- 
blng and Alice last night and. whrie 
no one was seriously hurt every effort 
is being made today to hush up the 
affair. 

Two voung women employed as 
waiiros.ses at the Oliver cafe and two 
well known traveling salesmen nar- 
rowly escaped serious injury when the 
machine in which they were riding 
was struck in passing by an auto- 
mobile being driven by C. R. Rhodes, 
near the cemetery hill. 

UheirlM Stripped Off. 

The rear wheels of the car in which 
the traveling men and the young 
women were riding were stripped from 
the machine by the force of the im- 
pact and one of the young women 
sustained a dislocated shoulder and 
cuts about the body and limbs. The 
second woman received a severe cut 
ov^T one eye. One of the traveling 
men was bruised about the hip, while 
tu- other escaped without injury. 
Both cars were going at a high rate 
^^{ speed. The women were attended 
by a physician, but none of the party 
was seriouslv injured. 

S<><-ond folllwion Earlier In Day. 

Five people narrowly escaped pos 
sible death and serious 
collision of automobiles 
high rate of speed on 
smoke-obscured highway 
mile from the St. Paul 
Keewatin road yesterday 

Frank Dear 
cut about the 



Minister Favors Using 
City Hall for Such 
Purpose. 

Vlrgina, Minn., May 1. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — "Use the old city hall 
for a Y. M. C. A.," says Rev. Thom- 
as Grice of the First M. E. 
•Build a new city hall that 
ample for the' requirements 
city's needs so that it will not 
essary to have some of the 
ments of the city 
Into half 
ent, then 
good cause." 

Mr. Grlce points out that while the 
members of the Oliver Iron Mining 
company's force can all have the use 
of splendid club rooms, those of tlie 
Independent companies have for the 
most part no place but the saloon or 
the pool room in which to spend a 
quiet evening without taking in the 
show. 

chishoCmwill 
be beautified 



church. 

will be 

of the 
be nec- 
depart- 
administration spread 
a dozen buildings as at pres- 
rent the old building for some 



Great Northern Orders Its 

Patrolmen to Keep Close 

Watch. 

Hibblng, Minn., May 1. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — Incipient woods fires, 
some of which threatened to do con- 
siderable damage, reported to State 

Forest Ranger Nelson in Hibblng last 
night, caused him to order out all the 
railroad patrolmen of the Great Nortii- 
ern in the vicinity of Nashwauk and 
Keewatin, as well as the patrolmen at 
several points along the line of the 
Missabe. 

The biggest of the fires reported was 
in the vicinity of Keewatin and was 
<loing some damage to standing tim- 
ber. Fires were also reported in the 
vicnity of Marble and Nashwauli. 
Fires Near Alice. 

Two small tires were running in the 
country to the south of Alice last 
night and caused some anxiety to the 
residents of the outlying districts of 
the village. There were frequent calls 
to the fire department in Hibbing, bui 
Chief Charles McHlhargey, after look- 
ing over tlie ground and taking pre- 
cautionary measures, decided the dan- 
ger of their coming up to the village 
was slight. 

W. C. Barrett and Herman Antonelll 
last night aided a Finnish settler on 
the Wilpen road in putting out a fire 
which ignited a bath house on his 
place, just this side of Penobscot creek 
and threatened its destruction. 




Duluth's beauti- 
ful spring weather 
continues today, 

but the weather 
man predicts a 
change tonight. Tht 
mercury is expect- 
ed to go below tlie 
freezing point, with 
cloudv weather pie- 
vaillng. A year 
ago it was cold and 
cloudy. The sun 
rose this morning 
at 4:52 and will set at 7:1.8, makirg 
fourteen houni and twenty-six minutes 
of sunlight. , ^ ,, , „ 

Mr. Richardson makes the following 
comment on vveather conditions: 

"Freezing weather prevailed this 
morning in western Canada, North Da- 
kota. Montana, Wyoming, Nevada and 
southern Uta'i. This turn to cold -r 
should reach the Head of the I-akes 
this afternoon and tonight and tender 
plants that may be up should be pro- 
tected. During the last twenty-four 
hours light ]-ain or snow fell over 
northern and western Minnesota, South 
Dakota, Saskatchewan, Wyoming, Ne- 
vada, souther)! Utah, southern Florida 
and Maine," 



temperature near freezing tonight wua 
colder in east and central portions. 

Montana— Fair tonight and Friday; 
freezing temperature tonight; 
tonight in north portion. 

Upper Michigan — Showers 
cooler tonight and Friday in 
north portion tonight. 



warmer 

tonight; 
extreme 



The Temperaturen. 

Following were tiie highest temper- 
atures for twenty-four hours and the 
lowest for twelve, ending at 7 a. m. 
today: 



Abilene 

Alpena 

Atlantic 

Baltimore 

Battleford 

Bismarck 



High. Low 



City. . 



..84 
,.60 
. . .'.6 
.70 
..42 
..86 



General 

Chicago, May 1. 



Forecast H. 

-Forecasts 
beginning at 



for twen- 
7 o'clock 



Injury in a 
going at a 
a stretch of 
about a half 
mine on the 

afternoon. 



BRUSH FIRES BAD 
IN ITASCA COUNTY 



of Hibbing was badly 
neck by broken glass 
from the wind shield, Morris Hostetler 
was painfully bruised and shaken up, 
C H. Dickinson of the Itasca Mercan- 
tile comnany. Grand P.apids, was badly 
cut on the left hand by broken glass 
and bruised about the head. Mrs. 
Frank l>ear sustained Injury to one of 
her arms and Raymond Dear and E. J. 




Why Have Grey or Faded 

Hair That Makes You 

Look Old 



Why lose your good looks that youth- 
ful, natural colored hair always helps 
you to keep? There is absolutely no 
need for it. A few applications of 
Hay's Hair Health will restore your 
grey hairs to their natural color and 
beauty, almost immediately and it will 
look even more beautiful than ever — 
your money back if it doesn't. Get a 
bc^Me today — prove it to your own sat- 
isfaction. 

Always ask for Hay's Hair Health. 
Don't take chances with any others. 

Free: Sign this adv. and taKe It to the 
following druggists and get a 50c. bot- 
tle of Hay's Hair Health and a 25c. 
cake of Harflna Soap, for 50c.; or |1.00 
bottle of Hay's Hair Health and two 
25c. cakes of Harfina Soap Free, for |1. 

y A ABBETT. C. F. BOYCE, TREDWAY PHARM 
*CY. L. B. MATTIX. A. E. SWEDHERS. 



Street Commissioner Has 
Started on Some Impor- 
tant Street Work. 

Chisholm, Minn.. May 1.— (Special to 
The Herald.) — Commissioner Harring- 
ton has started the most extensive 
work ever undertaken by the villa^^e 
in the way of improving the streets 
and boulevarding the city as well as 
planting trees. A man experienced In 
tree planting will superintend the 
planting of the trees. Many streets 
must be raised or lowered to grade in 
places and the engineer has the woik 
outlined and will keep the street conr- 
missloner and his crew iiusy. ihe 
work will be started on Oak street to 
the extreme south side of the town, 
and the work will be carried north as 
fust as conditions will warrant. Nearly 
every street and avenue in town will 
receive some attention and wherever 
possible the streets will be left in a 
finished condition as regards the curbs 
and tree planting. 

Two thousand trees have been or- 
dered and additional stock can be pur- 
chased on short notice according to 
the terms of the contract. The trees 
are mostly elms and Carolina and Nor- 
way poplars. 

chishoUmman^held. 



Another Said to Be Implicated in 
Case Involving Young Girl. 

Chisholm. Minn., May 1. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — Upon a charge of carnal 
knowledge of a girl under the age of 
14 Adolph Klippie was bound over to 
the district court In Judge Brady's 
court at Hibbing yesterday. 

Klippie formerly lived here nnd 
roomed in a rooming house on l^ako 
street for several months prior to be- 
ing arrested. He was a switch man 
at the Monroe pit for the past few 
months. His continued attention to the 
girl aroused a suspicion on the part 
of her father who appealed to Humane 
Officer W. B. Brown who together with 
Probation Officer C. E. Everett of Hib- 
bing set a trap for the young people. 
The girl confessed and It is said Kllp- 
plle confessed. 

Martin Vawkman also Implicated In 
the case will be given a preliminary 
examination within a day or two. 
Vawkman is a fireman on the Great 
Northern railway and it is understood 
he has expressed a willingness to 
plead guilty to a similar charge. 

virginIansw'anT 
park bamd concerts. 



ty-four hour£ 
tonight: 

Wisconsin — Fair and continued warm 
in southeast, probably unsettled and 
cooler in north and west portions to- 
night and Friday. ^ . r . 

Minnesota — Mostly cloudy tonight 
and Fridav; :'rost tonight with colder 
In east and south portions. 

Iowa — Generally fair in east, show- 
ers in west and central portions to- 
night Or Friday; colder in west portion 
tonight and in central portion Friday. 

Xorth Dakota— Fair tonight with 
freezing temperature; Friday fair and 
slightly warmer. 

South Dakota— Unsettled weather 
with rain or snow tonight or Friday; 



final acceptance on May 8. It is ex- 
pected that £. call for bids will be is- 
sued the bids to be opened on May 28 
when if everything is favorable the 
contracts will be let for the immediate 
construction of the building. 

The board has been badly hampered 
the last year for lack of room and the 
demand for another spacious school 
building is piesslng. 

SOCIALISTS tF 

HAVE BIG TIME 



Boise 48 

Rofitoii 58 

Buffalo 52 

CtUgary 44 

riiarleston 70 

Chicago 72 

rurpus ChriBtl...72 

Henver 78 

Des Moines 84 

Devils Lake BO 

Dodge 84 

DiiliiiQiie 80 

DULUTH 76 

Durancco 68 

Kastport 42 

Kdmonton 42 

Ksoanaba 52 

Galveston 76 

Gr.md Forks OC 

Oiaiui Haven 66 

Green Bay 76 

Hatteras 62 

Havre .... SB 

Helena 40 



C.1 
48 
44 
50 
2f 
31 
34 
44 
42 
18 
.'.6 
58 
70 
40 
62 
32 
60 
58 
48 
36 

;h2 

26 
44 
68 
32 
SO 
58 
60 
22 
24 



High. Low. 


.44 


34 


...58 


56 


...44 


26 


....66 


30 


...80 


54 


...60 


42 


....90 


32 


...80 


64 


....62 


46 


....88 


38 


....81 


60 


....86 


62 



Hougliton 70 

Huron 84 38 

Jacksonville 76 58 

Kamloops 60 .30 

Kan!^a.s City ....84 64 

Knoxvllle 74 48 

1a Cros.se 60 

Louisville 72 54 

Madison 78 66 

MarfiuHtc S2 64 

Me<llclne Hat ...38 22 

Memphis 76 58 

Miami 6€ 



MUes Ciiy . 
.Milwaukee 
Mlnnedi'Sa . 
JIf dona .... 
.Montgomery 
Moiitre.i] . . . 
Moorhead . . 
New Orleans 
New York . . 
North Plane 
Oklahoma . . 

Omaha 

Parry Sound 

Plioenix 86 

Pierre pfl 

Pittsburg 66 

l'..rt Anijur 58 

I'ortlaud, Or 52 

P.-ince Albert 42 

Qu'Aprello 32 

Raleigh 70 

Kauld City 54 

Rosehurg B4 

Hoswell 86 

St. Louis 78 

St. Peul 8i) 

Salt Lake City.. 48 

San Dleso 68 

Hxi »an<.is20 5C 

Snult .Sle. M.'U^e.70 

Seattle 56 

Sheridan 42 

.Shievep'irt 82 

Slou\ City 84 

Spokarie H 

Swift Current 34 

Tolwln 60 

Valentine 

Washington 70 

Wllllston 40 

Winnemuccai 46 

Winnipeg 52 

Tellowstone 42 



58 40 



42 
41 
42 
40 
26 
20 
50 
32 
36 
52 
60 
62 
36 
50 
r,0 

40 
42 
30 

eo 

62 
36 
28 
52 
88 
44 
28 
20 
30 
24 



taxes on the tracts involved, about 
seventy forties, for the year 1912, was 
$1, -123. 61. A reduction to IZ66.24 Is 
asked. W. F, McKay, county super- 
visor of assessors, attended the meet- 
ing. 

BRUSH FIRES RAGE 

NO RTH O F TOWER. 

Tower, Minn., May 1.— (Special to 
The Herald.)— A forest fire prevails a 
few miles south of town near the 
Frederlckson farm. The underbrush 
is furnishing the fuel for the fire and 
the atmosphere was smoke-laden all 
Wednesday afternoon and evening. 

— - — — ^ 

Gilbert .SaloonJst Fined. 

Gilbert, Minn., May 1.— (Special to 
The Herald.) — V. Dechti, who runs the 
Club saloon, pleaded guilty In a Jus- 
tice's court here yesterday to giving 
liquor to three boys the youngest 9 
and the oldest U. and was fined 
$75 and costs. Range probation offi- 
cers worked up the case after being 
notified of the boys being discovered 
drinking beer from a can in the rear 
of the Club saloon. F. Nyberg, another 
resident of Gilbert, paid a fine of 1-0 
for selling a 5-cent package of Copen- 
hagen snaff to Joe Jallen, 9 years 



m eRLy mi 
mm iTCHEO so 

-• 

Head and Face Raw All Over. Hair 
Coming Out Badly. Scales on 
Head. Simply a Sight. Used 
Cuticura Soap and Ointment. In 
Six Weeks Sound and Well. 



Coon Rapids. Iowa.— "When my Uttla 
girl was two years old thero was a. eoro 
ber he*d just above the temple In 
her hair in the bhapa of 
a tK>il. It kept gettlcf 
[larger, causing her Iot« 
of pain. After a couple 
of woek« it broke out 
In pimples all over her 
Iiead aad face. Hhe was 
a Bight I teU you. It 
affected hor eyes so she 
could hardly see. Wo thought she would 
go blind. Her head and face were raw all 
over. It kept getting worse all the time, 
and was just raw sores. Her hair came out 
badly when It was combed and we were 
afraid it would all come out. The eczema 
Itched so it nearly set her craay. By spells 
there were scales on her head as large as a 
quarter. She waa disfigured, she was Just 
simply a sight. She was cross and fretful all 
the time. 

" I boujsht a cake of Cuticura 3o»p aad a 
box of Cuticura Ointment. Wo could see 
an improvement the first week and she got 
better right along. In six weeks she was 
souiid and wdJ. Cuticura Soap and Oint- 
ment cured her." (Signed) Amos Pa.<iUr. 
Aim-. 16, 1912. 

Cuticura Soap 25c. and Cuticura Ointment 
50c. are sold everywhere. Uberal sample of 
each mailed tne, »1th 3a-p. Skin Book. Ad- 
dross post-card " 'Cuticura, Dopt. T.Boston." 
JK^MtsD who sliave and shampoo with Cu- 
ticura Soap will find it best for skin and scalp. 




old. 



Railroad Stations at Marble 

and Gunn Junction Are 

Destroyed. 

Coleraine, Minn., May 1. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — Forest fires have been 
th'-eatening in Itasca county the last 
tv.-o days. The flre companies at Bovey 
and Coleraine have been called out to 

fight nearby fires. Neither of these 
villages are in immediate danger, but 
the authorities are taking no chances. 
Reports came from Gunn Junction on 
the Great Northern, near Grand Rapids, 
that the railroad station, section houses 
and water tank were burned there. 
Marhle Station Burns. 
The Great Northern passenger and 
freight station at Marble was burned 
last night by forest fires south of 
town For a time the entire town was 
in danger, but the fire-fighters had the 
flames under control before midnight. 
Early this morning the situation has 
been relieved by showers. 



will make 
corner of 
street at 2:30 

will fur- 
parade AVill 
musical or- 



NEED SCHOOL ROOM. 



Chisholm Board Will 
creasing Present 



Not Delay 
Facilities. 



In- 



Chisholm, Minn.. May 1. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — The school board has 
ordered bids called for for all outside 
repairing and for building of fences 
around the buildings now unfenced. 
The Lincoln school will be among 
those that will be looked after. 

The plans and specifications for the 
new school building will be ready for 



Yoa'll Be Healthier an^ 
Happier Every Day in 
the Year If Yau Regu- 
larly Drink 



Morris Kaplan and Others 

to Speak at Chisholm 

Next Sunday. 

Chisholm, Minn.. May 1.— (Special to 
The Herald.)— The Socialists are plan- 
ning a big celebration next Sunday. A 
program has been arranged which will 
include some speaking of more than 
local character. , ^ , ,^ 

Morris Kaolan of Duluth 
an open air talk from the 
First avenue and Lake 
in the afternoon. . , ^ ^ ^ 

The Hibbing Socialist band 
nish the music and a big 
b»i given headed by that 
ganfzatlon. . , * _ 

In th# evening a movinr picture 
show w/ll be given in the Worker.s hall. 
"The Cry of the Children' "The White 
Slave Trsffio." "The Problem of Life 
"Scenes and Traveli^ You Have Missed, 
etc., will be among the pictures dis- 
played. 

TWO HARBORSTOY 
BORNE TO GRAVE 

Last Rites for Bland Tru- 
man, Who Died Suddenly 
Early Tuesday. 

Two Harbors, Minn., May 1.— 'Spe- 
cial to The Herald.)— The funeral of 
Bland Truman, son of Mr. and Mrs. W. 
C. Truman, who died very suddenly 
Tuesday morning of heart failure, 
held this afternoon from the 
Burial was in the Two 

"livid Truman, a brother of the de- 
ceased, who resides at Blwablk is here 
and will remain here until after the 
funeral. Miss Delia Truman, a sister 
is teaching school at Castle Dan 
also arrived 



former resident of Hibbing and one 
of the pioneers of Superior, Wis. The 
news came as sad shock to Mrs. Cor- 
mack as she had not been informed of 
Mrs. Roseman's illness. Mrs. Roseman 
was 65 years of age and moved from 
Hibblng to Washington about three 
years ago. She leaves a family ot 
grown sons and daughters and will be 
well remembered by many friends in 
Hibblng and Superior. It Is not Im- 
probable that the body may be brought 
back to Superior for burial. 

C. M. EVERETT IS 

BU RIED A T TOWER. 

Tower, Minn., May 1. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — The funeral of C. M. 
Everett was held yesterday afternoon 
from the ^t. James Presbyterian 
church, Rev. Joseph Mopson orfitiat- 
ing. The service had been postponed 
from Tuesday afternoon to await the 
arrival of relatives from a distance. 
Interment took place in Lakevlev/ cem- 
etery. 

The steamer Erma D is engaged in 
towing logs, pulpwood and tics down 
Pike bay 1© this city for Die Olson. 

The Erma D was the first boat to 
reach Vermilion dam this season, mak- 
ing the round trip from Tower on 
Wednesday. She encountered no ice. 
She Is the largest boat of the Lake 
Vermilion Navigation ccmpuny and Is 
commanded by Capt. Ed Heglund. 



Vir- 

ITnlon 
base- 



Put VIrsrinIa on Mop. 

Virgina, Minn., May 1.— (Special to 
The Herald.) — The new service of the 
Western Union combined with the 
Northern league baseball games being 
played here is helping to put 
glnia on the map. The Western 
strung a special wire from the 
ball grounds and the messages sent 
out over this wire have preference over 
all others so that the returns of the 
games may be rushed to the waiting 
public. 

\llee AVoman Burled. 

Hibbing, Minn., May 1.— (Special to 
The Herald.)— The funeral of Mrs. 
Peter Endmark of Alice, who died 
Tuesday, was held here yesterday from 
the Swedish Lutheran church. Rev 
Idstrom officiating and burial was 
Hibbing cemetery. 




Mr 

in 



TO TRY INDIAN BOY. 



Ac- 



Baraga County, Mich., Redskin 
cused of Killing Father. 

L'Anse, Mich., May 1.— (Special to The 
Herald)— Henry Shelafoe, an Indian, 
will be placed on trial in the circuit 
court for Baraga county at the term 
opening 



here next Monday. He Is 
charged with murder. Shelafoe who is 
little more than a boy. killed his 
father at Keweenaw Bav during the 
winter. He shot the old^er nian dead 
in a saloon, after having had an al- 
tercation with the bartender The 
father died because he interfered. It Is 
believed the defense will be insanity. 



EVELETH WOMAN TO 

BE BURIE D FRIDAY. 

Eveleth Minn., May 1. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — The funeral of the late 
Mrs. J. C. McGllvery has been set for 
Friday morning at 8 o'clock from the 
St. Patrick's Catholic church. Rev. 
Timothy Culligan will officiate. The 
body will be taken to Hibbing for 
burial. 



JOB KEPT jN_FAMILY. 

Aged Iron Mountain, Mich., Mail 
Carrier Succeeded By His Son. 

Iron Mountain. Mich., May 1.— (Spe- 
cial to The Herald.)— Although 
ard James, a veteran 
has been compelled 



BLOOD DISEASES 

TELLS ITS OWN STORY 

P*mplM. sp<its on The eklB, sore throat, swollen ton- 
sils \)on« Pdlns, catarrK dulled eje, and haCTWd look. 
Not' only does the victim of blood fUsejise suffer phys- 
ical weHkening ajid mental depression but haa U.e 
tormenlli:g huiiilH.-itlon of knov.lng that the malady 
cannot be concealed from the ejee of friend*. Blcod 
.ibeaies above all diseases, sluuld have iieatmeiil, 
the mnnjent am" of Ita eymptotns axe manlfeet, V\rtt« 
to Dr. Brown, 835 Arch St., Philadelphia. Specialist 
on Blood Dl»eas«, or send for ft botUe of 

BROWN'S BLOOD TREATMENT, $2 

—enough to last a month. TakB It and not« the Im- 
provement. Sold In DiJutli by >fax Wirth, 13 Weat 
Sui>erlor »tr«*t, and by all drjgglsu. 



Vlrgina. Minn.. May 
The Herald.) — There is 
park commission should 
band concerts in Olcott 



1. — (Special to 

a demand the 

arrange for 

park every 



Water ^ 



GREAT NORTHERN 

K ICKS O N TAXES. 

Hibbing. Minn., May 1. — CSpecial to 
The Herald.) — A representative of the 
Great Northern road made application 
to the StuntK township board for a 
reduction in tlie road's real estate taxes 
on a large share of their lands in towns 
52-21 and 58-20. The total of the 



was 

residence. 
Harbors ceme- 



who 
ger 



home 

-♦- 



yesterday. 



PRAISES VIRGINIA. 



Ap- 



Profeaaof Koch, of Berlin, i.n<J 
other noted •oi«oti»t9 aflrca that the 

iSl'tVt;r^rcKtoTf:Ros^ 

la on« ol the moat efficient means 
of aiding digeatioa. 



Charles Marshall Pleased With 
pearance of Range City. 

Vlrgina, Minn.. May 1.— (Special to 
The Herald >^C. A, Marshall, the the- 
atrical marager of Duluth. spoke in 
glowing terms of the future of 



the 



BOW TO DESTROY 

THE DANDRUFF GERH 



Rich- 
mail carrier here, 
to retire from the 
service because of poor health, tlie po- 
sition he haa rellnoulshed Is retained 
?n the family. Mr. James Is succeeded 
bv his son William. The veteran had 
clrrled mail In Iron Mountain ever 
since the service was established in the 
Menominee iron range "if ropolls 
twentv-two years ago. He is one of 
the best known and most popular men 
in the city^ 

SPECIALISTS TO SPEAK. 

At North Dakota Sunday School Meet 
at Grand Forks. 

Grand Forks. N. D., April 30.— (Spe- 
cial to The Herald.)— Seven Sunday 
Bcliool specialists of world-wide fame 
will be speakers at the annual con- 
vention of the North. Dakota Sunday 
Sohool association which >v;in be held 
here June 10. 11 and 12. _^}^E. Car- 
penter of Brazil. Ind.; Prof. "W . S. 
Athearn, Des Moines. Iowa.;^Dr. Frank- 
lin McElfresh of Chicago; E C. Knapp 
of Spokane. Wash.; A. Lincoln Hall of 
Philadelphia; Mrs. E. C. Knapp of Spo- 
kane, and Dr. Adam Gerbert of Phila- 
delphia. 

BEMIDJT FIRM LOSES 

$215 BY ROBBERY. 



citv of VlrKinla while here. 

While Mr. Marshall did not give any 
positive as.'urance that he would erect 
a new thef ter here, he admitted that 
he has siztd up the theater situation 
lure and tliere seems little doubt that 
he will secure a house here before very 
long, 

FORMER SUPERIOR 

V/OMANjS CALLED. 

Hibbing. Minn., May 1.— (Special to 
Tho Heraia.) — Mrs. K Cormack re- 
ceived a telegram announcing the death 
Tuesdav a'. Orvllle, Wash., of her 
oldest 'sister, Mrs, H. Roseman, a 



BY A SPECIALIST. 

That the dandruff germ is respon- 
sible for nearly all the diseases to 
which the scalp is heir, as well as for 
baldness and premature gray hair, is 
a well known fact, but when we real- 
ize that it Is also Indirectly responsible 
for many of the worst cases of catarrh 
and consumption, we appreciate the 
importance of any agent that will de- 
stroy its power. We are, therefore, 
particularly pleased to give herewith 
the prescription whtch an eminent sci- 
entist states he has found, after re- 
peated tests, to completely destroy the 
dandruff germ in from one to three 
applications. It will also almost im- 
mediately stop falling hair and it has 
in numerous cases produced a new 
hair-growth after years of baldness. 
This prescription can be made up at 
home, or any druggist will put it up 
for you: 6 ounces Bay Rum, 2 ounces 
Lavona de Composee. one-half drachm 
Menthol Crystals. Mix thoroughly, and 
after stadnlng half an hour it Is ready 
for use. Apply night and morning, 
rubbing Into the scalp with the ringer. 
tlp.«i If you wish it perfumed, add half 
a tea.-^poonful of To-Kalon Perfume, 
which unites perfectly with tho other 
Ingredients. While this preparation is 
not a dye, it is unequalled for restor- 
ing gray lialr to its original color. 



Bemidji, Minn., May 1.— O f- Rood ft 
Co are mourning the loss of |215 taken 
bv" a sneak thief Tuesday night from 
the desk in the rear where Mr. Rood, 
who had been counting the day s re- 
ceipts, $225. left it while he went out 
for lunch. . . , j 

When Mr. Rood returned ne round a 
back window broken and all of tho 
money except a |10 bill and fome 
loose change was gone. Mr. Rood be- 
lieves that the thief watched him 
tlirough a back window of the store, 
and when he went out, the thief 
quickly smashed the window and 
made his get-away. The police were 
notified at once, and outbound trains 
were watched, but the robber has not 
been caught. 

JUVENILE PROTECTION 

IN GRAN D FORKS. 

Grand Forks, N. D.. Mav 1.— (Special 
to The Herald.V— Juvenile protection 
on the same plan that has been adopted 
in manv of the large cities of the 
United States will be made effective 
In Grand Forks by the Juvenile Pro- 
organized by citizens. 



department in the handling of all 
cases of Juvenile delinquency. Miss 
Pearl Blough, formerly of Minneapolis, 
police matron of the city, is promi- 
nently Identified with the movement. 

• — — - 

To Teach In Philippine*. 
Chatham. Mich., April 30.— (Special 
to The Herald.) — Nat Hynes, for the 
last three years superintendent of the 
schools of Rock River township, Al- 
ger county, who recently resigned, will 
sail from San Francisco this week for 
the Philippines to enter the service of 
the Insular government. Eighty other 
instructors from various parts of the 
United States will depart on the same 
steamship. Mr. Hynes has been ap- 
pointed to a position similar to the 
post he held in Up per M ichigan. 

Eun Claire Satnnlli Sold. 

Eau Claire, Wis., May 1.— The big 
sawmill of the Daniel Shaw Lumber 
companv. which was closed down last 
fall afler being In oporation more 
than fifty years, was sold yesterday 
to the John H. Kaiser Lumber com- 
panv of this city. The d.al included 
mill" stock and real estate, the con- 
sideration not being named. The 
Kaiser company will operate its mill 
in this city and also the newly ac- 
quired plant. 

• 

RalMlDK Club Fnndii. 

Grand Forks. N. D.. May 1.— (Special 
to The Herald.)— The Commercial club 
will be placed on a budget basis, and 
todav the directors of the organiza- 
tion ' will conclude a three-day cam- 
paign which is expected to result in 
the completion of the fund sought. 
The budget will cover all departments 
of club activity, and is designed to 
place the organization on a better 

working basis. 

«— ■ 

FercuN Fall* Church Bums. 

Fergus Falls, Minn., May 1. — The 
old Presbyterian church, an old frame 
structure, was burned Tuesday eve- 
ning along with the parsonage, an 
adjoining residence and two harps 
The Fergus broom factory lost fl.BOO 
worth of broomcorn in storage. The 
fire was set by boys. 



STEAMSHIPS. 



ALLAN t'f. LINE 



^e«nTe St. Lawrence Rout* 



3( MlhnsMry wmk ( Fridays U UmtmoI. 
( ««aba«. ( taidaya to iawa aai lea^o. 

Large. Modem Triple and Twin Screw Steam- 
era. Pirat, Second and Third Claaa. Popular 
"One Class Cabin" Service (Called second class) 

Eates $45 & upwards to London, $47.50 1» Glasgow. 
•rtest— Fiaett— FtitMt St«inert ¥• Caaada 



ALSATiAN 






CALGARIAN 



\ 



V 



*» 



»# 



II 



1^ t r 



tection league. 



The 
work 



plan of the association 
In conjunction with the 



is to 
police 



Will B« RMdy Summer ••••«n 

Luxurious Accomniodations, Glass Enclosed 
promenades; Electric Elevators, Gymnasium, etc. 

Boston to Olsogow, Sailing ovory two w««h*. 

carrying one class cabin (second) Passengers, 

All Skeamera fitted with evftry Modem Equipment. 

For Rooorvatiens Apply Allan flk Co. ^ 

127 N. DMrborn St., Chieaso or Local Ac«# 




i 



i 



-I 
I 



f- 



-^ 



I 



Thursday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



May 1, 1913. 



^JA^A!AASS\\\\SN\vCS:\VV\\\\\SVr^\\\\\\\V!A!^>;A^ 



©f Hills 





amiio) 



@ 



PART II. 



^ 



|ERE is a moderate-priced player-piano 
possessing- the structural features, the 
fideHty of workmanship and the high 
artistic ideals that characterize all the products 
of this great house. Based on their knowledge 
of the entire player field, both in this country 
and abroad, the Aeolian Co. makes the im- 
equivocal statement : 

—That no player-piano at anywhere near 
its price approaches the Technola Piano. 

— That no player-piano at any price (save 
only the Pianola Piano) is superior to the 
Technola Piano. 

(Concluded Saturday Evening.) 

EXCLUSIVE REPRESENTATIVES. 
Write us for catalogue. 



WOMEN START 
FRESH FIRES 

Suffragettes Burn Stable 

and Boathouse in Their 

Campaign. 



16 



Mrs. Belmont Criticizes the 

Course of the British 

Government. 



S-ant wajres— wigoa entirely out of ac- 
cord w'lth the I allroadUi' obligations as 
a whole — railway t'mplojN?« apparently 
act on the as.vuniptton that a strike 
that would tic up trafilo would nt'ver 
be permitted by the pubUo. They «eem 
to think that f a strike Is to bo 
avoided the railroads must give way; 
tJiat the public will forc.« tlieni to give 
vvay, b^'lievlnK that arbitration must, 
take place; an.l that In the end the 
spiittinfiT of dlfferencoa between what 
they demand and tht* wages they will 
receive will re.Mjlt In their favor. In 
other words, ih ? employee have every- 
thinsr to sain and nutting to lose." 

freeTIimberfight 

(Continued from pagra 1.) 



'and 





m 

St^inway Ranos C O Pianola Pianos 
Talking Machinog unnjnui,,!,,.,.,,,,.,,,,^ 




309 AND 311 WEST FIRST ST.— Elks Building. 

Melrose 1714 — Grand 1004. 





No Need to 
Have 

Gray or 
Faded Hair! 

Here is the IT-ye&ra' 
Buceess/ul 

Empress Instantemeous 
Hair Color Restorer 

Gives any desired color to hsdr with 
one application. Very eaay to uisa. 

On* Dollar Box 75c 

Empres Shampoo Soap n»ciui.s perfect healtli 

to Scttip, LusTxe and Beauty to Hah ; firevcata 

teddiab tint CMiMd by Hair Djrea. 

Boyc» Druii company; Frelniuth's Departmant 
store; Comfort Beauty shop, 20 Wast Superior street 



Demands of the Peace 



PUT INVA DERS O N FARMS 

(Continued from paere 1.) 



but always to protect — not one but 
runs far greater risk of sudden In- 
Jury or death than the soldier or ma- 
rine of our country does today. There 
is little dangrer of anjr of these ever 
seeing war. thank God! They will 
only have to parade." 

The speaker pictured a possible for- 
eign Invasion as follows: "British au- 
thorities consider it might be possible 
for an enemy to land as many as 
170,000 men upon their Island in three 
weeks, and they believe they have 
jirovided a force sufficient to deal with 
this number. We could cope with 
seven times this number of invaders. 
If we could only induce them to accept 
our invitation to march far enougrn 
inland and partake of our hospitallfy 
until they were rested and gave us 
notice they were ready to begin op- 
erations. We would probably conquer 
without firing a shot. Thousands 
might decide to stay in the great W»st 
and work and save until they could 
buy a farm. We might turn invadt-rs 
Into citizens. 

For World Police. 
*'I believe In the formation of an in- 
ternational police, never for aggression, 
always for protection, if needed, of 
the peace of the civilized world. Th<.s 
requires only the agreement of a few 
of the leading nations. 

"Three or four leading peace natlon.3 
combined, constituting, as they would. 
an overwhelming force, unbroken peace 
•would almost certainly be ensured, for 
to br^ak It would be folly. If ever it 
wer^- brok-n, however. It would be well 
before resorting to force for the peace- 
prvserving nations to first proclaim 
non-intercourse with the offender, no 
loans, no exchange of products, no 
military or naval supplies — above' all, 
no mails — this would serve as a solemn 
•warning and probably prove effective, 
but if not, th**n as a last resort force 
should be used. This plan seems the 
easie-st and speediest mode of attain- 
ing international peace." 

Mr. t^arnegle deplored the failure of 
the -senate to ratify the Taft peace 
treatlf-s. 

B'-njamln F. Trueblood, secretary of 
the American Peace society, spoke on' 



"The Present 
Movement." 

,_„ Tru«'bIood for Arbitration. 

We mu.st urge," he said, "that all 
controversies not susceptible of ad- 
justment by direct negotiation be 
submltled to the court of arbitration 
*'w. il*® Hague, or to other tribunals 
which It may be found advisable to 
create at the moment. We have heard 
too much about 'national honor' and 
vital Interests' and hair-splitting dis- 
tinctions between Justiciable and non- 
Justiciable disputes. Are we not trying 
to conceal a hankering after war and 
pillage every time we use one of these 
vague and Indefinable terms? There 
are no unarbltral controversies In our 
day between nations whose Indepen- 
dence mutually Is recognized." 
Would Limit Armaments. 

Mr. Truoblood said tliat when the 
present aiTministratlon at Washington 
takes up the matter of arbitration 
treaties. every pressure mu.st be 
brought on the senate to bring about 
the ratification of the compacts 

He also urged that the United States 
take the lead In securing an agree- 
ment among the powers for a limitation 
of armaments. 



London, May 1. — Mlsg Annie Kenney, 
one of the moat prominent of the mili- 
tant sufTragettes, was arrested today 
as soon as she set foot In England on 
her arrival from the continent. A detec- 
tive had accompanied her from Paris 
bearing a warrant charging her with 
conspiracy. 

Miss Kenney was arraigned later at 
the Bow street police court and re- 
manded until tomorrow by the magis- 
trate, who refused to grant ball. 

The police still are in possession of 
the headquarters of the Woman's So- 
cial and Political union, the militant 
suffragette organization in Kingsway. 
The telephone switchboard in the of- 
fices has been placed in charge of a 
detective. 

Inane Their Paper. 

The suffragettes managed this after- 
noon to is.sue their paper, the "Suffra- 
gette." in spite of the warning of the 
government counsel. The number con- 
sisted of eight pages, the front page 
containing only the one word, "Raid- 
ed!" in large type. Most London news 
dealers refused to handle the publica- 
tion and only a few women were sell- 
ing It on the streets. The type and all 
the other printing materials Were 
selaed yesterday In the raid by the po- 
lice. 

Notwithstanding the activity of the 
police the campaign of arson conducted 
by the militant suffragettes was con- 
tinued this morning. A largo stable at 
Handon, a Northwestern suburb of Lon. 
don was set on lire and practically de- 
stroyed. A placard with the words- 

"Votes! Votes: Votes! Beware!" was 
found posted on the premises. 

Mrs. O. H. P. Belmont of New York, 
left for Paris today. Before leaving 
siie S9.ld: 

"The British government learns 
nothing from history. The present co- 
ercive measures against the suffra- 
gettes are bound to fall." 

Mrs. Carrie Chapman Catt of New 
York Intends to attend a meeting of 
protest against the payment of taxes 
by the dur-hess of Bedford. Distraint 
was levied on the property of the 
duchess on April 21 and a sliver cup 
belonging to hc-r was taken by thfe 
tax collectors to satisfy the claim. To- 
morrow Mrs. Catt will make her flr*t 
public speech in PZngland at a meeting 
of the Actresses' Franchise league. 

A boathouse on the Thames, opposite 
Hampton court palace, together with a 
number of boats, was destroyed by 
suffragettes early today. 



AUSTRIA. ITALY AND 
ENGLAND MAY OCCUPY 
MONT ENEGR IN PORTS 

(Continued from page 1.) 




INDIAN USESJ<EROSENE 

To Start Fire at Search Bay, Mich., 
and Loses Life. 

Hessel, Mich., May 1.— (Special to 
The Herald.)— Due. It Is reported, to an 
attempt to kindle a kitchen fire with 
kerosene, .Samuel Moses, an Indian, 
was burned to death at Search Bay in 
a log cabin In which he was sJeeplng. 
Only part of his remains were found. 
These were buried In the cemetery at 
Indian village, on Pine river. Moses 
was 30 years of age. His father and 
sister escaped from the cabin, the man 
with serious burns, suffered In a futile 
attempt to extinguish the fire and then 
to ."rave his son. 



to an Antivarl dispatch to the Mall. 
The majority of these are from Styria. 
A large number of Austrian troops al- 
so are proceeding to Antivarl by sea. 
A Vienna dispatch of the Times says 
that In the event of Austria attempt- 
ing to coerce Montenegro there Is lit- 
tle doubt that she would be supported 
by Italy, which probably would oc- 
cupy Santa Quaranta and A\'lona, while 
Austria would proceed against Lovlch- 
en mountain and ScutarL In order to 
avoid needlessly offending Russia, the 
action against Scutari would be car- 
ried out through Albania, not from 
Herzegovina. 

Danger of Conflict. 
The Sofia correspondent of the Times 
learns that the Greek and Servian 
forces now massed in Southern Maoe- 
donla aggregate 220,000. They are 
confronted by three Bulgarian divi- 
sions totaling 60,000 men. Almost all 
the remaining Bulgarian forces are 
still before Bulair and Tchatalja. 

The Bulgarian government, thfe dis- 
patch adds. Is exhausting every means 
to arrive at a friepdly arrangement 
with Servla and Greece, but the dan- 
ger of a conflict Is still Imminent. 
Peace Plnnx ProgrcMfting. 
In the meantime arrangements are 
In progress for the definite conclusion 
of peace between the Balkan allies and 
Turkey. The European powers h.ive 
requested the respective governments 
to appoint plenipotentiaries who when 
meeting in I^ndon will be invited to 
-sign a draft of the prellmlnarleg which 
the powers have already drawn up. 
This course has been H'iopted In order 
to prevent prolonged discussion. 



swered Leader Underwood, 
would call theni nuisances " 

Representatlvo Mondell of Wyomlnc 
ca led them "theao little choo-choo af^ 
fairs that are a cross between the 
bicycle and the automobile." 

Attacked Metal Schedule. 
Just before taking up the wood 
schedule, the last paragraph of the 
metal schedule was reverted to on a 
late amendment submitted by Repre- 
sentative Green of Massachusetts, who 
said he was acilng at the request of 
Democrats in his district. 

Greene, a Republican, declared that 
Jewelers and Jewelry workers In hl» 
district, who Jiaid they voted for 
President Wilson, had protested 
against the Underwood rate of 25 per 
cent on metals partly composed of 
platinum, silver or gold or plated. He 
sad he had received a letter from 
104 Jewelers, who claimed to be Demo- 
crats, another from the North Attle- 
boro Democratic town committee and 
one from the Democratic town commit- 
tee of another town in his district, 
protesting against the Underwood rat» 
and urging restoration of the Pavne 
ratt-s. An amenlment to restore tliem 
was voted down. 

..T ..-?*"^ FlnlMh by Saturday. 
, I think well finl.sh with the tarlflf 
in the house by Saturday night," Dem- 
ocratic Loader IJnderwood .said last 
night after an all-day debate on the 
Iron and steel si.Miedule. 

The metal schedule Is only the third 
of the fourteen schedules, which are 
followed by the free list, the techni- 
calities of the admlnstrative provis- 
ions and the in«;ome tax plan, and 
many of the members of the house 
are prepared to ;3ee the debate stretch 
into next w-^-ek. Representative Gard- 
ner of Massachusetts, one of the Re- 
publican membeis of the ways and 
means committee, figured on passage 
of the revision measure about next 
Tuesday night. But Mr. Underwood, 
smiling and conf der.t, saw nothing to 
disturb the plan for shifting the scene 
of the tariff bii: to the senate with 
the opening of next week. 

The Democratiii leader does not be- 
lieve a special rule will be necessary 
to put the bill through. The plan is 
to have the measure adopted within 
an hour after thj reading for amend- 
ment has been concluded. All day yes- 
terday and again last night the Dem- 
ocrats, with their overwhelming ma- 
jority, bowled o\er all amendments 
proposed by the Republicans and Pro- 
gressives. 

Heckled Palmer. 
The iron and s'eel schedule was the 
particular subject of attack and Rep- 
resentative Palmer of Pennsylvania, In 
charge of that schedule for the ways 
and means committee, frequently was 
reminded from the Republican s'lde of 
the fact that th.? South Bethlehem 
company was In hi.s district Repre- 
sentative Mann of Illinois, Republican 
leaders, and others charged that the 
duty on ferro-manganese was distinct- 
ly in the interest of the United States 
Steel corporation, with Itg sub.sldlary 
plants, and that the enhancement of 
value of ferro-maiganese In this coun- 
try, under the proposed advance In 
rates, should be sufficient to warrant 
the Pennsylvania member's indefinite 
continuance in congress. 

Representative Stanley of Kentucky 
aroused Chairman Underwood with a 
statement that convict labor was em- 
ployed In the ste?l mills of Alabama, 
that convicts were worker! In the mines, 
and In some Instances corporations had 
runjiers around police stations to pick 
up persons arrested for minor offenses 
and send them to the mines. 

"I want to say," Mr. Underwood de- 
clared, "that I vC'ted to put Iron ore 
on the free list, tlius affecting my ow^n 
business, but I cm't stand here and 
listen to a sland.^r on my own con- 
stituency." 

He emphatically denied Mr. Stanley's 
charges. 

Miller Ansalln Stanley 




The best 

Boys' Clothes 

in 

this 

big, round 

world are 

at 




CitiJtir>|Oi 



Duluth Agent 
for the famous 

SAMPECK CLOTHES. 



Moved From 330 West Superior St, to IVo, 18 3rd Avenne West 
Where We Will Be Glad to Meet All Our Customers 



PROFESSION 
IS ELEVATED 



Growing Respect for School- 
master, Says Andrew 
Nelson in Address. 



Election of Woodrow Wilson 

an Example of This 

Esteem. 



Representative IvTlller of Minnesota 
hotly resented what he characterized 
as the "habitual looseness of speech in- 
dulged In by Mr. Stanley." Mr. Stanley 
retorted that Mirer'3 remarks were 
bold and Impudent. 

Mr. Miller repudiated the Stanley 
steel Investigation .committee. 



BRYAN SEE;S^APANESE 

(Continued from page 1.) 



"OLD AMD Y IS N O MORE 

(Continued from page 1.) 



Jf 



STOMACH SUFFERERS, CHEER UP! 
TAKE S AMUEL'S "3-P" CAPSULES 

Did you ever stop to think that stomach trouble make.s a different person 
of you? It Just turna your whole world upside down, makes you feel blue 
downcast, despondent and unfit for plea.sure or business. If you eat what you 
crave you have a sour stomach, heartburn, feel bloated, uncomfortable, full 
of mhsery— indigestion; you often have sleepless nights, are nervous' and 
irritable, lack interest In the things in which you formerly took pleasure 

You, too, will praise "3-P" like Mr. J. F. Town.send. a prominent whole- 
sale merchant of Columbus. Ohio, who says: "Your 'S-P" has done me a 
great deal of good. I would hate to think I could not get them as they are 
certainly all you claim for them." 

Now, this very day, stop dieting and .starving your already weakened sys- 
tem. Thousands have found how needless It is to have a bad stomach by 

getting at the drug store a 25- 



cent package of this prescrip- 
tion after the formula of a fam- 
ous French .specialist, put up in 
easy-to-take, gelatin cap.sules. 

All your stomach distre.ss will 
go and with It that belching of 
sour, undigested food, and your 
nerves will tingle with renewed 
vitality; you'll sleep good and 
feel good. 

Write The Samuel Chemical 
Company, Cincinnati, Ohio, for 
a free trial box. 




Herald building, resigning this posi- 
tion two weeks ago. 

At the time of hla death he had 
been reading the "Life of John A 
.Johnson." The bookmark Indicated 
that he had read this book about half 
way through. 

Wold was a member of Duluth lodge. 
Xo. 28, Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows. He was a member of the lodge's 
degree team and carried In his pocket 
a notification to attend the next meet- 
ing of the team. He also carried an 
Identification shield showing member- 
ship In the Loyal Protective League of 
Boston, Ma.ss. 

The deceased had charge of the en- 
gineering plants of The Herald Mc- 
Kay and Hender.<»on buildings prior to 
his death. He was considered an effi- 
cient engineer and had a host of 
frlen<l3 among the tenant.^ of those 
buildings. 

Little Is known of his relatives. 
He Is believed to have a brother, Arnt 
A. Wold, whose la.=it address was' given 
as Chetek, Wis. Coroner McComb sent 
a tel.'gram to that cltv In the hope of 
locating Mr. Wold. The brother was 
hf^re last year, at which time he oc- 
cupied the room with Andrew 

The body will probably be held at 
the undertaking rooms until word can 
be heard from the brother. It Is prob 
able that the Odd Fellows will take 
charge of the funeral arrangements. 

WAGE DEMAND 

TURNED DOWN 

(Contlntied from page 1.) 



the extent of the restrictions placed 
upon aliens who t.re not permitted to 
become citizens, although the limita- 
tions are precisely those Imposed In the 
existing treaties '>etween the United 
States and Japan, China and other na- 
tions who.se subjects are ineligible. 

In the case of Japan, they are pro- 
hibited entirely from acquiring or 
holding land for i'arming or agricul- 
tural purposes, antl it Is declared that 
the passage of the act will put an end 
not only to the growth or Japanese 
farming colonies, but eventually to the 
colonies themselve.'i. According to Sen- 
ator Thompson, who has made a study 
of the bin the theory is as follows: 

"Only cUIzeng and those eligible to 
become citizens mc.y bo proprietors of 
land. They may e:iiploy Japanese and 
Chinese, but they cannot lease or oth- 
erwise give such aliens any Interest or 
share In their proprietorship. Such 
land as Is now held by Japanese and 
Chinese cannot be bequeathed to their 
alien heirs. It mu.'it be sold." 

"The practical result of the bill," 
said Senator Thompson, "will be that 
all further acquisitions will be pre- 
vented, leasing colonies will be exter- 
minated, and at the end of the pres- 
ent generation mo.st of the land now 
hfld by .Japanese and Chinese will bo 
owned by citizens." 

FIRE THREATENS 

R^^^ FOREST. 

Celle, Germany, Way 1. — A great for 
est Are has been raging In this district 
since Wednesday evening. It has de- 
vastated 10,000 acres and now menaces 
the village of Rebberlah and the roy- 
al forest. The flames today crossed 
the railroad running from Hanover to 
Hambury holding up the trains for 
several hours. 



The Duluth Schoolmasters' club held 
its April meeting and supper at the 
Y. M. O. A. last evening. The fea- 
ture of the meeting was an address by 
Andrew Nelson, attorney at law, and 
member of the board of education. 

Mr. Nelson referred to the fact that 
with Woodrow Wilson's election to 
the presidency, the stock of the school- 
master has gone up, that in the 
Twentieth century responsibilities of 
the school man have expanded and at 
the same time the right-minded 

teacher Is being held In higher esteem 
for his co-operation with the people. 

In his address Mr. Nelson referred 
to the greater opportunity and the 
wider field open to the teacher of to- 
day, as compared with twenty years 
ago. The work of the teacher has be- 
come more practical as well as broad- 
er, and his aim Is to fit boys and girls 
for life rather than to fill their minds 
with a lot of undigested and unrelated 
facts. 

•'Hence In these later days we have 
introduced manual training and voca- 
tional courses of all kinds into our 
curricula of study." said the speaker. 

"Moreover, our educators have quite 
generally come to understand that 
their work comprehends not only the 
training of the intellect but the 
moulding, guiding and developing of 
the emotions and the will as well. As 
a result they have assumed to share 
with the parents the great resoonsl- 
billty of developing the character of 
their pupils along the right lines. This 
fact has rendered the duties of the 
teacher most varied and complex, as 
compared with the teacher of the past 
generation. 

M«re Sympathy. 
"As a result of this increased re- 
.•5Ponsibillty and widened field of actlv- 
ity and usefulness, the public has be- 
gun to regard the teacher with kind- 
lier sympathy and a better under- 



standing and appreciation of his work. 
L)urmg the past ten years the respect 
for and the admiration of the profes- 
sion of teaching has greatly grown, 
and this feeling of sympathy, respect 
and appreciation of the work of the 
teacher and the high quality of char- 
acter, which the men and women who 
lollow this work generally possess, 
has culminated in the election of 
Woodrow Wilson, a teacher of boys, as 
president of the United States." 
^v,^\^- J^'elson also alluded to the fact 
that the schoolmaster is not the monk 
and recluse he used to be. He had 
come to understand that the most sa- 
gacious scholar is he who oftenest 
leiv-es hl3 study to observe the men 
and women of the market place, just 
as the wisest policiclan Is he who 
spends a large amount of his time In 
study and meditation. This attitude 
has made the present day schoolmaster 
an exponent of enlightened twentieth 
ceritury democracy. This fact Is an 
additional reason for the new esteem 
with which the public regard him. 
Ihe spirit of the new teacher is best 
exemplified in President Wilson, who 
throughout his work as a teacher 
burned with the desire to spread and 
promulgate true democracy in our uni- 
versities," he said. 

In closing the speaker quoted the 
following extract from one of the ad- 
dresses of President Wilson. 

"The great voice of America does not 
come from the seats of learning It 
comes in a murmur from the hills and 
woods and farms and factories and the 
mills, rolling and gaining volume until 
It comes to us from the homes of com- 
mon men. Do these murmurs echo In 
the corridors of the universities? I 
have not heard them. The universities 
would make men forget their common 
origins, forget their universal sympa- 
thies, and Join a class — and no class 
can ever serve America. I have dedi- 
cated every power there Is within me 
to bring the colleges that I have any- 
thing to do with to an absolutely dem- 
ocratic regeneration In spirit and I 
shall not be satisfied until America 
shall know that the men In the col- 
leges are saturated with the same 
thought, the same sympathy, that 
pulses through the whole body politic " 
Reports from standing committees 
showed definite organization toward 
results that count In a practical way. 
Among these were reports by T F 
Phillips, chairman of the bovs' "em- 
ployment committee; Principal Leonard 
ioung. chairman of tl;e vocational 
guidance committee, and J. F. Taylor, 
chairman of the program committee 
The date for the annual meeting was 
set for May 28, at which time officers 
for next year will be elected. 

Among Important actions was the 
unanimous adoption of resolutions 
commending Commissioner W A. 
Hlckon upon his strong stand for law 
enforcement. 



th! r^^u^x-^ ?-" Tii'iett. secretary of 
c^St^'*'''' ^^orker8' union. An appeal 
sent by cable on their behalf today to 
Samuel Gompers. Is as follows- 
<« ^ J-^^A ^'^'"l^t'"3 appeal to the Amer- 
lean trades unions not to mask the 
Carnegie peace delegates' missim to 
America. They hope America will not 
support the suggestion that she should 
assist England in making war against 
Germany.— Ben Tillett," b»"ioi 

MISSOURiANS^SH 
TO GET INSURftNOE 

More Than Thirty Compan- 
ies Decide to Stay in the 
State. 

Kansas City. Mo., May 1. — More than 
ninety insurance agencies of this city, 
representing the Are Insurance com- 
panies which have decided to suspend 
business In Mls.^ourl. closed their busi- 
ness here at midnight. The agents 
had Instructions from the home com- 
panies to sign no policies after that 
hour. 

The agents wrote hundreds of poli- 
cies last night. One agent Is said to 
if Xaa a^""',* '*" policies representing 
?S,000,000 Insurance during vesterday. 
Clients of old line companies wl-.ose 
policies were about to expire were 
eager to have their old policies re- 
newed and this added to the volume of 
burliness. 



Many Win stay. 

Jefferson City, Mo., May 1.— Super- 
Intendent of Insjrance Revelle 



an- 



nounced today that more than thirty 
foreign fire insurance companies have 
notified him that they will not leave 
the state on account of the Orr Insur- 
ance law. 

It was because of this statute that 
most of the com.panies In the Western 
Insurance union and In the Western 
insurance bureau agreed to 
writing poUales In Missouri 
April 30. 



cease 
after 



BRITISH WORKERS 

CABLE PROTEST. 



London, May 1. — An extremely hos- 
tile attitude toward the British delega- 
tion now on its way to the United 
States to arrange for the Anglo-Amer- 

can centenary has been taken by a Harvester company 
section of British working men. At I th 



WEED QUITS 

POST AL BANK. 

Washington, May 1. — Theodore L 
Weed, director of the postal savings 
system since Its establishment, pre- 
sented to Postmaster General Burleson 
today his resignation effective June 30 
Mr. Weed will engage in business In 
New York. 

• . — 

DnoheMM Is Ret«er. 
London. May 1. — A slight Improve- 
ment was noted today In the condition 
of the duchess of Connaught wife of 
the governor general of Canada, who 
was operated on a second time for ab- 
dominal trouble on April 29. 



Tvrliie strike Settled. 

Auburn, N. Y.. May ].— The strike at 
the twine mills of the International 

has been settled 
is afternoon. 




«4.v/\ J uurOivmiist tor ■ — -__ 

Siimui^lYSnookoneivrypaa' / 
forinpnumeofSainiiiff and our ^.^*^ 

JradeMark ofthefii/uw-Jin ihe la/yc ieUe?B' 



securities which would have prefer- 
ence over first mortgage bonds 

"If the railroads are f orced ' to pav 
extravagant wages to men In train 
service, the burden must fall on the 
public. You will readily see there- 
fore, why. In considering your de- 
mands, we hold the public Interest 
paramount. 

"Already the traffic of a growing 
country has overtaxed the existing fa- 
cilities; and the heavy burdens In- 
curred through Ill-advised legl.slatlon 
RU'-h as extra crew bills — for which 
the Brotherhood of Railroad Trainmen 
Is alonn responsible — have forced on 
the railroads, and consequently on the 
public, nee<ness expenditures of mil- 
lions of dollars annually. All of these 
factors are making It lmposail)le for 
many of the roads to provide those fa- 
cilities which prudent foresight de- 
mands and which the Interests of the 
public require. 

^ "fiain all, I.one IVothlne," 

'In maldng demands for extrava- 



BRYAN FINISHES 

WESTEI^ MISSION. 

Washington. May 1. — Secretary Bry- 

nn has telegraphed from Sacramento 

that ho will leave that city tonight for 
Washington. If he :an reach St. Louis 
in time he will deliver an address In 
that city at the American peace con- 
ference convention t^aturday night. The 
secretary probably has communicated 
directly to President Wll.son the latest 
developments In alien land owning leg- 
islation, but pending the final action of 
the legislature, officials here are silent. 

PEACE IN PARIS 

LAB()R CIRCLES. 

Paris, May 1. — For the first time In 
many years May day a|)peared des- 
tined this morning to pass off without 
any disturbance of the peace, the g«n- 
(rjil confodtMatlon ol labor liaving de- 
cided not to call upon its members to 
demonstrate In celebration of "labor 
day." The government, lyowever, took 
tie precaution of postlna: ■strong forces 
of police In various parts of Paris, 
where they would bo In a position to 
cop ' with any outbreak of disorder. 



Be Sure to Specify This Gas Range for Your 

New Home or Flat Building 

IT DIFFERS IN MANY WAYS. 




Construction 
Twelve Years 



The Best 

Double 

Action 

Is 
Surely a 
Departure 
From 
the Old 
Style 
Gas 
Consum- 
ers-Let 
Us Show 
You Why ; 



Thtre la no use denying that with the old style gas 
range whatever was being cooked in the oven had to be 
turned a number of times to prevent the bottom baking 
raster than the top, the top faster than the bottom or 
the sides faster than the center. Uniform baking or 
roasting was impossible without constantly changing 
the position of the food. -."Si'is 

Broiling was rarely attempted owing to the fact that 
It was hard to accomplish without setting the broiler 
on nre. 

Judging by outward appearance, the Double Action 
Cias Range, aside from the original features of dress Is 
practically like many other gas ranges— but there the 
likeness ends. 

No other gas range heats Its oven as does the Double 
Action. 

No other gas range broils as does the Double Action 
the Double Action gas range is constructed on an en- 
tirely new principle and Is difYerent from all other iras 
ranges made. The Double Action gas range uses the 
heat In the o%-en twice, and Is the only oven In the world 
that does. The Double Action gas range has onlv two 
rows of fire In the oven where all others have three or 
f.^ur. which means that the Double Action oven uses 
from thirty-three and one-third to fifty per cent less gas. 

Made in the Style and Sine to mrrt your needs. 



Detroit Plant Hums. 

Detroit, Mich.. Ma> 1. — The plant of 
the r>etrolt Forgini? company was 
b\irn<'i1 last night with a loss ot 
1100,000. 



If Interested, Get Our Cata- 
logue and Descriptive Book, 
or Better Yet, Call and Let 
Us Demonstrate to You. 



OMPUn KRJSCnilflSBIS 




A& 



DUUrrH, MINNESOTA 



i 



<■ 




-^^■■■^■■iHflHBHHiHIi^HHHHiHHiHi^HiHiiHHBHHH 




5?^!SJJ^2T^2Tt!!?'I^!^Kr^* 



mmiMmamm^m 




( 



16 



Thursday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



May 1, 1913. 



STATEMENT OF THE CIRCULATION OF 

THE DULUTH HERALD 

FOR THE MONTH OF APRIL 



THE HERALD HAS THE GREATEST CIRCULA- 
TION OF ANY PAPER IN THE WORLD PUB- 
LISHED IN A CITY THE SIZE OF DULUTH. 



WEST DULUTH 

IIKHAM) imA\< II OFIirKSt 
A. Jt'UHou. -.VM North •'•Ttli Ave. \V. J. .1. Moran. 31 O^/s/ North Ontrnl Ave. 

Heiahl's West Duluth reporter may be reiiWied after 
h'liir of Ki>itif< to press, at rHlunict 17:?-M ami Cole -47. 



Dat* 



Copies 

1 27,609 

A Atf,Tt\j\j 

3 28,017 

4 **i ^i oA 

5 29,032 

6 Sunday 

7 27,619 

8 27,610 

9 27,611 

10 28,042 

11 27,808 

12 29,330 

13 Sunday 

14 27,828 

15 27,774 



Date Copies 

16 27,842 

17 27,920 

18 28,044 

19 29,292 

20 Sunday 

21 27,891 

22 27,471 

23 27,826 

24 28,071 

25 27.883 

26 28,947 

27 Sunday 

28 27,575 

29 27,665 

30 27,744 



WEST DULUTH GIRL IS THE 

BRIDE OF SOUTHERN MAN 



Total for the Month 729,592 

Average Daily Circulation ZOaUIll 

Average Saturday Circulation ZHalOU 



The above is a true and correct record of the actual paid circulation 
of The Duluth Herald for the month of April, 1913. 

WM. F. HENIJY, Business and Advertising Manager. 

Subscribed and sworn to before me this 1st day of May, 1913. 

F. N. ALLEN, 
(Seal.) Notary Public, St. Louis County, Minnesota. 

My commission expires April 1, 1915. 

THE HERALD HAS A REALCiRCULATiON 

Tlie Duluth Herald leads all Minnesota newspapers (outside the 
Twin Cities) by thousands of daily paid subscribers, and this noteworthy 
circulation has been secured without the artificial aid of guessing contests, 
or cheap premiums in the form of frying pans, razor 
strops, foot warmers, pokers, rat traps, etc. The Herald 
enjoys the unique distinction of being the only Duluth 
newspaper that has not resorted to these circulation 
schemes. 

The Herald is delivered by carrier every evening to 96 PER CENT 

of the homes of Duluth, thus combining QUANTITY with QUALITY 

of a high order. The Herald has proven its value as one of the most 
productive advertising mediums of America, and its advertisers are as- 
sured of getting what they pay for, and what they are entitled to — REAL 
circulation, substantial and solid, that produces the maximum of results. 





prettily decorated for the occasion. 
Prizes in the various games were won 
by Mrs. E. A Silbersteln, Mrs. W. M. 
Evered. Mrs. Weddell. and Mrs. C. O. 
Appleliagen. 

The (4:uests were: Mesdames — J. P. 
Ruckley. W. M. Evered. E. A. SUber- 
.«teln, M. C. Alhenberg, C. O. Appk- 
hagen, Weddell, and S. J. Nygren. 

preparingTor 
oratory contest 



CHARNELL W. MIDDLECOFF. 

Middlecoff left in tlie afternoon for 
Minneapolis, where they will visit a 
few days. A reception will be held 
for them there this evening. They will 
leave Saturday for the South, and after 
spending two week.s vlsitinpr various 
places, will make thtlr home at Milan, 
Tenn. 

Ml.ss Murr:iy was one of West Dn- 
luth's most popular younp women. .She 
was secretary of the Euclid chapter. 
Order of th< Eastern .Star, last year, 
and hold a similar position with the 
West Duluth lodge. Uoyal Neighbors. 

The bride'i parents entertained at a 
reception for the bride on Monday 
evening:. The home was prettily deco- 
rated in red and white streamers, bells 
and hearts. Thfe guests were: 

Mesdames Bishop, Scott and Middle- 
coff. 

Misses Agres Campbell. Mabel Soren- 
sen, Cnarlotte McFarlane, Floretta 
drape of cream Spanish lace and pearls, } Bujold, I.aura< McFarlane, Edna Ross, 
the latter having been worn by the I Mildred Winters, Mary Wolfrom, Clara 
mother twenty-seven years before. She ! Schulte, Clara Wolfrom, Mary Schulto, 



MRS. C. W. MIDDLECOFF. 

A pretty home weddi;ig took place 
yesterday when Miss Esther E. Murray, 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. George 
Murray, 428 North Fifty-seventh ave- 
nue west, became the bride of Charnell 
W. Middlecoff of Milan, Tenn. The 
c( remony took place at the home of 
the bride's parents, Rev. M. S. Rice, 
pastor of the First Methodist church, 
reading the service. 

To the strains of Mendelssohn's 
wedding march, played by Miss Char- 
lotte McFarlane, Itev. Mr. Rice and the 
groom entered the parlor at 10 o'clock. 
The bride, accompanied by her father 
and attended by her .sister, Miss Jladc- 
line Murray, followed, after which im- 
mediate friends and relatives entered. 

The bride wore a handsome gown of 
cream brocaded satin with an over 



Team Will Be Chosen to 

Compete for Wallace 

Cup. 

Pupils of the Duluth Industrial high 
school are preparing for the Wallace 
cup contest which will take place on 
May 11. Four members of the senior 
class will compete on either Monday 
or Tuesday fur representation on the 
team that will uphold the honors of 
the West Duluth sehool. 

These are John Davies, Esther Field - 
man, Mabel Melin and Emeiine Rrett. 
Three Judges will decide the champion- 
ship, one of whom will be Robert E. 
Denfeld, superintendent of schools. The 
other two judges have not been de- 
cided on. 

.. » — 

I. 0. G. T. Meeting. 

H. M. Jacobson of St. Paul, grand 
chief templar for the Scandinavian 
grand lodge of I. O. (J. T. in Minne- 
sota, is in the city today. 

He attended the regular meeting of 
the Morning Star lodge last evening 
at Dormedy hall. He said that the 
law enforcement people all over the 
state are admiring the stand taken by 
the commission of this city. The 
Morning Star lodge now has a mem- 
bership of 125 and has instructed its 
trustees to buy a lot on which to build 
its temple. 

Election of officers took place last 
r.lght. The following were elected for 
the next quarter: 

Chief tempiar. Gust Redman; vice 
templar, Hulda Soderbcrg; past chief 
templar, N J. Nelson; lodge deputy, 
And. Bertilson; lodge secretary, Mrs. 
J. Lidfors; financial secretary, Emil 
Soderberg; treasurer, A. Anderson; 
marshal, J. Skarman; assistant mar- 
shal, Julia Holt; assistant secretary, 
Robert dander: chaplain, Mauritz Ek: 
S J. T., Rose Borgstrom; guard, Mag- 
nus Westerlund; sentinel, Peter 

Dockcn. 

« 

Lecture on Mormonism. 

Rev. W. H. Farrell, pastor of the 
Asbury Methodist church, Sixtieth ave- 
nue west and Raleigh street, will give 
an illustrated lecture on "Mormonism 
in the church this evening. He will 
show a Series of seventy pictures of 
scenes taken in Utah, of Mormon 
churches, Mormon leaders and .pages 
from the books containing their doc- 
trines. The lecture will be repeated to- 
morrow evening at the Lester Park 
Methodist church. 



carried a bouquet of white roses and 
lilies of the valley. Another feature 
of the wedding was the gloves worn 
by the groom, which were the same 
as worn by the bride's father on his 
wedding day. The bridesmaid wore a 
pink figured silk organdy with Irish 
point lace and carried pink flowers 



Alice Whale n, Ceclla Schulte, Grace 
Smith, Bille Ashford, Ruby Mitchell, 
Hortence Carr. Hilda Hanson, Jennie 
Lind, Anna Murray, Gravell, Callahan, 
Madeline Murray, Nlta Murphy, Melline 
Lowe, Grace White. Anna Brand, 
Esther Donald, Mollle Fink, Doela Fink, 
Elizabeth Fink, Ellyn Anderson, Ger- 



Dies After Long Illness. 

Arcamgelo Pitorcia, 37 years old 
died yesterday afternoon at 329 South 
Fifty-seventh avenue, following an ill- 
ness" of live vears' duration of tuber- 
culosis. The funeral arrangements will 
be made this evening. 



F'oUowing the ceremony a wedding trude Empete, Anna r>egerman, Eliza 



dinner was served. 



M"r. and Mrs. beth O'Connor and Minnie Fedl. 



RACINE BUILDING 

W ORK IS HALTED. 

Racine Wis., May 1. — The building 
Industry "in Racine practically is at a 
standstill as a result of the expiration 
of labor contracts and the subsetiuent 
refusal of contractors to meet demands 
for Increased wages. 

Several hundred union workers In- 
cluding carpenters, lathers and jour- 
neymen plumbers, demanded various 
Increases in wages ranging from 5 



cents per hour to a flat increase of 50 
cents per day. 

Increases were granted to the tin- 
ners and electricians and they worked 
en without interruption. At present 
there is no indication of a settlement 
being reached. 

• 

Soo Line VardM* Fire. 

St. Paul, Minn., May 1. — Fire, believed 
to have been caused by sparks from 
an engine, destroyed several buildings 
in the Soo line train yards last night, 
causing $25,000 damage. The work of 
the firemen was hampered by a strong 
wind. 



STORAGE YARD 
IS PLANNED 



Steel Plant Will Have Facil- 
ities for Handling Coal 
and Limestone. 




Three Additional Open Hearth 

Furnaces Will Cost 

$760,000. 



An immense storage yard for coal 
and limestone will be constructed at 
the steel plant. 

This yard will be 1,000 feet long by 
600 feet wide and will have suffi- 
cient capacity to store the necessary 
supplies of coal and limestone. 

It has been officially announced that 
three additional open hearth furnaces 
will be constructed at the plant. These 
will cost $760,000. Another reheating 
furnace will also be erected. These 
additions were found necessary to bal- 
ance the plant The blast furnaces, it 
was found, would turn out more pig 
iron than the seven open hearth fur- 
naces would handle, and the three ad- 
ditional furnaces were necessary for 
economical operation. 

There will be ninety coke ovens In 
the new plant and these are now be- 
ing constructed. They will have a ca- 
pacity of 1,000 tons a day. 

The plant presents a very busy 
scene these days. Work is evidently 
being rushed and six coaches are now 
needed to transport the workmen re 
turning to Duluth in the evening 



during the T^'eek days, a modern kitch- 
en and the engine room. 

The main 'loor will be provided with 
a seating room for 150 oom.munlcants. 
A balcony -vi'hich will seat fifty-seven 
more is also provided for. In the rear 
of the chur;h will also be Sunday 
.school room? which will be provided 
with sliding doors In order that it 
may be thrc'wn open when additional 
seating capacity is required. 

Construction work will commence 
immediately following the letting of 
the contract. It is hoped by members 
of the congregation to have the church 
completed so that It may be dedicated 
early in the fall. The estimated cost 
of the structure is placed at $6,000. 
Most of this money has now been sub- 
scribed by the people of Proctor. 



IS PROSTRATED 

BY THE HEAT 



In 



Buy Your 



SHIRTS 



at 



THE COLUMBIA 



Why? Because you'll find there the largest 
selections and reasonable prices. 

Splendid 50c and $1.00 shirts. 

The famous Manhattan and Columbia Cuf- 
turn shirts. 

Shirts of every sort in rich variety. 

Long-armed or big-necked or fat-bellied men 
can be fitted here. 

If you are very particular, we'll make-to- 
measure, better and for less than the itinerant 
agent. 



■7 




addition to the men on the train there 
are manv who reside in the boarding 
houses a"t Gary and New Duluth. 

WILL MAkfTHEIR 

OWN DRESSES 



New Duluth Man Overcome 

By Sudden Change in 

Temperature. 

The first heat prostration of the 
year reported in Duluth took place at 
3 o'clock /esterday at New Dulutli 
when Joe Krueger dropped in front 
of the fire liall at New Duluth. Krue- 
ger was picl<ed up in a semi-conscious 
condition by Sergeant McDermott of 
the New I)ulutli police station and 
restoratives administered. 

Krueger is an employe at the steel 
plant. The sudden change in the 
weather early in the afternoon is be- 
lieved to have caused his sudden ill- 
ness. 



West Duluth Briefs. 

Miss Iva M. Lydell of the Duluth In- 
dustrial high school Is meeting every 
evening with the members of the senior 
elass to rehearse the annual class play. 
Miss Lydell has charge of directing the 
play. 

Miss Brethorst, a returned mission- 
arv from China, will speak Sunday 
morning at the Asbury Methodist 
church, Sixtieth avenue west and 
Raleigh street. 

See the dinner set in Loewensteln's 
window. Central avenue, which will be 
given away free. 

Rev. M. S. Rice, pastor of the Meth- 
odist church, lectured last night at the 
New Duluth church on his recent trip 
to Euroi^e. The lecture was illustrated 
with a number of interesting pictures. 

Mrs. W. Jenkins. 1307 North Fifty- 
eighth avenue west, entertained this 
afternoon for members of the Ladies 
Aid Society of the Asbury Methodist 
cliurch. 

Martin J. Murray, 623 North Central 
avenue, returned this morning from a 
short business trip to the Twin Cities. 

To be given away free, a 42-plece 
china dinner set. See it in our window. 
Loewenstein's dry goods store. Centra) 
avenue. 

Edward Lynn will give violin lessons 
at pupil's residence, ^hone Cole 327-X. 
Watch repairing. Hurst, W. Duluth. Adv 

The Young People's Society of the 
Bethel Swedish Lutheran church will 
meet this evening in the church par- 
lors. Fifty-third avenue west and Wa- 
dena street. A social session will fol- 
low the business meeting. 



BICYCLISTS ARE 

TOO RECKLESS 



Graduation Not Expensive 

for West Duluth Sciiool 

Girls. 

Grls of the senior class of the Du- 
luth Industrial high school will not 
have to call on their mothers or dress- 
makers to make their graduating 
gowns or lingerie. The entire outfit, 
gowns, underskirts and other wearing 
apparel will be made by the eight 
girls in the class. 

Miss Esther Perusse, teacher of sew- 
ing at the school, said this morning 
that the girls had become very pro- 
ficient In dressmaking, and that the 
articles made by them would be a 
credit to many expert dressmakers. 

PREPARING BIDS 

FOR NEW CHURCH 



Must Quit Riding on Side- 
walks as Result of Se- 
rious Accident. 

Boys will have to quit riding bicycles 
on sidewalks in this end of the city. 
That is the ultimatum issued by Lieut. 
C. R. Wilco:: of the W^est Duluth police 
station this morning. A number of 
complaints have been received by the 
police of boys riding on the walks in a 
reckless manner. 

One of these came In last night when 
two boys ran into two women on P'fty 



Railroads 



SOO LINE ERAPLOYES 
WILL BUY SECURITIES 



Contractors are preparing bids for 
the construction of the new Proctor 
•Methodist church on the east side of 
the village. The bids, which will be 
separate for the foundation and super- 
structure, are expected to be all be- 
fore the trustees of the church before 
the middle of next week. 

The church will be modern In every 
respect. It will be 32 feet wide and 
52 feet deep. A full basement Avill be 
constructed in which will be provided 
a large room for Sunday school classes 



women were wheeling a baby carriage, 
which was jverturned by the collision, 
the baby narrowly escaping death by 
landing on a grassy plot between the 
edge of the sidewalk and the stjne 
curbing. 

•'We will have no more riding of 
wheels on the sidewalk," said Lieut. 
Wilcox this morning. "This ordinance 
will be st-ictly enforced where the 
streets arc in condition so that riding 
on them is not a hardship. In the out- 
skirts it is different: but even there, wo 
will not countenance any reckless rid- 
ing." 



Co-operative Association Is 

Launched at Fond du 

Lac, Wis. 

Fond du Lac, Wis., May 1. — A move- 
ment was launched here today look- 
ing to the organization of a co-opera- 
tive association among Soo Line em- 
ployes who have been in tlie service 
six months or longer. The plans were 
explained by M. R. Newhouse of the 
auditing department and A. R. Kipp, 
general superintendent of motive 
power for the Chicago division, and 
favorably received. 

Under the plan, employes will be 
privileged to set apart a certain sum 
from their monthly earnings which 
is to be invested In Soo Line securi- 
ties, each holder of one share, par 
value %\, In the proposed association, 
to have one vote in its management. 

As the Soo Line payroll amounts to 



seventh avenue near Cody street. The $9,000,000 annually, it is estimated that 



IN WEST DULUTH COURT 



a saving of 5 per cent of the wages by 
employes In this way will create an 
annual investment fund of nearly 
$500,000. 

The plan has the two-fold purpose of 
encouraging thrift and increased In- 
terest in the road on the part of the 
employes. 




THK STORE FOR SEUVKE. 
113-115-117-119 WEST SVPKKIOR ST.. DVIXTH. MIXN. 

This Is May-Day! 

See the May-Pole Dance in Our Show Window 

Hurrah for the Glorious Out-of-Door 

St ason ! 

Little folks and big folks should follow Mother Nature's cx- 
amp'le and clon 
spring garb. 



I 



Our show win- 
dows display the 
things the well- 
dressed will wear 
— things for 
baby; for big sis- 
ter; for mother, 
and grandmother. 

And prices are 
proper — they al- 
ways are here — 
that's what makes 
our business 
grow so rapidly 
with those who 
know. 

Tomorrow will 
be a good day to 
look at our show 
windows — and a 
good day to buy, 
for assortments 
of everytlving are 
mighty fine, and 
we can give you 
better service 
than is possible 
on a busy Satur- 
day. 



1 to[^GrOl.%m 




would be to prevent employment of 
railroad men in emergency, such as a 
strike, etc., although they misrht be 
experienced and fully capable. 

Immigrants for Canada. 

A special car of 200 Immigrants who 
came to Duluth yesterday morning on 
the Northwestern line, left yesterday 
afternoon on the Canadian Northern 
road for Western Canada. They landed 
in this country last week and are be- 
ing taken directly across the conti- 
nent to settle on farms in Canada. 



Train Discontinued. 

The homeseekers' special train, 
which has been run every Tuesday 
morning by the Canadian Northern 
road since March 11, has been discon- 
tinued for the year. Most of the pas- 
sengers on these specials were bound 
for farms in Western Canada, accord- 
ing to the local agent. 

. -^ 

Flood Damage Repaired. 

Through train service by direct 
routes has been resumed on all lines 
of the Baltimore & Ohio system. The 
bridge across the Miami river at 
Lawrenceburg, Ind., on the main line 
of the Baltimore & Ohio Southwestern, 
twenty-five miles west of Cincinnati, 
which was destroyed during the March 
floods has been replaced. The total 
length of the bridge was 1,240 feet, of 
which 820 feet of steel work was 
swept away. 



COMMISSIONERS 

IN FARGO CHOSEN 



Assume Duties Next Tues- 
day and Have Already 
Apportioned Duties. 

Fargo, N. D., May 1. — (Special to Th© 
Herald.) — There was a light vote in 
the city commissioners election yes- 
terday because many traveling men 
living here were out of the city and 
manv contracting firms had men at 
out-of-town points. H. F. Kmery wa9 
elected president. Joseph Ames, AleX 
Stern, J. J. Jordan and R. B. Blake- 
more members in the order named. 
Blakemore was fourteen votes ahead 
of Thomas Baker and Seth Wright ten 
behind Baker. Two aldermen vvere 
among the candidates. They were last 
and the third from last. All members 
except Blakemore are Republicans, al- 
though party lines cut no figure in the 
election. 

CommlHaionrrM OrKanlse. 

The new commissioners will as^sume 
charge of the city's affairs Tuesday, 
May 6, instead of Monday. May 5, aS 
intended. ^ . 

Jordan will have charge of the po- 
lice and firemen. Stern of the financesu 
Ames of the streets and lighting, an 
Blakemore of the waterworks an 
sewers. 




Pascal Dilber used abusive language 
at the hone of Mr. and Mrs. Maren, 
5103 Main Mtreet last night after hav- 
ing filled up on stuff usually secured 
in barrooms. Officer Peterson was 
called and le was booked up as drunk 
and disorderly. This morning he 
pleaded gulty to the charge before 
Judge Lanner.s and was fined $35 and 
costs with the option of sojourning 
thirty dayii in the county jail. He 

chose the latter. 

— * 

Mrs. Kastriner Hostess. 



Mrs. M. Kastriner, 818 North Cen- 
tral avenue, was hostess at a rainbow 
party at her home yesterday after- 
noon. Games and music featured the 
and 'will "b"e"uBed'^for"BOclaV gatherings entertainment The roomg were 



BILL WOULD PREVENT 
OPERATION OF TRAINS. 

A letter addressed to the public, 
sent out by the Pennsylvania Rail- 
road company, is to protest against a 
bill which has been reported favor- 
ably by the railroad committee of the 
state assembly In Pennsylvania. Tlie 
bill, which is designated as one "to 
promote the safety of the traveling 
public and employes on railroads." It 
Is asserted In the circular Issued by 
the Pennsvlvania road's officials, as 
really intended to make Impossible 
the operation of a railroad in case of 
a strike affecting the higher grades of 
employes. 

The bill provides that It shall be un- 
lawful for any railroad to appoint any 
person to the position of conductor, 
engineer, fireman or brakeman, unless 
such person shall have been similarly 
employed on any road for eighteen 
months and shall for three months 
previous to such appointment been In 
the emplov of the road appointing 
him to either of the four positions 
named The effect of the three-months' 
provision, the Pennsylvania declares. 



Monday, May 5, 

PIANO 

PRICES 

WILL 

FALL 



The Korby Piano Company is retiring 
from the wholesale business in Duluth and 
over 50 high-grade Pianos of the leading man- 
ufacturers in America will be sold, regardless 
of cost, quality or terms. 

The Sale Opens 9 a. m. 

Monday, May 5, at our 

Warehouse, 628 Garfield Avenue 



.j 



r i| 









'^t»('ii^ 










1 


i 




- 








.... 


.- .. -4 




- 


' ^ 


















^^SS:^ 























1 


■ 










r ' " 






















Thursday, 



THE DULUTtr HERALD 



May 1, 1913. 



17 



1 



SESSION IS 
QUIET ONE 

May and July Wheat Weak, 

Closing at Low 

Point. 



Flax Has Reaction and 

Closes at Fraction Below 

Wednesday. 



Duluth Board of Trade. May 1 — 
After a session marked only by Its 
laasltude the market closed this aft- 
ernoon In a tired sort of a way. Al- 
most every cereal closed at the low- 
est point reached durin< the day. 
That was true at any rate of May 
July wh-'at options on the 
Minneapolis and Wnnipeg 
durum wheat on 
flaxseed both In 



and 
Duluth, 
markets, 
the Duluth board and 
May and July options 



on the Duluth board. 

May wheat clMsed He below the 
close of yesterday and July wheat 
olo.sed He below yesterday. May 
durum closed l\ic below yesterday's 
close and May fla.\seed dropped *ic 
and July flax Is down a similar 
am cunt from the Wednesday close. 

Aside from flax tn the coarse grains, 
barley was the only g-raln to fall otl, 
dropplnti Ic from yesterday. 

The sioncral tone of the market this 
morning was weak. Tradlnt: was slow 
and the market had a listless air. In 
the meantime there was a drop In the 
prices of almost every cereal. Various 
causes are given, the most important 
one heins: the drop In the Minneapolis 
market caused by the ta-t that some 
of the mills there are about to close — 
at lea.st rumor says so. Another rea- 
son given is that the only market open 
on the other aide of the pond Is Liver- 
pool, the other market.s being closed 
tn observance of Ascension day. as is 
also the market at Buenos Ayres. Re- 
ports that Continental dealers are 
Willing: to resell cargoe.s received on 
account of excellent reports on crops 
In America and Argentine Republic 
does not help the price situation at all. 
There is scarcely any export business 
at present except that of tlax from the 
Canadian Northwest, and this fact, has 
a deteriorating effect. 

May wheat opened at the same price 
as the close of yesterday, but soon 
sagged going as low as Vie under 
earlv In the day. July wheat opened 
at 92 5sc. Vi« under yesterday's close, 
and soon dropped VtC more. Septem- 
ber wheat opened at 94'4c bid. which 
was 'rtC over the close, but soon lost 
ground and was quoted at 92^*0. 

May durum wheat opened at 94 %c, 
yestfi day's closing price, but quickly 
dropped Vio. July opened at 96c, yes- 
terday's close, but went down %c soon. 

May flax closed yesterday and 
opened today at $1.33 but because of 
a narrow market went down to $1.32 Vi. 
July also took a tumble of %c. 
Casih Wheat ChantceM. 

Cash wheat changes which took 
place today show that No. 1 northern 
on track and to arrive is %c under 
July: No. 2 northern Is 2@2\ic under 
No. 1; No. 1 durum U at tha July price 
to ^c over: No. 2 durum is 2c under 
No. 1. Flax on track and to arrive U 
\c to 2c under the July option. 

Minneapolis puts and calls: Puts, 
90^c; calls, 91VsC. 



Vo. 

No. 

No. 

No. 

No. 

No. 

Kv 

No t 

N). 8 

Barley. 

B«rl?y. 

Biirl<rv. 

Barley. 

Barley. 

OaU. 1 

No. 

No 



Cash .Sale* Thur«iday. 

northam, i cars 

nortiiwn. *. cars 

norttiern. 1.500 bu. to xcetn 

northern. 3 car* 

tiuruin, 1 car 

•liirim. ■lOO bu, to arrire 

■li:nim. 1.400 bu 

mixtvl, 1 oar ,. 

niU.^I. 1 CAT 

1 car 

'1 2ttn 

i cara 

1 CiT , 

.Mr, 3-W , 



No, 
No. 
No. 
No. 



rye, i c?n . 
flax. 2 cars . 
flix. SCO bu. 
flax. 570 bu. . 
flax. TOO bu. 
flax. 1.300 bu 



to arriT*. . 

to arrivo. , 



t .91\ 
.92 
.91\ 
.SO* 

.WH 

.n\i 

.49 
.46 
.50 
.47 
.54 
.33Vi 
.59 
l.Xi\ 

1.32% 

La"* 

1.33\4 



MARKET GOSSIP. 



AMERICAN WHEAT MARKETS, MAY 1, 1913. 



May — 

Duluth 

Minneapolis 
Chicago . . . 
Winnipeg , . 

July— 
Duluth .... 
Minneapolis 
Chicago . . . 
Winnipeg . 



Open. 


High. 


.OO'n.a 


.90%b 


.88% 


.89^ 
.92 % 


.91%-% 


.93^ 


.93% 



.92%a .92% 

.91%-M, .'31% 
.92^-91% .92% 
.94%-% .96 



Low. 
.89 %a 
.88 

.9H4-% 
.92% 

.91% 
.90% 
.91% 
.94% 



Close. 
.89%a 
.88 

.9ma 
.92 %b 

.91% 
.90%b 
.91% 
.94% 



.\prll 30. 
.90 ^ 
.88%a 
.92 ^ a 
.93%b 

.92% 
.91%a 
.92%a 
.94% 



DULUTH DURUM MARKET. 



May 



May 
July 



Open. 

.94% 



High. 
.94\b 



Close. 
.94% 



April 30. 
.94% 



DULUTH LINSEED MARKET. 



Open. 

1.33b 

1.35%b 



High. 
l.SSVi 
1.3« 



Low. 

1.32 y^ 

1.34%b 



Close. 
1.32 V4 
1.34%b 



April 
1.33 
1.3& 



30. 



y'r ago. 
1 13% 
1.11% 
1.14% 
1.03% 

1.13% 
1.12% 
1.10%-% 
1.04%-% 



Y'r ago. 
1.09 



Y'r ago. 

2.16% 

2.12% 



Duluth close: Wheat — On track: No. 1 hard, 92%c; No. 1 northern, 91%r!; 
No. 2 northerii, 8S^h(f?89%c; No. 1 northern to arrive. 91Mic; Montana No. 2 hard. 
89%c; May. S9%c asked; July, 91 %c; September. 92%c asked. Durum — On track: 
No. 1. 95^c; No. 2, i»3V«c; to arrive: No. 1, 95 %c; No. 2, 93 %c; May. 94 %o July, 
94%r(i>a5>4C bid. Linseed — On track $1.32 M: (9*1.32% ; to arrive $1.32 % @ 1.32 % ; May 
$1.32 ".i; July. $1.32 14 bid; September, $1.37 asked; October. $1.35 »4 asked. Oats — 
On track, 33r(fc33Hc; to arrive. 33(?i)33%c. Rye — On track, 56@59o; to arrive, 
56#59c. Barley — On track, 44f«D58c. 

Elevator receipts of domestic grain — Wheat, 84.910 bu; last year, 52,289 bu; 
barley. 5.074 bu; last year. 1,731 bu; flax. 978 bu; last year, 9,706 bu; rye, 1.764 
bu; last year. 325 bu; oats, S,040 bu; last year, 10,708 bu. 

Shipments of domestic grain — Wheat, 405,767 bu; oats, last year, 273,793 bu; 
barley, 415.000 bu. 

Elevator receipts of bonded grain — Wheat, 55,217 bu; last year, 108,789 bu; 
flax 34,854 bu; last year, 5.219 bu; oats, 21,115 bu; last year, 61,368 bu; barley, 
3.028 bu; last year. 11.147 bu. 

Shipments of bonded grain — Wheat 25.427 bu; last year, 409,352 bu; oats. 
63 bu; last year. 109,698 bu; barley. 47,895 bu; last year, 25,410 bu. 



4,991.000 bu, de- 
total of all grains. 



2,095,000 bu total, 
crease. 82,000 bu; 
23,056.000 bu. 

• * • 

Pour shipments from Minneapolis 
yesterday amounted to 56,449 bbl. 

• • • 
Clearances reported are: Wheat, 75,- 

000 bu; rtour, 15,000 bbl; corn. 60,000 
bu; oats, 13.000 bu; wheat and Hour 
equal to 143,000 bu. 



• • • 
receipts and 



Primary receipts and shipments are 
as follows: Wheat— Receipts. 555.000 
bu. last year. 464.000 bu; shipments, 
365.000 bu, last year 326,000 bu. Corn- 
Receipts, 383.000 bu. last year. 594.000 
bu; shipments. 383,000 bu, last year, 
449 000 bu. Oats— Receipts, 438,000 bu. 
last year, 347.000 bu; shipments, 523,000 
bu, last year, 590,000 bu. 
• • • 

S. S. Dunn, a farmer of Carrlngton, 
N. D.. says that conditions for a good 
big crop are perfect in that part of the 
country. There lias been enough frost 
in the ground and it Is coming up Just 
right to produce crops. Mr. Dunn, who 
was on the Board of Trade Moor this 
morning, says that all that is needed 
now is a good heavy rain about June 
15 and everything will be lovely, a big 
crop will be assured. There has been 
plentv of moisture, he says, and in low 
places there Is yet too much water and 
seeding has been delayed. He does not 
expect to see seeding finished before 
May 15. 

Cars 



of 



wheat 



Duluth 



received : 

Yesterday 

89 

Minneapolis 191 

Winnipeg 190 

Chicago 40 

Kansas City 36 

St- Louis, bu 58,000 

received: 
Yesterday. 

Duluth 8 

Minneapolis 26 

Winnipeg 24 



Cars of 



linseed 



Mliuieapolla Cloudy] 

AJexaudri* Cloudy 

CaiiipbeU Cloudy 

Cro)k3ton Cloudy 

r.etDlt City Cloudy 

Now Ulm Cloudy' 

Park R.^pidd Cloudy 

Uochester pt. Cloudy 

Winnebago City l.'lear 

Wortldngioa Clear 

il't''lieU Cloudy 

Uodlleld Cloudy 

aioux Falls Clear 

Watertown Cloudy 

Yankton Cloudy 

Ameiiia Cloudy 

Bottineau Cloudy 

Uowbella Cloudy 

Wheat Opens Strong But Turns Weak ^^.^^llXa ■::::::::::::::^^ 

....Cloudy 



Year 

Ago. 

23 

95 

239 

19 

28 

42,000 

Year 
Ago. 

3 



19 
19 



MINNEAPOLIS MARKET. 



white, 
35V«c; 

No. 
timothy, 
22.00. 

Pork $19.62% 
$11.12%(&;11.87%. 



35^®3Gc; No. 
standard, 36 %c. 
i rye. «3%«; 
$2.95(8)3.65; 



4 white, 34% @ 



barley, 
clover. 



46@70c; 
$17.00®) 



lard. $10.97%; ribs, 



.55%- 



Wheat— 
Maj .... 
July .... 
3oi>t 

Corn- 
May .... 
July .... 
Se»)t 

Oata— 

May 

July .... 
Sept 

Pork- 
May ....19.70 

July 10.6,", 

S«pt ...19.30 

Lard — 



Open. Hirtt. 

.91V4-% .92^ 
.91%-»a-'4.92% 

.n%.-% .a2'4 



.S5\ 



.5814-% .5714 



.OlVi-% 

.i)lH 

.9114 

.55 

.35% 

.B6H 



35^4%. 
34 ^-.IS 
34%-J3 



May . . 

July . . 
Sept 

.Short 

yuy . . 

Jubf , . 

Sept . . 



.11.00 
..lO.STVi 
. 10.85 
Ribs— 
..11.40 

..n.o2H- 

. .10.87H 



05 



H.35^4- 

.35% 
.3514- 

1&.75 
19.70 
19.50 

n.02V4 
10. 87^ 
10.90 

11.50 

11.07^ 

10.87Vi 



90 



.W% 

.3414- 
.3414 

19.62% 
19.62% 
19.42% 

10.97% 
10. 8.5 
10.85 

11.40 

11.02% 

10.37% 



% 



CI039. 
.1)1% 
.91% 
.91%- 

.M% 

.56 

.56%- 

.85%- 
.34%- 

.34% 

19.02% 

19.35 

19.12% 

10.97% 

10.85-S7 

10.87% 

1 1 . iSO 
11.05 
10.87% 



CORN AND WHEAT BULLETIN 

For the tweinty-four hours eii.liug at 8 a. aa.. Ttmrs- 
dap. May I. 



STATIONS. 



(State of 
I weather 



Temperature 



I 



naln- 
tali. 



11 



Duluth car Inspection: WTieat — No. 
1 hard. 2; No. 1 northern. 38; No. 2 
northern. 22; No. 3, 3: no grade, 3; 
winter. 2; durum. 16; mixed. 2; reject- 
ed. 1; total wheat. 89. last year 28; 
t\a.x, 8. last year 8; rye. 2. last year l; 
oats, 5. last year 1; barley, 31; corn, 1; 
total of all grains, 136, last year 38; 
on track. 125. 

« « « 

Clement Curtis & Co. of Chicago Is- 
sued the followln;^: 

•■Reports of our correspondents show 
an average condition of 91.7 compared 
with 93.2 last month and the govern- 
ment report of 91.6. The abandoned 
acreage as reported by the same corre. 
spondenta Is the smalle.st recorded. 
The fl >od3 in the central states were 
less destructive than believed a month i er 
ago. as shown in the returns of the 
three affected state.s. Kansas lost the 
larg-st amount of acreage and Cali- 
fornia had the heaviest percentage of 
los.-i. The average over the country 
was 2.1 and the total loaa was 663,000 
acres, comparing wttli 20.1 per cent 
last year and ah acreage of 6.644.000. 

•'Translating the May 1 condition 
Into acreage suggests a crop of 570,- 
000,000 bu, should the condition be 
maintained to harvest. On the aver- 
age of May 1 and the harvest condition 
of five years the suggested crop is 
518.000.000 bu. and on a ten-year aver- 
age of same character 510.000.000 bu." 

• • • 

Duluth bonded grain receipts. Wheat 
105 cars; oats, 25 cars: barley. 5 cars; 
flax. 24 cars. Total. 159 cars. 

• • • 

Foreign closing cables: Liverpool — 



With Wide Changes. 

Minneapolis, Minn., May 1. — Wheat 
was weak after early strength. Market 
active and fluctuations wide and sharp 
May closed %c lower than yesterday: 
July %c lower and September %@%c 
lower. Local elevator stocks decreased 
r.40.000 bu for five days. Total deliver- 
ies on May contract were 730.000 bu. 

May opened 8S-%c; high, 89%c: low, 
S8c: closed, 88c. July opened 91% (® 
91 %o; high. giTsc; low, 90%c; closed, 
90Sc. September opened 92*,ic: high, 
92 %c; low, 9iy3c; closed. 91%@91%c. 

Closing cash: No. 1 hard. 91 %c; No. 1 
northern. 90@90%c: to arrive. 89%c; 
choice to arrive, 90%c; No. 2 northern, 
SSOSS^ic: No. 2 hard Montana, 91c: 
No. 3 wheat, 86(fJ86?4c; No. 3 yellow 
corn, 55%@56%c; No. 3 white oats, 
33c; No. 2 rye, 56@d8V2C. 

The flour market was dull and void 
of any new features. Shipments. 56,- 
449 bbl. In wood, f. o. b. Minneapolis — 
First patents. $4.30fi)4.t)5: second pat- 
ents, $4.15@4.50: first clears, $3.10® 
3.40; second clears, $2.60(^2.80. 

Bran in 100-lb sacks, %16fa)n. 

Cash wheat steady: demand good. 
No. 1 northern 2*.4(i'/)3c above market. 

Millstuffs — Shipments. 1,343 tons. 
Demand fair: prices unchanged. 

Flax — Receipts, 26 cars; year ago, 
19; shipments, 4. Demand good. Clos- 
ing prices, $1.32%. 

Barlf-y — Receipts. 28 cars; year ago, 
8; shipments, 33. Demand active. 
Closing range, 42@58c. 



CHICAGO MARKET. 



WTieat. 

lower, 

day. 



%d lower; corn. %d to %d 
Paris, Budapest. Antwerp, holi- 

• • • 

I>uliiTh grain sto-^ks at close of busi- 
ness yesterday: Wheat — Western and 
winter. 228,000 bu, decrease, 38.000 bu: 
spring. ll,6oT.000 bu. decrease. 477.000 
bu; durum, 714.000 bu. decrease, 93,000 
bu: bonded, 3.217,000 bu. Increase. 80.- 
ftOO bu; total. 15,814,000 bu, net de- 
crease. 528,000 bu. Corn. 47.000 bu; 
oats, domestic and bonded, 1.435.000 bu. 
increase, 69,000 bu; rye, 57,000 bu. in- 
crease, 49.000 bu; barley, domestic and 
bonded. 712,000 bu, decrease, 460,000 
bu; fl.ix, domestic, ^,896,000 bu, bonded 



A GOOD HRM TO SHIP 
YOUR GRAIN TO 

ATWOOD-LARSON 
COMPANY, Inc. 

itentlon given to 



cash 

shipment* our 



Bpecial at 
grain*. We give all 
personal attention 

DLLITH. MINNEAPOLIS. 



Nearly 2,000,000 Bushels of Wheat 
Delivered on May Contracts. 

Chicago, May 1. — Because the great- 
quantity of wheat delivered on May 
contracts — 1,895,000 bu — went into 
strong hands that option showed most 
strength. May opened %c to %c off 
at 91%c to 91 %c and advanced to 

92%c. July started Vgc to %(7i%c off at 
91%'a)92«4r. but in .sympathy with 
May firmed up to 92%. 

After a further slight upturn profit- 
taking caused a reaction from which 
there was partial recovery. The close 
was weak for May at 91 %c, a net loss 
of %c, and steady for July at 91 %G, a 
net decline of %c. 

Corn advanced. May delivery of 60.- 
000 bu was mainly scattered. July 
opened a shade to %®%c off at 55%^ 
56c to 56f§)56%c. but on fair buying 
went up to 56V4(fi)56%. 

A small additional uplift was met by 
selling that again lowered prices. The 
close wa.s nervous with July %c net 
lower at 56c. 

Infhientlal buying lifted oats. July 
opened unchanged to %c lower at 34'74c 
to 35c and went up to 35t4c. May con- 
tract deliveries were 405,000 bu, mainly 
scattered. 

Better piices at the yards helped 
provisions. A net advance of 2%c to 
5c was scored. July opened: Pork. 
$19.65; lard, $10.87%; ribs, $11.02 %0 
11.05. 

Closing cash: Wheat — No. 2 red, 
$1.04 %'?»!. 07%; No. 3 red 95cffi)$1.00; 
No. 2 hard, 93'^95c; No. 3 hard, 92 (g» 
94%c; No. 1 northern. 92%fj)94%c: No. 

2 northern, 91%(a>93%c; No. 3 north- 
ern 90(f291c; No. z spring. 91(^93c; No. 

3 spring. 89@91c; No. 4 spring, 85@ 
89c; velvet chaflf, 89(g)94c; durum, 
9;' 'Q) 99c. 

Corn— No. 2, 56%'??' 58c: No. 2 white. 
.'.9'?J)60c; No. 2 yellow 56%'a57: No. 3. 
55%'5'57c; No. 3 white, 58'fi).n8%c; No. 



(irafton 

Jajuecitowa ". . . ."ciear 

LatiKdon clear 

LiTiinore Pt. Cloudy 

Li.<b.jn Ooudyl 

Napoleon Cluudyi 

PembliiA Cloudy 

Walipeton Cloudy 

Bl'liiigs Cloudy' 

JUuliJth Cloudy 

SMoorhead Cloudy 

SISt. Paul Cloudy 

§L.^ Crosse Cloudy 

8Huron Cloudy 

Si'wi" Cloudy 

8IUpld City Rnlalng 

§bLsniari;k Cloudy 

SDevila Idke Cloudy 

§<;rand Forka Cloudy 

SWlUlston Cloudy 

5»a'^re Clear 

Sillies <;Uy Cloudy 

$tMlnnodo«a Cloudy 

5tWiniilpeg Cloudy 

ItUu'AppoUe Snowing 



86 
88 
'JO 
84 
88 
88 
84 
86 
88 
78 
90 
78 
86 
80 
86 
36 
44 
42 
44 
48 
60 
72 
44 
62 
86 
52 
42 
90 
46 
76 
90 
S6 

84 
66 
54 
86 
SO 
66 
40 
S6 
44 
44 
52 
32 



58 
38 
34 
30 
40 
50 
36 
54 
56 
44 
38 
36 
48 
34 
42 
32 
28 
20 
30 
32 
32 
80 
28 
30 
32 
20 
22 
30 
32 
48 
82 
62 
60 
38 
42 
32 
34 
32 
32 
28 
22 
34 
26 
30 
20 





.02 

.20 



.28 



.12 







.14 

.10 

.12 











.12 











.04 





.xo 




.18 



.01 


.02 









.02 



RE.MAKK.S— Light rain or snow foil over South 
Dakou and Nortliein and Western Minnesota, othw- 
wliie fair weather wis the rule. Free7,i:ig weather 
prevailed in North Dakota and STontana. 

H. W. RICHARDSON. 
Liocal Forecaster. 



&. m.. 



J— Not Included In the district acorages. 

t— Maximum of yesterday, minimum of laat nlaht. 

•—Highest yesterday. 

t— rx)wp.8t for twenty-four hours, ending at 8 
8erent.v fifth meridian time. 

Note— The average highest and lowest temperafuras 
are niaiie up at each center from the actual number 
of reports received, and the arerage prcolpltailona 
from the number of stations reporting 0.10 inch or 
more. The "state of weather" la that prevailing at 
time of observation. 



New 
closed 



New 

York 
at 99%c 



York 

May 



Grain. 

1.— July 



wheat 



Market. 

1- — The cotton mar- 
at an advance of 
on heavy covering 



Cotton 

New York, May 
ket opened firm 
10 to 19 points 

and an active demand from bulLs or 
reactionists who were encouraged by 
firm cables, reports of a smaller In- 
crease In acreage than expected and a 
bullish view of the near month situa- 
tion owing to prospective shipments 
from both tho New York and New Or- 
leans stocks. 

The advance ran the market into 
big selling orders which appeared to 
come largely from the South and with 
the forecasts indicating good weath- 
er, prices eased off several points from 
the best during the early morning. 

The market was very nervous and 
unsettled toward the end of the first 
hour. 

Spot, closed quiet: middling uplands, 
11.9,->; middling gulf, 12.20. Sales. 88.- 
700 bales. 

Futures closed steady; closing bids- 
May, 11.57; June, 11.59; July, 1163; 
August, 11.41; September, 11.10; Octo- 
ber, 11.04; December. 11.06; January, 
11.03; March, 11.11, ^' 



Chicago lilveMtock. 

Chtc>ago, May 1.— Hogs— Ke(«lpU, 15.000- market 
.1c higher than yosforday'a averae; bulk of sales (8 45 
(S8.60; light. «.50ru!8.73; mixed, $8.30<^8.7a- 'heavy 
$8.05(^8.00; rough. $8.05^8.20; plgg, J6 00@8'70 

Cattle — Receipts. 3.500; steady to sliadt^ higher- 
beeves, $7.20(48 90; Texae steers, |6.70(^7.76- west- 
ern, $6i»Oi«8.IO; stoclwrs aiid feeders, $0.0(5(^8 00- 
cows and lielfors, $:i.H0:»8.15; rnlves, $6.r.0(90 50 

.Slieep— RecPiptJi, 11,000; strong: native. »5 9u@7 25- 
western, $0.1St*7.25; yearlings. $0.40(38.00- lambs' 
native, $0.50(28.80; western, $0.90(38.80. 



3 yellow, 561^56^0: No 
No. 4 white. 55%@56%c 
55^5:. -^n. 

Oats— No. 2 white, 37(®37%c; No. 3 



4. 54%® 56c: 
No. 4 yellow, 



0. A. HOFFMAN 

208 PAI.LADIO BLDO. 

STOCKS AND BONDS 



UNLISTED SECURITIES. 
Correwpondrnce Invited 



Midway Home Mnrket. 

MInnesnta Transfer. St. Paul, .Minn., May i _ 
Iliirrett & Zlniiuernian report: Dealers report a sat- 
isfactory inquiry for draft and cmiorai purpose farm 
liorses and mares, several grt.i.l nales being booked to 
dealers in WLscoasln. Mlchlcan and Montana. Shlp- 
r-ents were made to Appleton, F-ranklln and Chls- 
liolm, Minn.; Plt-ntyw.jod. Mont.; /Vshlsml. RJb Lake 
snd River FaUs, WLs ; and Marquette. Mich. Values 
aa follows: 

Drn'tcrs, extra 

Prafters, choice \ 

Prafters. ciunmon to good 

Farm horses and niaros, extra ,'." 

Farm horses and mares. choU,-© 

Fiirm hotaee. common to good 

I >elivery \ 

Hrivera and saddlers . . . ^ ,' *] 

Mules, ati-ordlng to sIm 



.tl75(!?'2:i.', 

. 125(Tfl75 

. J)5(;?'125 

. 125@175 

. 9.-|(^I2.-) 

. fl5(.<i 95 

. 105(^215 

. 10.')(>*200 

. 105(3230 



SHIP TO THE OLD RELIABLE 

C. C. WYMAN & CO. 



New York Money. 

New York, May 1. — Money on call 
steady. 2<<ii3 per cent; ruling rate 3- 
closing bid, 2 V^ ; offered at S%. T^nie 
loans steady; 60 days. 4 per cerrt and 
no days 4(8)4 V4 per cent; six months, 
4Vi®4V4. 

Close: Prime mercantile paper, 5(3) 
5% per cent; sterling exchange steady 
with actual business In hankers' bill.<» 
at $4.83.55 for 60-day bills, and $4,86.60 
for demand. Commercial bills, $4.83. 
nar silver, 60c. Mexican dollars, 48c. 
Government bonds, steady; railroad 
bonds, irregular. 



DULUTH 



SRAIN COMMISSION 



MINNEAPOLIS 



South St. Pniil MvcHtock. 

Routh .St. Paul, Minn.. May 1 —rattle— Receipts 
900; killers, steady; steers, $3.75«*8 25; cows-he(f»rs' 
$4 50(1*7 .15: calves. steady, $5.ii0(»«.75; feeders' 
steady, $4 S0(»7 75. Hoga— Receipts. .1.000- steady 
range, $8.1O@8.:<0; bulk, $8.20. Hheop--n.icelpU 
1,000; steady, lambs. $4.50^8.00; wetUon. $4 S0(^ 
«.26; ewea. $J.2.5(affl.0<>. ' ^ 



STOCKS m 

VERY Strong 



J u 



Market Gives IBest Exhibi- 
tion of Strength for 
Long Time. 

Stocks, Recently Demoral- 
ized, Go Upward in Spec- 
tacular Fashion. 



New York. May 1. — Dependence on 
the foreign markets us a barometer of 
political conditions abroad was impos- 
sible in the stock market today, ow- 
ing to the holiday at the principal 
foreign centers. 

The absence of official news re- 
stricted trading. While the home mar- 
ket started higher. the period of 
strength was of brief duration, and 
the downward movement was resumed 
with some violence in spots. 

High class stocks sought substantial- 
ly lower levels, with a sprinkling of 
low records by investment and non- 
dividend paying issues. Speculative 
leaders showed considerable resiliency. 
rallying briskly where there was a 
cessation of liquidation to other yuar- 
tors. Bonds were easy, 
strength on the tirst transactions but 
quickly eased off. Li<iuidation of some 
of the recent weak features was con- 
tinued and seve!"al new prices were re- 
corded. New Haven dropped as much 
as a point between sales, and fell back 
3 points to 103. Illinois Central also 
touched a new low fl,?ure at 113, a de- 
cline of a point. 

Creation of many aiditional low rec- 
ords by seasoneil dividend paying 
stocks overcame the monetary (Jlsplay 
of strength at the outset and the gen- 
eral level fell to below yesterday's 
clo.sing. Some Improvement occurred 
afterwards but the rtdly caused a con- 
sid.M-ahle contraction in the dealings. 

The turn in the tire came with the 
definite announcement of a change for 
the better in forelgr. political affairs. 
Representativo stock.'i which had bt^en 
chafing under the restraint imposed by 
the li(juidation of minor issues, bound- 
ed up vigorously, and pulled the whole 
list upwards. Shorts fastened to cover 
and bid up prices materially on them- 
selves in their anxletv to get stock. 

Canadian Pacific sold 5 point.s above 
yesterday's closing and Union Pacific, 
Soutliern Pacific, Missiourl Pacific, Cop- 
per and Steel from 1\ to 2V2. Many 
stocks which had establLshed new low 
records in the earlier downward move- 
ment, rallied to a point or more above 
yesterday's figures. 

Immediate demandti of the short in- 
terest having becomo satisfied, prices 
were allowed to slip back fractionally, 
after which the list tecame dull. Vio- 
lent movements wero common in the 
downward and upwa.rd swings some 
active shares vibrat ng more than 3 
points. 

The market closed .strong. Bulls took 
aggros.sive action again in the closing 
hour and lifted prices another peg. 
Strength permeated ill quarters and 
stocks which were recently demoral- 
ized, such aa Rumldy, went up In 
spectacular fashion. In fact the mar- 
ket gave the best exhibition of strength 
that has been witnessed for a long 
time. 



Closing quotations furnished by Gay 
& Sturgls, 326 West Superior street: 



STOCKS— 



mgh.. I Low. 1 Close. [Apr 30 



Amalgamated 
Anaconda 
American Can 

do pfd 

Amer. Cotton Oil 
Amer. Tele. Co. 
Amer. Beet Sug. 
.'Vmer. Smelting 

Atchison 

tJ. & O 

Bethlehem Stee.l. 

Bklyn K. T 

Can. Pacific . . . . 
Cal. Petroleum. .. 
Car Foundry . . . 
Col. Fuel & Iron. 

Chino 

Ches. & Ohio 

Cons. Oas 

Central Leather 
Com. Products. . 

Erie ! 

Gt. North, pfd. . . 
Gt. North. Ore 



General Electrlcil38i/«!l37»'i 




Guggenheim . 
Illinois Central. 
Interborough . . 

do pfd 

Lehigh 

Louisville & N. . 
Mex. Petroleum. 
Mo., Kan. & T. . 

Mo Pacific 

N. Y. Central... 
New Haven .... 

Nev. Con 

Northern Pac. . . 
Norfolk & West. 
National Lead . . 
Ontario & West. 

Pacific Mail 

Penn.sylvanla . . 
People's Gas. . . . 
Pressed Steel . . . 
Ray Consolidated 

Reading 

Rock Island 

do. pfd 

Rubber 

Southern Pacific 

Sugar 

South. Railway.. 

St. Paul 

Texas Pacific . . 
Union Pacific .. 
Steel common .. 

do pfd 

Western Union . 
* Wool worth 
*x-Dividend 1% 



44 Vi 
113%, 

14% 

51 %t 
155 
131M; 

66 V.. 

23 V.; 

3.5 

101 7<| 

105 

16%, 
114Vi: 
104 Ti. 

49 

29 Vi 

22 
114 M- 
109 T^, 

24V^ 

17' 



42% 

112% 
14 
*8% 

153 

129% 
64 V« 
221^ 
S2% 

100% 

io2.y2 

16V^ 
113 
104 Va 

49 

2 9 Mi 

21 
114% 
109% 

24 

17 



1G1»4,11^8V2 



10 

32 V4 

62 

98 
110% 

23% 
107 

iri% 

149% 
61 



65% 
91Vi 



60% 
96 
110% 
23 iH. 

lOS^rS 

15% 

146% 

58% 



64% 
89 



per cent. 



73% 
37^ 

32H 
92 

43V& 
128% 

29V4 
67 
99 . 
97% 
33 

89% 
240% 
41 Vs 
49 

3214 
3914 
64% 

129 y* 

23-% 
10% 

28%| 
126% 

31% 
138 

44 y* 

113% 
14% 
51% 

155 

131V^ 
66 Vs 
tab 74 
34% 

101% 

104% 
16% 

114% 

104 78 
49 

29% 
22 

114% 

IO9V2 
2 4Vt 
17 'i 

161 
18% 
31% 
62 
98 

110% 
23% 

lOGTii 
15% 

149% 
60% 



f.5% 
91 H 



71 Vs 
36 V4 
32% 
91% 
43% 

128 Vi 
28 Vi 
65 Vi 
9S% 
97 

3214 
88 

235% 
40Vi 

*3i% 

37% 
63% 
127% 
22 

10 

27% 
125 

31% 
137 Vj 

42 

114% 

14 Vb 

50 

1153% 

1129% 

I 64% 

22% 

33 Vi 

101 

106% 
16% 

113% 

104-% 
48% 
28% 
22 

114% 

109% 
22% 
17% 

158% 
19% 
32% 
60 7:, 
96% 

111 
23-% 

105% 

146% 



107 
64 Vi 



New York 
Sales up to 11 a. m. 
vSales up to noon . . . 
Sales up to 1 p. ni.. 
Sales up to 2 p. m. . 

Total sales 

Bar silver 60c. 



Sales 
.. 87.557 
. .260.900 
. .361,924 
. .417,871 
. .561.100 



BOSTON COPPER STOCKS. 

Closing quotations furnished by Gay 
& Sturgls. 326 West Superior street: 



Idsted Stockn — 


1 Bid. 


1 Asked. 


Adventure 


1% 


2 


Agr. Chem 


50 


52 


Ahmeek 


300 


310 


Algomah 


75c 


1.00 


AlIou(>z 


31% 


32 


Amalgamated . 


73 % 


73% 


Arcadian 


1% 


1% 


Arizona Commercial 


2% 


3 


Bo.ston & Cor bin .... 


5 


5% 


Butte & Ballaklava 


2 


2% 


Butte & Superior 


27 


27% 


ChIno 


39 


39% 


Calumet & Arizona ... 


68 


63% 


Calumet & Hecla 


455 


460 


Centennial 


12% 


13% 


Coi)per Range 


41% 


42% 


Daly West 


2% 


3 1-16 


Ka.st Boston , . 




11% 
12 


ICast Butte . 


11% 
6 


Franklin 


6% 


Olroux 


2% 


2% 


Granby 


61% 


62 


Greene-Cananea 


6% 


7 


Hancock 


18 


19 


Indiana . 


8% 


9% 


Inspiration 


16 


16% 


Islo Royale 


82% 


£3 


Kerr Lake 


3 8-16 


3 5-16 


Keweenaw 


1% 


2 


Lake 


12% 


12% 


La Salle 


3% 
6% 

?.7% 


4 


Md-vflowor 


7% 

88% 


Mass Gas ^ 


Mass Copper ,, • 

Mason Valley 


3 


3% 


6 


28% 
1% 


Miami 


23 
1 


Mlehlaran 


Mohawk 


60 



Ne"vada Conaolldatod . . 

Nlpissing 

North Butte 

North Lake , 

Old Dominion 

OJIbway 

Osceola 

Pon«l Crek 

Quincy 

Hay tJonsolldated 

Shannon 

Shut luck 

aiioe Machinery 

Superior & Boston 

.Superior Copper 

Swift 

Tamarack 

Trinity 

Tuolumne 

U. S. Mining common. 

United Fruit 

Utah Consolidated 

Utah Copper 

Victoria 

Winona 

Wolverine 

Zince 

II n luted Stock»^ 
Arizona Sc Michigan... 

Bay State Gas 

Begole 

Bohemia 

Boston Ely 

Butte Central 

Butte & London 

Cactus 

Calaveras 

Alaska Dev 

Chief Cons 

Corbln Copper 

Cortez 

Crown Reserve 

Davis Daly 

Doble 

Dome Extension 

Ely Cona 

First National 

Goldfield Cons 

HoIUnger 

Houghton 

La Rose 

Mines Co. of America. . 

Montana 

New Baltic 

Ohio Copper 

Oneco 

Pearl Lake 

Porcupine Gold 

Preston 

Raven 

Smokey Dev 

South Lake 

Southwestern Miami . . 

Superior & Globe 

Tcmlskaming 

Tonopah 

Tonopali Belmont 

Tonopah lOxten.sion . . . 

United Verde Ext 

We.st End 

Wettlaufer 

Yukon 



'11 


17 
9 


28% 


28% 


1% 


45% 


47 


1 


1% 


83 


84 


18% 


19 


67 


68 


'li 


17% 
10 


23 




47% 


47% 


3 


3% 


27% 


28 


104% 


105 


27% 


28 


3% 


3% 


2 


2 3-16 


38% 


39 


154 


154% 


7% 


7% 


50% 


50% 


1 


1% 


2 


2% 


50 


51 


24% 


25 




15c 


15c 


17c 


2 


2% 


1% 


2% 


55c 


60 c 


2% 


2 5-16 


22c 


27c 


8c 


10c 


2% 


2 9-16 


11% 


11% 


1% 


1 7-16 


950 


97c 


25c 


40c 


3% 


4 


2 5-16 


2 7-16 


10c 


35c 


10c 


14c 


8c 


10c 


13-16 


1 15-16 


15-16 


2 


17c 


18c 


2% 


3% 


2% 


2 7-16 


2% 


2% 


1 7-16 


1 11-16 


1 


1% 


89c 


95c 


1 


1% 


50c 


65c 


230 


30c 


2c 


6c 


15c 


17c 


1 


1% 


6 


6% 


2% 


3% 


5g 


15c 


34 


39 


5% 


5% 


5% 


5% 


2% 


2% 


69c 


73c 


1% 


1 9-16 


13c 


17c 


2% 


2% 



Liverpool Grain. 

Liverpool, May 1. — Wheat: Spot steady; 

No. 2 Manitoba, 7s lid; No. 3 Manitoba, 

7.S lOd; futures easy; May, 7s 9d; July, 
7.S 6%d; October. 7s 4%d. 

Corn — Spot steady; American mixed 
new, 5s %d; American mixed new 
kiln dried, 5s l%d; American mixed 
old. 63; American mixed old, via Galves- 
ton, 73 SVad; futures easy; May, Ameri- 
can mixed, 4s ll%d; July. (La Plata), 
53 l%d. 



THE PRODUCE MARKET. 



fancj. per bos. $5. 25 
to ItOe. fancy 

5.00 



fancy. 



5.50 

5.50 



3.00 



C.'VLIFORNIA 0RANOES~- 

CallfortUa navel oi&uaea. 2503, 
Caiifornia navel oranges, 98s 

per bux 

California navel orauges, 1268 to 200a. 

per box 

California navel orani{»«, 2I6s. faii(!y. per box. 
California uavei oranges, 288s an<l smaller. 

fancy, i>er box 5. 00 

JERSEY CR.^N'IJIiUUlIES— 
Jersey cranberrlea. bu 

FRESH FRUITS— 

Havana pineapples, per orate 3.75 

Louisiana strawberrlea, per case of 24 

pints $2,509 2.75 

B*RREL APPLK3— (Southern atock.) 

Fanry Jonathans, per t>bl 5. 00 

Ben Davis, per bbl. fancy 3.50 

tJanos, per bbl 3.50 

Uldc-k T\vlg.-i. per bbl 3.75 

WESTKRN nOX AFPLE8— 

Spiizeubergs. fancy, per box i.jf 

Jonathans, per box Jl.lOia l.UO 

GRAPIJ^RUIT— 
Florida Urights atid Rua.sets 46s. per 

box 4.23 

Same, !t4H and 04s. per doz |4.75@ 5.00 

B.^NANAS— 
Jumb) bunches. Port Llmon fruit, per lb 04 H 

TOMATOES— 
Floiiiia. ti-basket crate 4.50 

CELERY— 
California trimmed, per rtoz..' $1.00® 1,25 

CAI.IFOR.MA LEMONS- 
California lemons, extra fancy, per dox, 300a 

and 3608 

Imported limes, per box. 

MISCELLAMCOUS— 

Beans, navy, per bu 

Bean-*, brown, per bu. . 
New t'alifoniia walnuts, 
Mixed nuts, per lb 

CIDER— 
New apple, sweet, per keg 3,93 

VEGETABLES— 

lettuce leaf, per bu 1.25 

Green onions, per doi 20iS 

Large parsley, per doz 

Small parsley, per doz 

Garlic, new Italian, per lb 

Oarllo fancy, 50-lb hampers, per lb u 

Round radishes, hut house, large bunchea. 

per doz 

Long radLslies. per doz bunches 

Hothouae cucumbers, doz 

Florida peppers. i>er basket 3,5 

.Spinach. l)er bu box 1.10 

California cauliflower, per crate. » doz 

Oyster plant., per daz 

Florida egg plant, per doz 

New beets, per doz bunches 

New carrots, per doz buncbes 

Rhubarb, 40-lb box 

A.sparagtw, l)er d^z bunches 1.35 

POTATOia— 
White Ktuck potatoes, selected fancy, per bu 
New potatoes, per hamper 



lb.. 



•••••••*••■• 



8.00 
1.50 

2.50 

2.25 

.19 

.14 



.30 
.90 
.35 
.12 



.90 
.50 
.00 



.75 
.85 

1.75 
.50 
.50 

2.00 



.43 

2.75 

per bu hamper 2.25 



Jersey sweet potatoes 

ROOTS— 

Parsnips, per cwt 1.75 

lljrse radish root, per bbt 5. so 

H ir.so radish, per lb 10 

R. ilabagaa. per cwt l.oo 

Beets, per cwt I.15 

Carruts. per cwt 1.50* 

CADUAOE— 

Home grown, last season cabbage, per cwt I.50 

Texas, new cabbage, per cwt * i.iQ 

ONIONS— 

Minnesota red onions, per sarfc. 100-Ib l,io 

Minnesota yellow, per sack, 100-lb 1.25 

Si>anlsh onions, per crt 1.75 

ONION .SETS— 

Red. pei bu 3.50 

Yellow, per Ou , 2. 75 

Wtiite. per bu 3. 00 

BUTTER— 

Creamery, per lb 34® .35 

Dairy, per lb 20(cj ,26 

Oleomargarine $0 

CHEESI'y— 

Twins 15 

New York twins 17 

Block Swiss, per lb. No. 1 22 

Wheel Swiss, per lb. No. 1 22 

Prlni'>t>t 09 

Brick cheoae, pec lb 15 

EGOS— 
Fr«sh 19® .20 

MIw\l*S— 



..10® 

..12® 
..15® 
..12® 
..14® 



.18H® 



•••«•••«. 



Beef, per lb , 

Mutton, per lb 

Pork loins, per lb 

T'eal, per lb 

1 tmb, per lb 

Lard, per lb • ... 

FRE.su DR^i»S^a) POOLTHY— 

Hens, per lb 

Geese, per lb 

Dry picked turkeys , 

Stag roosters, per ID 

Sprlntrs, per lb 

FROZIuN POUI.TRT— 

Hena, per lb 17H9 

Oecse. per lo 

Dry picked tnrkej-9 

Spring:^, per lb I1\k9 

1.1 Vi; POULTRY— 

Hens, per lb 

Si>rlngs. per lb 

Stag roosters 

The aliovB quntatloiia Indlrate what the rctallen 
pay to the wholesaler. The hay prices below are 
what the farmers receive from the jobbers. 

HAY— 

No. 1 timothy, per ton $1S.OO(!»'14.00 

No. 2 timothy, per ton 10.r>0®12..%0 

No. 1 mixed llmotliy. par ton 10.00((i'l'.!.P0 

2 nilxod timothy, per ton 7.00® B.OO 

1 prairie, per ton 11.00(.^12.04) 

2 prairie, pe.- ton 8.00® 9.nO 

1 Midland, per tun 6.00® 7.00 

2 Midland, per toa t.50(^• 5.00 

Rye straw, per ton 5.00® 5.^0 

Oats straw, per ton 4.50® S.M 



.134 

.13 

.16 

.14 

.16 

.12i4 

.20 
.17 
.24 
.15 
.20 

.19 
.16 
.22 
.18 

.SO 

.20 
.14 



GAY &. SXURGIS 

326 WEST SUPERIOR ST. 

Members of the New York and Boston Stock Exchanges. 

Listed Securities including FRACTIONAL 

LOTS bought and sold on both exchanges. 

SPECIAL ATTENTION TO LOCAL SECURITIES 

Direct Private Wire to 
Boston, New YorK, Detroit, Chicago, Houghton and Calumet 
We have a full and complete Statistical Department, which is at 
your service at all times. Correspondence solicited. 
R T. Goodell. Resident Manager. W. J. North, Assistant Manager. 

Both 'Phones, 2210. 



L. P. GALLAGHER, 

Commercial Photographer 



Milling, CntnlOBTMe, Archl- 
teotiirul, Prourfwis & Con- 
•itriiction, i'nuoramle Vlewii. 



315 WEST FIKST .STHEET, 
Uululb, .Mluii. 

Phone. MelruNe 2.t.%4. 



stylo or quality, 13®17%c. Eggs—Firm «id un- 
changed; rectipu, 27,542 caaes. 

HIDES. LEATHER. FURS. 

GRKE.V SALTED HIDK.S— 

Market atlU very weak. Tanners not Interested. 

No. 1. No. t. 

a. 8. steers, over GO lbs lt% .IIH 

G. 8. cows, 25 lbs and up. and steer* 

under 50 lbs 12V4 .11V4 

O 8. cows, 40 lbs and up. branded 

flat 10% 

G S. long haired kips. 8 to 25 lbs.. .13 .IIH 

G. 8. veal kip, 8 to 25 lbs IS%. .12% 

O. .S. veal kip, 8 to 15 Iba 16 .14% 

G S deacon Hklns, under 8 lbs 85 .65 

G. S. boree hides 4.00 1.30 

DRY HlDliS— 

Weak In sympathy with green salted. No. 1. No. 8. 

Dry western, over 12 lbs 22 .20 

Dry Mltuiesota. Dakota, WUconaln 

and Iowa hides, over 12 lbs 19 .17 

Dry kip, 5 to 12 lbs 21 .19 

Dry calf, under 5 lbs all .wctlona 23 .21 

TALLOW AND UilEAiJli— 

Market steady. No 1. No. 2. 

Tallow In cakes 06% .04% 

TallO'.v In barrels 05% .04% 

Grease, white 05 — 

Gi-ease, yellow and brown 04% .03% 

.Ship in light 2-headed barrels to avoid leakage 

SHE1:P PELT8— 

Market dull In sympathy with wooL 

Q. S. pelts, lai-ge 50 1.00 

G. S. pelus, small t> medium 30 .50 

G. S. shearlings 10 .25 

Dry butcher pelts, lb 10 .11 

Dry muiTains, lb 09 .10 

— Per Lb- 

LEATITER— No. 1. No. 2. 

Texaa oals sole A 44 .42 

Hemlock slaughter sole II 87 .36 

Hemlock dry hide sole 35 .33 

Hemlock harness leather 44 .42 

Oak larness leather 45 .43 

FURS— 

Large. Medium. Small. 

.Skunk, black $2.50 $2.00 $1.75 

SkuBk. broad stripe 1.75 1.25 l.oO 

Skunk, long narrow stripe 2.25 1.75 1.50 

Muskrat. winter 36 .32 .25 

Raccoon 2.50 2.O0 1.75 

Mink, dark and brown 5.00 3.50 2.00 

Mink, pale 4.25 8.00 1.50 

Beaver 11.00 7.50 4.09 

Cat. wild 4.00 2.50 l.'SO 

Fisher, dark 35.00 20.00 15.00 

Fisher, pale 1500 10.00 6.50 

Fox. red 9.00 6.50 5 00 

Fox. red BOO 8.00 J. 00 

Fox, dark cross 25.00 19.00 12.09 

Fox silver dark 800.00 450.00 3,50.00 

Foi, sUver pale 300.00 200 00 150.00 

Wolverines 10.00 7.50 6.00 

Otter, dirk 25.00 20.00 15.00 

Otter, pale 1200 8 00 4.00 

Lynx 20.00 15.00 10.00 

Marten, dark brown and pale 25.00 12.50 5.00 

Weaiel, white 70 .60 .40 

Weasel, stained, daji*\ged 20 .15 .10 

Wolf, timber 2.60 1.50 1.00 

Bear, a* ^ size 3.00 (£35.00 

COPPERS HAVE 

ANOTHER BREAK 



No. 
No. 
Nn. 
No. 
No. 



ChlcnKO. 

Chicago. May 1. — Rutter— Firm; receipts. 8.131 
Ui!)s; creamerj- extras, 30i'; extra flrsls. 20c; flrsta. 
27%(rtf28c; 3e<-onds. 26(*2:c; ladles. No. 1, 24 %c; 
pai'.klng. 25c. K4{gH— Steady: recolpts. 24.380 ca-ies; 
frnsli, I8r; at mark, cases Included, I7ii*18c; ordln- 
«ry lirats, 17c; firsts. lOc. Potatoes— Undianged; re- 
ceipts, 2r> cars; Michigan, 42<<#45c; Min-ieNota, 35 
(g'4:!c; Wisconsin, 40i'?15c. Live poultrj — Higher; 
cluckens and springs, 17c. 



New York. 

Now Y'lrlt, Mar I.— Butter— atea<ly and un- 
change<1: receipts. 7,545 tubs. Cheese — Steady; re- 
ceipts, 2.031 boxes; state whole milk, hold aa to 



Subscribe for The Herald 



Following a weak opening' and little 
If any trading for the flr.st few hours 
thi.s morning a sudden break in copper 
stocks all along the line took place 
about the middle of the session. Later 
there was a slight recovery, but it did 
not amount to much up to noon. It 
was quite evident that there was heavy 
selling in the East. 

It is believed to be the fact that 
quite a number of speculators are go- 
ing short in anticipation of a rally, 
for, according to the dispatches, a 
rally is expected at any time now and 
must be reckoned with. Conditions 
are ripe for one and It may be. some 
hold the opinion, that were it not for 
the fact that exchanges on the other 
side of the Atlantic are closed today, 
a heavy rally might start todaj', as 
American stocks have continued to be 
strong over there even in face of the 
fact that they have been weak at 
home. 

As a whole there is not a great deal 
of activity in coppers today. The most 
notably active are Amalgamated, Butte 
& Superior — which, by the way. shows 
the least inclination to rally — Calumet 
& Arizona, Lake and North Butte. In 
the other stocks United States Steel 
common is active, as are also some of 
the railroads. These are holding their 
own in price and some of them have 
advanced a trifle. 

• • • 

Coppers did not rally to any great 
extent toward the close. Amalgamated 
had a slight bulge which seemed sub- 
stantial, Butte & Superior rose and 
fell with nothing definite to be detected 
in Its movement, Qranby closed at an 
Increase over yesterday, and North 
Butte was steady at a slight advance. 
Other stocks were Inactive since the 
break of the morning. 

A change of some sort Is confidently 
looked for for tomorrow. 

• * • 

Gay & Sturgls received today by 
wire the following comment from Bos- 
ton: 

Reports are very contradictory on 
Butte & Superior. Some are favorable, 
others not. A proper comparison of 
what a mining stock Is worth now- 
adays Is furnished by the fact that 
railways are paying 6 per cent for 
money constituting a first lien and in- 
dustrials 6V4 per cent. Mining stocks 
should net at least 8 per cent by com- 
parison. The claims for Butte & Su- 
perior were (6 per share. It's the 
extremely depressed condition of senti- 
ment that makes these prices, not con- 
ditions at mines. 

• • * 

Duluth cnrn stock quotations for to- 
day were as follows: 

Stocks — Bid. Asked. 

American Saginaw ... $ 9.50 $10.00 

Butte-Alex Scott 8.37 8 . RO 

Butte & Ely .60 

t^actus 10 .11 

Calumet & Montana .05 

Calumet & Corbin ... .06 

Calumet & Sonora.... 2.00 2.50 

Carman .45 .50 

Chief Consolidated ... 1.37 1.50 

Cliff Miningf 85 .90 

Copper queen .10 

Denn-Arlzona 6.50 7.00 

Duluth Mocteauma 1.00 

Florence .70 ,80 

Keating 1.26 1.87 

Elenita 1.25 

Mowitza iO .30 

Rainbow Dev 9.00 

Red Warrior 1.00 1.12 

San Antonio 2.75 

Savanna 1.60 1.75 

St. Mary .08 

Sierra 70 .80 

Summit Copper .05 .07 

Warren 6.00 6.50 

Warrior Development. .90 1.00 



SAYS COLLEGE MEN 
ARE FORCE FOR PEACE 



St. Louis, Mo.. May 1. — The college 
man, whether teacher or student, was 
given his credit for promoting peace 
relations throughout the world by 
President Charles F. Thwlng of We.st- 
ern Reserve university, at the Fourth 
American Peace congress today. Dr. 
Thwlng. who is president of the Inter- 
collegiate Peace association, spoke on 
"International Patriotism Amoaff Col- 
lege Men." He aald: 

"CoUeff» men ar« patriotic. No col- 



lege men are more patriotic than the 
American. But what is today needed 
Is no* less of national patriotism, but 
more of international. There should 
be a patriotism for all nations among 
each nation of college men. The songs 
of each nation ought to be .sung by 
the students of all nations. That glad 
time is dawning. 

"Students from each country are 
found In all countries. The Chinese 
go to Japan as well as to America, the 
Hindu to England, the Russian to 
Germany, the American to Germany. 
France to England, and all come to 
America. Such migrations are to ba 
encouraged." 

WALSH TELLS ABOUT 
"THE SYSTEM'S" FUNDS 



New York, May 1. — Driven to the ex- 
pedient by graft disclosures that 
threatened to lead to grand jury action, 
prominent figures in the police "sys- 
tem" prepared to raise two bribe funds, 
one to ket-p a policeman under ar- 
rest from "squealng" and the other to 
pay a disorderly resort keeper not to 
testify. 

This was In effect Former Police 
Captain Thomas W. Walsh's testimony 
against Thompson, Hussey, Murtha 
and Sweeney, four former inspectors on 
trial on charges of conbpl^acy to ob- 
struct justice. The first of the funds 
was $15,000, Walsh said. 

Testifying ua to graft. Walsh swore 
he collected tribute for a numb^-r of 
years, instructed by the defendants. 

Walsh was on the stand nearly eight 
hours. 



Strike U Averted. 

Pittsburg, Pa., May 1. — A threatened 
strike of 4.200 carpenters, scheduled 
to begin v.Ar(» today,, was averted last 
night when an agreement was reached 
between the Master Builders' associa- 
tion and the general executive com- 
mittee of the United Brotherhood of 
Carpenters and Joiners. The men have 
been receiving? 50 cents an hour, and 
asked 60 cents. Under the agreement 
they are given 55 cents an hour, and 
whether they will get the additional 5 
cents is left to a joint arbitration com. 
mlltee. 



BRUSH FIRE BURNS 
4-YEAR-OLD GIRL 



Tomah. Wis.. May 1. — Elnore. 4-year- 
old daughter of William Timmerman. 
was burned to death yesterday in a 
brush fire, raging near the home of her 
father, six miles west of Tomah. 
Arthur Timmerman, 14 years old, 
brother of the child, was badly burned 
trying to rescue his sister, but will re. 
cover. 

Bru.sh fires have been burning at 
many points In this vicinity for several 
days, the season being one of the driest 
in years, but up to this time have con- 
fined their ravages mostly to waste 
land on the bluffs, with no serious 
property damage. Now the flames are 
in a number of cases drawing near th« 
homes of settlers. 



The Aetna Accident <& Liability 
i'urapany. 

Principal office: Haivfuri, Conn. iOrgiinlz««d la 
188:j. I M. a. Uulkeiey. prt<sid«ia; J. Scotteld Howe, 
secretary. Attorney to acc«ji»; serriue iu llioueaoU: 
Commissioner of iii'uraiice. 

CASH CAPITA!,. H.OOO.OOJ.OO. 
INCOME IN 1912. 

Premiums recel\eil (Net) — 

FSiipliiyers' llablUty $!«. 129.68 

maellty and aurvty 147, 1*5.79 

Plate glass 118.236.78 

Burglary aiid theft H4.IS8 61 

Sprinkler 34.34».17 

Fly wheel 1,»11 12 

Auto property damac« 439.748.91 

Total net premium Income f 903.9M.06 

I'Yum Intuixst and reiita 88!oj4.07 



Total Income | 99S.728.1J 

LcUger assets Deo. 31 of pre»ioua year.. 2,365.066.91 



Sum 



yi.s:i$.79<i.H 



DISBURSEMENTS IN 1912. 

Claims paid (Not) — 

ridality arid surety K4 80 

Plate glass 39. Hi ,i 50 

Hurglary and thrfl 60.084.83 

Sprinkler 8.703.46 

Auto properly damiurs l.>j,676.11 

Net paid poll.-yholtlera | 234. 704. TO 

liiresUgation and adjustment of claims... It! i07 69 

Couimi.s8iuiu . , , Ji 1,(HT 95 

Salaries of officers, agvnta, enipioyw. 

esamluera' and inspedlon fee* 83.706 OT 

DKIdeuds to stockholders fiO.iKiO 00 

All otlier Olslxirsemout* 86.199 13 



Total dlsbunementa $ CS8.t)8:>.M 

B«ian<* JS.C70.790 M 

LEDGER ASSETS DEC. 31. 1912. 

M.)rt«,ig» loatis j 632,781 25 

CoUateral loatis 103.i)«0.00 

Boik value ot bonds and stocka 1.509.435 t9 

Ca-sli iu offli-e, tmst companlaa and 

'>•"'" 164. 018.25 

PriMulums In course of collection 20.'^ 071 35 

All otlier ledger asoela 6!415!ai 

Ttatal ledger asset.4 (as per ba!ance> 
NON-LEDGER ASSETS. 
Interest and riMiU* due an J acvniod . . . . f 
Market value of real estate, bonds and 

stock."? over botik value 

Other non-led«i«r aaeeis 



82.670.730.54 

29,423.83 

5,600.51 
1.700. OS 



Gross naseta $2.707. 463. 9« 

DEDUCT ASSETS NOT ADMITTED. 

Premiunw in course of collection 'rasi 

due) « 21 ofij ag 

.speiiai lieposil, loas J12,125.04 Habilliy 

..»•»«•'■?'>'' 89.374 9« 

All other assets not admitted 6.415.60 



Total assets uot admitted t 70,086 41 

Total admitted a.tsets S2 637 377 M 

LIABILITIES. 

Oslma— 

Adjusted I 3.J592 44 

In process of adjustment and reiMrled. . . 26'5'^6 "r 
•^«-'"*<» 14;R40»« 



1^»»l t 44.M9 41 

iVnluct reiiisuniuce i ,oot; a 

Unpaid claims except liability claims.. 
Expenses of iuvestlgatluii and adjust- 
ment 

TTneamed premiums ] '. 

Commissions and brokers** 

Iteiiisurance 

All other liabilities .. 

Capital stock paid up. 



• • •••»••••• 



I iS.9S3.lS 

2.196 A8 

448.32.'<.54 

48.105.78 

17,946.01 

10.807 13 

. 1.000,000.09 



TkUI liabilities. Including capiul $1,569,313,28 

Suri>lut OTW all liabilities $i oca n^A a* 

BUSINESS IN MINNESOTA IN 1912. 

Premiums llof^lved Losses Paid. 

ridelitT $ S37.99 

Burety 1,685.88 

PlaU glass 8.TT5.88 

Burglary and theft 1,. 134 51 

Sprinkler 315.55 

Automobile propwtjr damaca. .. 4.8(H.43 



$1..MT.«1 
1.I4S.M 



Totals 



111.653.99 tS.48S.S4 



State of Minnesota. Oepartment of Inaiirano*. 

I Hervby Certify. That the Aiutual Statement at 
The Aetna Accident ft IJabUtty company, for the 
year ending Dei-ember 31. 1912. of which the tbor* to 
•A abstract, has be«i received and Oled In this d«- 
partmeat and duly appn>Ted by m*. 

J A 0. PRRUB. 
OiMnnilMloaf of lasuraaoik 



[ 







»>♦=•*.>« ^ 



Pv-i,i^:M,, 




f 




THE DULUTH HERALD 



May 1. 1913. 




ITS GOOD POLICY TO H AVE A GOOD POLICY-WE ISSUE THEM IN THE 

"ROYAL" 

THE WORLD'S GREATEST FIRE IIMSURAIMCE COMPANY _ - ^^^ — - 

PWORTH-KIRBY AGENCY 



INSURANCE IN ALL OF ITS BRANCHES 



Zenith, Granci 191 



fc.. 



«-»' --fJ^-ltt^tL... .f l^.^o^^.^?^..^li'o'^?i^S.v.. 4f ^?^.H 



MnnmnclntnrU* Flr« * Martne Insur- 
ance Company. 

Prinolral office: Bubton. Mass^ (Or- 
irani/ed In 1910.) Everett C. Benton, 
ffe.utenU Walter Adlard. secretary. 
Attorney to accept eervlce In Mlune- 
Bota* Conimisfloner of Insurance. 
CASH CAPITAL. $500,000.00. 
Income In 1912. 

^'nX'kT/ ""'''"" '^*.". . ''.'.'".'l 531.510.38 

Benta and Interests 39,644.62 

Gross prolit on sale, ma- 
turity or adjustment of 
ledger aBsete ^'^^°-^'^ 



Total 
liedger 



income •; • • ■:' 

assets Dec. 31 of 



672.810,58 

previous year 1,190.960.62 

B^„ $1,763,761.10 

Net amount paid for losscs.$ 222.618.42 
Expenses of adjustment or 

losses .......... 

CommlsslonB and broker- 

Salaries and fees of offi- 
cers, asrents and employes 

Taxes, fees, rents, real ,9 gg^ 39 
estate expense l».b64.(J3 

Gross loss on sale, ma- 
turity or adjustment or 
ledger assets • •• •• 

All other dieburBtments. . . 



BHtiMh AmcHcan Anauranoe Company. 

Principal office: Toronto. Can. Com- 
menced business In the United States 
1874. W. B. Melkle, general manager. 
Attorney to accept service In Minne- 
sota: Commissioner of Insurance. 
DEPOSIT CAPITAL. $210,000.00. 
Income In 1013. 

Premiums other than P®'^",. .01 ire aa 
petuals •^•^Iu'Ir^?? 

Bents and Interests 6».484.id 

Grose profit on sale, ma- 
turity or adjustment of 
ledger assets 



Pa, 



70.00 



income $1,164,009.79 

assets I^-'^- ^V°S.697,810.63 



8,946.37 

136.819.90 

46.348.38 



1,343.81 
21,636.78 



Total 
Ledger 

previous year 

Sum J2.851.820 

Dlabnracmenta in 1913. 

Net amount paid for losses $ 675,233.83 
Expenses of adjustment of 

losses .' * V ■ i" ■ ■ ■ 

Commissions and broker- 
age i ■■■;<! ■ 

Salaries and fees of ofn- 
cers, agents and employes 

Taxes, fees, rents, real 
estate 

Returned 

All other 



PennHylvanIa Fire Insurance Com 
pany. 

Principal office: 'Philadelphia, 
(Organized In 1825). R. Dale Benson, 
president: W. Gardner Crowell, secre- 
larv. Attorney to accept service in 
Minnesota: CommisBloner of insur- 

'cash CAPITAL, $750,000.00. 
Income In 1012. 

Premiums other than 
perpetuals $ 

Premiums on perpetual 
risks 

Rents and interests.... 

Gross profit on sale, ma- 
turity or adjustment 
of ledger assets 

From all other sources.. 



8,477,485.72 

66,061.75 
309,009.16 



10,537.38 
845.50 



Sterling Fir*- Iniiurance Company. 

Principal of'lce: Indianapolis, Ind. 
(Organized in 1911.) John C. BlU- 
helmer, president; Cyrus W. 
rctary. Attorney to accept 
Minnesota; Comralasioner 
ance. 

CASH CAPITAL. $850,000.00 

Income in 1912. 

Premiums other than per- 
petuals I 

Rents and Interest 

Gross profit on sale, ma- 
turity or adjustment of 
ledger as»etf: 

From all other sources.... 



Neal, seo- 
»ervice In 
of Insur- 



244,860.89 
59,127.24 



8.18 
1,362.40 



Total 



income $ 3,893,939.50 



42 



12.307.83 

269.084.79 

98,130.08 



68.767.20 



Total disbursements ... ■$ 452.298.04 
Balance $1,311,463.06 

Collateral loans •« 50.000.00 

Book value of bonds and .„,..„-. 
St 'cka 1.107.S5J.I4 

Cash in office, trust com- 
panies and banks .• 

Agents' balances, unpaid 
premiums and bills re- 
ceivable, taken for pre- .484212 

Total ledger assets (as 

per balance) $l,3ll.4ed.oo 

\on-I.*dKcr Asset*. 
Interest and rents due and 

accrued • • • • ■•■■,' 

Market value of reai 
estate, bonds and stocks 
over book value 



V'xpensr""'... ... 41.734.96 

i to home office... J^-^^H? 
r disbursements... 43,l»y<.ei 



Ledger assets Dec. 81 of 
previous year I 



7,743,621.16 



11.637,560.65 
1013. 



Total disbursements 



.$1,050,983.98 



8,821.08 



19,097.26 



Balance V "i,- " ' -si'VIJi'''''' 

Lediser Aimcta Dec. 31, lOia. 

^"s^tockV"^ "".^ .^''"^'- .^." >1.382,891.38 
Ca*sh^n oVflce," 'trust com- ,- -9^ jq 

panles and banks ,. Zi/, .»•»•!" 

Agents' balances, unpaid 
premiums and bills re- 
ceivable, taken for pre- ^^^ 99 
miums '• 



Sum I 

Disbursementa in 

Net amount paid for ,0018,910 
losses $ l,991,832.1d 

Expenses of adjustment 
of losses 

Commissions and broker- 

Salaries and feed of offi- 
cers, agents and em- 
ployes • 

Taxes, fees, rents, real 
estate expense 

Dividends and interest.. 

Gross loss on sale, ma- 
turity or adjustment 
of ledger assets 

All other disbursement* 



64,335.87 
770,575.05 

212.815.58 

138,966.45 
225,000.00 



1.080.00 
175,168.38 



Total Incom.j $ 806.868,71 

Ledger assets Dec. 81 of 

previous year l.B&i.&OiS.ga 



Sum » 1.656.856.59 

Dlabni'scmcnta in 1013. 

Net amount paid for lo88e8.$ 

Expenses of adjustment 
of losses 

Commissions and broker- ^-- 
age 

Salaries and Tees of offi- 
cers, agents and em- 
ployes 

Taxes, fees, rents, real es- 
tate expenso 

Gross loss on sale, matu- 
rity or adjustment of 
ledger assets 

All other dlsbureements. . 



Total disbursements. .$ 8,569,773.46 



$1,800,836.44 



Gross assets • • • 

Deduct Asseta ^*»* ,,,„ 

Agents' balances and bins 

receivable 



, , .$1,339,381.40 
Admitted. 



1.624.46 



Total assets not admltted .$ 1,624.46 



Total admitted assets. ...11.337,656.94 

Llabllltlea Dec. 31, \91'' ^co r.R 
rnpald losses and claims.. $ H'-HH 
Unearned premiums ...... 3»a,^».J.oo 

Salaries, expenses, taxes, 

dividends and Interest ^(, Qg, 94 

Ca^P^ltal • stock- Vald up 1 ! ! l! :__60MOO^ 



Total ledger assets (as 

per balance) 

Non-l>«djfer Asueta- 
Interest and rents due and ^^ 

accrued '^ 

Gross assets $1,821887.83 

Dednct Aa.eta ^«* ,^A«»"<*^ 

Agents' balances and bills 

receivable 

Book value of ledger as- 

eete over market value.. 
Special deposits, less $^8,- 

693.04 liability thereon - 



$ 



2.956.07 
72,307.08 
16,870.46 



Total 
ing 



, $ 373,208.36 

^^iJlL^'Jnl Premium*: VoiAu^ine-. 



written 



$53,550,142.00 



(a) Fire risks 

during the year 
Premiums received there- 538899.05 

MaHne' and' inland ■^rWks 
written ^"'■ing the year 

Premiums received there- 
on : • • '^''^' ' " ' 

Net amount in lorce 
end of the year 

r.f ^nclS^]n^_:business 



Total assets not admltted .$ 92.133.68 

Total admitted "sets • . .$1.;29,754.25 
I^labtlitiea Dec. 31, 1012. 

rnpald losses and claims.. $ 10..601 84 
Unearned premiums ..^. . . . 91G,bt)4.ou 

Salaries. , e^Pene^^s* ,„J^*^„*: 

dividends and Interest ^^ ^^g §5 

Commissions and broker- ^ ^^^ ^^ 

age • • • • • • • • aio'.OOO.OO 

Deposit capital • 

^^^ios\n^l^ .!"?."':n.^5MS0.89 



Balance 9^^ VaVo'^'-" 

Ledger Aaaeta Dec. 31, 1012. 

Book value of real es- 
tate * 

Mortgage loans 

Collateral loans 

Book value of bonds and 

of Acltg ,, > 

Cash In office, trust com- 
panies and banks..... 

Agents' balances, unpaid 
premiums and bills re- 
ceivable, taken for pre- 
miums 



189,377.07 
174,760.00 
276,467.11 

6,484,621.87 

183,088.28 

760,482.86 



22,946.18 

390.83 

52.942.30 

80,454.09 
10,040.40 



70.19 
47,450.78 



Niagara Fire Innurance Company. 

Principal office: New York. N. Y. 
(Organized in 1850). Harold Herrick, 
president; Geo. W. Delsey, secretary. 
Attorney to accept service In Minne- 
sota: Commissioner of Insurance. 
CAiSH CAPITAU $1,000,000.00 
Inconie in 1012. 
Premiums other than 

perpetuals $ 

Rents and interests.... 
Grose profit on sale, ma- 
turity or adjustment of 

ledger assets 

From all other sources. 



3,174,668.96 
260.758.31 



36,686.39 
1,168.45 



Total income I 3,472,177.11 



Ledger assets Dec. 31 
previous year 



of 



$ 6,451,775.09 

Sum I 9,923,952.20 

Dlaburaements in 1013. 

Net amount paid for 
losses • » 

Expenses of adjustment 
of losses 

Commissions and brok- 
erage • • 

Salaries and fees of of- 
ficers, agents and em- 
ployes • 

Taxes, fees, rents, real 
estate expense 

Dividends and Interest. 

All other disbursements 



1,691,311.00 

40,733.08 

696,102.45 

324,341.74 

159,460.03 
250,000.00 
15-3,094.60 



Royal Innurnnce Company, Limited. 

Principal Office In the United btates. 
New York city, N. Y. Commenced busl- 
nes^ in [he united States 1851. Edward 
Kltch Beddall, general attorney for the 
United States. Attorney to accept serv- 
ice In Minnesota: Commissioner of in- 

DEPOSIT CAPITAL. $450,000. 
Income in 1012. 

Premiums other than per- ,,„„,, c« 
p«tuais » ^'^f^'!^^s5 

Rents and Interests...... ^^S'^;.p?a 

Received from home office 27,400. ib 

Gross profit on sale, ma- 
turity or adjustment of „^„ ,.» ,, 
ledger assets 209, 346.53 

Total Income $ 9,449,858 

Ledger assets Dec. 31 of 
pi'evioua year 



K. 



,33 



11,810,549.92 



Total ledger assets -, „», -g^ ,9 
(as per balance) ... .$ 8,067,787.i» 
Non-Led«er Aaaeta. 
Interest and rents due 

and accrued $ »i,obo.d<i 

Gross assets t 8,156,347.52 

Deduct Assets Not Admitted, 

Agents' balances and 
bills receivable $ 

Book value of ledger as- 
sets over market value 

Special deposits, less 
$21,748.56 liability " 
thereon 



Total disbu:-semontB ... 184,294.77 

Balance $ 1,472,561.82 

Ledger Aaaeta Dec. 81« Ij^.^^. . 

Mortgage loans I ^'^^'f^Hfi 

Collateral loans .• 29,75b.b6 

Book value of bonds and „.^,(.,aq 

stocks 265,16l.4» 

Cash In oftlce:. trust com- 
panies and banks 

Agents' bala:iccs, unpaid 
premiums and bills re- 
ceivable, taken for pre- 
miums 

Stock Bubscriptions 



Total disbursements. .$ 3,215.042.90 



114,001.88 



67.138.65 
1,100.00 



32,991.18 
266,745.06 

81,701.46 



Total ledger asaets (as 

per balance) $1,472,561.84 

NoEi-Ledgcr Asaeta. 

Interest and rents due and 

accrued 21,215.84 

All other non-ledger as- 2,821.48 

Gross assets $ 1,496,599.14 

Detfpct Aaaeta Not Admitted. 

Agents' balances and bills 



Balance f 6.708,909.30 

Ledger AHaets Dec. 31, 1012. 

Mortgage loans •$ 582,000.00 

Book value of bonds and 

stocks 

Cash In office, trust 

companies and banks. 
Agents' balances, unpaid 

premiums and bills 

celvable, taken 

premiums 



Sum $21,260,408.25 

Dlsbnraementa In 1012. 

Net amount paid '«»•,..„ e^, 44 

losses ;♦ 4,111. 6a. 44 

Expenses or adjustment of 

losses 98,631.14 

"^ agr'.'.'*°"." .^"^ !'""''.^': 1.698,012.98 
Salaries and fees of offl- 

S?o7'es".r'^.^'..'": 861,428.30 

Taxes, fees, rents, real es- 
tate expense 

Returned to home office.. 

Gross loss ^n sale, matur- 
ity or adjustment of 
ledger assets 

All other disbursements.. 



Royal Inelemnlty Company. 

Principal office: New York City, 
Y. (Organized In 1910.) Edward F. 
Beddall, president; J. Harold i'earph, 
secretary; Charles H. Holland, vloe 
president and general manager. At- 
torney to accept service In MinucsotftI 
Commissioner of insurance. 

CASH CAPITAL, $1,UOO,000.<JO. 
Income In 1012. 
Premiums received (Net,» — 
A c c i d e nt and ' 

health $ 182,934.78 

Employers' li- 
ability 1,877,025.48 

Fidelity and 

surety 96,996.64 

Plate glass 108.852.13 

Steam boiler.... 42.683.78 
Burglary and „„. «» 

theft 96.276.62 

Fly wheel 6,764.60 

Auto property 

damage 201,891.29 

Workmen's col- 
lective 6,623.60 

Total net premium Income. $2,117,948.71 
From interest and rents... „f;;5°^'f5 
From all other sources... . 260.<50.» o 

Total income $2,436,357.17 

Ledger assets Dec. 31 Of 



698.994 
1,151,421 



22,658 
437,112 



53 
06 



previous y 



ear .". 1,988,342.74 



re- 
fer 



5,071,333.39 
485,200.40 

670,375.51 



Total ledger assets . -qo oqq 30 
(as per balance) $ 6,708,aoa.du 

Non-Led«er Aaaeta. 

Interest and rents due 
and accrued ......•••» 

Market value of real es- 
tate, bonds and stocks 
over book value 

All other non-ledger as- 
sets 



28,38-».44 

249,496.61 
1,791.49 



Total disbursements ...$ 8,979, 829.72 

Balance $12,280,578.53 

Ledger Aaaeta Dec. 31, 1012. 

Book value of real estate. $ 4,348,500.00 

Mortgage loans 2d8,100.oo 

Book value of bonds and 

stocks 6,505,785.43 

Cash in office, trust com- 

panics and banks 810,534. 10 

Agents* balances, unpaid 
premiums and bills re- 
ceivable, taken for pre- 
miums 1,357,658.5*6 



at 
(Fire 



9,417,483.00 
168,325.42 

56.367,572.00 
other than 



Net surplus 



-Marine and \"1'\"J„'* „<« In 1013. . 

(in^curn? -in""-£%cc^ived and 
deducting reinsurance Pl^ced^)^^^ ^^^^^ 
$780.D$1.0g 



....$ 474,673.36 
Rlska and Premium*. 1012 Buaine**. 

(a) Fire risks xvrltten 

during the year ■•••••; 

p r e m I u ms received 

thereon ... ; -J * " 

^^* /nf^'Jhe vear .:.' 175,429,545.00 

?^)* Including business other than 

"^"BL"*1ne**' in 'Minnesota In 1012.^ , 

(TncUidTng reinsurance received and 
deducting felnsurance place^.) 



.$167,156,996.00 

1,688,555.40 
at 



Total assets not admit- 

iQ^ $ 881,437.68 



Risks written . . • • . 
Premiums received 
Net losses Incurred 
Net losse.s paid . . ■ . 
Amount at risk 



• •••••• 



12,385.49 

5,869.82 

1,989.83 

387,919.00 



State of Minnesota, Department of In- 

Burance ^^^..f^ That the Annual 
I Hereby Certify^ That ;n|^jg ^^^^ 

I'^i^a'ine InBurrnce'^ompany, for the 

&.Y^?dho^;r'lT\^n abitrl'c\f' ha^^ 
wn received and filed In this depart- 
Sfe^n"t S'dufy approved by me^^,^ 

Commissioner of Insurance. 



Risks written ....• 
Premiums received 
Net losses incurred 
Net losses paid . . . 
Amount at rls* . . . 



Fire Risks. 

.$2,355,290.00 

, 33.489.24 

17.384.17 

16,836.68 

. 2,382,504.00 



State of Minnesota, Department of In- 

T^He^r^eby Certify, That the Annual 
I Herepy ^-V' Tfrltlsh American .Vs- 
atement »'J^^t for the year ending 
irnnce company, for tne yt-ai , ■» 



Total admitted assets. $ 
Llabilltiea Dec. 81, 

Unpaid losses and claims | 

Unearned premiums . . . 

Reclalmable on perpet- 
ual policies 

Salaries, expenses, taxes, 
dividends and Interest 

due 1' '■il' \" 

Commissions and brok- 
erage ' 

Reinsurance premiums.. 
Capital stock paid up,. 



7,823.909.84 
1013. 

320.117.66 
3,386,246.73 

666,874.31 



42,500.00 

22.175.4 

35,000.0 

760,000.00 



receivable * 

Book valtie of ledger as- 
sets over market value. 
Special deposits, less 
$2,813.52 lUblUty there- 
on \' "'a' 

All other astets not aa- 
mltted 



634.26 
667.89 

89,698.98 
1,100.00 



42,001.12 



Stat 



Burance companv^ of wMcfi the above 
December 31, 19 lA 01 received and 

Iflerin^'t'hlB ^epartm'/nt"and duly ap- 
proved by me. j ^ o. PREUS, 

Commissioner of Insurance. 




C.F.How,Jr.,Agt. 

403 and 405 Lonsdale Building. 

w \f XFFLY CO., St. Paul, General 

^'AKenU foC MlnAe«<>ta, North and 

Semtll Dakota, and Northern Uis- 

cousin. 

The Employer*' Liability Aasurance 

Corporation, LImlteiU 

ije7"^":tc'.?.ei' to !Z^ service In Mlnn«ot*, 

C-'-^^'°^VoSlT"oAnTXL. 1200,000.00. 
INCOME IN 1912. 
Pr«niuirui received iNeD- 

Acadent m^ health • 356.488.15 

Eir-rifyers" liibUlty .,.. 



Vneamed rrwnlurM 

Comtntoslon* »nd broker»g« 

All other llabUltlei 

Suiutory deposit 



........ 



3,M3,481.59 
400,lf*-lO 
125.000.00 
200,000.00 



Total liabilities In- .,02^1,09 
eluding capital $ t.bZi,\*l6.vv 

Net surplus 9 2.300.995.85 

lU8l(M and PremJuma, 1912 Bualneset. 

(a) Fire risks ^^"rilten 

during the year $453,795,333.00 

Premiums received .»,.«„,„ 

thereon • 4,644,627.36 

Net amount In force at 

end of the year (Fire - .. 

anfl Marine) Gbi ,idi,i.bi.\>\J 

(a) Including business other than 
"Marine and Inland." 

Bnainesa in MInneaota in 1»1Z. 
(Including reinsurance received 
deducting reinsurance placed.) 
Fire Risks '^^-^ 
Risks written $5,712,026.00 

^^cX•eT^.'!■ 85,267.00 

""l^Vr'eT'.!": 87.212.00 
Net losses paid 80,513.00 



Total assets not admit- 
ted * 

Total adm tted aB8«t« v't«\i^*'^^^'°^ 
Llablillea Dec. 81, ^^^^ 

Unpaid losses and claimB.$ JJ.^jejS 

Unearned premiums ... .- 142,399.oa 

Salaries, exi)en8es taxes, 

dividends and interest 

CommlsslonB and broker- 
Reinsurance ■ premiums. . . 
Unearned interest paid In 

advance ,1'''J''" 

Capital stoclt paid up.... 

Includ 



Gross asseta « 6,988,581.84 

Deduct Aaaeta Not Admitted. 

Agents' balances and 71^268 
bills receivable ..,...$ i.i.v^.'oo 
Special deposits, leas 
^66,712.66 liability 
thereon ^_J 



Total ledger assets (as 

per balance) $12,280,578.58 

Non-Ledger Aaaeta. 

Interest and rents due and 

accrued I 83,5b6,7B 

All other non-ledger AS- 

sets 61,199.60 



Sum $4,424,700.61 

DiHbnraementa In 1012. 

Claims paid (Net) — 
Accident and ^ ..„ „„ 

health $ 68,412.23 

Employers' Ua- „„,,,„-- 
blllty 221,113.05 

Fidelity and .^.qik 

surety „2''?^iS 

Plate glass .... 27,996.76 

Steam boiler .... 991.02 

Burglary and 
theft 

Auto property 
damage 

Workmen's col- 
lective ■•••■• ^ , . 

Net paid policyholders . . 

Investigation and adjust- 
ment of claims 

Commissions • • 

Salaries of officers, agents, 
employers, examiners and 
Inspection 

Loss on sale or maturity 
of ledger assets 

All other disbursements,.. 



Total assets not admit- 
ted • .,«•. " 

Total admitted assets. $ 
Llabilltiea Dec. 81, 

Unpaid losses and 



61.295.03 



16,300.23 

449.24 
10,883.95 

16.28 
850,000.00 



claims 
Unearned premiums 



$ 



Total liabilities, 
ing capital .. 



Ing the year .... 
Premiums received 

"" ••""force at 



and 



Tornado. 
$352,607.00 

2,387.00 



Toti Uabmtl«i. including oplt>l....l 6.m.983.69 



„ ,1 Kni»i.. .1 2,044,543.38 

' P^niluir. ;-^-'03^^8^v'9 



962.00 

962.00 

Aggregate. 

$6,064,538.00 



,$ 1,034,165.58 

""AUranl Premiim«.-19ll J^u^.'' 
(a) Ffre rlsl:s_written <»";^;^28,277,600.00 

'"^T.: 818,623.87 
Net" amount in _«orce at ^5^528.00 
\l) fnclucfln^g^'b-usiness other than 

("chidtnir Velnsurance received and 
deducting reinsurance ^l--f\^^^^^,_ 
Risks written.. .$1,408,821.03 $79,835.00 
Premiums re- 
ceived ■• • 

Net losses in- 
curred . . ■ • ; • 
Net losses P^;!^ . .„. ^.^ 

Amount at risk. l,881,3.5l.uw 



6,937,286.81 
1013. 

■ 241,190.27 
2,969.429.70 

60,770.60 

3,000.00 

42,606.28 

1,000,000.00 



Gross assets $12,425,884.91 

Deduct Aaaeta Jiot Admitted 

Agents balances and bills 

receivable I 20,260.77 

Book value of ledger as- ,.,„,o -o 

sets over market value, 153,269.68 

Total assets not admit- ,„„,,„ .. 
ted f 178.628.46 



23,739.18 

62,000.94 

1.708.86 

$ 401,751.18 

102.268.44 
469,481.01 

fe^eT!"".°.v'" 284,170.68 

2.224.00 
141,004.6$ 



...$1,400,899.6? 

. . .$8,023,800.63 
31, 1912. 



$2,349,876.64 



22,609.70 



Salaries, expenses laxet. 
dividends and Interest 

CommiBsVo'nV and broker- 

Re^-^nsuVance' prenilums. 
Capital stock paid up..^ 

• Total liabilities. in- . -g 99 
eluding capital f 4,8iB,ja 

^i„o .. .$ 2.620,289.96 

Net surplus » • ' 

Rlak. and Premiums. 1912 Du.lnesa. 

<^lurfn'^%^l^-r.^""M32.474,000.00 

^^h'^rn^ ...^.!.'.^^^.'.' 4.^04,531.87 
Net amount In force at 

'"^ Marine) '^ ■ 5^3,924,942.00 

tSf'lnclSdU -business other than 
"Marine and Inland. 

Bnalneaa in MInneaota In 1912. 

including reinsurance received and 

deducting reinsurance placed.) 

aeauciiiiB ^^^^ Risks. Tnrr 

$8,745,290.00 



Total admitted assets. . .$12,251,806.46 
Liabllitiea Dec. 31, 1012. 

Unpaid Tosses and claims. $ «?l,457.7l 

Unearned premiums • 

Reclalmable on perpetual 

policies :•••;• 

Reserve and liabllitjes in 

special department .... 
Salaries, expenses, taxes, 

dividends and interest 

du« .••',''■* 

Commissions and broker- ^ 

age -ftoaU 

i Return premiums ^'Aii ' 01 

6 o. Reinsurance premiums . . . .f^-^^S • Si 

•^-^^ n^noBH nanltal 450,000.00 



Total disbursements . 

Balance • ■ • • 

Ledger Aaaeta Dec. 

Book value of bonds and 

stocks • • • 

Cash In office truBt com- „ 

panles and banks. .. ....- 

Premiums in course of col- 

lections . ;• lf,'c.46'67 

All other ledger assets it>.C'4t>.Dt 

Total ledger assets (",, (,03 gco 62 

per balance) • • ■ • . $3.o.J,fci «■»-« 

Non-Ledger Aaaeta. 
Interest and rents due and 
accrued ' 



8,255,044.60 
88,575.95 
87,611.66 

281,598,07 



34.038.8T 



Gross aseetB 



$3,057,839.19 



^Deduct Aaaet. Not Admitted. 

•emlums in course of col- 

lection (past due)....- •$ 44,ld^. 



Prem 

lection v»j«»-''\ *^''~' ■ ■'„-„♦» 

Book value of ledeer assets 
over market value...... 

Special deposit. Jess $86.- 
765.17 liability thereon • 

All other assets not admit- 
ted _ 



31 



34,537.82 
87,654.88 
12,129.28 



646.60 



$7,654.00 
38.174. 00 



• !•••••••••' 



5.420.734.43 
8T. 880.03 
18.802.59 
17.029.13 
111.347.65 
3*6,5::. 32 
70.637.78 



Fidelity 

Plate gla-"" 

Bteam boiler . . . • • 

BurgUry and theft 

Aut' property d»nia«« 

Woikiuen'8 ^ollertlve 

Tr>Ul net premium Income 

rrom Intereil and renU .■■VV,'' 

5^t on sile or matarliy of ledger «. 

aeia 

rrom »11 other louices 



Accident ,,..., ^ 

Health 

tlabUltr ...«.•. 

Fidelity ••■• 

Plate gla« •••:•!: 

Burglary and theft. ... •• 

Automobile prperty damage. 
Workmen'* coUectlve 



8,e:7.89 1,437,21 

91,543.99 57,845.93 

692.58 

,. 3,028.98 147.73 

. 1,889.05 87.50 

.. 8,115.11 2,162.79 

.. 1,361.21 823.87 

.$U7,400.76 »:8,370.12 



,^,^S%ec.«oi-p«;iou.-,eai. 



6.448.755.90 
2(K),.S18.a7 

1,387.50 
107.99 

6.848. 5«9.72 
B,096.519.B4 



Totala jjj 

^%°ieS'"cri?v. ^TTarr ^nJuTir^ent ^^^ 
1 Hereoy "-^v"- ' .w.,i,v Asaurance Corporation 
Smlte^"*fo7\"e yl'J^Tl.. D^c^J^ber 31 1913. of 
whT^ vl«. ilove ta an abstract, ba. been •;e<r''«^/"'^ 
Jfelf in'^department and duly «^--^''^-*- 

rommlsaioner of Insuraitce. 



Risks written .... 
Premiums received ....... 

Net losses Incurred fli'475 06 

Net losses pad o 7ki tosfift 

Amount at risk 9,761,596.00 

State of Minnesota. Department of In- 

f^He'r^by Certify. That the Annual 
Statement of the Pennsvlvania Fire In- 
surance Company, for the year ending 

_1 ""'. of which th 
an ' ^ " 



7,826.88 
1,887.56 



le above Is 



■um 



$ 12.645.089.26 
OiSBURSEMENTS IN 1812, 
Claims paid (.NeD- , 212.415.50 



Accident and healib 
jtaHJloyen' UabllKj... 

rwellij 

Plate glM» 

J team boiler . . - 
lurglary and 'h"i 

Auto property damage. 

Workmen's coUecllvo . 

Met oald pollcyhdldera 

StwUgailon and adjustment of claim.. 

ffi« oT"'offlcer.: agenuV employM," «: 
^mlner^' and Inspection fees 

5rr.:^.'rmSty-ofl^er-a.: 

aeU : 

All other disfrursemenU 



1,074.508.28 

47,786.59 

1,113.77 

844.47 

39.677 29 

113.788 14 

30,296.87 

f 



Thomas&Shaw 

General Agents 

EQUITABLE LIFE OP IOWA. 

Antlrus Bldg., Minneapolis, Minn. 

(D^strr" AgeSt wanted for Duluth.) 

Eqnitable Life Inanrance Company, 

t>,Hn..in»i of flee- I>e9 Moines, Iowa. (Organized 
Principal of ace ^^^^^^ president; Charles A. 

^nyd^ aecretary. Attorney to accept .errloe In Mln- 

— ^^TA'?ir?APITr"^\oOO.OO. 
INCOME IN 1912, 



^^^" abstract.*" has been" rec'eived and 
filed In this Department and duly ap- 
proved by me. ^ ^ ^ ^^^^^ 

Commissioner of Insurance. 



8.98 

16.04 

79,885.00 

Aggregate. 

Risks written ... ., ^^'illselo 

Premiums received 7 8858? 

Net losses incurred ],J8B 86 

Net losses Pflfl 1 461 166 00 

Amount at risk. i,40i,aotj.uu 

State of M'nnesota, Department of In- 

I^Hc'Veby certify. That the Annual 



Risks written 
Prertilums re- 
ceived • • • • • 
Net loBses in- 
curred ••••;. 
Net losses paid 
Amount at risk 



Tornado. 
$96,740.00 



66,106.72 

80,068.96 

26,816.51 

4.895,860.00 



Risks written ••••• 
Premiums received 
Net losses Incurred 
Net losses paid. 
Amount at risk. 



. . . 
....... 



» ^ I . f . . 



646.80 

B42.20 
492.20 
116,485.00 
Aggregate. 
$3,842,080.00 
66,752.62 
80,611.16 
26,308.41 
4,611,335.00 



Deposit capital 

Total liabilities, .includ- 

Ing deposit capital $ 9,881, 960.76 

Net surplus $ 2,3f.9,845.70 

niaks and Preminmn, 1912 Bnalneaa. 

(a) Fire risks ^^'^'l^*^",, ,„ o-. o97 00 
during the year $1,132,350,03/ .uu 

Premiums received ,,-,.910.5 
thereon • - • • 11.675,210.45 

Marine and Inland 
rinV-B written during 
the yeJr .! 252,669,798 . 00 

Premiums received 
thereon ; 

Net amount In force at 

end of the year (tire ,.„,„„ 

and marine) 1,516.'708,49» 

(a) Including business other ti 

"Marine and Inland." 

Bnalneaa in MInneaota in 1013. 
(Including reinsurance received and 

deducting reinsurance Placed^)^^^^^ ^^^ 

Fire Risks. 

^wmten.. $11.756.117. 00 
Premiums ^^^^,^,_^^ 



Total assets not admltte d.$ 1TS.460.1» 

,$2,879,379.00 



Total 



admitted assets. 
Llabilltiea. 



Claims — 

Adjusted 

In process or 

and reported 
Resisted 



3.920.08 



adjustment 



67.417.7 
14.271.0 



1,002,203.97 



00 
than 



Total • 

Deduct reinsurance ..... 

Unpaid claims except liabil- 
ity claims .i'li'^^ 

Expenses of investigation 

and adjustment -i 

Special reserve for unpaid 

liability losses 

nnearned premiums • 

rommlssions and brokerage 
Estimated to be paid for 
taxes 



7, '5,608,78 
2.700.71 



72,908.08 
1,475.00 



306..=136.0 

994.490 

106.004 



\l 



All other liabilities.. 
Capital stock paid up. 



87,064.00 
6.805.70 



'.$1,000,000.00 



State of Minnesota, Department of In- 
^"f^Hel^eby Certify, That the Annual 



statement of the Niagara Fire Insur- 
?ra"slr e..a\_»e.n r.ce.v.d and 



i » — -,- . ., Rtorllnff Fire Insur- 
Statem_^ri.Pi.*^f^r^theyelrendlng^De- ,_ ^^^^^ ^, 

abstract has been received 
rB'an"abst-act. has »««" rrj^'V"," an" filed In this' Department and duly ap 
filed in this Department and duly ap J^^oved by me. ^ PREUS 

proved by me. ^ ^ ^ preUS. | Commissioner ot Insurance 

Commissioner of Insurance. 



Mortgage 

All oUier 



en building and Interest, 
disbursements 



Total dlsbursementa 



Balance 



121,936.88 1 
129,701.87 

.$ 1,741,817.97 

.9 12,012,234.81 



LEDGER ASSETS DEC. 31. 1912. 

owned ♦ 469,982.15 

10.269,450.14 

52,990.00 



Value or real c«Ut« 

Mortgage loan* 

Collateral loana • 

premium notes and poUcj loma 

Bond* and stocks owned • 

C^^ in oftlce. banha and trust com- 

Bi^^'r'^liabie ■ "aitd ' agenta' ' baiances.' '. 
All other ledger aasetj 



1,068,146 8:i 
48.600.13 

80,361.18 

86,02«.98 

9.711.51 



9 059 $ 14,415.298.07 
tbe JMT •••;■;• M.;^'(lU'4^ S 619 4,301,025.43 
^^'^ ^TSKESS^I^VrNN'^OTAJN .9.2. 



Amount. 



In force during 



2,419,930.91 

494.930.23 

1.490.555.86 

232.392.30 

217,40.7.31 

48.222.55 
250.310.96 



Total ledger a«eU (as per balance).! 12,032,234.81 
Total l««^„oN. LEDGER ASSETS. 

due and accrued..! 295,087.24 



Policle. in f..rce at beginning 
of the year 

Isswed during tbe year 

Ceased to be 
the year ■■■•■•••• 

In forte Dec 31 Iwt 

Ix>a8e9 and clal«» Incurred dur- 
ing the jeaf '_., 

U*^ a^d cl,dr». Killed during 

the year . 

for piemltuM 



1,882 $ 
927 

230 
ft,529 



2.499.184.00 
1.234,772.00 

S93,378.f»« 
3,440.580.00 



banks 



8 I 



15,232.00 



8 ! 



15,232.00 



Tntereat and renla 

Net^eferred and unpaid premliuna. . 



175,430.14 



Total 



diaimraementg $ 5.151.810.12 



Balance 



! 7,493,279.14 

LEDGER ASSETS DEC. 31, .912. 

B«,^ ,^ue cf boad. .....•■.» 8,819.922.50 

Caih in office, truat eompanlea Md ^^^^,.06 

T^^^ la' co'lTM of' ciuwrUoii: '.'.'.'.'. '. 1.682:503:98 

Tctal ledger a»Ms (a« per bal.ano*).! 7,493,279.14 
TCi« it«» NON-L^DOER ASSETS. 
Iat«r«t and reotJ duo and accrued... 1 78,480.79 



r.^/nr\nTSrder- vaiuie^to P^^ 

Cotreri-tr ^rTr^Siri ^IS^ 
"^^pS'tW contract., involving llf. 

rontlngenclet 

Ilenewal premlUBM ^ 

Total premltim Income I 

Rents and lnter»«t» • ■ ''ji.'.'J,' 

GroM profit on sale, maturity or adjust- 
ment of ledger aweta 

From aQ other sourcei 



458,96X08 
81.088.96 



2.255.89 
1,748,481.12 



2,238,787.91 
628,670.08 

200.00 
30.391.21 



^''"'^D^tlCT ASSETS NbT 

AgenU' debit balances 

Bills receivable 

Total assets not admitted.... 

Totfcl admltud assets 

LIABILITIES DEC, 



! 12,502.752.19 

ADMITTED. 

I 58.475.19 

16.581.99 



120,471.20 



A«ents' balancM, unpaid premiums and 
bills lecelTable, taken for premiums. .! 

AH other ledger asseU, cash depOTlt 
wlUi treasurer of ilsssachusetta ^ 

Total ledger assets (as per balance) .. 

^ NON-LEDQER ASSETS, 

Interest and rents due and accrued ! 



39,099.13 
283,756.77 



445.89 



received. 
Net losses 

Incurred. 
Net losses 

paid . . • • 

Risks 

written.. 
Premiums 

received. 
Net losses 

Incurred, 
Net losses 

paid ■ . . • 
Amount at 

risk , . . • 



65,449.76 

63.235.92 
Tornado. 

$1,054,717.00 

6,610.88 

2,446.32 

2,447,18 



Inland. 
$446,790.00 
8.005.26 
2,630.84 



Total liabiltles, »nc^"«'°^,2.625.288.18 
capital * ' ■ - 

Surplus over all llabilitle8..$ 864.095.83 
nn«liie«« In Mlniie»««a In 1»12. _ 
Bnslnesa » premiums Lopsei 

Received. 

$ 2,238.91 

994.51 



Accident 
Henlth 



•••••• 



2,030.84 
Aggregate. 

$18,266,624.00 

168,196. .'7 

70,525.92 I 

67,718.89 

21,642,704.00 



15.186.02 



Liability 1MR70 

3,490.86 

1.972.70 

2.104.64 

30.00 



Paid. 

196.00 

311.7* 

3.568.00 

ISO.IB 

■ "sVs.ii 

21.00 
64.25 



1.981.24 



895,268.52 
5,020.00 



.,„,t- ! 901.178.52 

°"" D^rSucV • ASSETS NOT AD M ITTED 

Aeents' balanc*. and bill. recelTahle. .^! 18,«14.ie 

Book yalue of ledger aaeu over market 
value 

Special deposit _ 



State of Minnesota. Department of In- 

I^nrr'e^by Certify. That the Annual 
Statement of the Royal Insurance Com- 
nanv Limited, for the year ending De- 
cember 8 Is" 1912. of which the above 
fs an abstract, has been received and 
filed In this department and duly ap- 
proved by me. 



f 



kii 



29,221.97 
10,400.00 



Total assets not 



admitted I 



68,286.18 



ReoelTed 

St^te Of Mln^n«^,». ?Sf ^hf An^nuL""sS^ent 



of 



^ il^'hi. life Insurance company, lor ine »«« 
the BdulUble l-ue xi« ^.^^^^ ^^ ^^^^ j, 

ending Pecenf^ ^ J^^^,-^^^ ^^ A,^ In tw. do- 
^^t'^dTuly approved hy^^me. ^_ ^^^^ 



Tl,027.18 



SI. 



supplementary 



Total Income . . . 
Urilger aaseU Dec. 



! 2.938.04968 

31 of previous year. 10,938.002.50 



Sum 



375,038.82 

5.762.12 
283,908.92 
283.643.74 

6,768.56 



o,r« uoett » 7,571,759.93 

°' OEDUCV ASSETS NOT ADMITTED, 



Premium* In course of collection (pa-ot^ 
due) 

Total admitted «^^B„_iVlE3: 

Claims — 
Ib pre cm 
Baalsted _ 

trnpald claim* except UablUty claims. ..$ 
t^cuTes of mrestlgatlcn and adju.t- 

nS iWTt |«ruw>»Klli»Wlltjlo»e.. 



108,518.01 



..! 7,485,531.93 



of adjustment and reported..! 



89.255.00 
83.035.00 



112,290 00 

7,365.00 
U32.;6a.00 



! 13.774,052. i8 

tiisBURSEMENTS DURING 1912 
neath claims and mafun'd endowraPnts.! 
Annuities and premium notes voided by 

1atw6 ...-•< •»..•* 

Surrender values to pollcyholdeM 

DiTlflends to prllcyholders 

Dividends left with company ^ 

Total paid policyholders ! 954,122.36 

Dividends held on deposit sturendered 

during the year -, 5i!*i 

IMvliK-mlf to stfctOiolders 21,000.00 

Commissions and bonuses to agent* 

flrnt year's premium 281.002.41 

Coinmls-xions on renewals 66.966.05 

Agency supervision and branch office 

expenses • • ■ 40,369.63 

Medical examiner's fees and inspection 

of risks 40,7.S0.41 

Salaries of officers and employes 76,273.26 

Legal expenses ••• 25.00 

AgenU' balances charged ofr..,~.<.<*k lit.1(i 



Net rwerve 

Present value on _„ ... 

Uacts and canceled policies 

Claims due an4 unpaid • ■ • • • • 

SalllS M^»^ «>d not due. and un- 

adJui'tcd Rnd reported 

StlSl^ntn'w.thcoinpany-to;*^: 
mulate ; " ' ' V " V« 

holders •••;•■••" '.'li; ' ' 

Hinklng Mnd for buUdlng 

All other llabUlllcs _ 



..! 12.431,7*5.01 
1912. 

....! 10,623,894.31 
COB- 



26.153.45 
2.330.44 

28,800.85 
1,000.00 

10,784.68 
8.683.43 

459.834.43 

6,864.00 

77,147.28 



Conunlsslonei of Insurance. 



inlon I««rli»e In«arance CompanF, 
Llnklteo. 

T. (Commerced jmslnwin^ ^ ^^ ^^^^ ^^^^ 
aerrloe In MlnnesoU: Commls- 



ToUl nablUtle. on ^""•^^'''"'f"; ."^j 11.135,272.85 
count ^. - 

Capital stock psld up 



800,000.00 



Una-^lened fund, '""n)!"?^^-^ 
EXHIBIT OF POLICIES. 



.,, ! 996.452.16 

1912 BUSINESS. 

No. Amount. 



^1^^ ,r°[?lt^coT^n'oS;^;39.689 ! 57.272.054.80 

P<,l,d« in force at close of the^^ ^^^ eT.«2fl,327.24 

year . 



F. Hermann & CO' 
Attorney to accept 
.loner of Insurance. 

DEPOSIT CAriTAU 
INCOME IN 

Premiums oOicr tUsn perpetuals 

nflnts and Irterwits . . • • • 

Received from home office 

Fiom all othsr sources 



Total admitted assets ••■•■■■■'•••• --.lK 
LIABILITIES DEC. !l. iei2- 

Unpaid losses and claims ! 

Unearned premiums U.JaL^'aL' '^a 

Salaries, expecses, taxes, dividends and 

Interest due 

Commlselons and ^rokerage. ........ -.^ 

AU other UabDlUea. reinsurance pre- 
miums 

Deposit capital 



847,642.39 

175,803.03 
167,777.70 

30.600.00 
10.402.27 

J04,2!V3.78 
200,000.00 



IV^tal llabilltiea, 
capital 



Including dettoftt 



e78.82«.7« 



1200.000.00. 
1912. 



91«,127.98 

22.578.70 

87,041.65 

812.94 



Total Income • ••At'-i-'-A;:.," •••;::' 

KiMr asseU Dec % of pretlo.is yeai. 



! 



Ledger asseU 



07e.B«1.27 
778,057.23 



Sum 



Net Increase 

iBued. rertTe* #Bd 



6,540 ! 10.114,272.64 



Incwaaed duiiotf 



! 1,753.«1A.50 

OISBIJ''"'*^'*^* "« '"'J- 

Net amount paid for losses ! 

Co^teslons and brokerage. . . .^ • . .^^ 
Salaries and ?e«s of officers, agents ana 

RotUrned to home office 

All other dliibursemenU 

Total disbursement* .. 



.! 189.11688 

riskTand" prkmiums; ■ \m business. 

Inland rlsto wrlUen dur- 



Net euTplus 



Marine and 

Ing the year 

Premiums received thereon..... 
Net amount In force at end 



.!4 86. 094. 667. 00 
... «,000,S81.84 
tbe 
... Jl.144, 168.00 

'•"lnVluilln'g"b\i.ln«;'oi^e''ib;n ">*^« ""» ^'»- 



J. A. O. PPBUS. 

Commissioner of Insurance. 



STATE OF MINNESOTA. COUNTY OP 
DlSu-rc^Jr^'J^ifteenth Judicial Dis- 

Mlcan' Kosanovlc. administra- 
tor de bonis non of the 
tate of Peter Maravich, 
ceased, 



Fidelity 

Surety • 

Plate Rlass 

Steam boiler ... ■■■ 
Burglary and theft. 

Flv •wheel 

Automobile proper- 
ty damage . ... • • 

Totals .... $30 ,619.68 

State of Minnesota. Department of In 
surance. 
I Hereby Certify, 

^omnanvSor the'year ending Decern- 
be^^sTst 1912. of which the above Is an 
to»l«7.t baa been received and filed 
fn tMs' De^pa'rtmen" a'nd duly approve! 
by me 



410.89 

107.8T 

$6,444.11 



That the Annual 
Royal Indemnity 



es 
de- 



ie«gee««««»e4 



645.811 26 
164,288.45 

11,525.18 
26,288.33 
98,500.20 
17,857.61 



.$ 867,859.98 



.$ 895,258.62 



(a) 
^'"'*" BUSINESS IN MINNESOTA JN 1912. 

(inclu'd^^'^^ur^nc. -•'^-i -^.^l^'a.^^ 

srut'^r'A ''v-'''-'iiT,ui 

Premiums received .• ;; iUli ;,i 

Net losses Incurred y •• Jo, 976.05 

1^ io^«« p«^t •••••::::: m^lll 

Amount at risk "•■_••; '•'* 

Department of Insurance, 

teireby Certify, ' • " 

1 Marine Insui 

ending Decemb 
Is an abstract, has c ... ... 

?aAment and duly .proved by «*^ ^ ^^^ 



'**' "Thstrlo^t^n ^^''^J ^ "•** '° ^ **- 



Comnilsaloner cf Insurance. 



^'^"'^Ll doer' ASSETS DEO. 81, 1912. 
Book tglue of bonds and •toclo-v -.^ J B71.956.97 

b$A iB 0.'&0S> 



tjnist eamptaim ■a4 



AMise In The Herald 



Plaintiff. 
v». 
Rogers-Brown Ore Company, a 

corporation. 

Defendant. 

Ti«moved to St. Louis County. Mlnne- 

B^t^ for the Purpose of Trial and 

To^^Mn^a" Maravich. and Dana Mara- 
vlch, heirs at law and next of kin 
of ciecedent. Peter Maravich Edgar 
Prochlnk. Impertal and Royal Consul 
for Austria-Hungary, Pidellty & 
Deposit Company of Maryland, and 
all other persons interested in the 
estate of Peter Maravich. deceased: 
Pursuant tP an (Srder of the above 
named District CoTlrt. duly made and 
fiio<i In thd above entitled matter, no- 
tice Is hereby given you: That tbe un- 
dersigned Mlcan Kosanoylc af ad- 
ministrator de bonis non of the estate 
of Peter Maravioh, deceased, has in 
hli nOBsesslon a certain sum of money, 
re'ceived by him as damages on account 
of the wrongful death of said doced- 

That an application has been made 
to the Dlstfiot Court of St. Louis 
C?oun"y. Kleventh Jtidlclal Dlstrlot, of 
Minnesota, for an order avowing and 
adjusting all attorney's fees and 6th- 
er expenses Incurred In connection 
with ths collection «uad dlatrlbutidn of 
MUd fund, dstsin&lnlnff lbs Uwful 



J. A. O. PREITS. 
Commissioner of Insurance. 



heirs and next of kin of the decedent, 
and other persons entitled to share in 
the distribution of said fund, as credi- 
tors or otherwise, and authorizing and 
directing the undersigned representa- 
tive to distribute said fund In accord- 
ance with such determination. 

That said application will b« 
brought on for hearing before aatd 
I^our? at a special term thereof, to bS 
held in the County Court House In DUr 
luth, Mlnn^^ota, on the Slst dav ot 
Mav lin at 9:30 o'clock In the forp- 
Twfor; of said day, or as soon thereaftsf 
^°counset can b^ heard. ..t ^hlch tlm* 
^d Dlace all persons interested In tho 
Si.trlbutlon of said fund may arsert 
fhelr cVa ms and will be heard therein. 

nlted this 16th day of April. 191*. 

Daiea mICAN KQ3ANOVIC, 

Administrator de bonis non of the 

tate of Peter Maravioh, deceased. 

^ By THEO. HOLLISTER. 

Attorney; 
THEO. HOU^ISTER. 

e06 Sellwood Building, 

Attorney for Administrator. 
D. H., April 17, 24. May 1, 1918. 



WATER TOWER AND 



SALE OP 

TANK — 

Notice is hereby given that on tho 
20th day of May.^, 1913, at (i> eight 
^•clock P. M, the Village Council of the 
Village of Mountain Iron, Minn., will 
Bell a wooden water tower and tanTf, 
delcrlption of which is as t^i^oy^'^l 
HelKhl of tower. 60 feet; dimensions of 
tank, height 16 feet, diameter 22 feetl 
capacity, 40.000 gallons. 

featsl April ^^^^^^,^^^^0^, 

Tillage Recordavi 



\ 



(T* 



^ 



Thursday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



OFFICIAL nnn fc:KDl.\GS. 



m 



Council Chamber. 
Duluth. Minn.. April 25. 1913. 
10 o'clock a. m. 
Adjourned meeting. 
Roll call: 

Present — Commlsaionora Illoken, 
Murchiaon. Merrltt. Voaa, Mayor 
Prince — 5. 

Absent — None. 



PRESF3NTATION OF PETITIONS AND 
OTHER COMMUN1CATION3. 

Leon E. Lumm asking that the city 
attorney Investigate why the Northern 
Parlflo Railway company refuses to 
transfer freight to Lundmark & Fran- 
son'a store on Bast Michigan street — 
City attorney. 

Secretary of the West End Hillside 
Improvement club asking that a scale 
be Installed In the vicinity of Piedmont 
avenue and Tenth street — Commission- 
er of public affairs. 

G. a. Hartley asking permission to 
ert'ct a fence two feet outside the gut- 
ters along Hartley road. 

Commissioner Murchlson moved that 
euch permission be granted and the 
motion was declared adopted upon the 
following vote: 

Veas — Commissioners Hlcken. Mer- 
ritt. Murchlson. Vos-^, Mayor Prince — a. 

Nays — None. 

Passed April 25. 1913. 

Approved April 26. 1913. 

Applications and bonds for licenses 
as follows: 

PrATklRERS. 

D. Martino at No. 5514 Raleigh 
street. 
EMPLOYMENT OFFICES FOR MEN. 

N. O. Sundby at No. 523 West Michi- 
gan street. 

PAWNBROKERS. 

M. Even at No. 717 West Superior 
street. 

Sam Moscovltch at No. 522 West Su- 
perior street. 

POOL AND BILLIARD TABLES. 

F A. Wilson at No. 1619 West Su- 
peri'^r street. 

Anton Szymczak at No. 2a06 West Su- 
pe:lor street. 

Applications and bonds for liquor li- 
censes as follows: 

Peter C. Schmidt at No. 5503 Grand 
avenue. 

Axel Algotson at No. 1605 West Su- 
perior street. 

James J. Wall at No. 310 West Su- 
perior street. 

Lantry & Mathews at No. 1 East Su- 
perior street — Commissioner of public 
safety. 

REPORTS OF OFFICERS. 

Commissioner of public works rec- 
ommending that bids for tanks for the 
storage of road oil be rejected — Re- 
ceived. 

Commissioner of public works rela- 
tive to the condemnation of Roosevelt 
street from Fifty-eighth avenue west 
to Sixty-first avenue east — City attor- 
ney. 

Relative to the construction of tanks 
and sludge beds near the outlet of 
the so-called Woodland trunk sewer. 

Commissioner Hi'-ken moved that 
such tanks and sludge beds be not 
built at the present time. The m i- 
tion was declared adopted upon the 
following vote: 

Yeas — Commissioners Hlcken, Mer- 
ritt. Murchlson. Voss. Mayor Prince — 5. 

Nays — None. 

Passed April 25. 1913. 

Approved April 26, 1913. 

Commissioner of public works rec- 
ommending the cancellation of side- 
walk assessment against lot 2S. block 
137. West Duluth, Fifth division — Re- 
ceived. 

Relative to the laying of water and 
gas mains In Vernon street between 
Michigan avenue and Paclrtc avenue and 
between Atlantic avenue and the west 
line of Bryant's addition — Commission- 
er of public utilities. 

INTRODUCTION AND CONSIDERA- 
TION OF ORDINANCES. 

The following entitled ordinance 
took Its first reading: 
By Commissioner Murchlson: 

An ordinance to appropriate from the 
publio works fund the sum of $8,000 
for the purcha.«3e of lumber for main- 
tenance purposf-3 during the season 
1913. 



of sanitary sewer in Foui th alley when 
same Is built. 

Commissioner Murchlson moved the 
adoption of the resolution and It was 
declared adopted upon the following 
vote: 

Yeas — Commissioners Hioken. Mer- 
rltt. Murchlson. Voss, Mayor Prince 
— 5. 

Nays — None. 

Passed. April 26, 1913. 

Approved April 26. 1913. 



By CommisMloner Merritt: 

Resolved. That the bid of Lane Mao- 
Oregor & Co., for furnishing liability 
insurance covering the operation of the 
water and light department for the 
year beginning April 29. 1913, for the 
sum of 1958.40 be and hereby is ac- 
cepted and it Is hereby directed that 
the contract for the furnishing uf sucli 
Insurance be awarded to said company. 

Commissioner Merritt moved the 
adoption of the resolution and It was 
declared adopted upon the following 
vote: 

Yeas — Commissioners Hlcken, Mer- 
ritt, Murchlson, Voss, Mayor Prince 
— 5. 

Nays — None. 

Passed. April 25, 1913. 

Approved April 26, 1913. 



By Commissioner Murchlson: 

Resolved. That the city auditor is 
hereby directed to deduct from assess- 
ment levied asrainst lot 28. block 137, 
West Duluth. Fifth division, the sum 
of $59.71. being the cost of construct- 
ing a sidewalk in connection with 
Ramsey stieet paving. 

Commls.siimer Murchlson moved the 
adoption of the resolution and It was 
declared adopted upon the following 
vote: 

Yea.** — Commissii>ner3 Hlcken, Mer- 
ritt. Murchlson, Voss, Mayor Prince 
—5. 

Navs — None. 

Passed. April 25. 1913. 

Approved April 26. 1913. 



By Commissioner Hlcken: 

Resolved. That applications for li- 
cense are hereby granted and bonds 
accompanyinsr same are hereby ap- 
proved as follows: 

PLI'MBERS. 

D. Martino at No. 5514 Raleigh 

POOL AND BILLIARD TABLES. 

F. A. Wilson at No. 1619 West Su- 
perior street. 

Anton Szymczak at No. 2006 West 
Superior street. 

Commissioner Hicken Taoved the 
adoption of the resolution and It was 
declared adopted upon the following 
vote: 

Yeas — Commissioners Hlcken. Mer- 
ritt. Murohison, Voss, Mayor Prince — 5. 

Nays — None. 

Passed — April 25, 1913. 

Approved — April 26, 1918. 



By Commissioner Murchlson: 

Resolved. That all bids submitted 
for furnishing and delivering of two 
storage tanks fur road oil be and 
hereby are rejected and the city clerk 
is hereby authorized to return to the 
several bidders the certified check 
submitted with said bids. 

Commissioner Murchlson moved the 
adoption of the resolution and It was 
declared adopted upon the following 
vote: 

Yeas — Commissioners Hlcken, Mer- 
ritt. Murchlson, Voss, Mayor Prince — 5. 

Navs — None. 

Passed — April 25. 1913. 

Approved — April 26, 1913. 



The following entitled ordinance 
took Its secord reading; 
By Commissioner Voss: 

An ordinance to appropriate from the 
general fund the sum of $64S.00 to pay 
for bonds for city officials other than 
commissioners. 



The following entitled ordinance 
took Its third reading: 
By Commissioner Merritt: 

An ordinance to appropriate from the 
public utility fund the sum of $95>}.40 
to provide for liability insurance In 
the operation of the water and light 
department for the year beginning 
April 29, 1913 

Commissioner Merritt moved the 
adoption of the ordinance and It was 
declared adopted upon the following 
vote: 

Yeaa — Commissioners Hicken, Mer- 
ritt. Murchlson. Voss, Mayor Prince — 5. 

Nays — None. 

The ordinance by Commissioner Mur- 
ohison entitled 'An ordinance to ap- 
propriate from the general fund the 
sum of $2,000 to be used for the pur- 
chase of road oil for sprinkling dur- 
ing the season 1913" took its third 
reading. 

Commissioner Murchlson moved the 
adoption of the ordinance and it was 
declared adopted upon the following 
vote: 

Yeas — Commissioners Hicken, Mer- 
ritt. Murchlson, Voss, Mayor Prince — 5. 

Nays — None. 

The ordinance by Commissioner Mur- 
chlson entitled "An ordinance to ap- 
propriate from the general fund the 
sum of $15,000 for sprinkling with wa- 
ter during the season 1913" took Its 
third reading. 

Mayor Prince moved the adoption 
of the ordinance and It was declared 
adopted upon the following vote: 

Yei.s — Commissioners Hicken, Mer- 
ritt. Murchlson. Voss, Mayor Prince — 5. 

Nayj — None. 



By Commissioner Voss: 

Resolved. That pay roll for serving 
notice in connection with condemna- 
tion of building line easements in the 
sum of $37.50 be and hereby is ap- 
proved and it is hereby directed that 
an order be drawn on the general fund 
to pay the same. 

Commissioner Voss moved the adop- 
tion of the resolution and it was de- 
clared adopted upon the following 
vote: 

Yeas — Commissioners Hicken, Mer- 
••Itt, Murchl.son, Voss. Mayor Prince — 5. 

Nays — None. 

Passer.— April 25, 1913. 

Approved — April 26. 1913. 



helping children confined at the No- 
peming sanitarium. 

CommlJsloner Voss moved that the 
request be granted and that Jtme 14 be 
designated as tag day for said society. 

The motion was declared adopted 
upon the following vote: 

Yeas — Commissioners Hlcken. Mer- 
ritt, Murchlson, VostJ, Mayor Prince — 5. 

Nays — None. 

Passed April 28. 1913. 
( Approved April 30. 1913. 
I Applications and bonds for pool table 
I llcenses'as follows: 

Axel Ellstrom at 18 East Superior 
strbet. 

John Schramel at No. 5501 Grand 
I avenue. 

I Ous Economos at No. 214 West Su- 
I perior street. 

Joe Dl Marco at No. 123 West Michi- 
gan street. 

Jacob J. Forsman at No. 336 Lake 
avenue south. 

Applications and bonds for pawn 
brokers' licenses as follows: 

William Goldstein at No. 601 We.st 
Michigan street. 

J. E. Coll at No. 217 West Superior 
street. 

Frank Labovltz at No. 516 West Su- 
perior .<»treot. 

D. Ostrov at No. 631 West Superior 
street. 

Eugene Flskett at No. 507 West 
Michigan street. 

Aam Bernard at No. 504 West Supe- 
rior street. 

Applications and bonds for plumbers' 
licenses as follows: 

.Sanitary Plumbing company at No. 
34 West First street. 

A. J. Archambo at No. «29 East Su- 
perior street. 

Applications and bond.i for employ- 
ment ofrtce licenses for men: 

.Stack Employment company at No. 
517 >^ West Michigan street. 

Empire Employment company at No. 
521 West Michigan street. 

Swan Carlson at No. 411% West 
Michigan street. 

Buckley & Bergstrom at No. 517 
W.'st MIrhigan street. 

Mutual Labor Exchange at No. 419 
West Michigan street. 

Duluth Employment company at No. 
523 Vi West Michigan street. 

Standard Employment company at 
No. 529 West Michigan street. 

Olund Engberg company at No. 505% 
West Michigan street. 

Applications and bonds for licenses 
to sell intoxicating liquors as follows: 

E. F. \Lidden at No. 505 West Supe- 
rior .«!treet. being a tran.sfer from B. 
J. Madden at the same location. 

A. J. P:rlckson at No. 19 South Sixty- 
third avenue west. 

Charles Peterson at No. 609 West 
Superior street. — Commissioner of pub- 
lic safety. 

Bonds of C. S. Palmer, city clerk; Dr. 
H. E. Webster as director of public 
health; J. A. Scott, as city asse.<»sor; 
H. G. Inman, as harbor master; B. J. 
Campbell, as auditor; each with the 
America.i Fidelity company as surety. 
— Commissioner of finance. 

Miscellaneous bills — 

Requisitions of city officers and de- 
partments Noa. 3410 to 3485 Inclusive. 
— Commissioner of finance. 



5 



following 



clared adopted «V<^n 
vote: 

Yeas — Commiiiatomrs Hlcken. Mer- 
ritt, Murchlson. ,:|ff)J?a, Mayor Prince — 5. 

Nays — None. "jL 

MOTIONS i^ND RWSOLU'T'IONS. 
Commissioner- Murchlson submitted a 
resolution awalfllng the cojitract for 
paving First st.eet from First avenue 
east to Sixth avenu^ east to P. McDon- 
nell on his bid for creosoted blocks, 
action on which was postponed for one 
week. 1 



Fr M\ 



By Commissionfr Hjjrchison 

Resolved, Tln,t ihe city clerk is 
hereby directed to'i^idvertise for bids 
for the construe ti^rtjj of cement and tile 
sl(lewalk.s and I'lAflw walks in the city 
of Duluth for tjlJi^seaHUn 1913. 

Commissioner Wc(rchi8on moved the 
adoption of the resolution and it was 
declared adopted upon the following 
vote: 

Yeas — Commlealoncrs Hicktn, Mer- 
ritt, Murchlson. Vosa, Mayor Prince — 5. 

Naya — None. 

Passed April 28, 1913. 

Approved April 30, 1913. 



REPORTS OF OFFICERS. 

Engineer, submitting plat of Home 
Acres, Second division. 

Commissioner of public safety, re- 
porting appointments of pound mas- 
ters. — Received. 



The ordinance by Commissioner Mur- 
chlson entitled "An ordinance to regu- 
late the making of bids and letting of 
contracts for doing of work and fur- 
nishing material and property to the 
city of Duluth" took its third read- 
ing. 

Commissioner Prinze moved the adop- 
tion of the ordinance and It was de- 
clared adopted upon the following 
vote: 

Yeas — Commissioners Hlcken. Mer- 
ritt. -Murchlson, Voss, Mayor Prince — •!>. 

Nays — Nona. 



MOTIONS .\ND RESOLUTIONS. 
By Commissioner Hiciten: 

Resolved. That a bond with personal 
sureties be accepted on the contract of 
Nel.'<on & F'eterson for furnishing a 
carload of oats to the fire department. 

Commissioner Hicken moved the 
adoption of the resolution and It was 
declared adoptedg upon the followln 
declared adopted upon the following 
vote: 

Yeas — Commlasionors Hlcken, Mer- 
ritt, Murchlson, Voss, Mayor Prince 
—5. 

Nay.i — None. 

Passed. April 25. 191S. 

Approved April 26, 191J. 

Commissioner Murchlson submitted a 
resolution awarding .contracts for 
sprinkling with water during the sea. 
son 1913. action on which was post- i 
pon-d for one week. 

C'unmlssloner .Merritt introduced 
resolutions awarding contracts to the 
Thoni.«en Foundry company for furnish- 
ing special plpt> ''astlng^ for »he use of 
the water and light departmei;t and to 
the TTnlted .<?tat.-3 Cast Iron Pipe •!: 
Foundry company for furnishing cast 
Iron pipe to said department, action on 
•ach of which was postponed for one 
week. 



MISCELLANEOUS BUSINESS. 
Commissioner Hicken Introduced the 
following resolution: 

"VN'hereas, Ther« has been a wide 
difference of opinion among property 
owners of Duluth for inany years past 
over the relative merits of several 
permanent paving materials and the 
climatic, topographical and rock and 
earth conditions in Duluth seem to 
give us a problem peculiar to our- 
selves to work out on this subject, and 

Whereas, Our people who own prop- 
erty on streets about to be paved are 
periodically circularized and solicited 
to favor one or the other of various 
paving materials on the highways 
upon which their property abutts and 
naturally are not In a position, except 
possibLv In Isolated cases, to pass any 
intelligent judgment on such ques- 
tions, based on their personal obser- 
vation, and 

Whereas, In former years property 
owners of intelligence with a fair de- 
gree of unanimity on different high- 
ways about to be paved, have ex- 
pressed their preference for asphalt, 
creosoted block, bltullthic, sand^ 
stone block and brick pavements and 
such pavements have been laid In 
many other cities to a large extent 
and with apparent gt^neral satisfaction 
to the people and officials of most of 
such cities, and 

Whereas, The city of Duluth has 
now under consideration the paving of 
First street from First avenue east to 
Sixth avenue east, which portion of 
said street is a heavily traveled street 
with traffic of all descriptions and 
would therefore provide an excellent 
test of the durability of any paving 
material laid thereon, and 

Whereas. This commission is desir- 
ous of. u.sing such paving material in 
each case as Is in accordance with the 
wishf-s of the people who have to pay 
the assessments therefor, but also 
feels its responsibility to assist in any 
way it can to have such wishes intt^lll- 
gently expressed and believes that the 
principal competitive pavements can 
best be judged under like competitive 
conditions, 

Therefore be it resolved. That the 
representatives of the five paving ma- 
terials nam.ed. to-wlt: Asnhalt. creo- 
soted block, bitulithic, sandstone block 
and brick, be and hereb.v are invited 
to lay, at their own expense, one 
block each on First street from First 
to Sixth avenues east (the respective 
blocks to be determined by lot unless 
otherwise agreed upon) on specifica- 
tions submitted by such representa- 
tives for their respective pavements, 
a!* a demonstration pavement for the 
people of Duluth and surrounding 
munl'^'nalltles, of the merits of their 
r<*spectlvc pavements, and be it 
further. 

Resolved. That it is the purpose of 
this commission to endeavor to secure 
a similar t>>st, to be made in fhe 
proper plac<^. of the cheaper and less 
permanent pavlntr m.-\terials. 

r'ommls.«»loner Hicken moved the 
adoption of tne resoluvlon and it was 
declared adopted upon th© following 
vote: 

Yeas — Commissioner."! Hlcken, M'^r- 
rltt. Murchlson. Voss, Mayor Prince — 5. 

Nay.«* — None. 

Pas<ied— April 25. 191S. 

Approved — April 26. 1913. 

On motion of Commissioner Hicken 
tho counoll ad.lournrd to meet In the 
council chamber Monday, April 28, at 
8 o'clock p. m. 

C. S. P.ALMER, 

City Clerk. 



UNFINISHED BUSINESS. 
By Commissioner Murchlson: 

Resolved, That the contract for pav- 
ing of Seventeenth avenue east from 
Fourth street to Seventh street with 
asphalt be, and hereby is, awarded to 
P. McDonnell on his bid of $10,002.25. 

Commissioner Murchlson moved the 
adoption of the resolution and it was 
declared adopted upon the following 
vote: 

Yeas — Commissioners Hlcken. Mer- 
ritt Murohison, Voss, Mayor Prince — 5. 

Nays — None. 

Passed April 28, 1913. 

Approved — April 30, 1913. 

By Commissioner Murchlson: 

Resolved, That the contract for pav- 
ing of Victoria street from Woodland 
avenue to Hartley road with bitumi- 
nous concrete be and hereby Is awarded 
to P. McDonnell on his bid of $14,- 
343.50. 

Commissioner Murchlson moved the 
adoption of the resolution and It was 
declared adopted upon the following 
vote: 

Yea.s — Comml.Hsioners Hicken, Mer- 
ritt, Murchlson, Voss, Mayor Prince — 5. 

Nays — None. 

Passed April 2S, 1913. 

Approved April 30, 1913. 



By CommlBSionor Murchlson: 

Resolved. Th.it the Duluth-Edison 
Electric company is her<'i>y directed to 
move the arc 'Ight now at Twenty- 
sixth avenue w ist and Fifth street to 
a point 150 feet northerly from lt.<j 
present location. 

Commissioner Murchlson moved the 
adoption of the resolution, and It was 
declared adopttd upon the following 
vote: 

Yeas — Commifisioners Hicken, Mer- 
ritt, Murchlson, Vo.ss, Mayor Prince — 5. 

Nays — None. 

Passed April 28, 1913. 

Approved April 30, 1918. 



By Commissioner Murchlson: 

Resolved. That the contract for pav- 
ing .Sixth street from Eighteenth ave- 
nue east to Woodland avenue with 
asphalt be and hereby is awarded to 
P. McDonnell on his bid of $12,321.75. 

Commissioner Murchlson moved the 
adoption of the resolution and it was 
declared adopted upon the followiag 
vote: 

Yeas — Commissionerf" Hicken, Mer- 
ritt, Murchlson, Voss, Mayor Prince — 5. 

Nays — None. 

Passed April 28. 1913. 

Approved April 30, 1913 



By* Commissioner Murchlson: 

Resolved, That the contract for pav- 
ing Twenty-second avenue .east from 
Third to Fifth streets with asphalt 
be and hereby Is awarded to P. Mc- 
Donnell on his bid of $4,055. 

Commissioner Murchlson moved the 
adoption of the resiolutlon and It was 
declared adopted upon the following 
vota: 

Yeas — Commissioners Hicken, Mer- 



By Commlsslontir Voss: 

Resolved, That extension of time is 
hereby granted to the owners of prop- 
erty for the pajment of the remaining 
portion of a.ssesHments hereinafter 
mentioned, such payments to be made 
in not to exceed three installments, 
payable in one, two and tliree years, 
the first installment to be due and pay- 
able Oct. 1, 1914. The assessments re- 
ferred to are e.k follows; 

Assessment against Benjamin Low, 
owner of lot .■;69, block 147, Duluth 
proper. Second rllvislon. 

Said assessment being levied for full 
expense of gracing and otherwise im- 
proving Fifth Htreet from Twenty- 
third avenue wcat to Twenty-fifth ave- 
nue west. 

Assessment against B. G. Kreidler, 
owner of lots l'» and 16, block 7, West 
Duluth. First division. 

Said assessment being levlcd for full 
expense of grading, paving and im- 
proving Ramsey street trom Central 
avenue to Grand avenue. 

Assessment aKain&t liosamond Helen 
Munsey (William Charlea Miller her 
attorney in fact), owner of lot 9, bli.'ck 
11. Helm additioa. 

Said assessment being levied for full 
expense of con-jtruoting a sanitary 
sewer in Helm Htreet from Twenty- 
seventh to Twenty-sl>;th avenues west, 
a combined stoi-ni and sanitary sewer 
In Twenty-sixth avcnuo west from 
Helm street to Railroad alley and in 
Railroad alley from Twenty-sixth ave- 
nue west to the sewer in Twenty- 
eighth avenue \^'e8t. 

Assessment afrain.st E. S. Youngquist, 
owner of lots 11 and 12. block 106, 
Myers Rearran«fement, block 106, Du- 
luth proper. Second division. 

Said assessment being levied for full 
expense of constructing a sanitary 
sewer in Third street from the alley 
between Eighteenth and Elghtennth 
and a Half avenue west to a connec- 
tion with the Viewer in Third street 
about 40 feet e-ist of Nineteenth ave- 
nue west. 

Assessment against William Qolrt- 
steln, owner of lots ^4 and 96, block 18. 
Duluth proper. Third division. 

Said assessment 'jeing levied for full 
expense of pav ng and otherwise im- 
proving Sixth avenue east from Michi- 
gan street to First street. 

Assessment again.st E. P. Alexander, 
owner of lot 9, block, 4, Harrison's di- 
vision. . ... - - ,1 

Said assessme It being levied for full 
expense of constructing a sanitary 
sewer in" Second street from a poltit (5 
feet east of Twenty-sixth avenue east 
to the sewer «n Twenty -ninth avenue 

Assessment against J. W. Booth (by 
O. H. Clarke. a?ent), owner of lots i> 
and 6, block 17, Highland Park addl- 

Sa!id assesameit being levied for full 
expense of contracting a sanitary 
sewer in Sixth alley from Twentieth 
avenue east to tlie sewer in Eighteenth 
avenue east. TTtn,,- ^ 

Assessment against Mrs. v\ Illiam 
John.son (by Ole O. Towo. agent), own- 
er of lot 22, bloc'i 2, Spaulding addition. 

Assessment against Ole O. Towe, 
owner of lots 1^. 17, 18 and 28. block 
2. Spaulding addition, and lots I and 2, 
block 69, Harrison's Brookdale division. 

Said assessme;it being levied for full 
expense of grading and otherwise im- 
proving Tenth .street from Twenty- 
third avenue west to Twenty-fourth 

avenue west. Txriuo^ 

Assessment against Mrs. William 
Johnson (by Ole O. Towe, agent), own- 
er of lot 22, block 2, Spaulding s addi- 
tion. 

Assessment against Ole O. Towe, 
owner of lots 16. 17. 18, 26, block 2. 
Spaulding addition. 

Said assessmerts being levied for full 
i^xpense of constructing a sanitary 
sewer In Elghtl. street from Twenty- 
fourth to Twenty-fifth avenues west, 
in Ninth alley from the east line 
of Lincoln pa;-k to Twenty-fourth 
avenue west, in Tenth alley and 
Eleventh street from Twenty-third 
avenue west to Twenty-fourth avenue 



(By T. A. Spear, Agt.), owner of lot 2, 
block 7, London addition. 

Said assessments being levied for 
full expense of constructing a nanltary 
sewer In Luverne alley from Forty- 
third avenue east to Forty-fourth ave- 
nue east with outlet In I'^orty-fourth 
avenue east to tlia aewer In London 
road. 

Assessment against Joseph A. Blals 
(By Sarah Blals, Agt.), owner of tne 
west half of lot 5. block 11, Chester 
Park division. 

Assessment against Dorethea F. C. 
Bldwell, owner of the east half of lot 
6, block 11, Chester Park division. 

Said assessments being levied for full 
expense of constructing a sanitary 
sewer in Eleventh alley from Twelfth 
avenue east to Thirteenth avenue east. 

Assessment against H. W, Cheadle, 
Prank A. Day, C. Francis Colman, (each 
owning an undivided one-third of each 
of said lota) owners of lots 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 
block 6. Clover Hill division of Duluth. 

Assessment against Frank R. Day 
and William E. Richardson, owners of 
lot 4, block 7, Clover Hill division of 
Duluth. 

A.ssessment against George A. Spear- 
in, owner of lots 1 and 2, block 8, Clov- 
er Hill division. 

A.ssesament against Marian Watts 
(By Y. J. Watts, Agt.), owner of the 
northerly :{3 1-3 feet of lot 4, block 8, 
Clover Hill. 

Assessment against Brewer Mat- 
tocks, Jr., owner of lot 6, block 7, Clov- 
er Hill division. 

Said assessments being levied for full 
expense of constructing a sanitary 
sewer In Woodland avenue from Allen 
avenue to Niagara street. 

Assessment agaln.st C. A. Lanlgan, 
owner of tho east lialf of lot 12, block 
10, Chester Parle division. 

Assessment against W. J. Lanlgan, 
owner of the west half of lot 12, block 
10, Chester Park division. 

Assessment against Axel Johnson, 
owner of the east half of lot 10, block 
10, Chester Park division. 

Assessment against E. Running, own- 
er of lot 7. block 9, Chester Park divi- 
sion. 

Said a.ssessments being levied for full 
expense of constructing a sanitary 
sewer in Tenth alley and In Tenth 
street from Twelfth avenue east to 
Eleventh avenue east with outlet in 
Eleventh avenue east to the sewer in 
Ninth street. 

Assessment against C. F. Powell, (By 
R. Locke), owner of lot 1, block 67, ad- 
dition to Oneota. 

Said assessment being levied for full 
expense of constructing a sanitary 
sewer In Grand avenue from Forty- 
sixth avenue west to" Forty-ninth ave- 
nue west. 

Commissioner Hlcken moved the 
adoption of the resolution and It was 
declared adopted upon the following 
vote: 

Yeas — Commissioners Hlcken, Mer- 
ritt, Murchlson, Voss, Mayor Prince — 5. 

Nays — None. 

Passed April 28. 1913. 

Approved April 30, 1913. 




By Commissioner Murchlson: 

Resolved, That the contract for pav- 
ing Fourth street from Sixth avenue 
east to Fourteenth avenue east with 
asphalt and granite toothing blocks 
along the street car tracks bo and 
hereby is awarded to P. McDonnell on 
his bid of $46,281.50. 

Commissioner Hicken moved the 
adoption of the resolution and it was 
declared adopted upon the following 
vote: 

Yeas — Commissioners Hlcken, Mer- 
ritt. Voss — 3. 

Nays — Commissioner Murchlson, 
Mayor Prince — 2. 

Passed April 28. 1918. 

Approved April 80, 1913. 



By CommisBlorer Murchlson: 

R«>3olved. That the aHPes'.ment of 
$9.!? Ipvied by the city council on 
Maio^-. 31. 191.1, against the south 4-1 
fee*, -if lots 1 and 2. Mock 79. Oneota^ 
for the expense of oon-*tvuct'ng sew*»r 
In Vv'est Fourth street, be anif the aamo 
licifbv Is cancelled, snid '>rr perty to 
b« u.=!He»aed for its share of the cost 



Council Chamber, 
Duluth, Minn.. April 28. 1913, 
8 o'clock p. m. 
Adionrned meeting. 
Roll call: 

Present — r-ommlssioners Hl-'ken. 
Merritt, Murchlson. Voss. Mayor 
Prlnce---5. 

Absent — None. 

PRESENTATION OT PETITIONS AND 
OTHER COM.MT'NTCATTONS. 

J. B. Cade et si. asking that sanrt- 
«»ton« be u.^ed between the trpcks in 
thn Improvement of Fourth street from 
Sixth avenue east to Fourteenth ave- 
nue ea.'!t. — Comml.«s!oner of public 
works 

Advisory committee of the Red, 
'C^^hlte .%• tilv; society asking that June 
14 be {Vplpnated n<< tag day for said 
society to sell flags for the purpose of 



Commissioner Hlck.iU moved to re- 
consider the vote by which the resolu- 
tion inviting the representatives of 
five paving materials to each lav a 
block on First street between First 
avenue east and Sixth avenue east 
was declared adopted at the last meet- 
ing of the council. 

The motion to recon.«<lder was de- 
clared adopted on the following vote: 

Yeas — Commissioners Hlcken, Mer- 
ritt, Murchlson, Voss. Mayor Prince — 5. 

Nays — None. 

Commissioner Hicken moved to 
amend said resolution by striking out 
the words "First street from FHrst 
avenue east to Sixth avenue east" 
where they occur in said resolution 
and inserting In lieu thereof the 
words "Superior street from Twenty- 
fifth avenue west to Thirtieth avenue 
west." 

The amendment was declared adopt- 
ed upon the following vote; 

Yeas — Commissioners Hlcken, Mer- 
ritt, Murchlson, Voss, Mayor Prince — 5. 

Nay.'< — None. 

Commissioner Hlcken moved the 
adoption of the resolution as .amended 
and It was declared adopted upon the 
following vote: 

Yeas — Commissioners Hicken, Mer- 
ritt, Murchlson, Voss, Mayor Prince — 5. 

Nays — None. 

Passed April 28. 1913. 

Approved April 30, 1913. 

INTRODTTCTION AND CONSIDERA- 
TION OF ORDINANCES. 
The ordinance by Commissioner 
Murchlson entitled "An ordinance to 
appropriate from the public works 
fund the sum of $8,000 for the pur- 
chase of luml>er for mainti;nanco pur- 
poses for the season 1913." took its 
second reading. 



The ordinance by Commls.«<ioner Voss 
entitled "An ordinance to appropriate 
from the general fiind th^' sum of $(148 
to pay for bonds of city officials other 
than commissioners" took its third 
reading. 

Commissioner Voss moved the .adop- 
tion of the r«aolution and It was do- J 



from Eleventh utreot to the sewer in 
Seventh street. r>i»tt 

Assessment against Olonzo W Piatt, 
owner of lot 13, block 19, West Duluth, 

First division. ^ „ ^j- iJi„, 

Assessment agatnBt E.G. Kreidler, 
owner of lots 15 and 16, block 7, West 
Duluth. First dix'ision and lots 1 and 2, 
block 19, West Euluth, First division. 

Said assessment being levied for full 
expense of paving and improving Cen- 
tral avenue from Roo.sevelt street to 
the north line of Cody street. _^. . ^ 

Assessment against L. A. Ralston, 
owner of lot 28, East First street. Du- 
luth proper, First division. 

Assessment against Olof Pearson, 
owner of the ncrth 100 feet of lot 34 
and the west 22 feet of the north 100 
feet of lot 36. -East First street, Duluth 
proper. First division. .,^ _ .. . 

Assessment against H. Y. Josepns. 
owner of the oast half of lot 25, East 
Superior street, Duluth proper. First 

'Assessment agiinst William E. Rich- 
ardson and Fred.)rick D. Haread. presi- 
dent and secretary of the Miller com- 
pany, owners of the north o4 feet of 
lot 32. the nortn 64 feet of the east 
26 feet of lot 80, the west half of lot 
30, East First utreet, Duluth proper. 
First division. .. „ -, 

Assessment against William R. Ryan 
(executor), owner of lot 37, h^ast irtrsi 
street. Duluth ProP'*'*, First division 

As.sessment against Tilly Goldish 
(bv Louis Goldish, ageni,). owner of 
the west half of lot^38 East First 
street. Duluth proper. First division 

Assessment against C. 3. Sargent (by 
Little & Noite company, agents,), (l>y 
C. F. West, secretary.) owner of lots 
34 and 36. East Second street, Duluth 
proper. First division. „,.».,, 

Assessment against Frank RIttel 
owner of the south 40 feet of lot 84 
and tho east 28 feet of the north 100 
and the south i.) feet of lot 36. East 
First street, Duluth proper. First divl- 

Sald assessment* being levied for full 
expense of paving and otherwise Itn- 
provlng Second av«n«o east from Mich- 
igan street to .^econd street. 

AsHe.ssments airainst H. Y. Josephs, 
owner of lots 312 and 344. block 14, 
Duluth proper. S»cond division. 

Assessment agalnpt Olof Pearson, 
owner of the west half of lot 339 and 
lot 341. block 74, Duluth proper. Sec- 
ond division. , . , ^ , , ,. 

Assessment against Alvlna Dahl (by 
S M Johnson), >wner of lota 338 and 
340 block 74, E'uluth proper. Second 

division. ^ , , I J » 

Said assessments being levied for 
full oxpenae of paving and otherwise 
Improving Twonty-firat avenue west 
from the dock lite to the south side of 
Third street. 

Asfieasment agilnst Fred P. Bayha, 
owner of lot 4. l»look 7, London addi- 
tion. 

Assessment arainst Bslle M. Spsar. 



By Commissioner Voss: 

Resolved, That the bond of C. S. Pal- 
mer as city clerlt in the sum of $5,000, 
of B. J. Campbell as auditor in the sum 
of $5,000, of J. A. Scott as assessor in 
the sum of $5,000, of H. E. Webster, s^b 
director of public health in the sum of 
$3,000. and of H. G. Inman as harbor 
master In the sum of $600, each with 
the American Fidelity company as 
surety be and hereby Is approved. 

Commissioner Voss moved the adop- 
tion of the resolution and It was de- 
clared adopted upon the following 
vote: 

Yeas — Commissioners Hlcken, Mer- 
ritt, Murchison, Voss, Mayor Prince — 5. 

Nays — None. 

Passed April 28, 1913. 

Approved April 30, 1918. 

By Commissioner Voss: 

Resolved. That the time for the pay- 
ment of assessment for grading Zim- 
merly avenue from the county road to 
Commonwealth avenue be and hereby 
is extended for a period of thirty days, 
without penalty. 

Commissioner Voss moved the adop- 
tion of the resolution and it was de- 
clared adopted upon the following 
vote: 

Yeas — Commissioners Hlcken, Mer- 
ritt, Murchison, Voss, Mayor Prince — 5. 

Nays — None. 

Passed April 28. 1913. 

Approved April 30. 1913. 

Bv Commissioner Voss: 

Resolved, That bills are hereby al- 
lowed and It is hereby directed that 
orders be drawn on the city treasurer 
to pay the same as follows: 
PUBLIC SAFETY. 
Fire Department. 

American La France Fire Engine 
company, $500.00; water and light de- 
partment, $9.45; C. S. Prosser & Co., 
$164.50; Wahl & Messer, $30.90; Whit- 
ney Wall company, $43.60. 

GENERAL FUND. 

Chamberlain-Taylor company, $1.00; 
city of Duluth, water and light depart- 
ment, $5.16; Dunning & Dunning, $55.45; 
the Duluth Street Railway company, 
$5.00; Dunlop-Moore company, $8.80; 
Duluth Paper & Stationery company, 
$44.47: Globe Iron works $1.38; William 
P Harrison, $11.35; G. E. McLean, 
$68.84; Merritt & Hector, $24.00; Mar- 
shall-Wells Hardware company, $5.80; 
Pittsburg Coal company, $21,15; Ran- 
kin Printing company, $5.25; J. A. 
Scott, $5.00; Fay-Schau company, $1,- 
392.00. 

PUBLIC WORKS. 

Architects' & Engineers' Supply com- 
pany, $24.80; water and lig'ht depart- 
ment, $105.00; Chamberlain & Taylor 
company. $1.20; Duluth Street Railway 
company. $35.00; Duluth Auto Tire Re- 
pair company, $5.50; Duluth Machinery 
company, $1.50; Helmbach Lumber 
company, $12.78; National Iron com- 
pany, 63 cents; National Hardware & 
Supply company, $1.25; Williamson & 
Mendenhall. $4.05. 

LIBRARY FUND. 

Water and light department, $4.f>0; 
W. A. Pond Fuel company, $126.85; 
Waldorf Bindery company, $110.05. 
PERMANENT IMPROVEMENT. 

Gamewell Fire Alarm Telegraph com- 
pany. $1,316.67. 

Commissioner Voss moved the adop- 
tion of the resolution, and it was de- 
clared adopted upon the following 
vote: 

Yeaa — Commissioners Hicken. Merritt, 
Murchlson, Voss, Mayor Prince — 5. 

Nays — None. 

Passed April 28. 1913. 

Approved April 30, 1913. 

By Commissioner Murchlson: 

Resolved, Tl.at the bids submitted for 
grading of Fifth street between Thirty- 
eighth and Forty-third avenues west 
be and hereby are rejected. 

Commissioner Murchison moved the 
adoption of the resolution, and it was 
declared adopted upon the following 
vote: 

Yeas — Commissioners Hicken, Merritt, 
Murchison. Voss, Mayor Prince — 5. 

Nays — None. 

Passed April 28, 1913. 

Approved April 30, 1913. 



By Commissioner Murchison! 

Resolved, That this council deems it 
necessary for public convenience and 
safety that a sanitary sewer be con- 
structed in Kenilworth avenue In said 
city from Sussex avenue to Livingstone 
avenue: thence in Livingstone avenue 
to Snlveley road; and In Sussex avenue 
from Kenilworth avenue to Snlveley 
road and thence In Snlveley road to the 
sewer in Victoria street, and It is 
hereby ordered that said sower be con- 
structed. 

Resolved further. That said improve- 
ment be made by contract, that thr 
clerk advertise for bids for making 
of said Improvement, that the c^st 
thereof be paid out of the permanent 
improvement revolving fund and that 
an assessment be levied In accordance 
with the provisions of the city charter 
on the property benefited by said Im- 
provement, according to the benefits 
received, to defray the cost '>f such 
Improvement and sucli other expenses 
as under the provisions of said charter 
may be assessed. 

Commissioner Murchlson moved the 
adoption of the resolution and It was 
declared adopted upon tho following 
vote: 

Yeas — Commissioners Hicken, Mer- 
ritt, Murchlson. Voss, Mayor Prince — 6. 

Nays — None. 

Passed April 28, 1918 

Approved April 30, 1918. 

By Commissioner Murchison: 

Resolved, That the supplemontftry 



assessment levied to defray the ex- 
pense of constructing a sanitary sewer 
In Third stieet from a point 300 feet 
east of Twenty-sixth avenue east to 
Twenty-ninth avenue east; thence In 
Twenty-ninth avenue east to Second 
street be and hereby is confirmed. 

Resolved, further. That the city au- 
ditor 1« hereby authorized to audit 
vouchers in favor of the owners of lots 
in blocks 8 and 4, Gordon-Whiting's 
division, to effect a refund of the 
excess of the amount of the assess- 
ment levied against said lots Feb. 
24, 1913, over tne cost of constructing 
a sanitary sewer in Second street from 
Twenty-ninth avenue east to the sewer 
In Parkslde avenue. 

Commissioner Murchison moved the 
adoption of the resolution and it was 
declared adopted upon the following 
vote: 

Yeaa — Commissioners Hicken, Mer- 
ritt, Murchlson, Voss, Mayor Prince — 5. 

Nays — None. 

Passed April 28. 1913. 

Approved April 30. 1913. 

By Mayor Prince: 

Resolved. That the plat of Home 
Acres, Second division, be and hereby 
is approved and accepted. 

Mayor Prince moved the adoption of 
the resolution and It was declared 
adopted upon the following vote: 

Yeas — Commissioners Hlckf^n. Mer- 
ritt. Murc'ilson, Voss, Mayor Prince — 5. 

Nays — None. 

Passed April 28, 1918. 

Approved April 30, 1913, 

By Commissioner Hicken: 

Resolved, That licenses to sell in- 
toxicating liquors be and hereby are 
granted and bonds accompanying same 
are hereby approved, as follows: 

Rady Orllch at No. 5516 Raleigh 

Henry Casmlr at No. 505 West Michi- 
gan street. 

I. Goldberg at No. 601 West Supe- 
rior street. 

William Wiski at No. 216 Lake ave- 
nue south. 

Forrest Maloney at No. 332 North 
Central avenue. 

W. P. Wlieaton at No. 228 Lake ave- 
nue south, being a transfer from No. 
222 Lake avenue south. 

Commissioner Hicken moved the 
adoption of the resolution and It was 
declared adopted upon the following 
vote: 

Yeas — Commissioners Hicken, Mer- 
ritt. Murchlson, Voss, Mayor Prince — 5. 

Nays — None. 

Passed April 28, 1913. 

Approved April 30, 1913. 

By Commissioner Hicken: 

Resolved That licenses are hereby 
granted and bonds accompanying same 
are hereby approved as follows: 
EMPLOYMENT OFFICES FOR MEN. 

Olund-Engberg Employment com- 
pany at No. 505 West Michigan street. 

Standard Employment company at 
No. 529 West Michigan street. 

Duluth Employment company at No. 
523 V- West Michigan street. 

Mutual Labor Exchange at No. 419 
West Michigan street. 

N'.O. Sundby at No. 523 West Michi- 
gan street. 

Empire Employment company at NO. 
521 West Michigan street. 

POOL AND BILLIARD TABLES. 

Ous Economos at No. 214 West Su- 
perior street. ^ ^ . 

John Schramel at No. 5501 Grand 
avenue west. 

Jacob J. Forsman at No. 336 Lake 
! avenue south. 

PLUMBERS. 

A. J. Archambo at No. 829 East Su- 
perior street. 

PAWN BROKERS. 

William Goldstein at No. 501 West 
Michigan street. 

Resolved, That application of Swan 
Carlson for license to conduct employ- 
ment office for men at No. 411 Vi West 
Michigan street be and hereby Is de- 
nied. ^ ^, 

Commissioner Hicken moved the 
adoption of the resolution, and it was 
declared adopted upon the following 
vote: 

Yeas — Commissioners Hicken, Mer- 
ritt Murchison. Vods. Mayor Prince — 5. 

Nays — None. 

Passed April 28. 1913. 

Approved April 30, 1913. 

Bv Commissioner Voss: 

"Resolved. That requisitions of city 
officers and departments Nos. 3410 to 
3485 Inclusive, be and hereby are ap- 
proved. 

Commissioner Voss moved the adop- 
tion of the resolution, and it was de- 
clared adopted upon the following 
vote: 

Yeas — Commissioners Hlcken. Mer- 
ritt. Voss. Murchlson. Mayor Prince — 5. 

Nays — None. 

Passed April 28. 1913. 

Approved April 30, 1913. 

By Commissioner Murchison: 

Resolved. That the city attorney Is 
hereby requested to advise this council 
as to whether or not it could enforce 
the provisions of an ordinance requir- 
ing property owners to lay water and 
gas mains and the necessary connec- 
tions in streets a year or two before 
the same are improved, and If not, 
could the city do the work of laying 
such connections from the mains to 
the property line, and assess the bene- 
fits thereof \o the property benefited. 

Resolved further. That if the city at- 
torney find that either of these courses 
can be followed, he draft a suitable 
ordinance providing for the same. 

Commissioner Murchlson moved the 
adoption of thv^ resolution, and It was 
declared adopted, upon the following 
vote: 

Yea.s — Commissioners Hlcken. Mer- 
ritt. Murchison, Voss, Mayor Prince — 6. 

Nave — None. 

Passed April 28. 1913. 

Approved April 30, 1913. 

By Commissioner Voss: 

Resolved. That the city treasurer Is 
hereby directed to receive from the 
owner of lot 353. block 155, Duluth 
proper. Second division, the amount of 
the original assessment levied against 
said property for the construction of a 
sidewalk provided the same is paid 
within fifteen days from the date of 
the passage of this resolution and fur- 
ther provided the owner shall at the 
same time pay the sum of $1.50, the es- 
timated cost of the publication of this 
resolution. 

Resolved further. That upon such 
payment being made the city auditor is 
hereby directed to notify the county 
auditor of such fact. 

Commissioner Voss moved the adop- 
tion of the resolution and it was de- 
clared adopted upon the following 
vote: 

Yeas — Commissioners Hlcken, Mer- 
ritt, Murchison, Voss, Mayor Prince — 5. 

Nays — None. 

Passed April 28. 191S. 

Approved April 30, 1913. 

MISCELLANEOUS BUSINESS. 
By Mayor Prince: 

Resolved. That the following be and 
hereby are appointed as members' of 
the civil service board: 

H. W. Cheadle to serve for six years, 
J. L. CJromwell to serve for four years 
and W. B. Getchell to serve for two 
years. 

Mayor Prince moved the adoption of 
the resolution and It was declared 
adopted upon the following vote: 

Yeas — Commissioners Hlcken. Mer- 
ritt, Murchison. Voss. Mayor Prince — 5. 

Nays — None. 

Passed April 28, 1913. 

Approved April SO, 1913. 

On motion of Commissioner Hicken 
the council adjourned to meet Monday, 
May 4. at 3 o'clock p. m. 

C. S. PALMER. 

Clerk. 



force and take effect thirty days after 
its passage and publication. 
Passed — April 25. 1913. 
Approved — April 26. 1913. 

W. L PRINCE, 

Mayor. 



Attest: 

C. s. PALMEm, 
Clerk. 



^1 



ORDINANCE NO. 819. 
By Commissioner Murchison; 
AN ORDINANCE TO APPROPRIATE 

FROM THE GENERA 1. FUND THK 

SUM OF |2.)00 TO BE USED FOR 

THE PITRCHASE OF ROAD OIL 

FOR SPRINKLING DURING THB 

SEASON 1913. 
The City of Duluth Does Ordain: 

Section 1. That there be and here- 
by Is appropriated from the general 
fund of the city of Duluth the sum of 
$2,000 to be used for the purchase of 
road oil for sprinkling during the sea- 
son 1913. 

Sec. 2. This ordinance shall take 
effect and be in force thirty days after 
its passage and last publication. 

Passed — April 25, 1913. 

Approved — April 26, 1913, 

W. l. PRINCE. 

Mayor. 
Attest: 

C. S. PALMER. 

Cierk. ! 



ORDINANCE NO 320. 
By Commissioner Murchlson- 
AN ORDINANCE TO APPROPRIATH! 
FROM THE GENERAL FITND THE 
SUM OF $15,000.00 TO BE USP:D 
FOR SPRINKLING WITH WATER 
DURING THE SEA.SON 1918. 
The City of Duluth Does Ordain- 

Section 1. That there be and here- 
by is appropriated from the general 
fund of the city of Duluth the sum ot 
$15,000.00 to be used for the payment 
of ali expense connected witli the 
sprinkling of the streets of the city 
with water during the season 1913. 

Sec. 2. This ordinance shall take 
effect and be in force thirty days after 
its passage and last publication. 
Passed — April 25, 1913. 
Approved — April 26, 1913 

W. I. PRINCE, 

._ ^ Mayor. 

Attest: 

C. S. PALMER. 

Clerk. 



ORDINANCE NO. 318. 
By Commissioner Merritt: 

AN ORDINANCE TO APPROPRIATE 
FROM THE PUBLIC UTILITY FITND 
THE SUM OF $958.40 TO PROVIDE 
K>R LIABILITY INSURANCE ON 
THE OPERATION OF THE WATER 
AND LIGHT DEPARTMENT FOR 
THE YEAR BEGINNING .A.PRIL 29. 
1918. 
The City of Duluth Does Ordain: 

Section 1. That there be and la 
hereby appropriated from the public 
utility fund the sum of $958.40 to pro- 
vide for liability Insurance on tho op- 
eration of the water and light depart- 
ment for the year befflnnlngr April 29. 
1918. 
Sec. 2. This ordinance shall be in 



ORDINANCE NO. 321. 
By Commissioner Murchison- 
AN ORDINANCE TO REGULATE THE 
MAKING OF BIDS AND LETTING 
OF CONTRACTS FOR THE DOING 
OF WORK OR F<^R THE FURNISH- 
ING OF MATKRI.\L ( »R PROPERTY 
TO THE CITY OF DULUTH 
The City of Duluth Does Ordain: 

.Section 1. In ali cases of work to 
be done by contract, or for the pur- 
chase of property of any kind, when 
the probable and estimated amount in- 
volved Is more than one hundred dol- 
lars ($100), and l-ss than one thousand 
dollars ($1,000). a ten (10) days' no- 
tice shall be given by one (1) adver- 
tisement In the official paper of the 
city of Duluth of the time when and 
the place where bids for the doing of 
such work or the furnishing of such 
material shall be received. 

Sec. 2. In all cases of work to he 
done by contract, or for the purchase 
of property of any kind, when the 
estimated and probable amount in- 
volved is over one thousand dollars 
($1,000). a ten (10) days' notice shall 
be given by two (2) advertisements In 
the official paper of the city of Duluth 
of the time when and the place where 
bids for the doing of such work or the 
furnishing of such material shall be 
received. 

Sec. 3. The notice herein required 
to be given shall substantially de- 
scribe the work to be done or the ma- 
terial or property to be purchased, and 
such other particulars as may be nec- 
essary, and shall designate the time 
and place, when and where .ecaled bids 
shall be received therefor. Such no- 
tices shall be signed by the clerk tn 
the name of the city of Duluth and 
also by the commissioner of the di- 
vision under which said work is to be 
done or material or prop-rty to ba 
furnished, or by the mayor, as the 
case may be. 

Sec. 4. All bids and proposals shall 
be addressed to the city of Duluth and 
marked in the care of the commission- 
er or mayor, as the case may be, hav- 
ing supervision of the division under 
which said work is to be done, or to 
which material or property is to be 
furnished, and deposited with such 
commissioner or mayor, as the case 
may be. and there shall be written on 
the envelope containing such bid a 
statement showing the work covered 
by the bid, or the property or mate- 
rial covered by the bid. 

Sec. 5. Each bid for the doing of 
such work or the furnishing of such 
material or property, as the case may 
be, shall be accompanit-d by a check 
for at least ten per cent (10%) of the 
amount of the bid, certified by some 
bank authorized to do business in the 
state of Minne.<»ota and payable to the 
order of the treasurer of the city of 
Duluth. Any bid not accompanied by 
such check shall be absolutely void, 
and shall not be considered, exceot 
that the bidder may in lieu of tho 
furnishing of such certified check pay 
directly io the city treasurer of the 
city of Duluth, prior to the time stated 
in the notice or notices hereinbefore 
referred to for the opening of such 
bids. In currency, an amount equal to 
at least ten per cent (10'~o) of the 
amount bid for the doing of such work 
or the furnishing of such material or 
property, as the case may be. 

Sec. 6. All bids shall be publicly 
rpened by the commissioner or mayor. 
as the case may be, having supervision 
of the division under which said work 
is to be done or to which material or 
property is to be furnished, at the time 
and place to be fixed by such com- 
missioner or mayor, which time and 
place shall be stated in the notice or 
notices required by this ordinance to 
be given. 

Sec. T. In case the bid of any bidder 
is accepted and the bidder neglects or 
refuses to enter into a contract with 
the city of Duluth. his certified check, 
or the amount deposited with the tre.as- 
urer of the city of Duluth (shall, with- 
out any further act on the part of the 
city of Duluth. be forfeited absolutely 
to the city of Duluth as liquidated 
damages. In case any bid Is rejected 
the certified chtck accompanying tho 
same, or the amount deposited -with 
the treasurer of the city of Duluth, as 
the case may be. shall be returned to 
the bidder furnlshinjf such check or 
depo.«»itlng such amount, as the case 
may be. 

Sec. 8. In case any bid is accepted, 
the city council of the city of Duluth 
shall pass a resolution awarding the 
contract for the doing of such work 
or the furnishing of such material or 
property. a..s the case may be, to the 
i5ucce8.'»ful bidder, who shall be the 
lowest responsible bidd-r, provided, 
however, that the city council may re- 
ject any and all bids. 

Sec. 9. In case of the awarfl of any 
contract In accordance with the 
sealed bid or proposal therefdr. a writ- 
ten contract In accordinance therewith 
shall be drafted by the city attorney 
and execut'^d in legal form by the suc- 
cessful bidder, signed .ind approved hv 
the mayor. attested bv the clerk. 
courtersljKnod by the auditor, approved 
by the commissioner or mayor having 
supervision of the division under w^hlch 
the work Is to be done or the niaff»rlal 
or property to be furnished, as the 
case may be. and approved as to ror- 
leetness, form and validity by the clty 
Rttorney 

Sec. ift. Before any contract what- 
ever for the dolnr of any public work 
or the furnishing of any material or 
property to the city of Duluth is en- 
tered Into by the city, when the 
amount Involved is more than two 
hundred dollars ($200). the contractor 
therefor shall enter Into a bond with 
the city of Duluth. which bond !«hall. 
in the case of a contract for the doing 
of public work, conform to the rs- 
oulrements of the laws of the state of 
Minne.«;ota relatlnic to such bonds, and 
Which bond shall, in the case of the 
furnishing of material or property. b« 
conditioned for the full performance 
of such contract In accordance with 
Its terms, and for yavlnpr the citj* ot 
Duluth harmless from all cbsta, 
charges, damages and lo.«!s of any kind 
that may Krow out of the matter cov- 
ered by such contract, and for com- 
pliance with all the requirements of 
the law, 

Thp pennlty of such bond shall be 
not less than the contract varies. 

Every such bond shall bf» the bond 
of a surety oompany, which stirety 





I 





20 



Thursday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 




May 1. 1913. 



companv shall held a certitlcatc from 
the Insurance commlssi«.ner of the 
Btate of Minnesota, stating that it Is 
authorized to contract as surety on 
bonds in the state of Minnesota, ex- 
cept that on resolution of the city \ 
council, passed by a 



jiLctffi anil repvrtrd 



I ClBiai« r<st»t«-(l 

i rHvidniliK left with ouinp&ny to acciimu- 

I late 

Preniiui>u p^U in Atlvanca 

> DlviOeiuls due ur apportlonetl policyhoM 

*" 

four-fifths vote, I fi>.\aiue<l Interoet «nd rent ytJd In ad- 

nersL.nal sureties may bo allowed; and! lanc-e 

every such bond shall bo duly signed ! Ml other iuh.iit»«. 

and acknowledged by the contractor 

and surety, and every such bond 

shall be approved by the city 

attorney and by the treasurer 

of the city of Duluth. and 8hail be 

filed with the treasurer of the city of 

Duluth: and a copy of such bond shall 

be filed with the contract In the tifr'f* 

of the auditor of the city of Duluth 



C890 M ' 
S9.*IS6.!il I 

I 

6.:S5.S2 
U.lU.Z-i 

l,Sl)i40o.41 

OS.fiOO .19 
oH.OOl.M 



Total liabilities on polU^holders' ac- 
count $ 21.619.M8.46 



BUY TWO 
OR THREE 
ACRES AT 



EXETER FARMS 



IT WILL 
MAKE YOU 
MONEY 



ALLIANCE REAL ESTATE CO., Lonsdale BIdg. 



Capital »tock paid tip $ 



100. 000. 00 



Vnawlinietl fuiufci ixurplmn t 180.410.73 

EXHIBIT OF POLICIES. 1912 BUSINESS. 

No. Amount. 

Pi. Holes In force at end of pre- 

and'shan-be^open to"the inspection of - p^- '^'-;^«^-^;^' TlL''''' ' '''''''''' 
*^Sec. 11 No part of thl.c ordinance! "« ^.255 68.5S8.12600 



ehallbe deemed to apply to the pur 
chase by the city of Duluth of real 
croperty. . . • 

Sec 12. All ordinances and parts or 
ordinances inconsistent herewith are 
hereby repealed. ♦„u.,^ 

Sec 13. This ordinance shall take 
effect and be in force thirty days after 
its passHKO and publication. 

Passed April 25, 1913. 

Approved April 26.^,1513^^^^,^^ 

Attest: Mayor. 

C. S. PALMER. 
Clerk. 

ORDTNANCB NO. 322. 

Bv Comtnlssloner Voss: , . „^ 

AV OUniNVNTE TO APPROPRIATE 
FROM THK OENKRAL FUND THE 
SUM OF $64}i.oo TO PAY FOR BONDS 
of' city OFFICIALS OTHER THAN 
COMMISSIONERS. 
The City of Duluth Does Ordain: 

Section 1. That there be and here- 
by i'^ appropriated from the i^enerai 
ftind the sum of $fi48.O0 to provide for the 
payment of bonds for city officials oth- 
f-r'than commissioners. ^ ■, . 

«!ec 2 This ordinance shall taK<» 
effect and be in force thirty days after 
its passage and last publication. 
PaPfod April 2S. 1?>13 
Approved April 20. 1913. _,^,^„ 
^ W. I. PRINCE. 

Attest: Mayor. 

r 8. PALMER, 

Cltv Clerk. 
D H.. May 1. 1918. T) 771. 



Net Increase 1,32T 

Net iitCT^iLt» f 

iMUed, revived and Increased 



Tttal 



No. 



named District Court, duly made and 
filed in the above entitled matter, no- 1 
tlce is hereby K'ven you: j 

That the undersigned Marko Kos- 
anovlc. as administrator de bonis non 
of the estate of Sam Kosanovlc, de- 
ceased, has in his possession a certain 
Eum of money received by him as 
damages on account of the wrongful 
42,469.00 death of said decedent. 

That an application has been made 

. to the District Court of St. Louis 
during the year 3.«40 $ e.445>.fll,vOO bounty Eleventh Judicial District of 

'*' "^BU^mE^^m'mNL'F^OTi'm tVi '^ Minnesota, for an order allowinf; and 

BUSINESS IN MINNESOTA IN "9'2-^^^^_^^ adjusting all attorney's fees ami other 

expenses incurred in connection with 
1.171,442.00 the collection and distribution of said 
181.315.00 fund, as creditors, or otherwise, and 
authorizing and directing the under- 
, T^IkISSS , signed representative to distribute 
i,ii8.54.j.oo gg^i^ fy^^ j^ accordance with such de- 
termination. 

That said application will be 
brought on for hearing before said 
court, at a special term thereof, to bo 
held in the County Court House at 
Duluth, Minnesota, on the 31st day of 
May. A. D. 1913. at 9:30 o'clock in the 
forenoon of said day, or as soon there- 
after as counsel can be heard, at which 
time and place all persons interested 




Policies in furce at beginning vt 

llu- yvat 616 $ 

Issued during the year 96 

I'eaaed to be in force during the 
year 82 

In force Dec. 81 last 6S0 



I WOJBW buys an slegant rMldeno* 00 
; BjuBt First street; 10 rooms; bot 



I»we8 and clalma Incurred during the 
year I 49.950.20 

Loaaes and clalma aettled during the 
year 49.950.20 

RereiTCd for premlume $ 32,220.40 



State of Minnesota. Depftrtment of Insurance. 

I HerKhy Certify. That the Annual .StAtement of 



UporiunHy 



ADDITIONAL WANTS 

FROM PAGES 21 and 22 



FOR SALE— REALESTATE 



FOR SALE. 



Watir heat 
iftw4d oak 



two bath*; quarter- 
tiim; house. %l<inf 



worth more than prlqe "*«d, ^^ 
wholft propert/; lot 60*140 fsati 
ftn additional JO f«et may be had 



If desired. 



the MaiUiaitan Life Insurance company, for tlie year | '"'x. _ «iiBtr-lhiitinn of said fund mav 
eniUng December 81. 191J. of which Uie aboie la an in the ,a»8trlbiatlon ^\^/«^<{,/"^" I"H 
»h«trnct has i»en r««ive<i »nd filed in this Ueoart- assert their claims, and will be nearu 



abtitrnct, has lieeii recelve<l and filed in llils depart- 
ment and duly approved hy me. 

J. A O. PRKfS. 
Commissioner of Insurance. 



CITY NOTICKS. 

"oft^'k^^Tvf^the'city clerk. 

Citv of Duluth. May 1, 1913. 
• fice Is" hereby given that a sup- 
ontarv assessment levied to de- 
fi.iv the "expense of constructing a 
sanitarv sewer In Third street from a 
point 300 feet east of Twenty-sixth 
avenue east to Twenty-ninth avenue 
east; thence In Twenty-ninth avenue 
eant to Pecond street has been duly 
confirmed by the council of the city 
of Duluth and Is payable at the city 
treasurer's- office at anv time within 
forty days from the publication of this 
notice and unless the same is so paid 
before June 10, 191."?, or an application 
is made to the council signed by the 
owner of the property assessed for 
extension of time of paymen* of same 
as provided In section 68 of the charter 
of the cltv of Duluth on or before May 
31. 191."?. a penalty of 10 per cent will 
be added to such assessment. 

C. S. PALMER, 

Clerk. 
D. H., M ay 1. 1913. D 772. 

PROPOSALS WANTED— 

Sealed bids will be received by the 
Commissioner of Public Safety In and 
for the corporation of the City of Du- 
luth. Minnesota, at his office in the 
Citv Hall at 11 A. M. on Monday, May 
12 '1913. for the following brands of 
coal: Run of pile, Blacksmith coal, 
Pocohontas coal^ Falrmount coal. Nut 
coal. Pea coal, Stove coal. Coal to be 
delivered as required to the various 
Are halls. Bids to state price per 
month from May 16, 1913 to May 16, 
1914. 

A certified check for ten per cent 
of the amount of bid. payable to the 
city treasurer of the City of Duluth 
must accompany each proposal. 

The City of Duluth reserves the right 
f) reject any and all bids. 

CITY OF DI'LUTH. 
By C. S. PALMER, 

Clerk. 
W. A. HICKEN. 

Commissioner of Public Safety. 
D. H.. May 1 and 2. 1913. D 773. 

' PROP(>SALS WANTED. 

Proposals will be received by the 
Commissioner of Public Safety at his 
office in the City Hall up to 11 A. M 
Monday. May 12th. for furnishing to 
the police department of the city a 
motor cycle, spcclflcatione for which 
are on file In the oflce of the chief of 
police. 

A certified check payable to the 
treasurer of the City of I>uluth for ten 
per cent of the amount of the bid must 
accompany each proposal. 

The City of Duluth reserves the 
right to reject all bids. 

CITY OF DULUTH, MINN.. 

C. S. PALMER, 
W. A. HTCKEN. Clerk. 

Commissioner of Public Safety. 
D H., Mty 1. 1913. D 774. 

.^lanhattnn Life Insurance Company. 

rrir.cipnl cfflce: .Vow York, N. Y. (Organized !n 
IS.'.O. ^ .Morris W. Torrey, pr«5.1deiit; Melvln D« Mott, 
nfcrettry. .Mtomey to accept serrlce lu Minnesota: 
t'ommlssloner of Insurance. 

CASH CAPITAb »10A.OOO.OO. 
INCOME IN 1912. 

First year's premlum.« I 161,801.18 

PividPiKiii and surrender values ai>pHed 
tu purcliase i>ald-up Insurance and 

aiUiUlties 6.218.19 

(• ' ' - •' rr>r original annuities, and 
'■ ctiilracts, InvoUlng life 

, ^ 7.1T3.83 

Henewal premluma 1.M5.729.27 



LKGAL NOTICES. 

oi;der Foi: hearing on claims— 

Stale of Minnesota, County of St. 

Louis, 

In Probate Court. 
In the Matter of the Estate of Henry 

Bielli, Decedent: 

LETTERS TESTAMENTARY this day 
having been granted to Teodolinda 
Bielli, 

IT IS ORDERED, That the time 
within which all creditors of the above 
named decedent may present claims 
against his estate in this Court, be, 
and the same hereby is. limited to six 
months from and after the date hereof; 
and that the 4th day of November, 
1913, at ten o'clock A. M., in the Pro- 
bate Court Rooms, at the Court House 
at Duluth in said County, be and the 
same hereby is, fixed and appointed as 
the time and place for hearing upon 
the examination, adjustment and al- 
lowance of such claims as shall be 
presented within the time aforesaid. 

Let notice hereof be given by the 
publication of this order in The Duluth 
Herald as provided by law. 

Dated at Duluth. Minn.. April 30th, 
1913. 

S. W. GILPIN, 
Judge of Probate. 
(Seal, Probate Court, St. Louis Co., 

Minn.) 
EDMOND INGALLS. 

Attorney for Representative. 
504-506 Torrey Bldg-. Duluth, Minn. 
D. H.. May 1, 8, 15, 1913. 



D. 



I 
I 

I 

I 

I ,. , , 

' »»,50<rVuys~'ft dojble house on Ei 
Superior street: 9 rooms each 
house; two hot -water heatlnf 
plant*; fireplaces; laundries; quaf- 
ter-dawed oi.k trim; annuel 
Income 11,200; building could not 
b« dupUoated for $11,000; M.600 
oaah, "'' 

fld.SOO buys a brick fiat building 
in Bast end; tijree six-room flats; 
oak finish 1 separate hot water 
plamts; laundiles and fireplacesj 
a bargain. 



Crescent View, lot 87 by 146. on Fourth 
street and Thirty-seventh avenue 
east; ?B00 down, balance to suit. 

Three lots. 76 by 226, West end, near 
Piedmont avenue; fl,T00, terms. 

Superior street business or factory 
space Twenty-first avenue west and 
Superior street; rental receipts $300 
annually; will sell reasonably for 
cash. 



Lot 25 by 140, West Duluth, Sixty-first 
avenue, south of car line, toward 
boathouse; $350 at $100 down, $10 
per month. 

Lot 17, Endion division rearrangement; 
$700 at $50 down, $10 per month. 
This is near Twenty-fourth avenue 
east, south of London road. 

Lot on Thirty-ninth avenue west and 
Fourth street; $700. at half down, 
balance to suit. 



PERSONAL 



8-^ 



Total premlwn Incumfl $ 

TtJ'nts and Interests 

s»le. msturlty or adjuat- 

, -r a-osets 

1..; ..: .b.. ic.i. vsiih company at InteiMt. 
From all other sources 



2.131,011.41 
1.040,&84.73 

12,945.76 

2,047.75 

11.577.32 



MOREGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE— 

Default having been made in the 
payment of the sum of Five hundred 
Eighty-seven and no-100 Dollars, which 
is claimed to be due and Is due at the 
date of this notice upon a certain 
Mortgage, duly executed and delivered 
by Dominic Jerome and Rosa Jerome, 
hia wife, Mortgagors, to Fltger Brew- 
ing Company, a corporation. Mort- 
gagee, bearing date the 2Bth day of 
November, 1907, and with a power of 
sale therein contained, duly recorded 
In the office of the Register of Deeds 
In and for the County of St. Louis and 
State of Minnesota, on the 2nd day 
of December, 1907, at 1:30 o'clock P.M., 
in Book 246 of Mortgages, on page 238, 
and no action or proceeding having 
been Instituted, at law or otherwise, to 
recover the debt secured by said Mort- 
gage or anv part thereof. 

NOW, TilEREFORE, NOTICE IS 
HEREBY GIVEN. That by virtue of 
the power of sale contained in said 
Mortgage, and pursuant to the statute 
in such case made and provided, the 
said Mortgage will be foreclosed by a 
sale of the premises described in and 
conveyed by said Mortgage, viz: 

Lot Seventeen (17), Block Twenty- 
five (26). Re-arrangement of the First 
Division to the Village now the CMty 
of Eveloth. according to the recorded 
Plat thereof, excepting minerals, In bt. 
Louis County and State of Minnesota, 
with hereditaments and appurtenances; 
which sale will be made by the Sheriff 
of said St. Louis County at his office 
In the Court House, In the City of 
Duluth. in said County and State, on 
the Second day of June, 1918, at 10 
o'clock A. M., of that day, at public 
vendue, to the highest bidder for cash, 
to pay said debt and interest, and the 
taxes. If any, on said premises, and 
Fifty Dollars, Attorney's fees, as stipu- 
lated in and bv said Mortgage In case 
of foreclosure, and the disbursements 
allowed by law: subject to redemption 
at any time within one year from the 
day of sale, as provided by law. 

Dated April Ifith, A. D. 1913. 
FITGER BREWING COMPANY, 

Mortgagee. 
Bv P, S. ANN EKE. Sec. 
P C. SCHMIDT. 

Attorney. 
D. H., April 17, 24. May 1, 8, 15, 21, 1913. 



EXAMINE FINAL AC- 
County of St. 



Trtal Income $ 3,108,566.09 

t.«<lger i-fjiets Dec. 31 of previous year.. 21.288.120.54 



Sum » 24,486,687.53 

DISBURSEMENTS DURING 1912. 

I>«ath claUii« and ra.ii.jrwl endow nient.s.$ 1,403.769.51 
' vuilfles and premium notes voided by 

..;.<.«> 16,755.64 

V ..'cr values to polloyliolden 419.674.03 

to [-^.lloyholders 2.14. 651. .I? 

>t- left with ccuipany 2. 047.75 



Total paid piillcyholilers t 

T . ."- held on (itposlt sunendered 

:he year 

•■ -tiicklioldera 

::.d bonuses to agents flrst 

; im 

' i:» on renewal* 

> :i4 on annuities 

f...,;;.a;<;a reiiewal and commissions. .. . 
.\.->riry supervision and branch office 



xamlner's fees and Inspection 

f otftcera and employes 

; . . rr.*en 

(.r"^ l<»>^« in sale, maturity or adjust- 
ment of ledger assets 

Rrpalrt and espen-^es on real estate. . . . 
Ail I'tlier dlsburseraoiils 



2,070,898.52 

572.58 
21,000.00 

72.801.91 

122.028.75 

122.70 

40rt.00 

40.525.73 

i.s.nso.ga 

104,154.62 
12.638.11 

178..'i«rt.27 
W5.780.r,| 

24S.02«i.4'J 



of Ora 



ToUl dLibutsementa I 2,988.874.27 

balance $21,477,813.26 

LEDGER ASSETS DEC. 31, 1913. 

Val.ie of real estate owned $ 5.279,78.'i.71 

Mortgage loans 7,08.i.CT'>.OO 

I'romlum notes and policy loans 4.212,3*1. .17 

H'inds and .stocks o»'ned .1,657,173.30 

(a.-h. In office, tanks and trust rom- 

lanies 321.r.2!>.42 

Ullls recclvat»le and agents' balances 21,267.26 



Total kdger assets (as per ba1an';eK.$ 21,477,813.26 
NON-LEDGER ASSETS. 

Interest and reiitj: diip tO anruf.1 . . 40'>,8ti8.IG 
Market value of real estate over bo'* 

.alue 78.414.19 

Net defrrreil and uitpald premiums 170.101t.39 



GiOds avseU $ 22.132.205.10 

DEDUCT ASSETS NOT ADMITTED. 

Agents' d<bll ndlai.ce.s $ 22,108.59 

Hook value of ledger as.sets over market 

value 210."0'>.,')0 

All oiiier aiaeta not .vimltted 111.83 



Total assetii not admitted t 



232,725.92 



Total admitted ssseta $ 21,899,470.18 

LIABILITIES DEC. 31. 1912. 

Xrt reserve $ 19.7:?3,777.00 

I'resrnt v.-tlne on supplementary Mnt.acvs 

and ranc; Id policies DS.tiSfl.On 

ClaiuM due snd uf.p vid 5.3j!f.07 

Claiui!< adju:.!cd tnd not due. ar.>l unad- 



FOR STEEL PLANT LOTS SEE 

STEEL PLANT IKVESTMENT CO. 

Central Htste Bank building. Telepbutica. Calu- 
met, 4»^: Cole, 34«X. 

Best Lots, Easiest Prices, Lowest Terms 



ORDER TO 

COU NT- 
State of Minnesota 

Louis — ss. ^ 

In Prohate Court. 
In the Matter of the Estate 

Harvey Walker. Decedent. 

THE PETITION OF Roscoe A. Walk- 
er as representative of the above 
named decedent, together with hiB 
final account of the administration of 
said estate, having been filed In this 
court representing, among other things 
that he has fullv administered said 
estate, and praying that said final ac- 
count of said administration be ex- 
amined, adjusted and allowed by the 
Court, and that the Court make and 
enter its final decree of distribution 
of the residue of the estate of said 
decedent to the persons entitled there- 
to and for the discharge of the rep- 
resentative and the sureties on his 

*^IT IS ORDERED, That said petition 
be heard, and said final account e.\- 
amined, adjusted, and If ^^orrect al- 
lowed by the Court, at the Probate 
Court Rooms in the Court House, in 
the City of Duluth in said County, on 
Mondav, the 26th day of May, 1913. at 
ten o'clock A. M., and all persons in- 
terested In said hearing and in said 
matter are hereby cited and required 
at said time and place to show cause, 
if any there be, why said petition 
should not be granted. 

ORDERED FURTHER, That this or- 
der be served by publication in The 
Duluth Herald according to law and 
by mailing a copy hereof to each heir 
and inttrested party at least 14 days 
before the day for hearing. 

Dated at Duluth. Minn., April 29th, 

'^By the Court, ^ ^ ^^^^^^^ 

Attest .Tudge of Probate. 

ARTHUR E. TEMPLETON, 
Clerk of Probate. , , ^ 
(Seal, Probate Court, St. Louis County, 

Minn.) , ,, ,„.,- 
T>. H., May 1. 8 and 15, 1913. 

STATE OF "MINNESOTA, COUNTY OF 
CROW WING— ,. . , rM 

District Court, Fifteenth Judicial Dis- 
trict. 

Marko Kosanovlc, administra- 
tor de bonis non of the es- 
tate of Sam Kosanovlc, de- 
ceased, . ,^ 

Plaintiff, 
vs. 

Rogers-Brown Ore Company, 
a corporation. 

Defendant. 

Removed to St. I/Ouis County, Minne- 
sota, for the Purpose of Trial and 
,Tudgment. 
To Rade Kosanovlc, and Annie Kos- 
anovlc, heirs at law and next of kin 
of decedent, Sam Kosanovlc; Edgar 
Prochtnk, Imperial and Royal Con- 
sul for Austria-Hungary; Fidelity 
& Deposit Company of Maryland; 
Mican Kosanovlc, and all other per- 
sons interested in the estate of Sam 
Kosanovlc, decedent: 
Pursuant to order of the above 



therein, , . ,, . 

Dated this 16th day of April, A. 
1913. 

MAtlKO KOSANOVIC, 
Administrator de bonis non of the es- 
tate of Sam Kosanovlc. deceased. 
By THEO. HOLLTSTER. 

Attorney. 
THEO. HOLLISTER. 
506 Sellwood Building, 

Attorney for Administrator. 
D. H., April 17, 24. May 1, 1918. 

MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE— 

Default having been made in the pay- 
ment of the sum of Thirteen Hundred 
Ninety-seven and 50-100 Dollars which is 
claimed to be due and is due at the date 
of this notice upon a certain Mortgage, 
duly executed and delivered by John 
S. Chcrne and Agnes Clierne, his wife. 
Mortgagors, to Fitgcr Brewing Com- 
panv, a corporation. Mortgagee, bear- 
lng"date the 10th day of January, 1912, 
and with a power of sale therein con- 
tained, duly recorded In the office of 
the Register of Deeds in and for the 
County of St. Louis and State of Min- 
nesota, on the 24th day of January, 
1912 at 11 o'clock A. M., in Book 298 
of Mortgages, on page 108. and no ac- 
tion or proceeding having been insti- 
tuted, at law or otherwise, to recover 
the debt secured by said Mortgage or 
any part thereof. 

NOW, THEREFORE, NOTICE IS 
HEREBY GIVEN, That by virtue of 
the power of sale contained in said 
Mortgage, and pursuant to the statute 
in such case made and provided, the 
said Mortgage will be foreclosed by a 
sale of the premises described in and 
conveyed by said Mortgage, viz: 

Lot Sixteen (16), Block Twenty (20), 
Virginia, Minnesota, according to the 
recorded plat thereof on file and of 
record in the office of Register of 
Deeds of St. Louis County, excepting 
minerals, in St. Louie County and State 
of Minnesota, with the hereditaments 
and appurtenances; which sale will be 
made bv the Sheriff of said St. Louis 
County "in his office in the Court 
House, in the City of Duluth, in said 
County and State, on the Second day 
of June. 1913, at 10 o'clock A. M., of 
that day, at public vendue, to the high- 
est bidder for cash, to pay said debt 
and Interest, and the taxes, if any. on 
Kaid premises, and Fifty Dollars Attor- 
ney's fees, as stipulated in and by said 
Mortgage in case of foreclosure, and 
the disbursements allowed by law; 
subject to redemption at any time 
within one year from the day of sale, 
as provided by law. 

Dated April 16th, A. D 1913. 
FITGER BREWING COMPANY, 

Mortgagee. 
By P. S. ANNEKE. 

Secretary. 
P. C SCHMIDT, 

Attorney. 
D. H.. April 17, 24, May 1, 8, 15 and 21, 

1913. 

ORDER OF HEARING ON PETITION 

FOR LICENSE TO LEASE LAND BY 

GUARDIAN— 
State of Minnesota, County of St. 

Louis — ss. 

In Probate Court. 
Tn the Matter of the Estate of Ella F. 

Probeck and George R. Probeck, 

Minors. 

THE PETITION OF William F. 
Lawrenz, as representative of the above 
named minors, having been filed in 
this Court, representing, among other 
things, that for reasons stated in said 
petition. It Is necessary and for the 
best interests of the estate of said 
minors and of all persons interested 
therein, to lease certain lands of said 
minors in said petition described and 
praving that license be to said guard- 
ian granted to lease the said land: 

IT IS ORDERED, That said petition 
be heard before this Court, at the Pro- 
bate Court Rooms in the Court House. 
In Duluth. in said County, on Monday, 
the 19th day of May, 1913, at ten 
o'clock A. M., and all persons interested 
in said hearing and in said matter are 
hereby cited and required at said time 
and place to show cause, if any there 
be, why said petition should not be 

ORDERED FITRTHER. That this^j- 
be served by publication in '"*' 



LITTLE & NOLTE CO. 

Bxchanar* BatIMn*. 




IPYOV /IPlE tOONI/SG 

FOR A Store, Flat 

Hovse^Rktory or 

W^rehovseToRemt 

It will Pe^^u 

to Consult Us 

John A. 

Stephenson 

8c CO. 

£&0 W. IMR9T STRCrr 



Half acre two blocks from Piedmont 
avenue. 



See me for more descriptions. 



McNAUGHTON REALTY CO., 
2022 West Superior St. 



FOR SALE— $1,100 THREE 60x140 
foot lots at Lakeside with water, 
sewer and gas, all i)lowed and fer- 
tilized for gardening, splendid soil, 
has small barn. Terms very easy. 
Greenfield Realty company, 310-11 
Columbia Bldg. 



CARLOADS "GOOD FURNITURE 
JuBt received from factory, will be 
sold less than retail prices; your old 
furniture taken as part payment; we 
repair, refinish, reupholster furniture 
for little money; large assortmeiit 
coverings, tapestries, leathers. Imi- 
tation leathers. The Furniture Ex- 
change and West end upholstering 
shop, 2201 West First street. 

PERSONAL— DON'T RUIN YOUR RUGS 
by beating them when the Sweeper- 
Vac will clean them better with less 
effort, and time. "Phone for free dem- 
onstration. The Moore Co. Mel. 3248: 
Grand 2054-Y. 319 West First stree t 

Personal — Ladies — Ask your druggist 
for Chichester Pills, the Diamond 
Brand. For 25 years known as best, 
safest, always reliable. Take no 
other Chichester Diamond Brand Pills 
are sold by druggists everywhere. 

Personal — Free to ladies — Remove su- 
perfluous hair from face, arms, neck 
and shoulders quickly by simple 
treatment. Send today for free sample 
and particulars. F. L, Engelking, 
Dept. 12, 1329 Minn, av., Duluth Minn. 

PERSONAL — TO WHOM IT MAY 
conern: This Is to certify that 1 will 
not be responsible for debts that my 
wife contracts. (Signed), 

A. L. OAGNON. 



POULTRY AND EGGS. 



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FOR SALE— $750 FOR 50x140 FOOT 
lot on the upper side of Regent 
street near Forty-third avenue east; 
beautiful building spot. Greenfield 
Realty company, 310-11 Columbia 
Bldg. 

FOR SALE BY OWNER, THREE 
choicest adjoining lots In Crosly 
Park addition. Cheap for cash. Act 
quick! Write H. A. Berg, Fosston, 
Minn. 



FOR SALE— LOT 100 BY 140 FEET, 
two blocks north of car line, corner 
of Robinson at Forty-first avenue 
east. S. O. Atkins. Melrose 4900. 



FOR SALE— LOTS TWO BLOCKS 
from W'oodland car line; $200 apiece, 
$10 down and $5 a montn; if inter- 
ested. Call Grand 971. 



STRYKER, 
MANLEY & BUCK 

Tmre} Building, 

1400 cagh and $25 per month for good home en 
the RouleTard drlTCi; seven rooms and bath, 
furnace, elecUlc Ilalit nnd iras, hardwood floors, 
fireplace; comer lot 58 by IM) feet: prire, 
$:iO<*0. (5674) 

$100 cash B»d $15 per month. 8-room house; 
gtone fcindatlon, Jlly wat*r, electric Hcht, 
hairdwood floors <Vn»n»talrs; on Fourth street, 
near Indlne; $1,250. (6225) 

$500 cash and $25 par month. 4-room cottage, 
with city water and e«wer. electric Hght. hanl- 
wocd floor* 'fine 50 by 14(t-fo<ji comer lot, one 
block from East Ninth street car line: $2,100. 

(5425) 



FOR SALE— FOUR GOOD LOTS IN 
Upper Duluth, or will exchange for 
St. Paul property. L. T. Roberts, 
White Bear, Minn. 



WANTED— TO BORROW $1,000 FROM 
private party; security house and lot 
in city; long time loan, or can agree 
to take up loan at any time on tlilrty 
days' notice. Address J 472, Herald. 

PERSONAL — Get away from washday 
troubles by sending your family wash 
to us; 5o per pound. Lutes' Laundry, 
808 East Second st reet. Both 'phones. 

PERSONAL — When your feet a<"he with 
corns, bunions, Ingrowing nails, etc., 
pee Mrs. Dr. Bahr, at the Comfort 
Beauty parlors, 20 W. Superior St. 



PERSONAL — LET GEORGE DO IT» 
clean your hat; it will look like new. 
Get your shoes shined here, best In 
city. 215 West Superior street. 



PERSONAL — SWEATING, BURNING, 
offensive feet and bodies Instantly 
relieved; sample treatment free. Ad- 
dress Box 251, Bayfield, Wis. 

PERSONAL — I will take off your storm 
windows and do your carpenter 
work on short notice. Melrose 5484. 

PERSONAI^— THE DOOR IS OPEN 
without trouble to the man left home 
6:30 Monday mornin g. Anxious wife. 

MRS. AMANDA SHOGREN WILL CALL 
at your home; gives first-class and 
latest massages. Grand 2178-D. 



FOR SALE —A BIG SNAP ON A COR- 
ner lot three blocks from steel 
plant; easy terras. Address X. B, 200, 
Herald. 

FOR SALE — LOT BETWEEN THIR- 
tv-elghth and Thirty-ninth avenue 
west. Call 3824 West Sixth street. 

FOR SALE— GARY LOT IN VERY 
best location; exceptional bargain. 
Address W 469, Herald. 

For Sale — 2% -acre wooded lot, near 
Woodland. $200. Whitney Wall Co. 



GOTTHAT FARM YET? 

FINE SPRING FOR FARMING! 

We have some very <holce Farms, 
best ol locations. 

Here Is a Dandy Ciuiip Spot on 
a beautiful lake, one mile to depot; 
fine fishing; good shore — $15 per 
acre. 

We have goccl farms all around 
Duluth. 

WHITNEY WALL CO 

301 Torrey BuildlnK. 



FOR RENT— COTTAGE ON PARK 
Point, suitable for summer and win- 
ter, in good condition. Melr ose 2941. 

FOR RENT— FOUR AND FIVE-ROOM 
cottages on Park Point. Melrose 502C. 



jCODAKS^ND^AMERAS^ 

THE"'oWir''STUDIOr^ 
Photo postcards, 3 for 25c. Enlarging 
and kodak flnl«hlng films developed, 
any size, lOo per roll. FREE Instruc- 
tion given to get the best pictures 
from your kodak. 220 W. Superior St. 



der 



The 



Duluth Herald according to law. 

Dated at Duluth, Minn., April 23rd, 

1913. 

Bv the Court. 

^ FRANCIS A. W^ATKINS, 

Judee of Probate of Carlton County, 

Acting Judge of Probate of St. Louis 

County, Minn. 

'^ARTHUR E. TEMPLETON, 

Clerk of Probate. „ , , _ 
(Seal, Probate Court, St. Louis County, 

BALDWIN & BALDWIN, 
Duluth, Minn., 

Attorneys for Petitioner. 
D H April 24. May 1 and 8, 1913. 



EXAMINE FINAL AC- 
County 



of St. 



WANTED! 

Applications for 

Real Estate Loans 



Any amount Rates B, 5% and 
6 per cent. <Jn or before priv- 
ileges. Money on liand. No 
delay. 

Cooiey & Underhfll Co., 

200-210-211 i:xehanBe Bldg. 




ORDER TO 

COUNT— 
State of Minnesota. 

IjOuIs — ss. ^ 

In Probate Court. 
In the Matter of the Estate of Joseph 

H Erickson. Decedent. 

THE PETITION OF Andrew Peter- 
son as representative ^f ♦hi, ^■^o^'^ 
named decedent, together with his final 
acrount of the administration of said 
estate, having been filed in this court 
representing, among other things that 
he has fully administered said estate, 
and praying that said final account of 
said administration be examined, ad- 
justed and allowed by the Court, and 
that the Oourt make and enter Its final 
decree of distribution of the residue of 
the estate of said decedent to the per- 
sons entitled thereto, and for the dis- 
charge of the representative and the 
sure-ties on hi? bond. 

IT 18 ORDP^RED. That said petition 
be heard, and said final account exam- 
ined, adjusted, and if correct allowed 
by ihe court, at the Probate Court 
Rooms In the Court House. In the City 
of Duluth in said County on Monday, 
the 26(h dav of May, 1913. at ten 
o'clock A. M., and all persons Inter- 
ested in said hearing and in said mat- 
ter Jre hereby cited and retjulred at 
paid time and place to shov^ cause, If 
any there be. why said petition should 
not be granted. . , 

ORDERED FURTHER, That this or- 
der be .served by publication in The 
Duluth Herald according to law and 
bv mailing a copy hereof to each her 
and interested party at least 14 days 

"^fTa^ed 'a% ''S^ulurh,^Mrn'n".;^- April 30th. 
'^By the Court. ^ ^ ^^^^^^^ 

AftpRf Judge of Probate. 

ARTHUR E. TEMPLETON. 
Clerk of Probate. 
(Seal, Probate Court, St. Louis County, 

AT t n n ^ 
BALDWIN & BALDWIN 
1 Attorneys for Administrator. 
D. H.. May 1, 8 and IB, 1913. 



If You Want lo Make Money 
Buy Crosby Real Estate 

The great increase In population 
that is bound to take place this 
spring will mate property go up by 
leaps and bounls. 

Get in now while prices are right 
and save the middleman's profit. 
For prices- and terms inquire of 

GEORGE H.CROSBY 

608 I>onsUaIe HIdB., Duluth, Minn. 

— OR— 

CHARLES S. ROULO 

Cro«iby, Minn. 



TlMBElT^AND CUt'^^'oVER LANDS 
bought; mortgage loans made, John 
Q. A. Crosb y, 305 Palladlo building, 

I buy standing timber; also cut-over 
lands. Geo. Rupley, 612 Lyceum Bldg. 



BRAZING. 



CAST IRON, STEEL, COPPER, BRASS. 
C. F. WiggertB & Son. 410 E. Sup. St. 



Personal — Combings and cut hair made 
into beautiful switches. Knauf Sisters. 



Massage — Constipation a specialty. Mar- 
garet Nelson, 218 W. Sup. St. Room 8. 



PERSONAL — Unclaimed suits cl^.cap. 
Tailor exchange, 20 Fifth avenue W. 



Personal — Nothing better on earth than 
Barker's for coughs and colds. Boyce's. 



^_JflONm^J-OAN^__ 

*. MONEY— $10 TO $50— MONEY ^ 
% LOANED * 

# On furniture, pianos, or to salaried # 
if employes, on plain note, quickly -)i 
f^ and contldentally. ')$ 
^ OUR RATES * 
•^ will please you, as they are de- * 
■*• signed especially for those who ■^ 
■^ cannot afford a higher rate, while ^ 

* THE EASY PAYMENT PLAN * 

# adopted by us makes it possible to y^ 
if. repay the loan weekly or monthly -9^ 
*. to suit your income. * 

* DULUTH LOAN COMPANY, * 
a. 307 Columbia Bldg., 303 W. Sup. St. H- 
4 Open all day and Wednesday and ■Sf 
ii. Saturday evenings. 7^ 



YOUR p:ggs, chicks and 

BREEL»ING STOCK WANTED. 

Hundreds of people In Duluth and 
vicinity who are interested in poultry 
raising will buy eggs, chicks, breeding 
stock. Incubators and feed during tlie 
present season. Somebody among this 
vast multitude wants what you have 
for sale. You can rt-ach these buyers 
by inserting an ad in these "want" ad 
columns. 

The Duluth Herald has the greatest 
circulation of any newspaper in Minne- 
sota, outside of the Twin Cities. 
RATES ARE LOWEST. 

The charges for classified advertis- 
ing in The Duluth Herald are less per 
thousand circulation than those of any 
other newspaper in Minnesota. 

A "want " ad man will be pleased to 
call on you and give estimates as to 
how much space your ad should oc- 
cupy and the cost. 

* FOR SALE. * 

* "FAULTLESS " HOUDANS. *- 
■^ This strain has been egg-bred •Sf 
•^ from trapnest records since April, ■^ 
it 1890. 1 have bred them 21 years * 

# for great layers and 12 years for ^ 

* large-size chalk-white eggs. These it- 
;'{■ fowls are extremely hardy, have # 
?^ neither comb nor wattle to freeze, *• 
4 and are the best all-winter layers ■* 
^ in open-front coops. "Faultless" # 
i^ strain Houdans have won every # 

# blue ribbon at New York, Boston, # 
■^ Chicago and Philadelphia shows * 

# for past six years. Eggs and # 
■j^ stock sold on honor. Send 10 cents * 

# for the largest illustrated poultry ^ 

# catalogue ever Issut-d: it tells you -J^ 
it how to breed these fowls, which ^ 

* average 250 eggs a year apiece: It # 
^ tells you how to net $3,000 a year # 

* from 100 hens. E. F. McAVOY, * 
^ secretary Houdan club, Cambridge, ^ 
it N. Y. * 



GARY 

THE HOME OF THE STEEL PLANT 

1bUY NOW! 

Lots on Easy Terms. 

THE HOME REALTY CO. 

200 Alworth Buildtn?. 




STEEL PLANT LOTS 

in the Steel Plant City of New 
Duluth, Firsi: division, to Duluth. 
Gary, First division, to Duluth. 
Pittsburg divisiion, to Duluth, and 
Norton's Steel Plant division, to 
Duluth. 
Prices from $100 to $1,500. 
Bought, sold and exchanged. 

A. W. KUEHNOW 

202 Palladio Building. 



NEW HOMES 

On Monthly Payment Plan. 

We have some six-room houses 
on Thirteenth avenue east, above 
Fourth street. Just finished, which 
we will sell on very small cash pay- 
ment, and balance monthly, like 
rent. 

They have oak finish, maple floors, 
full basement, large attic, complete 
itathroom, and the lots have 32% 
feet frontage. Look them over be- 
fore you rent. 

EBY & GRIDLEY 

COS Palladlo BnildiuK. 



SALARY AND CHATTEL LOANS. 
If you get your money Avhen needed 
from' us at fair rates and easy pay- 
ments, you can be sure of a 

SQUARE DEAL ALL THE TIME. 
Try Our Easy Payment Plan. 
Borrow flO, pay $0.50 w'kly or |2 m'th. 
Borrow $20, pay |0.75 w'kly or $3 mth. 
Borrow $26, pay $1.00 w'kly or $4 mth. 
Borrow $30, pay $1.23 w'kly or $6 mth. 
If you have a loan elsewhere, bring 
in your receipts and we will show you 
how much you can save by borrowing 
from us. 

DULUTH FINANCE CO., 
801 Palladio Bldg. 



CHICKEN LIFE INSURANCE. 
Nelson's Chick Food, a 
complete balanced ration, 
insures rapid growtii and 
strong, sturdy chicks. 
Price right. In large or 
small quantity. Beware of in- 
ferior grades. J. W. Nelson, 5 E. Sup. St. 





PRAIRIE STATE 

Incubators hatch largest 
number of big, healtjiy 
chicks. 120-page book on 
"Poultry Raising," it's 
free — sent a n y w h e r e. 
Kelley Hdw. Co., Duluth. 



FOR SALE — GET YOUR WHITE 
Orpington eggs from the winners of 
first at Duluth 1911, Superior 1912. 
Virginia and Duluth 1913; eggi- from 
three pens of these fine winter lay- 
ers, by parcel post. $3 for fifteen. 
Mrs. H. E. Abell, Stevenson, Minn. 



WE LOAN ON ALL KINDS OF PER- 
Bonal security at lowest rates. Call 
on us, 430 Manhattan Bldg., and get 
rates. Duluth Mortgage Loan Co. W. 
Horkan. New 159S-D; Melrose 3733. 

MONEY TO LOAN — HUNTERS — WE 
loan money on rifies, shot guns, 
revolvers; will hold till next season 
before sold. Keystone Loan Co., 22 
West Superior st reet. 

MONEY TO LOAN— LOANS MADE ON 
diamonds, furs, watches, all goods of 
value; $1 to $1,000; lowest rates in 
city. Keystone Loan Co., 2 2 W. Sup. St. 

MONEY FOR SALARIED PEOPLE AND 
others upon their own names; cheap 
rates; easy payments; confidential. 
D H. Tolman, 509 Lyceum building. 



MONEY TO LOAN ON REAL ESTATE, 
$500 $1,000. $1,500. S. .S. Williamson. 
Both phones. 515 Torrey Bldg. 



THE DULUTH & IRON RANGE 
RAILROAD COMPANY. 



dvl,i:tk- 



Knlfe UlTtr, Two Unrbors 

Tower. Ely. Wliiton 

Aurora. Biwabik, M'.-:viii- 

ley. Ppavta. Evcleth, Gil- 

l>ert. Vlra'nf*. 



I.eaTO. 



• 7:00 a.m. 

** 3:15 p.m. 

»»*ll :30 p.m. 



Arrive. 



FOR SALE— HATCHING EGGS, $1 TO 
$3 per IC; bantam eggs 10c each; 15 
standard breeds. New and second- 
hand incubatoTs, will exchange for 
hatching eggs. Old 'phone. Lakeside 
119. W. W. Seekins, 4517 Robinson 
street. Lakeside. 



"TWIN PORTS CHAMPIONS, " S. C. W. 
Leghorns, Crystal White Orpingtons 
bred to lay; winners of 22 first ana 
12 second. 1912-1913 leading shows; 
send for prices of tggs and mating 
list. H. J. Hammerbeck. Superior 
Wis. 



FOR SALE— EGGS FOR HATCHING 
from seven leading varieties; prices 
reasonable; prompt service and sat- 
isfaction guaranteed. Agate Bay 
Poultry Yards. Fred D. W. Thlas. 
proprietor. Two Harbors, Minn. 



FOR .SALE— EGGS FOR HATCHING, 
from prize-winning stock White Or- 
pingtons (the winter layers) $1.50 
to $6 per 15; $8 per 100. William 
Taber. 114 Minneapolis avenue, Du- 
luth. Minn., 2871 Melrose. 



••Il30».m. 

• 5:35 p.m. 

•••10:30 p.m. 





YOUR 



WE WANT 
INSIURAIICE 



6ILBERT, LCiCKER ft DONAHUE 

S03-4-5- B LAnadiiItt Bid*. 



FINE LOCATION 
EAST END 

We have for sale the residence 
of Dr. J. B. W^eston at 2130 East 
Superior St. — $10,600. Lot 76x176 
feet; ten rooms; hot water heat. 

PULFORD, HOW & CO. 

609 Alworth BuUdlng. 



MOUNT ROYAL OIVISION 

THE NEW EJiJCLUSIVE 
RESIDENCE ^(lECTlON— 

20 ACiiEs— rn 20 lots. 

See LimE & lOLTE CO. 




•— DaJly **— I>ally except Sunday. ♦**— Miswl 
train lesvea and arrlxes dally rifte«nib avenue east 

slatKJii. 

"cULUThTnORTHERN MINNESOTA RAILWAY. 
Offices, 510 Lonsdale Bldg., Duluth. 
Tralii'! cvnncit at Knife Hlvtr daily (exi-epl Sun- 
day) v.lUi P & I. J', trains Uaving IKiluih at 7;&0 
a m arriving at Duluth at 5:35 p. in. fonnccU at 
Cramer with Grand Marals stage when running. 



Duluth, South Shore & Atlantic. 



Leave. 



STATIONS. 



Arrive. 



+7. 45am ♦6. 15pm. 

(Soo 

t8.l2»m »6.45pm. 

(Soo 

t8.20«m •6.55pm, 

Arrive. 

f 7. 55pm 6.40am. 

t8.55pm 6 30am 

♦7. 05pm *4.20am 

t7.45pm •S.OOaw. 

• 10. 20am 

•8.00am 

*B.20pm 

Leave. 

t8 OSam •8.15pm 
flO 08pm*l0.20am. 



... Duiuth •10 30am ts.40pm 

Line Union Station.) 

Superioi ...*I0 00am fS.IOpm 
Line Unl'u Stallotj.) 

Superior ... •S.50am tSOOpa 
(Uui<.n l>»-i>ot.) Leave. 

.. Houghton ...fit. 00pm 



Calumet 
. . Ishpeiulng . . 
. . Maraueltc . . 
Saull Ste. Marie 
, .. Montreal .. 
. . . , Boston . . . 

. M'lntreal . . 
. . New Tork . . 



tlO 

•12 

•II 

•5 

•9 
•10 



lOpm 
.20ain t6.2oani 

30pm t5.20ajii 

2Spm 

50pm •8.20pm 
.00am 'B.SOam 



.•lO.OOamtlO.OOpm 
. ♦7.15pm tS.SOam 



f_DaU> except Sunday. •— Pally. 



DULUTH, MISSABE & NORTHERN' 
RAILWAY. 



Office: 



420 \Ve«t Superior .«t. 
'Phone, iMIfl. 



Arrive. 



Leave. 

f nibbing, Chlsholm. Virginia, Eve- 1 

•7 40amOeth. Coleralne, Sharon (Buhl), ^ •3.21pm 

tMouutaln Iroti. ISporta. tHlwabllt J 

nibbing. Chlsholm, Sharon 

(BuW). Virginia. Eveleth. 

Coleralne. 

Virginia, Cook, Italner, Fort 

Frances. Port Arthur. Bau- 

detle. Warroad, Wiiuiipeg. 

Jlpall y. t— nafly wcept Sunday, '^~ 

Cafe Observation Car. Mesaba Range 
Points' Solid Vcstlbuled Train. Modern 
Sleepers through to Winnipeg. 



•a.sopmi 



•;.40pmi 



^•lo.aiam 

I '8.3laai 



FOR SALE— RHODE ISIiAND RED 
eprgg. $2 for 15; day-old chicks, 20c. 
Orders taken for hatching thickens 
at 5c an eg.e or f4 per 100. Mrs. J. 
H. Tomlin. Grand 1292-X; 36 Palmetto 
street, Duluth Heights. 

HATCHING EGGS from prize-winning 
single comb Buff Orpingtons, rose 
comb White Leghorns; 11.50, $2 per 
15; few cockerels left. Box 122, Two 
Harbors, Minn., Sunny Valley farm. 

FOR .SALE— EGGS FOR HATCHING; 
white Wyandottis, repral strain, %2 for 
15, and buflf Cochin bantams, $1 for 
ir.. E. D. Krebs, 3805 West Sixth 
street. 

FOR SALE— HOUDANS, MOST HARDY 
fowls, constant layers: large, white 
eggs, $1.50 per setting of thirteen. 
J. B. Greenfield. 310 Columbia build- 
ing^ 

Poultry supplies, chick feed! small and 
large, cut alfalfa, chick grit, char- 
coal. Northern grown seed catalogue 
free. T. A. Scarlett, 213-15 E. 1st St. 

FOR^SALE— HATCHING EGGS, SIN- 

gle comb white Leghorns; winter 
lavers; fifteen eggs, 75c; 100 e^gs, 
$4.00. Mrs. Griffith, 4309 London road. 

Prize winning Puff Plymouth Rocks; 
stock and etcgs for sale; send for 
catalogue. E. H. Conkey & Son, 522 
Fifth avenue east. Melrose 1784. 



FOR SALE— HATCHING EGGS FROM 
S C. thoroughbred Rhode Island 
Reds; $1.25 for 16. Dr. F. C. Lee, 2304 
Princeton avt-nue. Melrose 3909. 



FOR SALF: — EGGS FOR HATCHING 
single comb White leghorns; $1.25 
for fifteen eggs; heavv lav'.ng strain. 
H. BJorlln. 2205 West First street. 



INDIAN 


RU 


NNEPv, 


FAWN AND WHITE. 


$1 for 


11 


eggs; 


ducklings 


25c each. 


'Phone 


P 


ark 5; 


-D. 4601 


Oneida 


street. 











FOR SALE— TEN HOCDAN HENS, 15' 
Houdan hatching eggs for $1 Call 
Melrose. 2857. 



__WANTED^TqjiENL__ 

WANTED TO RENT— BEFORE MAV 1, 
bv new married couple, three or four- 
room flat, unfurnished, with modern 
conveniences; wltliin walking filF- 
tanoe from postofflce; will furnish 
best of references. Z 383. Herald. 

WANTED TO RENT — YOUNG <;enI 
tleman desires room and board with 
privatt fiimlly; references exchanged. 
Room 221, Y. M. C. A. 



WANTED TO RENT— TWO UNFUR- 
nished rooms in private family; ref- 
erences exchanged. Call Melrose 
2630. 



WANTED TO RENT— BY YOUNG 
lady; furnished room; private fam- 
llv. W 458, Herald. 



UPHOLSTERING^ 

Furniture, Automobiles, Carriages: rea- 
»onabl« prices. E. Ott. 112 1st Ave. W. 



m 




t_ -; . .^ ... 



ii 



Thursday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



May 1, 1913. 



21 



Onoi Cent a Word Fach Insertion. 
No Advortisenient Lesks Than 13 Cents. 

_^ORJALE— HOUSES^ 

1200 CASH * 

Balance monthly, buys 816 North * 
Fifty-third fcvenud WB3t; 8 rooms ^ 
In very grood condition; all mod- # 
em except heat; a snap to re- # 
BpoQSlbU party. Hr 

1250 CASH I 

Balance on rental basis buys 8- ii- 
room houiie; good condition; some •^ 
conveniences; good barn price i(- 
only $1,550; thred blocks south # 



from oar line. 



# J. A- FORSMAN. 

^ 5202 RAmaey SL Calumet 328-M 

$300 CASH * 

* 

With balance on ea.«iy monthly ■i^ 
payments, will buy a 6-room house ^ 
near Bryant aohool; very conven- * 
lent to new Patrick woolen mill * 
and other factories; houae has city # 
water, •leotrlo light and gas. *• 
hardwood fioors. rtne atone base- ^ 
ment; good barn for three head of iii- 
stock: price only $a,000. Set* this; ^ 
It's a good buy. -^ 



One Cent a Word Fach Insertion. 
No Advertisement i.es.s Thuu 15 Cents. 



* 

% 



UNCOLN PARK. 



FURNISHED SEVKN-ROOM 
HOUSE. 

Modern except heat. $30 per 
month. 






^ will lease for six months or one ■*•' 
* year. Between Fifth and Hlxth A- 
^ streets, Twenty-flfth avenue west. * 



Fine location. 



J. F. McNAUGHTON, 
20J2 West Superior Street. 

a- 
* 



-*; 



CHESTER TERRACE. 



-*; 



L. H. WHIPPL.E. 
701 Torrey Bldg. 



WHITNEY WALI. CO. 



LOOKINO FOR EASY TERMS? 

READ THESE. 

<547> Woodland cottage, large lot; 

stone foundation, etc.; very easy 

terms. Price 1 1.300. 
(587) Say, read this quick — Ei^ht 

rooms, stone f'»undatlon, gas, sewer, 

water, electricity; large lot; |200 

oash Price |1.<00. 
(535) How's this? New bungalow, oak 

finish and fireplace, large lot; f300 

cash. Price $l,SOO. 
(582) Dandy little home. Jefferson 

str.^.'t. tine location; good lot; at only 

$2,100. 
(566) Six rooms. East Eighth street; 

easiest possible terms; $1,900. 



f 

^ One of the best lO-room houses 
* in this very desirable location. .. 
^ Three of the rooms already rented ^ 
7^ to good tenants. An exceptional ft 
;^ opportunity for a high-class room- # 
^ Ing house. 
*' 



One Cent a Word Fach Insertion. 
No Advertisement Less Tlmn 13 Cents. 



FOR RENT— HOUSES. 

(Continued.) 

FOR RENT — 1713 EAST SUPERIOR 
street; modern. E, P. Alexander, 414 
Torrey building. 



FOR RENT — LARGE BOARDING 
house. Mra Ralston, 122 East First 
street. 

PADDED VANS for moving furniture. 
West Duluth & Duluth Transfer Co. 

FOR H ENT— FI V E - ROOM HOU.SE. 
reasonable rent. Call Grand 1926-X. 

FOlt RENT — 7-ROOM HOUSE: $8 PER 
month. 606 Nineteenth avenue west. 



FARM AND FRUIT LANDS. 



FOR SALE. 



Two 10-acre tracts. Sec. 4. T, 61, 11. 13, 
Lester Park road. 



40 acres 5 miles west of Two Harbors, 
$550. at $10 down and $10 per month. 
This runs around tlie county road in 
a good Iowa colony. 



40 acres 14 miles north of city on How- 
ard-Gnesen road, $12 per acre. 

80 acres 3 miles south of Tamarack, $15 
per acre. 



*- 



W. M. PRINDLE & CO., 
Main Floor. Lonsdale Bldg. 



-* 



WHITNEY WALL CO. 



11,300.00 

house. 



# Buy.s a new 7-room 
^ Thlrtv-elghth avenue west; 

# hardwood Hoors and yellow 
finish downstairs. 



* 

at # 

has V^ 

pine ii 

# finish downstairs. -k- 

# $350 CASH ^ 
^ is ill required as flrst payment, % 
^ balance to be in $75 payments -^ 

# every six months. Write or see •)(■ 

J. E. LINDGREN, * 

414 Columbia Building. i(- 



a- 
* i:- 

* FOR RENT -^ 

* -i^ 

* An 8-room house; stone founda- '^ 
^ tion: all modern conveniences: * 
ie- four lots, garden, barn: half a -A- 
^ block from the street car. Wood- -A- 
a- land; $45 a month. Inquire at 602 'X' 
^ Torrey building. ii' 

* FOR RENT. * 
i^ Beautiful 7-room house, in fine # 

* residence district of East end; -^ 
■^ strictly modern and Is in fine *■ 
^ neighborhood; rent $40 per month, it 

* Apply it 

* WHITNEY WAI-L CO., * 
*• 301-02 Torrey Building. # 
a- Melrose 1368. Grand 810. ii- 



40 acres 8 miles north of Wright, $15 
per acre. 



160 acres 2% miles north of Cromwell, 
$15 per acre; Hue soil. 



20 acres In the Bitter Root valley; has 
7 acres frult-bearlng trees; $3,200, 
with $500 down, balance to suit; will 
exchange for city property. 



acres, Piedmont car route, Herman- 
town. 



114 acres, 20 acres cultivated; build- 
ln.«?s; $16 per acre; three-quarters of 
a mile from Grand Lake station, D., 
M. & N, Railroad. 



160 acres 2H miles south of Brookston, 
on county road; hewed log buildings; 
sacrificing this; $12.50 per acre. 

160 acres. 400,000 feet of timber, half 
mineral right, north of Tower 13 
miles: will sell for $15 per acre, in- 
cluding timber. 



McNATTOHTON REAUTY CO., 
2022 West Superior St. 



WHITNEY WALL 



A BIO BARGAIN AT $3,000. 



Six-room house at Eleventh ave- 
nue east and Third street, heat. 
lisfht. gas, bath, fireplace, hardwood 
floors and stone foundation: easily 
worth $3,500; terms $500 cash bal- 
ance like rent. Inquire evenings 321 
East Fifth street. 



DOMBROSS REALTY CO., 
706 Palladto Bldg. 

FOR SALE— BEAUTIFUL LAKESIDE 
home, built with all modern Im- 
provements; occupied one year; orig- 
inal cost $4,700, offered for $4,350; a 
snap, only $600 cash, balance monthly 
Installments: owner leaving town. 
•Ph.jne Lakeside 298. 



■^iC-'iirli'ii'iiii-^i'^i^^it^-ii-ii-iiii^i^^ 
^ '^ 

^ "BUY GOOD FURNITURE" # 

^ From Cameron - Johnson - Horgan # 
^ furniture distributing salesrooms, -X- 
if- 2110-2112 West Superior street. # 
ii- Our factory to you proposition i(> 
^ saves big money. Several largo iir 

* shipments Just arrived. Your -^ 

* credit "O K." 0- 

* ;* 

■^i^-i:-ii^C'i£r?y:i^-^;i^ii-ii-ii^i^iC-i6ii'iii^^ 

a- a- 

* FOR RENT. # 
^ ^ 

* Four-room Lakeside cottage: large O- 
iir attic: lot large enough for garden; it- 
a- $22.50. i^ 
^ CHARLES P. CRAIG & CO., # 
ii- Sellwood Building. iS- 

* a 



FOR .S.VLE— NEW SIX-ROOM HOUSE 
at Lakeside; modern in every re- 
spf-ct. hot water heat, bath, hard- 
w<j>.l floors, beamed ceiling, fire- 
place, etc. Only $300 cash, 130 per 
month. Greenfi>:'ld Realty Company, 
3Ii-ll Columbia Bldg. 

FOR 3 A LS — S EVEN- ROOM HOUSE 
near Twelfth avenue east below 
Fourth street. bathroom, furnace, 
fir'»pJace, hardwood floors, good cel- 
lar. $S00 cash; $1,000 in monthly pay- 
ments, and $2, 000 mortage. See us. 
E. D. Field Co. 



FOR SALE— 6-ROOM HOUSE. BUILT 
and for sale by owner; brand new: 
mtidern except heat; will install heat 
If desired: best buy out. $800 cash, 
balance easy terms: located at 519 
Twenty-Second avenue west. Call 
Lincoln 196-Y. 



FOR SALE OR TRADE — 7-ROOM 
newly built house at Lester Park, 
on oar line, hot water heat and all 
conveniences; with barn suitable for 
garage, 14 by 28 feet, two stories 
high. For particulars address M 324 
care Herald. * 



FOR SALE— FIVE- ROOM HOUSE AND 
good barn on fifty-foot lot. near Sec- 
ond street and Eighteenth avenue 
west, price $1,300. on terms to suit. 
B. H Schweiger. 201 Exchange build- 
ing. 



FOR SALE— TEN-ROOM HOUSE. 2117 
West Fourth street: all modern con- 
veniences; $2,300. $700 cash, balance 
easy terms. Inquire 614 North 
Twenty-flfth avenue west. 



R. B. KNOX & CO. 

220 E. Third St.. May 1 42.50 

458 Mesaba Ave., 8 rooms 25.00 

412 blxth Ave. W., brick 25.00 

26 Seventh Ave. W., 5 rooms 22.50 

R. B. KNOX & CO. 



R. B. KNOX & CO. 



Fine eight-room house at 811 East 
First street; modern." clean and in 
good repair. Let us show you this 

house. 



(0-2) For Sale — Fine farm, three- 
quarter-mile frontage on Whiteface 
river near Kelsey; 20 acres cleared; 
good log buildings, some Imple- 
ments; good timber; 99% acres. 
Price only $2,000; requires $500 cash. 

(S-4) For Sale — 80-acre farm; 10 
acres cleared; small house and barn: 
two miles to town and railroad; good 
soli and timber. Terms $200 cash. 
Price only $1,300. 



•WPts 



h 



Mrsi Advertiser 

jihc secret of advertising success is the 
placing of advertising to reach the greatest 
number of people in a given territory at the 
least expenditure. 

THE HERALD 

Covers not only Duluth like the sun, but 
circulates throughout the entire Duluth 
trading zone. Your advertisement in THE 
HERALD will be read by thousands of peo- 
ple who see no other newspaper. 

THE HERALD 

Is read by the public and reaches THE 
BUYERS. Use THE HERALD and you 
WILL get results from your advertising. 
^ ^ "RESULTS ARE CERTAIN." 

Want Ads phoned in will receive prompt 
and courteous attention. 



One Cent a Word Eooli In<^ortion. 
No Advertisenieiit liess Tlian 15 Cento. 

PRIVATE HOME BEFORE AND DUR- 
ing confinement; best of care by pro- 
fessional nurse; babies also cared for. 
Margaret Flnkle. Call Melrose 2454. 
214 Nlntlj avenue east. 

PRIVATE HOME FOR INDIES DUR- 
ing confinement; expert care; infants 
cared for. Ida Pearson, M. D., 284 
Harrison avenue, St. Paul. 

PROSPECTIVE MOTHERS WILL FIND 
a pleasant home during confinement 
at Ashland Maternity home. Ashland, 
Wis. Infants cared for. 

MRS. HANSON. OB A DU ATE MID- 
wife; female complaints. 413 Seventti 
avenue east. Zenith 1225. 

LYDIA LEHTONEN, MIDWIFE, 2406 
West Second St. 'Phone Lincoln 475-A. 

Mrs. H. Olson, graduate midwife; private 
hospital, 329 N. 68th Ave. W. Cole 173. 



One Cent a Word Each Inmrtlon. 
No AdTertisemcnt Lieas Thau 15 Cents. 

boatsIndjotorboats 

FOR SALE— 26-FOOT, 2 CYLINDER, 
motor boat, oak hull, fully equipped 
to run: $185, cost $700. Motor Boat 
exchange, 511 Torrey bldg. Mel. 1361. 

FOR SALE — LIGHT CEDAR ROW- 
boats and launches. H. S. Patter- 
son, foot of Sixth avenue west. 



FOR SALE— S. M. KANER WILL AR- 
rlve with a carload of fresh niiloh 
cows Thursday, May 1. 1217 East 
Seventh street 



BOARDJ^ROMWANTED. 

W^ANTED — YOUNO LADY WORKING, 
who wishes board and room cheap, 
references. Call Grand 1894-D. 



One Cent a Word Kaoh Insertion. 
No . Ati v«>r t iseinen I Le».s Tlmn 15 Cents. 

ADDITIONALWANTS~ 

SALE— MIS(;&J^A^ 

FOR SALE — NKW AND SECOND 
hand billiard ani pocKet table.s. bar 
fixtures and bawling alleys; easy 
munthly payment plan. Duluth rep- 
resentative, Bert Gustln, Spalding 
hotel. The Bruiiswick-Balke-CoUen- 
der company. 426-28-30 South Third 
street, Minneapolis, Minn. 



(D-1) For Sale — 132-acre farm; heavy 
loam soil; 60 acres cultivated; good 
buildings; on fine lake; good roads, 
near town and railroad; this is one 
of the best farms around Duluth; 
old age only reason for selling. 
Price $4,500. 
Reasonable Terms. 



W^HITNEY WALL CO., 
301 Torrey Bldg. 



R. B. KNOX & CO. 



HOUSES FOR RENT. 

623 East Fourth street, modern 
seven-room house, complete with 
gas range, laundry, etc $35.00 

414 Eighth avenue east, six rooms, 
hot water heat, gas range, 
laundry and all other conven- 
iences 35.00 

MASSACHUSETTS REAL E.STATB CO. 

18 Phoenix Blk.. Duluth. 

BEFORE FURNISHING YOUR HO.ME 
get prices on "good furniture" from 
Cameron - Johnson-Horgan, furniture 
distributors' salesrooms; carloads ar- 
riving direct from best manufactur- 
ers. ''Your credit good." Our largo 
salesro )ms 2110-2112 West Superior 
straet (next t o Moe). 

FOR RENT— 125 SEVENTH AVENUE 
west, seven rooms, hot and cold wa- 
ter, bath, coal range, electric light; 
* ') per month. Apply A. A. Men- 



FOR SALE— A LIMITED ACREAGE 
of choice dairy and agricultural 
lands near the stations of Alborn, 
Payne, Kelsey, Wallace and Zim is 
now being placed on the market, 
size of tracts and terms to suit pur- 
chaser. For prices and furtlier In- 
formation, write or call on L. B. 
Arnold, land commissioner D. & I. R. 
R. R. Co. 110 Wolvin building. Du- 
luth, Minnesota. 

ii^ii'i(^i'i{'9ii^9iiHi'^^9i^i6ii-^i^^ 

^ EASTERN CUYUNA RANGE. H 

■^ 200 acres of nice land on a lake, # 

^ about half hay meadow. Good ^ 

# roads and school on the place. ^ 

# Purchaser gets all minerals on 160 * 
i^ acres. Price $2,200. ^ 

# R. C. SANBORN & CO.. H 

# Melrose 867. 910 Torrey Bldg. ii, 
ii^-ii-}Hii(-9:- ^i^?ii.^ii »'JK^i^^T)g-Jtf^ j^T^fe;^ 

FOR SALE — FARM OF 120 ACRES; 
70 acres under cultivation; fine barn 
and neat dwelling house. Including 
stock and farm machinery and Im- 
plements; ideal place for dairy; %, 
miles from station; two trains daily: 
address A. J. Longtin, care Herald 
office. 

BAYFIELD ORCHARD LANDS. 
Large or small tracts aiid improved 
orchards: prices right; easy terms. We 
have 13,000 acres in the Cornucopia 
and Squaw Bay district. 



FOfl SALE— BILIJARD AND POOL 
tables, bar and ilgar store fixtures, 
also second-liantl tables. Write for 

firices, terms and catalogues. Koeh- 
er & Hinrlchs, St. Paul, manufac- 
turers. Local agent, Joe Appert, resi- 
dence 1327 London road, Dulutii. 



FOR SALE— FULL SET TAILOR'S DIS. 
play cases and (hie. cabinet suitcase, 
Mosler safe macllini, stove, irons and 
complete set of »ouls and tables to 
furnish back shop. See Dundee 
Woolen Mills, [128 West Superior 
street. 



FOR SALE— YOUi 
can be applied as 



OLD FURNITURE 
part payment on 



the best, new, Lp-to-date furniture. 
Our prices are 5 J per cent less than 
elsewhere. East End Furniture store, 
228 East Superior St. Grand 2013-X. 



FOR SALE — DON T BUY SECOND- 
hand furniture because it is cheap. 
Take advantage of Bayha & Co.'s 
credit system and buy good new fur- 
niture. Second avenue west and 
First street. 

BUSINE.SS MEN, ATTENTION. 
For Sale — Slightly used Addressograoh, 
Printograpli anil Edison dictating 
machines at bai^fi^n prices. Address 
O 491 Herald, or" 'phone 362 either 
'phone. 



One Cent a Word Kaeh Insertion. 
No .'\dvertl8ement Lt'ssH Than 15 Cents. 

SALGfliscin^ANEOUSr 

(Continued.) 

FOR SALE— CARLOADS GOOD FUR- 
nlture direct from best manufacture 
era selling away below retail store 
prices. Hundreds mattresses, "Du- 
luth made" (all sizes) and grades, 
brass beds, thirty-five year guaran- 
tee kind, from factory direct to you; 
sold and delivered from our distrih- 
uting salesrooms, 2110-2112 West Su- 
perior street. 'Your Credit OK." 
Cameron -Johnson-Horgan. furniture 
distributors. 




READY REFERENCE 

¥m Ymn oably meebb 



FOR SALE— LAITNCH. 23 t EET LONG, 
6-horse power Ferro engine; first- 
class condition; used two seasons; 
speed 8 to 9 m iles. A 460, xierald. 

FOR SALE — ONE 
frame car; also 

drill with split head; all in fine con- 
dition. Y 297. Herald. 

FOR SALE — EXCELLENT 4 BY 5 
folding camera, cheap; will call. 
S 422, Herald. 



YARD STEEL 
one 'Little Giant" 



HORSESJ/EHICLES.^ETC. 

1,000 HORSES AND MULES. 1.000. 

The largest assortment of horses and 
mules In the country, including big 
draft horses, farm mares, delivery 
horses, drivers and big work mules. 
Fresh horses arriving from the coun- 
try daily. Auctions every Wednes- 
day, private sales daily. We can 
save you from $15 to $25 on every 
horse you buy. Every horse guaran- 
teed to be as repre.iented. 

BARRETT & ZIMMERMAN, 

MIDWAY HORSE MARKET, 

St. Paul. Minn 



This directory is intended for the conven- 
ience of anyone desiring something a lit- 
tle out of the ordinary in their daily needs and requiring 
it in a hurry. The firms represented below make a special- 
ty of immediate service and will gladly furnish any infor- 
mation that is necessary. Remember, satisfaction is 
guaranteed by every advertiser. 

JUST USE YOUR TELEPHONE 

SEE IT IN THE HERALD EVERY DAY 



AWNINGS, TENTS, PACKSACKS. 



POIRIER TENT & AWNING CO., 413 
East Superior stre et. Both 'phones. 

DULUTH TENT & AWNING COMPANY, 
Get prices. 1608 W. Superior street. 



LAWN MOWERS SHARPENED. 



A-r .STEWART'S REPAIR SHOP KEY. 
lock and safe work. 18 North Third 
Av. W. Phone Mel. 6386. Grand 991-A 



ACCOUNTANT. 



MATTESON & MACGREGOR. 

PUBLIC ACCOUNTANTS AND 

AUDITORS. 

Business Counselors and .Systematlzers. 

700-701 Alworth Bldg. 

'Phones: Melrose 4700; Grand 71. 



WILLIAM BUS3ELMAN, ACCOUNTANT 
and systemizer. 24 Fourth avenue 
east. 'Phone Melrose 3660. 



F. D. HARLOW, 304 EXCHANGE 
building. Telephone. Melrose 3654. 



FOR SALE — NO. 4 UNDERWOOD 
typewriter; practically new; also 
tliree-foot safe with combination 
lock, documejit box, etc. Krieger- 
Janiar company, 416 East Superior 
street. 



C. A. KNIPPENBERO. 
300 Alworth Bldg. 'Phones 597. 



denhall, 29 
rose 3854. 



West Third street. Mel- 



FOR SALE — NEW SIX- ROOM HOTT.SE 
bu:!t by owner; gas, electric light' 
hardwood floors and finish; $3,000' 
Imiuire 2412 Wi^st Se cond street. 

For .Sale — Eleven-room house two 
nats. modern. 2902 W. Second .St 
Andrew Borgquist. 404 Exchange 
Bldg. 'phone Grand 217. 



FOR SALE — FOUR- ROOM BUNGA- 
low. lot 35 by lO^O feet, small cash 
payment, balance monthly. Inouire 
800 Lonsdale build ing. 

FOR SALE — NINE-ROOM HOUSE 
nrst-class shape, fifty-foot front 
near ranadlan Northern shops. West 
Duluth. R 334. Herald. 



FOR LAKESIDE HOUSES AND LOTS 

fo to ^tj]9 Greenfield Realty Co! 
i 'J " 1 



1 Columbia building. 



FOR RENT — SEVEN-ROOM MODERN 
house 317 South Fifteenth avenue 
east, $15 per month. Enquire Duluth 
Builders' Supply company, 18 North 
Thirty-second avenue west. Phones, 
226. 

FOR RENT — FIVE-ROOM HOUSE, 
partly furnished; modern conven- 
iences, near two car lines; 1009 East 
Seventh street. Inquire 504 Alworth 
building. Grand 518-X. 



FOR RENT— MODERN 8-ROOM HOUSE, 
Lake avenue and Fifth street; all 
conveniences: very central: $28 per 
month. Fay-Schau company. Both 
'phones 24. 

FOR RENT — HOUSE, SEVEN ROO.MS 
and bat'i; city water and gas. at 1920 
Minnesota avenue. Apply at 1731 
Minnesota avenue or telephone Mel- 
rose 351ff. 



FOR SALE — WISCONSIN, THE BEST 
dairy and general crop state In the 
Union; settlers wanted; will sacrifice 
land prices to get them; ask for 
booklet about Wisconsin Central 
land grant. Address Land Dept., 
Soo Line, Minneapolis, Minn. 



FOR BALE — SECOND-HAND STEEL 
ranges rebuilt so as to give excellent 
service; $9.85, $1;:.50 and up. Ander- 
son Furniture company. Twenty-first 
avenue west and Superior street. 

IX)R SALE .— FOJRNITURB, INCLUD- 
ing bed.s, dressers, steel couch, gas 
plate; owner l>reaking up house- 
keeping. 16 Wtist Superior street, 
upstairs. 



FOR S.VLE— SECOND-HAND PIANO; 
good condition; mahogany case at 
$80. The James fi . Terry Piano com- 
pany. 405 Central avenua West Du- 
luth. 



For Sale — Buffets, sideboards and china 
cabinets worth to $26.50; choose 
Quickly at $14.95 each. Anderson Fur- 
niture Co., 21st Ave. W. and Sup. St. 



FOR SALE— I BUY. SELL AND E»X- 
change farm, mineral and timber 
lands and deal In city property. Im- 
proved and unimproved farm land 
for sale on easy terms. Barney Eden 
407 Manhattan building. 



FOR SALE — 5% ACRES LAND, 3V4 
acres cleared; five-room house, one 
barn, three cows, one horse: one 
block from Kenwood school; price 
$1,800. Call or write Mich Zettel, 
Kenwood park. 

FOR SALE— 80 ACRES; PART READY 
for the plow: on Pike Lake road, five 
miles out. Call Melrose 6071 for in- 
formation. 



FOR SALE— FIVE-ROOM COTTAGE 
mod'-rn except heat. 1217 East 

Fourth .itreat. 



SITUATION WANTED. 

MALE. 



SITUATION WANTED— YOUNG MAN 
with six years' experience In gen- 
eral office Work; A-1 references; ts 
open for a position where there Is 
a chance to advance: no objection to 
outside work. F 463. Herald. 



SITUATION WANTED — A.S BOOK- 
keeper by young man; four years' 
experience with wholesale grocery 
books; A-1 references. O 431. Herald 



SITUATION WANTED — EX PER I . 
enced stenographer and bookkeeper, 
witli A-1 references, willing to leave 
city. Address XX 100, H erald. 

SITUATION WANTED — BY YOUNG 
man. m store or wholesale house 
preferred, reasonable salary; good 
references. G 397, Herald. 



SITUATION WANTEI>— BY EXPERI- 
enced young man bookkeeper, good 
refer»>n..H fr'>m previous employers 
L 497. Herald. 



FOR RENT— BEST LOCATION IN CITY, 
suitable for boarding or lodging 
house 532 West First street. Call 
501 West Michigan street. Melrose 
854. 



FOR RENT— EIGHT-ROOM MODERN 
house on East Fifth street near 
Eighteenth avenue, $45 per month 
E. D. Field Co. 204 Exchange build- 
ing. 



Farm Lands at wholesale prices. L A 
Larsen Co., 214 Providence building! 



FOR .S.\LE — Second-hand woodworking 
machinery, portable sawmills, trans- 
mission appllancts, pipes for steam, 
water and furnaces. Duluth Mach. Co. 

H)R SALE— TWO HUNDRED SHA^RES 
Vermillon-Mesabfi, 80 cents: 100 Iron 
Mountain, 95 cents; 1,000 Minnesota 
Steel & Iron, 55 cents. O 496, Herald. 

For Sale — Northrui" King's Northern- 
grown seeds; al^» garden tools and 
implements: seed oatfrlogue free. 213- 
216 East First street, T. A. Scarlett. 



WAGONS. WAGONS. WAGONS. 

A complete line of Studebaker and 
other makes always on hand, includ- 
ing dump, farm, dray, liglit and heavy 
delivery wagons: bargains in slight- 
ly used vehicles. Write for catalogue. 
L Hammel Company, Duluth. 

HORSE.S — GOOD— HORSES. 
Large selection to choose from: buy 
from a reliable firm; fair treatment. 
Zenith Sale & Boarding Stable, 524 
West First street. 

FOR SALE— THE CARLTON .STOCK 
market, Carlton, Minn., offer for sale 
forty head of drafters, farm mares, 
Express Chumks: fresh consignment. 

FOR SALE— FIVE HORSES. ~THREE 
blacks and two bays: 4 years old; 
well broke. Call Zenith City Bottle 
works, 1523 West Michigan street. 



ADVERTISING NOVELTIES. 

Duluth Badge & Novelty Co., 2022 W. 
.Superior St. Badges, banners, but- 
ton.s, flags, pennants, souvenirs, etc. 

ARCHITECT. 

W. B. -Roe, architect and builder. 41t 
Providence building. Grand 862. 



ASHES REMOVED AND TEAMING. 

REMOVED: ASHES, RUBBISH AND 
manure. Call Grand 1962-A. 



I3RAZING. 

STOVE AND FURNACE REPAIRING. 
Hubert, 18 Third Ave. West. 991-A. 



MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS. 




A. Haakonsen, dealer 
and expert repairer 
at J. W. Nelson's. 5 
East Superior St. 



BOSTON MUSIC CO., MUSICAL MBR- 
chandise, 6 and 8 West First street 



MUSIC LESSONS. 

violin lessons given at pupils' resi- 
dence. Edward Lynn, Cole 327-X. 



MOVING AND PACKING. 



WHEN READY TO MOVE. BE SURE 
l-u*,. ''^.'^v, Stewart Transfer line. 
Either phone. 334. Prices reason- 
able ; experienced movers; covered 
l>auded vans; work guaranteed 



MOVING PICTURE SUPPLIES. 

Motion picture outfits bought and sold 
•National" Co., 417 W. Michigan St! 



PATENTS. 

PATENTS — ALL ABOUT PATENTS 
Sea&tevens. 610 Sellwood building ' 



FOR SALE— NICE, GENTLE. YOUNG 
horse, fine silver mounted trap or 
surrey harness and light trap. At 
rear. 309 V^ West .Second street. 

FOR .SALE— A PAIR OP MULES, 
also heavy horse and one driving 
horse. Milch cows for sale. L. 
Cohen. 327 East Superior street. 



FOR SALE— IRON MOUNTAIN STOCK; 
will sacrifice block of 300 shares to 
raise cash; mall mo your bids. Ad- 
dress T 494, Herald. 



FOR SALE— HOWE SCALE, CAPAC- 
ity 2,500 pounds, )ne high top office 
desk and four wheel truck. Call 
Lincoln 8-X. 



FOR SALE — PAIR OF YOUNG, .SOUND 
horses, weight 3,000 pounds, for $260. 
Can be seen at 36 West Palmetto 
street, Duluth Heights. 



CARPENTER REPAIR WORK. 



Remodeling, new work and repairing. 
A. 3. Page. Lin. 1S5-D. Estimates free. 

Work done neatly. O Pearson. 207 W. 
First S t. Zenith 12t4-X, or Park 97. 

ALL KINDS OF CARPENTER WORK; 
estimates free. Calumet 150-L. 



PAINTING AND PAPERHANGING. " 

FOR PAINTING and DECORATING see 
Youngdahl & Pie rs, 223 W. I'nd St. 

FOR HOUSE PAINTING AND PAPER- 
hanging. A. Johnson. Park. 13-J-.A. 



PAINTING AND TINTING. 

HOr.SE PAINTING AND TINTING. Call 
tschultz & Johnson Bros., Grand 1319-D. 



CARPET CLEANING WORKS 



INTERSTATE CARPET CLEANI CO. 
L. Slnotte, Prop., compressed c and 
vacuum cleaners and rug eavers. 
1928 West Michigan St. Bo' phones. 



FOR SALE— THREE SPRING TOP 
buggy, newly painted; cheap. 320Vi 
East Sixth street. 



FOR SALE— DOUBLE DRAY; GOOD 
as new. 924 East Sixth street; Grand 
1962-A. 

FOR SATiE — Forty horses, all sizes. 23 
E. First St. Western Sales Stable Co. 



FOR RENT — NINE-ROOM HEATED 
house, 1822 West Second street; rent 
$35 summer, $40 winter months. N. 
J. Upham company. Providence build- 
ing. 



FOR RENT— SIX ROOMS; HOT WA- 
ter heat; ail conveniences: 309 East 
Third street. See N. J. U()ham com- 
pany, seventh floor I'rovldcnoe Bldg. 

FOR RENT— SIX-ROOM HOUSE; GOOD 
condition; 310 Fourteenth avenue 
east; only $18. N. J. Upham com- 
pany, seventh floor Providence Bldg. 

FOR RENT — BIOHT-ROOM, MOD^ 
ern house; $30 per month; 1828 Lon- 
don road; view of lake from every 
room. C. B. Gilbert. Proctor Minn. 



SITITATION WANTED— PRE.SS PHO- 
tographer wants any kind of em- 
ployment. Mr. Brauer. 718 West 
Fifth street. 



SITUATION WANTED— BY YOUNO 

man as clerk In clothing or gents' 

F 440. Ht'rald 



furnishing store. 



DYE WORKS.' 



Northwestern Dyeing & Cleanin 
19 Lake Ave. No 



g Co., 

Grand 1518; Met 133f 



FOR RENT— EIGHT- ROOM BRICK 
house; all latest conveniences, at 1017 
East Second street. Call 1019 East 
.Second street. 



# CONSULT WITH F. I. SALTER * 
it- COMPANY, ^ 

it- 303 Lonsdale Building. # 

a- It you are thinking of borrowing # 
a- money on real estate security They jA 
■# are always in funds, and ' grant * 
Hf every courtesy to their clients. * 
it- Building Loans a Specialty. ■^ 

■^ij6;?i^lj(;i(^t^f;^^ 

MONEY TO LOAN ON FARM AND 
oity property. Any amount from $500 
up. No delay. PJfficlent service. 
Wm. C. Sargent. 208 Exchange bldg. 

CASH ON HAND TO I^AN ON CITY 
and farm property, any amount, low- 
est rates, no delay. Northern Title 
Co.. 613 First National Bank bldg. 

City and village loans in Minnesota. Re- 
pay loan monthly: easy terms. C A 
Knlppenberg. 300 Alw orth. 'Phone 597! 

WANTED TO HORKOW— $2,500 ON IM^ 
proved i'uluth property worth $7,500 
No commission. Address K 849. 



FOR SALE— FANCS' SFJED POTATOES 
— Early Rose. Eai'ly Ohlos. Call 508 
West Third street; Grand 1820-X; 
Melrose 9532. 



WANTED— SUITS MADE BY DU- 
luth's best tailors, are for sale cheap 
at the Tailors' ICxchange. 20 Fifth 
avenue west. 

FOR SALE— A FEW UNCALLED-FOR 
suits at your o\?n price. Dundee 
Woolen MllKs. 353 West Superior 
street. 

FOR SALE— CABLI: PIANO USED t 
years; less than one-third original 
cost. Address Bargain X. Herald. 



RENT— STORES^FFICES 



CIVIL ENGINEERING. 



Duluth Engineering Co.. W. B. Patton 
Mgr.. 613 Palladlo bldg. Specifications 
prepared and construction superin- 
tended for waterworks, sewerage, eto. 



PLUMBING. 



THE 

W. 



SANITARY PLUMBING CO. 34 

First St. Plumbing and heating. 



REPAIR SHOP. 



CENTRAL REPAIR SHOP, 209 E Sup 
street — Gas engines, safe work, locks 
keys, cutlery grinding, motorcvcle 
repairing a specialty. I^wn mowers 
sharpened. Grand 2369- Y; Mel 6069 



CIRCULAR LETTERS. 



Try our writerpress, fac-slmile letters; 
look Just like typewriter ones. The 
Letter Shop, 909 Torrey Bldg. Mel. 116 



CLAIRVOYANT-HAIR SPECIALIST. 

MRa^'^NNAriTriBryan^^ 

growing parlors, grows a head of 
hair or no pay. 18 Lake av. Mel. 1145 



* FOR RENT. 
Hr Fine corner store, 201 North Cen- ■^ 

* tral avenue; in best business dls- <^ 
a- trlct in West Duluth; size 25 by * 
a- 80; steel ceiling; full cement base- it 
it ment; also large warehouse In it 
it rear; newly decorated through- it 
it out; rent v<;ry reasonable to right it 
it party If taken at once. ■*. 
it W. C. SHERWOOD & CO., it 

* 118 Manhattan Bldg # 
'* it 
it^ft^i'^titit'ie^t'iHl'^t'^i^t^mit^ititiHHt^ititit 



FOR SALE— A NUMBER OF PIECES 
of household fu-nlture practically 
new. 1028 East First street. 



FOR SALE— OWNER LEAVING TOWN 
will sell his new furniture for half 
price. 'Phone Lakeside 298. 



FOR SALE — ROLl^ TOP AND FLAT 
top desk, table, chairs, steel book 
rack. Z 399, Herald. 



FOR SALE — HOUSEHOLD FURNI- 
tiire, cheap: party leaving city. 1110 
East Sixth street. 



MONEY TO LOAN— LOANS MADE ON 
timber and farm lands. John Q A 
Crosby, 305 Palladlo building. 

MONEY ON HAND TO LOAN'on FIRST 
mortgages. See N. J. Upham com- 
pany. Providence building. 



FOR RENT— MODERN BRICK HOUSE, 
six rooms; every convenience. Apply 
1105 East Fourth street or call 
Grand 1138-A. 



HAVE US MOVE YOU WITH OUR 
largo van and experienced men. I>u- 
luth Van Co., 18 Fourth avenue west. 



P'OR RENT — THREE AND FOUR- 
room houses. $5 and $8. Inquire 428 
Nineteenth and One-half avenuo west. 



FOR RENT— SIX-ROOM HOUSE. HOT 
water heat; central; $30. N J. Up- 
ham company. Providence building. 



$500 TO LOAN ON CITY PROPERTY— 
First mortgage only. Address A 811 
Herald. 

LOANS on Improved farms, city loans 
insurance. W. B. Roe. 414 Prov. bldg! 

M.)n.'y to loan — Low rates; no delajT 
~)uluth Realty Co.. Ist National bldg! 

Mo ley to loan — any amount; low rates 
Cooley & Underbill. 209 Exchange. ' 



_JWATCIHESJ£PAIRED._ 

Guaranteed main springs. $1; waTch 
cleaned. $1. Garon Bros.. 213 W. 1st. 



FOR SALE— 850 WILL BUY SECOND- 
hand uprlglit piano; easy terms. V 
394. Herald. 



it FOR RENT. -j^ 

* # 
T> Two or four rooms, suitable for i^ 
it offices, prices reasonable, over # 

* Smith & Smiths drug store, 101 # 
a: West Superior street. Call at room # 
it 1005 Alworth building. Melrose * 

^'^I'iMtit^'^itii'^f^^t^^'itititititititit-'^t^il'itit 



CHIMNEY SWEEPER. 

Frr'^^ilcCARTFrYT'cWM^^ 

furnace cleaner, stack and flagpole 
painting. Call Park. 39-Y. 



REAL ESTATE. 

L A. LARSEN Co.. 213 Providence Bldg 
City property, lands, loans, fire ins! 



RUG WEAVING. 



FIRST-CLASS WORJv — SILK CL^R- 
tains a specialty. Melrose 3341. 



SWEDISH MASSAGE. 

A. B. HANSON. MASSEUr!''"400 l^iTw 
Jersey Bldg. Old phone. 4273 Melrose. 



GRADUATE MASSEUSE. 305 EAST 
First street. 'Phone. Grand 1215-X. 



CIVIL ENGINEER AND SURVEYORS 



NICHOLS & F.A.RRELL, 418 MANHAT- 
tan Bldg. Anything in engineering. 



CARD ENGRAVING AND STAMPS. 

Consolidated Stamp & Printing Co., 
Barker & Orr. Props., 14 4;th Ave. W. 



CORSETS. 



FOR RENT— THREE FINE STORES 
at First Ave. E. and Superior St.; 
newly decorated and In first class 
condition; rent very reasonable; are 
suitable for any mercantile business 
See Martin Smith, 104 E. Superior 5st. 



FOR SALE— .SODA FOUNTAIN, BAR, 
four tables and tvirenty chairs. L. B. 
C. Herald. 



l^R SALE — SECOND HAND SAFE. 
See N. J. Upham cftnpany. Provlclenca 
building. 



FOR SAI^E — RAN 
if taken at once 
west. 



aiiJI^TOVB; CHEAP 
I. 10 Eleventh avenue 



% 



FOR SALE— VISIBLE TYPEWRITER; 
li ke new : $50. Y 348. Herald. 

VXm SALE- TWO SIfSoNE ROLL-TOP 
desks. Call at 40a Providence build- 
ing. Mel. 960. 



FOR SALE — UPRIGHT PIANO. 
Smith-Barnes, $40 ca«h. Call Lincoln, 
515. 



For Sale — Edison Indestructible records 
by mall. 50c. Boston Music Co., Duluth. 



For Sale — National oash register and 
osteopath outfit. 7fe ^opkin. 29 W. Ist. 



FOR RENT — LARGE HALL; WELL 
furnished for lodge purposes or dan- 
cing; can be rented reasonable every 
Monday night, flrst and third Tues- 
day nights, flrst and third Saturday 
nights. Call Melrose. 1762. 

FOR RENT — CORNER STORE AT 
101 East Superior street; excellent 
lo<'atlon for any retail business. Call 
at store or at 530^ West Superior 

street. 



Spirella corsets. 7 W. Superior St, A, 
M. Osborne. Mel. 4479; Grand 2197-Y. 



DANCING ACADEMY. 



COFFIN — 25 Lake avenue north. Either 
'phone. Open afternoon and evening. 

Lynn Dancing academy, lady instructor. 
18 Lake Av. N. Hall for rent. Mel 1145 



SEWING MACHINE REPAIR CO. 

GEO. W. POND, MAN^COER 

1122 EAST BTFTH ST 

Melrose. 3641. Grand, 1533-Y. 

We do not sell new machines, but we 

correct any troubles and make over old 

ones to be usually better than new 

ones. Call us for estimate. 

"safety RAZORS SHARPENEOr 

.Safety raxor blades all klnds^harpened 
and put In first-class condition. 30c 
per doxen. Quayle-Larsen Co. 



FLORISTS AND NURSERYMEN. 



Duluth Floral Co., wholesale, retail cut 
flowers; funeral designs. 121 W. Sup. 



For quick service, funeral and wedding 
designs, try Seeklns. 302 E. Sup. St. 



FOR RENT— LARGE SPACE. SECOND 
floor front, 24 West Superior street. 
Fine business location. N. J. Upham 
company. Providence building. 



FOR RENT — STORE; LARGE BASE- 
ment; 23 East Fourth street; good 
location for grocery. Inquire 504 
West Superior street. 

FOR RENT — OFFICES FRONTING 
courthouse park; room 25 by 75; for 
light manufacturing. Apply Christie 
Lithograph company. 



FOR RENT— DESIRABLE DESK ROOM 
In Exchange build'ng; reasonable. 
Address J 499, Herald. 



FURNITURE RE-COVERED. 



Let Forsell do your UPHOLSTERING. 
334 E. Superior street. Both 'phones. 



GRADING AND SODDING. 



GRADINQ. SODDING AND SEEDINQ. 
Trees, shrubs and plants. We sell 
and move large trees. . Have trees 
trimmed now. Call Mercer, Lake- 
side, 323-1^ 



JANITOR AND WINDOW WASHER. 

PUBLIC JANITOR AND WINDOW- 
washer. Prudence Robert, the best 
new window cleaner In the city. Mel 
4196; Grand $<85-T. ISO Pioneer blk! 



TRANSFERRING AND STORAGE. 

1^ MO\1NG, PACKING AND TRANS- £ 

# FERRING OF ALL KINDS. ^ 
it General merchandise and household * 
it goods stored. We give service « 

# NORTHERN COLD STORAGE & # 

# WAREHOUSE CO. # 
it Old 'phone, Melrose 3590. H. 
it New, Grand 981 -A. -ifi 

it^^i^i^ i:-^itii^ii^itititit^-itit'i('ii^itii^ 

typewriters; 




and 



Slightly used 
rebuilt 
TYPEWRITERS. 
All makes sold or 
rented. Rental ap- 
plied as part pay- 
ment Send for list. 



DULUTH TYPEWRITER CO 
319 West First St. Melrose 324$. 



VETERINARY SURGEON. 

J. J. FINDL.\Y. veterinary surgeon Of- 
fice, City Wood yard, 115 Secondave- 
nue. W. Office hours 8 a. m. to 6 n m 



WATCHMAKER AND JEWELER.~~ 

CHRIST HAUG, Manufacturing Jeweler 
and watchmarker. 319 W. Firat 81. 



r 






i 




p th i fK^j fra Q iaie 






Thursday, 



THE BULUTH HERALD 



May 1, 1913. 



I 



YOUR SUNDAY PAPER 
SATURDAY NIGHT 

THE SATURDAY HERALD, always 
28 to 32 pages of good reading— enough to 
last vou from Saturday evening to Monday. 

All the sporting and automobile gossip, 
social and dramatic news, full Associated 
Press dispatches. 

Advertisers will find The Saturday Her- 
ald a valuable aid for Monday and Tuesday 
business as thousands in 



One Cent a Won! Each Insertion. 
No Advertisement I^ess Than 15 Cents. 



WANTED. 

I«>XrKRIENCED COOK. 

MRS. WARD AMES. JR., 
;;::1G East Second St. 









WANTED. 

OVERAI.T. AND MACKINAW 
COAT MAKERS. 

CHRISTENS5KN-MENDENHAL.L.- 

GRAHAM CO., 

614 West First Street. 



One Cent a Word Each Insertion. 
Xa Advertlsemenu Liess ThanJS^Centa. 

nSmfiwiii WAirre 

ON PACES aO ANDjj^ 

HELP WANl^ro^^^FEMALE. 

(Continued.) 

^ W^iNTED, § 

•^ Two experienced ladles for glove # 
^ department and knit underwear * 
department; ^ood position for * 
those who can qualify. * 

ROTH BROS. COMPANY, * 

Superior, Wis. * 



One Cent a Word Each Insertion. 
No Advertisement Less Than 15 Cents. 

nFORRENT^^^FLAT^ 



FOR RENT. 



925 E. r.th St., 5 
2408 W. iHt St., 
2106 W. Sup. St. 
32 10th Ave. W., 
318 W. 4th St., 
13 West 5th St. 
208 14 W. 2nd St. 



rooms 119.00 

6 rooms 10.00 

, 6 rooms a 

6 rooms ^^'^} 

6 rooms 14.00 

6 rooms crl 

, 7 rooms 25.00 



STRYKER. MANLEY & BUCK, 
Main floor, Torrey building. 

165 — 'Phones— Grand, I60. 



Melrose, 



One Cent a Word Each Insertion. 
No .Advertisement Less '^^^^J^^^J^ 

CLIFTON HOTEL, 
821 West First Street 
We are all through with the remodel- 
ing of the building- hot and cold 
water In every room. Rooms for ligni 
hou.sekc-eping. $2 per week and up. 
Will sell furniture to responsible 
party. Also building for rent. 



WANTED AT ONCE. 






WANTED AT ONCE. 



Iron Range towns see no o 
Monday. 



Duluth and the 
er paper until 



We require the services of several 
experienced salesladies; must be 
able to .speak Scandinavian; good 
salaries for rifiht parties. Apply 
BOSTON STORE, 
320 Central Avenue. 



Competent fitter 
partment; nor.e 
need apply. 



for alteration de- 
but experienced 



five 
serv' 



25.00 



J M. GIDDING & CO. 



'X- 



*-?f*7¥^¥^¥*-;^^;s^#'^-.¥^i^^;^^*^f**^^ 



"^ft^^.i^. 



On«' Cent a Word Each Imertlon. 
\dvertlscineiit Less Than 15 Cents. 



No 

TELEPHONE DIRECTORY 

OF 
BUSINESS 

HOUSES. 

Below you will llnd .1 

..n.lensed list of reliablo 

business firms. This is do- 

^ipned for the convenience 

if busy people. A telephone 

irder to any one of th*^ni 

.vill receive the same care- 

.ul attention as would be 

•iven an order placed in 

"i, rson. You can ^-^^y^V,,^'^- 

cud upon the reliability 

of iiny one of these firms 

' O'd 

'Phone. 

DRir.OISTS — ^w ^ ,« ., 

F.dtli'- .leronimus, Fh.U ii.iJ 

Dr F. if Burnett.D.D.3.4608 
L..%IX DRIES — 

PeerK ss Laundry .. 

Y;ile Laundry 

Lutts Laundry 

Home Laundry Co. 

Model Laundry 

Tit>v laundry 

MEvt MAIIKKT— 

Mork Brus 1590 

KKV. LOCK, SAFE WORKS- 

I'uluth Gun shop /-»»■ 




One Cent a Word I<:ach Insertion. 
No Advertisement Less Than 15 Cents. 

(Continued.) 
it 



WANTED. 



First-class real estate salesmen 
who can deliver the goods; rapid 
selling, legitimate proposition to 
offer to the right 
Herald. 



men. R 295, 



New 

Phone. 

1072 
909-X 



428 


428 


479 


479 


447 


447 


478 


478 


2749 


1302 


257 


257 



i(^^i'9i^i^i'9('^^^»ii^^ii^'-^it^t?^^ 



* 



WANTED— YOUNG LADY FAMILIAR 
with city to take orders for book 
about late flood disaster; $10 daily Is 
easy money. Also out-of-town solic- 
itors. Torrey Supply company, Tor- 
rey buildi ng. E>uluth. . 

Wanted— Girls to attend dressmaking 
school; make garments for yourself 
or others while learning. Quick, easy 
and perfect. Diplomas to 'graduates. 
Miss Gray 3rd floor. Geo. A. Gray Co. 

WANTED— GIRL FOR HOUSEWORK; 
domestic science graduate preferred, 
but new comer will be considered. 
Mrs. H. C. Strong, 2314 East * If th 
street 



WANTED— COOK AND TWINING ROOM 
girl. Glen hotel. Twelfth avenue west 
and Michigan street 

WANTED— GOOD GIRL 
al housework. Mrs. C. 
p:ast Superior street. 



FOR GENER- 
A. Britts, 2201 



WANTED — GIRL FOR 
housework; gtod wages. 
Third street 

WANTED— GIRI- 
housework. 717 
Melrose 4067. 



GENERAL 
1109 East 



FOR GENERAL 
Woodland avenue; 



FLATS FOR RENT. 

No. B 401 % East Fourth street four 
rooms and bath .•.•♦" 

No. 125% Tenth avenue east 
rooms, steam heat. Janitor 
Iq^ 

No. 704 East Fourth street entire- 
ly modern six-room heated apart- 
ment; has gas range, hot and cold 
water, janitor service . • • ■•*^-^^ 

MASSACHUSETTS REAL ESTATE CO. 
18 Phoenix Blk., Duluth. __ 



FOR RENT — You will both be happy 
and contented if you furnish your 
home with a Kelly 3-room outfit. 
Three rooms furnished for S69; sma.; 
payment down, balance »l-^<> Pf 
week; use It as you pay. F. S. Kelly 
Furniture Co., 17-19 W. Superior 



Hugh 
retary, 



SECRET SOCIETIES. 



PALESTINE LODGE, NO. 7»,. 
A. F. & A. M. — Regular meet- 
ings first and third Monday 
evenings of each month at 
8 o'clock. Next meeting. May 
5, 1913. Work — Second degree. 
Joyce, W. M.; H. Nesbitt, BftC- 





St 



FOR RENT — TWO CONNECTING 
rooms with large pantry, gas range 
and running water; complete for 
housekeeping for two or three per- 
sons; also other single and double 
rooms; warm and homelike. The 
Vero na hotel, 310 West Third atreet 

THE NEW ALEXANDRIA. 
Furnished apartments and single rooms, 
with bath or without; private tele- 
phone in all rooms; dining room in 
connection. 322 West Second s treet 

FOR RENT — TWO UNFURNISHED 
front rooms, hardwood floors, electric 
light, gas, bath, extension telephone, 
suitable for couple; very central. Mel- 
rose, 5235. Call evenings. 

THE DE ANGELTERR HOTEL. 
Fine newly furnished rooms with hot 
^^^^^^iW^Wf^?**^?^^^ i and^ COM junnjng ^water ^^steam heat^- 

310 East Superior street 



I 



FOR RENT. 
Five-room modern flat with heat, 
water and janitor service; loca- 
tion is in West end, near Eigh- 
teenth avenue west; rent |22.by 
per month. Apply _ 

WHITNEY WALL CO., 
301-02 Torrey Building. 
Melrose 1368. Grand 810. 



IONIC Lodge no. 186, a. p. 

& A. M. — Regular nieeting*- 
gecond and fourth Monday 
evenings of each month at 8» 
o'clock. Next liieeting. special^ 
Thursday, May 8, 1913. Worlr 

— Third degree. Carl K. Lonegren, W. 

M. ; Burr Porter, secretary. 

KEYSTONE CHAPTER NO. 
20, R. A. M. — Stated convoca- 
tions, second and fourth« 
Wtdnesday evenings of each^ 
month at 8 o'clock. Next 
meeting. May 14, 1913. Work — Regular- 
business; M. M. degree. Trevanlon W. 
Hugo, H. P.; Alfred Le Richeux, sec- 
retary. 




A 



ii^^-^6i(^}^:ii^^'}6'i(^?6'ii'i6'i^ 



FOR GENERAL 
of two. 524 East 



WANTED — GIRL FOR GENERAL 
housework; Scandinavian preferred; 
no objoction to newcomer, if expe- 
rienced. 1828 East Superior street 



^ WANTED, 






FIRST-CLASS CLOTHING 
SALESMAN. 

Age 2B to 35. Apply 

C. H. ZIEHLSDOKF, 

24 Third Avenue West. 



WANTED — COMPETENT COOK OR 
housemaid. Mrs. Ward Ames. Must 
come well recommended. 205 Eigh- 
teenth av enue east. 

WANTED — COMPETENT GIRL FOR 
general housework, three In family, 
best of wages. Call Melrose 561. 2330 
East Fifth street 

FOR 

good 

avenue. 



WANTED— A GIRL 
housework; family 
Third street. 

WANTED— GIRL FOR DINING ROOM 
only. At People's hotel. Lake ave- 
nue south. 

" PANTS- 

Phoenix 



FOR RENT. 

Desirable five-room flat with bath 
at 118 West Fourtli street; hard- 
wood floors throughout; |22.50 per 
month. „„ 

W. C. SHERWOOD & CO., 
lib Manhattan Bldg. 



WANTED- 
maker. 
block. 



-GIRL TO ASSIST 
Joe Weinberg, 26 



WANTED— A 
finisher at 
street 



SKIBT ArD WAIST 
once. 503 East Fourth 



THREE-ROOM FL.\TS FOR RENT. 
Downstairs, 309 Sixth avenue west. 
Upstairs. 309 Sixth avenue west 
Up.-'talrs, 601 West Third street 
Upstairs, 607 We.st Third street 
Rents moderate; good repair. Ap- 
ply to Henry Taylor, 603 Palladio 
building; Grand 2066-Y^ 



FOR RENT— FURNISHED ROOMS; 
also furnished for light housekeep- 
ing; single or en suite; steam heat; 
central location; Inquire 31 East Su- 
perior street, Lowell block, room 410. 

FOR RENT— COZY AND COMFORTA- 
ble Is the home of the newlyweds 
that have a three to five-ioom outnt 
from Forward's; $65 to |225; easy 
terms. R. R. Forward & Co. 



WANTED— YOUNG LADY TO WORK 
In dining room Bennett's cafeteria. 



WANTED— FIR:^T-CLASS CHAMBER- 
maid. Hotel Girand, West Duluth. 



WANTED— EXPERIENCED GIRL 
general housework, no washing 
pay. 29 North Fifty-seventh 
West Duluth. 



BUSINESS CHANCES. 



WANTED— GOOD STRONG GlIO^ TO 
learn washing. Apply Duluth Steam 
Laundry, 16 South Fifty-seventh 
avenue west. 

w"aNTED — YOUNG GIRL FOR 
housework in family of two; no 
cooking. 617 Tenth avenue east Mel- 
rose 31G0. 



-;g^-.'f#Vti;¥*-;^*^^'f-A:--;&*'**i^-^''^'^'»^^| 



189 
A 3969 



REAL ESTATE, FIRE 

INSURANXE AND 
RENTAL AGENCIES. 



L A. Larsen Co.. 214 Providence bldg. 
Duluth Realty Co., 608 1st N. Bank bldg. 
E D Field Co.. 203 Exchange building. 
Gettv-Smith Co., 306 Palladio building. 
The Home Realty Co.. 200 Alworth bldg. 
J F McNaughton, 2022 W. Superior ht. 









WANTED. 

TAILOR TO WORK ON 
TAILORED GARMENTS. 

Apply tailor shop, sixth floor, 

F. A. PATRICK & CO. 



* 



* WANTED. 
% BUSHET-.MAN, 
^ Steady work. Apply at once. 

* OAK HALL CLOTHING CO. 

WANTE1>— (K)OD RELIABLE MAN 
to work farm on shares, good chance 
to right man with team; about 
thirty acres cleared, twenty of 
which is stumped; small house, two 
barns, machinery shed and root 
house, have wagon, buggy and all 
other equipment Call 206 Palladio 
building. 



WANTED AT ONCE— EXPERIENCED 
girl to do hand embroidering; call 
- - 1 floor, Christie 



For Sale— Conftctionery store. $ 650.00 

Hotel and bar •*>§9^?V 

Railroad eating house 

Grocery stock 

Cigar store 

Gents' furnishing business 

Hotel of 35 rof.ras. everything 

new and first-class •• 

Several others for sale. 

DULUTH BUSINESS EXCHANGE. 

d09 Torrey Building. 



500.00 

1,300.00 

2.000.00 

.1.500.00 

1,300.00 



FOR RENT— FIVE ROOMS; HEATED 
for light housekeeping and office or 
specialty shop, 13 East Superior 
street; rent reasonable. Corporate 
Investme nt Co., 100 Torrey Bldg. 

FOR RENT— VACATED TODAY— FIV E - 
room flat; modern except heat; fine 
view of lake and city; references ex- 
ciianged. 314 South Nineteenth ave- 
nue eas t Call 590-Y, G rand. 

FOR RENT — SIX-ROOM FLAT; AL- 
most new; all conveniences; hard- 
wood floors and finish, hot water 
heat. 301 Eighth avenue east. Call 
T. Strand, Lincoln 310-A. 



DULUTH COUNCIL NO. Bi- 
R & S. M. — Stated convoca- 
tion.«<, first and third Fridays- 
of each month at 8 p. xn. 
Next meeting, May 2. 1913; 
Work — Regular business. Hei mon Ij. 
Dresser, T. L M.; Alfred Le Richeux,- 
secretary. 

DULUTH COMMANDERY NO. 
K. T. — Stated conclave;. 
St Tuesday of each month- 
8 o'flock. Next ( onrlnve, 
Tuesday, May 6. 1913. Work- 
— Regular business. John Cox. E. C; 
Alfred Le Rleheux. recorder. 





SCOTTISH RITE— REGULAR, 
meetings, every Tliursday 
evening at 8 o'clock. NO' 
meeting until further notice. 
Henry Nesbitt, secretary. 



FOR RENT — NICELY FURNISHED 
room; modern house; breakfast and 
6 o'clock dinner; prefer man and 
wife; will take ladies If employed. 
812 East First street 



FOR RENT— TWO OR THREE UN- 
furnlshed rooms with bath, light, 
heat and gas for light housekeep- 
ing. 621 East Fourth street. Call 
Melrose 1403. 



at Madame 
building. 



Burns, fifth 



WANTED — COMPETENT GIRL FOR 
general housework; no washing; 
housecleaning done. 1912 East Third 
street. 



WANTED — EXPERIENCED TOBAC- 
CO wrapper. Apply Duluth Cigar 
company, 118-120 West Michigan 
street . 



WANTED — AN ESTIM.\TOR FOR A 
factory doing hlgli-grnde Interior 
hardwood finish and general mill 
work; state fully experience, age and 
salary expected; correspondence con- 
fidential. X-468. Herald. 



■i;^-?^>'J'V^\i^'^**-^*^'^'^'^*-**;^;^ff'V^^^- 



Free Illustrated book tells of about 
300.000 protected pobitions In U. S. 
service. Thousands of vacancies 
every year. Tliere is a big chance 
here for you. sure and generous pay, 
lif»-time employment. Just ask for 
booklet T-302. .N'o obligation. Earl 
Hopkins. Washington, D. C. ■ 



WANTED — TACTFUL YOUNG MAN 
over 21, of neat appearance and good 
habit:?, for permanent position. Ap- 
ply in own handwriting, with refer- 
ences; moderate s^alary to start, but 
good opportunity for advancement. 
L -159, Herald. 



WANTED — MEAT CUTTER, FIR&T- 
class, all around man; young man 
preferred: must be strictly sober: a 
steady position; give all particulars: 
references required. Address L 496, 
Herald. 

LEARN TELEGRAPHY. ~~ 
Short hours; big salaries; great de- 
mand; railroad wires and experi 
instructors. Free catalogue. Barry s 
Telegraph institute, Minneapolis, 
Minn. 



WANTED — MAID FOR GENERAL 
housework; housecleaning all done; 
best of wages. 1531 East Superior 
street. 

WANTED— EXPERIENCED SEWING 
girl and one apprentice girl. 2512 
West Second street Miss Ostensen. 



WANTED — COMPETENT COOK, MA^ 
15; no laundry work. Mrs. R. H. 
Draper. 1511 East Superior street 



BUSI N ESS CH ANCES— W A NT ED TO 
contract for two portable sawmills 
with edgers; one at Palisade, Minn., 
Soo Line; one at Floodwood, Minn., 
Great Northe-n. Write or call Supe- 
rior Box company. Fifty-ninth street 
and N. P tra-k. 

WANTED — SALESMAN HAS SE- 
cured exceptionally strong line-up 
as result of success in line. Want 
business man or live salesman, hav- 
ing $1,000 tc join me in organizing 
on conservative basis. Address O 
493, Herald. 

BUSINESS CHANCES — FOR SALE — 
Small drvgood and clothing business 
In a new booming town. Business 
olears $300 a month above expenses. 
Good Investment. Must sell on ac- 
count of in lealth. R 391. Herald. 



FOR RENT — FIVE-ROOM FLAT 
with alcove; heated, modern, desir- 
able location. Inquire rental depart- 
ment, Bridgeman-Ru^js ell company. 

FOR RENT — FI^T AT NO. 911 
Fifty-sixth avenue west; six rooms, 
thoroughly modern. John A. Stephen- 
son & Co., 230 West First street. 



FOR RENT— TWO SETS OF TWO 
rooms each, furnished for light 
housekeeping, with bath and 'phone. 
2815 West Superior street; Lincoln 
92-A. 



ZENITH CHAPTER, NO. 25. 
Order of Eastern Star — Rtgu- 
lar meeting.s, second an 1 
Fourth Friday evenings of 
each month at 8 o'clock. Next 
May 9. 1913. Work — Regul.ar 
and initiation. Modelle Bron- 
son, W. M ; Ella F. Gearhart secretary. 



meeting, 
business 




FOR RENT — WELL FURNISHED 
room In modern new home; private 
family, for one or two gentlemen, 
reasonable. 517 East Second street. 



FOR RENT 
room with 
house. 213 
Grand 1926 



- FURNLSHED FRONT 

large closet in modern 

Twelfth avenue ea.st. 

Y. Breakfast if desired. 



FOR RENT — FIVE-ROOM DOWN- 
stalrs flat at 106 Forty-eighth ave- 
nue west. Rent $13. J. Forsman. 5202 
Ramsey street West Duluth. 



FOR RENT — THREE-ROOM FLAT 
for light housekeeping; heat, gas. 
electric light, telephone; very central; 
$20. Call Grand 1513-K. 



WANTED— FOUR GIRL ROO.MERS, 
strictly modern, new rooms, refined, 
lowest price; also plain sewing 
wanted. Call 622 East Eighth street. 



FOR RENT— PLEASANT FURNISHED 
room with breakfast and dinner if 
desired, one block from car line. 721 
Tenth avenue east Melrose 4879. 



EUCLID lodge:, no. 198. A, 
F. & A. M. — Meets at West 
Duluth, second and fourth 
Wednesdays of each month 
at 7:30 p. m. Next meeting 
May 14, 1913. Work— First 
degree. W. B. Getchell, W. M.; A. Dun- 
leav y, secretary. ^ 

DULUTH CHAPTER, NO. 59, 
R A. M. — Meets al West Du- 
luth first and third Wednes- 
davs of each month at . ;S0 
p. m. Next meeting. May 7, 
1913. Work— P. M. & M E. M. 

rees and lunch. Mas<m M. Forbes,. 

P.; A. Dunieavy, secretary. 





FOR RENT — FIVE-ROOM MODERN 
flat; hot water heat, one block from 
car line, rent reasonable. Apply 429 
Twelfth avenue east. 



FOR RENT — FOUR-ROOM BA&E- 
ment; gas, water, electric light hard- 
wood floors; $12 per month. 10 East 
Fifth street 



FOR RENT— TWO VERY PLEASANT, 
well furnished room.s; private family; 
light housekeeping allowed; central- 
ly located. Melrose, 2522. 

FOR RENT — ONE FRONT ROOM; 
furnished; suitable for two; also two 
rooms for light housekeeping. 226 
Fourth avenue west. 



FOR RENT— FURUNISHED 
room, all conveniences, 
family. 110 South Sixteenth 
east Melrose 5681. 



FRONT 
private 
avenue 




WANTED — GIRL FOR GENERAL 
housework; Scandinavian preferred. 
63 North Eighteenth avenue east. 

WANTED — GIRL FOR GENERAL 
housework. small family, good 
wages. Call 123 Ninth avenue east. 



WANTED— GIRL FOR LIGHT HOUSE- 
work must go home nights. Call 
mornings, 924 East Fifth street 



WANTED— JANITOR FOR BUSINESS 
block in the West end; must be able 
to take care of steam heating plant; 
steady work and good pay. Address 
Z 458. Herald^ 

W ANTE D^Tg H T TELEPHO.VE Op- 
erator at the Duluth Street railway 
office. Apply to D. C. Moore, super- 
intendent 2631 West Superior street. 



WANTED — GIRL FOR GENERAL 
housework. Mrs. David Gibbons. 217 
North Fifty-fourth avenue west 



BUSINESS CHANCES— FOR SALE— 
Barber shop; cheap if taken at once; 
two chairs; low rent; best proposi- 
tion In Dulath. Inquire or write 
Gibson Barber Supply company. 



BUSINESS CHANCES — WANTED 
man mechanically Inclined to invest 
$1 000 in established business and 
travel; pays 30 per cent on invest- 
ment O 471 , Herald. 

f5r sale — WELL EQUIPPED 
laundry doing business of clear 
profit of over $175 per week; 
sell at a sacrifice 
423, Herald. 



FOR RENT— HEATED FLAT IN WEST 
end; four rooms; only $20. See N. 
J. Upham company, Providence bulld- 
Ing. 

FOR RENT — FIVE -ROOM FLAT\ 
modern except heat, $18 per month. 
B. Summers, 115 West Second street. 



FOR RENT— ONE OR TWO DESIR- 
able rooms, unfurnished; very cen- 
tral. N. J. Upham company. Provi- 
dence building. 



FOR RENT — TWO FURNISHED 
rooms for light housekeeping; mod- 
ern; use of 'phone. 106^^ West Sec- 
ond street. 



EUCLID CHAPTER NO. 56,. 
Order of Eastern Star — Regu- 
lar meetings, first and third- 
Tuesday evenings of each- 
month at 7:30 at West Du- 
luth Masonic temi-le. Next 
meeting. May 6. 1913. Work— Regular 
business. Sophia Hoar. \V. M.; Pearl. 
E. Boerner, secretary. 

ZENITH COUNCIL. NO. 161, 
Royal league, meets the sec- 
ond? and fourth 'j^'hursdays ot 
the month at 8 p. m., K. of P. 
hall. 118 West Superior s^treet 
Shandoss Hoad. Kelley-llow-Thomson,, 
archon; collector. H. A. HalV. 18 Last 
Firs t street. _^ . 

DULUTH LODGE. NO. 28, I. O. O. F-- 
Me«t8 erery Friday tveuiiig »t S c ilocB. 
tl OUd Keliowt' hall. 18 lAke aMim»- 
nonlj. Next metung r.i^hi hrMaj, 

May 2 AJini\nsary tril«nai;>iu«-iit. J* 

G.; Geo. E. Uuil\3i:i:g. Uec. bei.; A. H. 

Sec ■ 

K O. T. M. ^_., 
Dl'IA'TH TENT. NO. 1, KNIGHTS OF 
the Maccabees tf the Wcrld, ineetj flrat 
aiid tliiid Mouuay* of each moiiUi at 
Marcal)e« hall, :;i I-*ke avenue north. 
Charlw G. Futter, comniander. 
North Fifty -»e»eijlh awiue 
record keeper, office in hall, 
m. dally. )>nlt b ptune. 

DULUTH lodge" NO. 505, 
Order of Moose, me*'!? 
Monday evening at 



BralT. N. 



ill health 



will 
cause. J 



WANTED — GOOD GIRL FOR GEN- 
eral housework; private family. Ap- 
ply 2205 West Second street. 

WANTED— NEAT, RELIABLE~~gTrL 
for second work. Apply to W. M. 
Prindle. 5 Lonsdale buildings 



BUSINESS CHANCES— FOR RENT— 
Poolroom; best location in citv; op- 
posite union depot Call at 501 West 
Michigan stieet 



LET US 
home. 
Fourth 



MOVE 

Duluth 

avenue 



YOU TO YOUR NEW 
Van & Storage Co., 18 
west. Just 'phone 492, 



FOR RENT— PLEASANT FURNISHED 
room for young lady; call mornings 
or evenings. 220 Twelfth avenue 

east 

509 



FOR RENT— THREE-RO<^M BASE- 
ment flat, electric light, gas and 
toilet, $10. 428 East Sixth street 



FOR RENT— SIX 
West Superior 
Oreckovsky. 101 



ROOMS OVER 

street Bee Max 
East Superior street. 



WANTED— OLD FRIENDS AND Ac- 
quaintances to drop in and see me. 
New stock arriving daily. I have 
Just returned from old country. Fair 
tr.atment to all. L Bergstein. the 
clothier. 521 West Superior street 



WANTED — ONE TAIL-END SAWYER 
and one edgerman. May 10. Address 
Charles Olson, care of Stover Electric 
eompany, Dterwood, Minn. 



WANTED — A MAN TO WORK 
around Hotel Bergland; steady Job 
and good pay. Alex Martin, proprie- 
tor, Bergland, Mich. 



WANTED— vSALESMAN, ONE WHO 
can talk Scandinavian, to work 
West Duluth and West end, to sell 
fruits, eggs and general produce; 
must be high grade; no dubs need 
apply. Address T 477 , Herald. 

WANTED — RAINCOAT TRAVELING 
sale.sman; must be acquainted with 
clothiers or dry goods trade; state 
your experience and a.ge. London 
Raincoat Manufacturing company. 
Pittsburg. Pa. 

^C\TEI>— THE DULUTH SEWING 
Machine Repair company will take 
a young man of natural mechanical 
ability to learn the business. Geo. 
W. Pond, manager, 1122 East Fifth 
street. 



WANTED— ONE QUICK SHOE RE- 
pairer and one shoe shiner and hat 
rleaner. Martin Panion. 319 Grant 
avenue. Eveleth, Minn. 



WANTED— GOOD GIRL FOR GENER- 
al housework; house cleaning done. 
1718 East Sup erior street 

WANTED — COMPETENT LAUN- 
dress for Mondays. Mrs. A. L. Ordean, 
2307 East Superior street. 



BI'SINESS CHANCES — FOR SALE — 
Fourteen room hotel and restaurant, 
best locatlor in town. C. N. R. bote , 
Warroad, M nn. ^^ 



WANTED— MARKER, SORTER, HAND 
ironer and mangle girl. Model Laun- 
dry, 126 E ast First street. 

WANTED AT ONCE— GIRL FOR GEN - 
eral housework. Mrs. L. C. Merrltt 
4103 West Seventh street ^ 



WANTED — GIRL 
housework: small 
416 West Superior 



FOR 

family 
street. 



GENERAL 
Call at 



BUSINESS CHANCES — RESTAURANT 
in Virginia for sale; good business 
location. Address St James cafe. Vir- 
ginia, Minn. 



FOR RENT — TWO- ROOM FRONT 
flat, modern in every respect. Mel- 
rose, 523 6. Call 7:30 even ings. 

FOR RENT— SIX-ROOM FLAT, MOD- 
ern except heat. 4312 Gllliat street 
Lakeside. Melrose 29-K. 



FOR RENT— FOUR-ROOM FLAT; GAS, 
water hardwood floors, gas stove. 
316 East Sixth street. 



FOB RENT— MODERN FURNISHED 
room in private family, rent reason- 
able. Inquire 413 East First street 




623 

west: J. & 
Hours, 10 a. 
Giaod. 61»-Jt 



Loyal 

every 

o'clock. Moose 

First street. 

secretary, 304 



8 
hall. 224 West 
J. F. Conway. 
C o 1 u mbia Bldg. 

meets- 



BUSINESS CHANCES— FOR SALE— 
Two-chair barber shop: choan rent 
and good location. M. Olive, Keewa- 
tin, Minn. 



ROOMS OVER 509 

street. See Max 

East Superior street 



WANTED — FIRST-CLASS 
guarantee $16 or better to 
Ft. Koch. Commercial 
Two Harbors. Minn. 



BARBER; 

right man. 

Barber shop. 



WANTED— ALL AROUND GOOD BA- 
ker $18 a week; steady work; Swe- 
dish preferred. Blwabik Bakery. Bi- 
wabik. Minn. ^ 



WANTED AT ONCE— DINING ROOM 
girl. West St. Paul restaurant 623 
West Superior street 

WANTED— GIRI^ TO WORK IN EGG 
department. The Victor Co. 202-4 
West Miclilgan street. 



FOR RENT— SIX 
West Superior 
Orecko wsky. lOl 

BUSINESS CHANCT* — FOR SALE— 
At a bargan. complete butcher out- 
fit Address box 166, Tower, Minn. 

^I^ir;: SNAP: FL'RNITURE OF 
room looming house; house for 



FOR RENT— ONE FIVE-ROOM MOD- 
ern flat. 124 East Fifth street Call 
to house In rear. 

FOR RENT— FIVE-ROOM FLAT; WA- 
ter, light, gas; rent reasonable. 1027 
West First street. 



FOR RENT — NICELY FURNISHED 
room for light housekeeping; all con- 
veniences. 201 Eas t Second street 

f^ RENT— FURNISHED ROOM.S; 
single or en suite: heat and bath 
furnished. 631 West Second street 

FOR RENT — ROOMS FOR LIG H T 
housekeeping, all conveniences, on 
car line. 521 East Fourth street 



FOR RENT— FURNISHED OUTSIDE 
flat for the .^ummer, all conveniences. 
East end. Melrose 4615. 



FOR 



Learn barber trade, always in demand, 
big wages, e^^y work. Few weeks 
completes. 'lools given, diplomas 
granted. Moler Barber college. 27 E. 
Nic. Ave., Minneapolis. Estab. 1893. 



WANTED — TWO GOOD SOLICITORS, 
salary and commission. Apply at 
once Duluth Dry Cleaners. 320 East 
Superior st reet. 

WANTED — LIVE REAL ESTATE 
salesman: very liberal commission 
and attractive property to handle. E. 
404, Herald. 



WANTED — GIRL FOR GENERAL 
housework. Mrs. H. R. Ketchum, 
1201 East Second street. 



n'nc 



rent Call 523 West Second street 



BUSINESS CHANCES 
Ten-room ooarding 
steady boarders. Z 4 



FOR RENT— 34 

East Superior street. 
West Superior street 



— FOR SALE — 

house full of 

r o, Herald. 

ROOM HOTEL AT 101 



FOR RENT— THREE-ROOM FLAT, 
all conveniences. Inquire 41C East 
Seventh street 



FOR RENT— LARGE FURNISHED 
basement rooms for liglit housekeep- 
ing. 216 West Third street. 

FOR RENT — FURNISHED ROOM ; 
every convenience; very central; gen- 
tle manonly^__Melros€\_422 8^ 

FOR RENT— ONE FURNISHED ROOM 
or two unfurnished rooms. ^09^ 
West Fourth street. 



month, 
axeiiue 
Uughes, 

pcrioi ..iril. 

rcspoiiOtiit, 

•phone 2i>y8 Melrose 

re^iaeIlce .No. 1 Exewr 

Lincoln. 



DVLtrH HOMESTEAD. NO. 
Brolherhc-od cf American Yeomen 
first and U.lrd Monday t^enLnp of each 
41 Woodmen hall. Twenty -ftrrt 
west and Firtt sueet. J. 
foreman, ofhce 10^! "est 



J. 

Su- 
cor- 
oid« 



bcth -phones; Mrs. J. A. Bellmeur. 

office •iiiZ2 Weti SuptTi.T street 

ZeiKth phone hZl U Uucoli).- 
streeu aeuilh 'pUoue Zi9-I> 




IMPERIAL camp; 2206 - MKKTS 
Maccabee hall. Lake avenue i.oith. 
and fourth Mondays cf each 



ind and fcartn Monoaye w ^.w - 
1). C. Ka«le», consul; f. P. J^\- ' 
F O. t)ox 411; ¥ A. Noble. dlstrJci 
uty. 417 Columbia building. 



AT' 
sec- 
monlb. 

lerk.. 
dep-- 




FOR RENT— NICE FIVE-ROOM FLAT; 
modern except heat 313 East Sixth 
street. 

FLAT. 
Seventh 



FOR RE.VT — 
nished rooms; 
avenue east. 



NICE CLEAN FUR- 
reasonable. 120 First 



FOR RENT — FOX'R-ROOM 
newly painted, at 51S East 
street. 



Call at 530 Vi 



WANTED — EXPERIENCED EDISON 
transcribers. Apply Mr. Kettner. 
Christie building. 



WANTED — TWO DISHWASHERS. 
Apply Ohio restaurant. 617 West Su- 
perior street. ^ 



WANTED TO BUY. 



"Wanted — People to know that Jens 
Drogsvo'.d, who worked for me, is 
now working for other parties; he 
Is no longer in my employ. L. Berg- 
stein, r.21 West Superior street. 



WANTED— BOY. 15 OR 
to assist in caring 
Pleasant Hill farm, 



16 YEARS OLD 
for chickens. 
Melrose. 220. 



^^^TED— FOUR GOOD SOLICITORS: 
steady work; good pay. Apply A. J. 
Jefferson, room 39, Frederic hotel. 



WANTED— YOUNG MAN OF NEAT 
appearance and able to furnish ref- 
erences to travel with manager and 



solicit 
Sefoiid 



Call 7 
street. 



to 9 p. m. at 318 West 
Mr. Armbuster. 



WANTED— TWO MEN TO WORK ON 
dairv; one old man to herd cows and 
one "barn man used to general farm 
work. H. Gould. Eighth avenue west 
and Tenth street. 



WANTED — IDEAS. WRITE FOR 
prizes and list of inventions wanted 
bv manufacturers. Four books free. 
Randolph & Co., patent attorneys, 
Wa.shlngton, D. C. 



WANTED — AT TOWER, MINN.. LUM- 
ber pilers and one green timber 
grader. Cook & Ket cham. 

WANTED — PIN BOYS. GRAND 
bowling alleys. Second avenue west 
and Superior street. 

BOARD 
Special 



WANTED — 
housework, 
rose, 4946 



GIRL FOR GENERAL 
Call Lincoln, 223-X; Mel- 



WANTED — GIRL 
housewok. Apply 
street. 



FOR GENERAL 
514 East Fifth 



WANTED— A COMPETENT GIRL FOR 
housework. 409 West Second 



gt neral 
street. 



WANTED TO BUY — WE PAY CASH 
for everything that can he used; we 
call for it. Litman Bros. 
Superior street Both 'phones 



FOR RENT— MODERN FIVE-ROOM 
basemen t flat. 128 East Fifth street. 

FOR RENT— THREE OR FOUR-ROOM 
flat, modern. 410 West Fourth street 



FOR RENT — FURNISHED ROOM 
with board, all conveniences. 18 
West Th ird street. 

FOR RENT— FOUR PLEASANT ROOMS 
upstairs, 422 Nineteenth avenue west; 
$8 per month. 



CLAN BTEWAUT, no. 50, O. s. c — 
Meets Brtt and third Wednesdays each • 
month, 8 p. m., at V. O F. hail, cortjef 
Fourth avenue west and First •"•«.»• 
Nest regular meeting May ;th ^^li. 
Aieiandei Anderson, cl.icf; John D. Mac- 
Arthur, sec.esan; -lohu Burnett, Cna.iclai secretary.- 

313 Tority bi-iiilmg^ _____^_ 

iilAMONT) LOPGE. NO. 4%. K. OF P. 
—Meets erery Mmday eveuhtg li: Sloan •«• 
i.Ell. ctiiner Twentieth aveiiut «e»t and 
SuiwrJor sUeel. b'JJd Vcrgan. C. C- 
Z-Z-:.6 West *1ret htreti. S. L. Fierce, li. 





K. OF P. . .. -_ 

NORTH STAl: Ll»l>GK. NO. o.-. K. UF 
p _Meeu every Fildaj evening at C««- 
tlc hall 118 West S-;*rlor sireet. tlf<>r<«' 
W l^tert. C. f.. 1112 Ea*t Htth- 
street. 8. A. Uc.rn. .8 ^"^'^ Tvr«:ll- 
eighUi atenue vrea>t. K. ot K. ana ». 



FOR RENT — FOUR 
modern conveniences, 
enth street. 



ROOMS, 
424 Eds; 



ALL 
Sev- 



FOR RENT— FOUR-ROOM MODERN 
flat, centrally. Inquire 513 Torrey. 



AUTOS & MOTORCYCLES. 



33 2 East 



OR 

Du- 
212, 



BUY— WE HAVE CUS- 

mtadow, or wild hay 

Sanborn & Co., 910 Tor- 



WA NT ED— FIFTY MEN TO 
and room at Hotel Grand, 
rates during .<?ummer. 



WANTED — 
housework, 
street. 



GIRL 

2028 



FOR GENERAL 
East Superior 



WANTED— GIRL FOR 
housework. Apply 1916 
street. 



GENERAL 
East Third 



WANTED^l^) BUY--IMPROVEP 
unimproved farm in vlcinitj' of 
luth. Send particulars to Box 
West Duluth. 

WANTED TO 
tomers for 
land. R. C- 
rey Bldg. 



WANTED TO BUY— ROTARY 
graph, second ha^;^; write 
.tlon and price. Quick 
glnia, Mlnn^ 



MIMEO- 

descrlp- 

Print Vlr- 



THE YALE MOTOR- 
CYCLE. For demon- 
stration of this world 
wide favorite call on 
us or write us; we 
are exclusive agents 
in this territory. The 
torcycle you will buy 




FOR RENT— STEAM-HEATED ROOMS 
and board. The Latona, 132 East 
First street. 

^:^ RKXT — FURNISHED ROOMS 
for light housekeeping at 118 Third 
avenue west. 



Yale 

after 



with others. Quayle-Larsen 



Is the mo- 
comparlnff 
Hdw. Co. 



WANTED — AN ASSISTANT BOOK- 
keeper; male: must have some ex- 
perience. M 446, Herald. 



WANTED — SEVERAL MORE YOUNG 
men to qualify for Interstate com- 
merce positions now open; 
and experitnce. S 4 

OF 



give 
Herald. 



age 



WANTED— BOYS OVER 16 YEARS 
age. Apply Duluth Brewing & -Malt- 
ing company bottling works. Tw.-n- 
ty-nintli avei.ue west. 



WANTED AT ON('E — ERRAND BOY. 
Apply to Printing Service, 20 East 
Superior street. 



WANTED — ERRAND BOY. GREER 
Printing company, 124 West Second 
street 



WANTED— YOUNG GIRL FOR HOUSE- 
work: no cooking. 327 West Second 



street 



WANTED — AT ONCE 
girl. Mrs. Fisher, 317 
street. 



APPRENTICE 
East Superior 



^^TaNTED -- TO BUY OR RENT, 
taurant ard rooming house, In 
location. Write at once, 
aid. 



RES- 

good 

388, Her- 



LARGE OR 



"WANTED TO BUY — A 

small tract of land for investment 
1 69, Herald. ^ 



WANTED— A 
for farm 
street. 



GOOD 
work. 



REI 

508 



lABLE 
West 



MAN 

Third 



WANTED — FIREMAN 
glneer's license. Apply 
at Christie Lithograph 
company. 



WITH EN- 
to engineer 
& Printing 



WANTED— A 
in factory, 
street. 



YOUNG MAN TO WORK 
Apply 16 East Michigan 



WANTED — FIRST-CLASS BUSHEL- 
man and vest maker. 1>. M. Morrison, 
Mci'ay hotel building. 



WANTED— YOUNG MAN WITH Li- 
cense to run elevator, at Christie 
building. 



WANTED — TAILOR. APPLY TO H. 
Holm, 505 Central avenue. West Du- 
luth. . . 

Learn Show Card writing at the Central 
Business college. Personal Instruction. 



WANTED— GIRLS AT THE PARK 
em pl oyment office. 15 Lake avenue N. 

GIRL FOR GENERAL 
2701 West Fourth street 



WANTED — 
housework. 



WANTED— Girls at the Central 
ployment office, 125 W. Sup. 



Em- 
St 



WANTED — PORTER; ELDERLY MAN 
preferred. 439 Lake avenue south. 



WANTED — SWEDISH NEWCO.MER 
girl for house work. »;'all Park 15 6. 

WANTED — NEAT, RELIABLE GIRL 
ge'neral housework. Melrose 1819. 



^^^^^^^^9 {^rlrk' ii%rT^''2ll"^. 



Popkin, 



Wanted to Buy - S/'^o"'l-J^"^ 

and ftoves. Hagstrom & 

2012 W. Sup. St. Lincoln 



ture 
quist. 



furnl- 
Lund- 
447-A. 



E»XCELSIOR 
MOTOR CYCLE. 

•NUF SAID. " 
Ask the man who 
rides one. We 
can arrange pay- 
ments if desired. 
KELLEY HARDWARE CO., Duluth. 




FOR RENT— SIX ROOMS: LIGHT AND 
Vater; $12 a month. 708 East Third 
street . . 



FOR RENT — ROOM IN MODERN 
flat. 712 West Third street Melrost, 




A. O. U. W. 
FIDKLITY LOl>GK. 
at Maccabee hall, 21 
everj Thursday at S p 
b*rs welcome. 



NO. 

l.ake 
n;. 
Initiation 



105— MKETS 

aveni'e norttu 

Visit ii>K mcm- 

and (mt'kar ' 



L. 



,i. lU.ai.ihr 



Tliursday. AprU 10. 
W. A. K. Ileruig icc^iJtr 
'1, I a>i Hfth street. 



Picric-, iL . 
O. J. Mur- 




MOPIJIN SAMAUITANS. 
ALFUA (OlNt 11 N«> 1-TAKE No- 
tice That Beuefl't"! degT«e meets »e<- 

ond and tourth riuirsdiys ai d t..c Min- 
arttan dfgree the 61 »t and 

<jaj^ •' I' O 

nue west and First 



S. ; VVallace 
First Nattonal 
O. S. 



tliC 

third Thurs- ■ 
F hall, coiner Four;h a>*- 
strtel. J. KelJ*. a. 
s , 



p W«llb«i«k«. k.-i!l>e: T A. Gail. 1- 



bank buUdlng. Emma Mahan. Lad, 



4176. 



For Rent — Furnished rooms, single or 
for light housekeeping. 121 E. Snd St 



For rent — Furnished rooms; light 
housekeeping allowed. 115 E. Sup. St 



retary. 



A JOB LOT OF SECOND-HAND TIRES 
for sale cheap. The Duluth Auto 
Supply Co., tire repairing experts. 
412-14 E. Superior St Zenith 2163; 
Melrose 4102. F. W. Newman. Mgr. 



FOR RENT — NICELY FURNISHED 
room. 21 Wlcklow street^ 



WANTED TO BUY — FAMILY SIZE 
refrigerator: must be in good condi- 
tion. Call_Mel rose. 3327. ^ 

I'D 



FOR SALE — A STEVENS-DURYEA 
runabout two or four passenger; 
can be seen at barn, 529 South Sev- 
enty-first avenue west; will trade 
for real estate. C all 7 06 Pa lladio. 

BEFORE YOU BUY, INVESTIGATE 
the Henderson motorcycle; catalogue 
upon request Splndler Bros., agents, 
623 Fourth avenue east. 



Grand 1870-Y. 



WANTED TO BUY-^-DOUBLE 
must be ?heap. Call Grand 
after 6 p. m. ._ 



DRAY: 
1460-X 



WANTED— GIRLS. PURITAN LAUN- 
dry, 21 Lake avenue north. 



WA N T E D— HOUS EM AT D AND 
1329 East Superior street 



COOK. 



WANTED 
Printing 



BOY AT HUNTLEY 



Co. 



WANTED- AN ELEVATOR 
St Luke's hospital. 



BOY AT 



WANTED— BARBER 
Superior street. 



AT 2529 WEST 



\VANTED— GENERAL H»)USEMAID. 
217 Second avenue east 



WANTED — 
East First 



A GOOD 
street. 



COOK AT 2232 



I would like to buy 
timber land or stumpage 



for Investment 
M 860, Herald. 



Wo nav higriest prices for second-hand 
furniture^ 10 W. Ist St Grand 1633-X. 



H POPKIN BUYS STOVES AND FUR- 
H. f^OPKlN «i.^n337-A; Melrose 1482. 



nlture. 



WANTED '?0 BUY — ^Kr^Np-HANp 
and stoves. Grand 1666-A. 



FOR SALE—ALL KINDS OF TIRES, 
G & J.. U. S., Goodyear and Michelin. 
Dulutli Auto Tire Repair Co. .128 E. 
Superior St. Mel. 776; Grand 939. 



SITUATION WANTED. 

FEMALE. 



SITUATION WANTED- -SCANDINAV- 
lan wom.-\n as housekeeper, where 
she can have 3-year-old child with 
her Scandinavian home preferred 
1002 Bay street, Superior, 




liLLlTfl COT7N- 
seccng and foutt* 
Maccabee hall, U 



nOTAL ARCANIM. 
ci'.. No. 1482— Me4U 
Tuekday *venln»i at 
Lake arenue ncrth. r.li.'.cn Brooks. 
401 Columbia bulldln*. 



ORDER 

Nesl, 
every 

IB, nth a' 

Suifrlor 

secretary. 



OF OWl.8. L'n.t TH 

>-o. 1J0<»— Mertlt-fs arc hrid 

Wednesday evening of ea-b 

Eagles haU. 418 West 

street. Jo»n>h F r •a'a, 

a East Suptrlor 



siract. 



A o r w— Duiuih 1. de». No. 10.-- 

Meeu every second 01..I fcurth Tue^la, 
at 1. O O. F. h» 



Wis. 



SITUATION WANTED — EXPERI- 
enced lady stenographer desires Im- 
mediate employment; moderate 
wages; can furnish best of refer- 
ences. U 461, Herald^ 



recorder; 
strect 



18 Lake ave- 

norlh Neit meeting M»'„}'^- • 

Initiation Tlrman 

W ; George H. I.li<'lerr, 

nnancler. 18 West Vi-rt' 



night 
iiuc 

p. m. shaip. 
A. Johnson. M. 
T. J. St- Germain, 



BOARD & ROOM OFFERED. 



_ ROO.M 
home. 14 



furniture 



BI^Y— A 
119 East 



TEAM OF 
First street. 



WANTED — GIRLS 
Laundry. 



AT PEERLESS 



WANTED TO 

heavy horses. 

HIGHEST i>RICEfi P«W for second-hand 
clothln*. 338E.fiu|^>St Grand IIW-Y. 



FOR SALE— INDIAN MOTORCYCLE; 
150 cash; SO-horse power CudiUac 
auto motor, good for speed boat 
$126. 2 031 West Superior stre et 

FOR SALE— WINTON, SIX-CYLINDER, 
seven-passenger, fore-door car; In 
flrst-class condition; a bargain. Ap- 
ply 1811 East Se cond street. 

SEE THE WAYNE OIL 'FANK & PUMP 

' company, 216 East Superior street 

about that gasoline outfit for your 

garage. 

Fxprinr' motorcycle and gas 

tnalnc repair work. Central Repair 
ihoir "6 W. Mich. St Grand 236»-y. 



SITUATION WANTED — BY YOUNG 
lady with two years' experience as 
bookkeeper and cashier, also have a 
fair knowledge of stenography, 
dress U 498, Herald. 



Ad- 



SITUATION WANTED — EXPERI- 
enced chambermaid wants position 
on passenger boat. Address Experi- 
ence, 1 26 Mesaba avenue. 

SITUATION WANTED — DRESSM AK - 
ing or ladles tailoring; prices rea- 
sonable. Call Miss Ganyean, 18.3-A 
Granfl- 

SITU ATION WANTED — CAPABLE, 
experienced lady stenographer wishes 
poBltlon. R 386. Herald. 

SITUATION WANTED— DRESSM AK- 
ing and ladles' tailoring. Phone 
Melrose 1177. 



BOARD OFFERED 
board in private 
Firs t str eet. 

FOR RENT— ROOM 
First avenue w est: 

F^nltENT— STEAM 

board. 122 East First, 



AND- 
West 



AND BOARD. 221 
; Wahldorf Anntx. 



HEATED 



and 



FOR RENT— ROOM 

210 West Second street. 



R:OMt) 
Latona. 

AND^BOARD. AT 



IjLOSTMiDFOyND; 

J^;^J^^SrrSXKERON-JOHNSON - HOR- 
gan furniture distributors sales- 
rooms 2110-2112 West Superior street^ 
can save vou blc money on good 
furniture. ^You r Credit O. K. 

STREET 



FOUND — ON SUPEIUOR 

S-icond avenue west. watcn 

Owner may have same bjr 

at Herald and paying for ad.^ 



near 

charm. 

calling 



} 



«•*■ 



« 




THE DULU 




HERA 








VOLUME XXXI— NO. 21. 



FRIDAY EVENING, MAY 2, 1913. 



TWO CENTS. 




WILL HAVE $1,000,000 BOULEVARD DRIf 

ALONG THE SHORE OF THE LAKE TO TWIi HARBORS 



CO ^ 



MELLEN'S 1102,000 
PROFIT" ONLY REBATE 
ON POLITICAL GIFT 



Head of New Haven Road 

Explains Puzzle in 

Finances. 



I 



Says Railroad Reimbursed 

Him for Republican 

Contributions. 



Is Not Put Under Oath Lest 

He Claim Immunity 

Later. 



Boston, May 2. — President Mellen, ex- 
plaining the apparent profit made by 
him of 1102,000 by the sale of the 
New Haven stock In 1904, told the in- 
terstate commerce commission today 
that the money had been paid back 
to him to reimburse him for contribu- 
tions to the Republican campaign fund 

of that year. 

President Mellen, appearing before 
the interstate commerce commission 
In his own behalf today, gave an un- 
expected explanation of some of the 
figures In the New Haven's books. 

According to the governrntnt expert 
accountant. David E. Brown, there ap- 
peared an apparent profit of $102,000, 
made by Mr. Mellen personally by trad- 
ing in the stock of the railroad com- 
pany. 

I'aed In Pollttc*. 

The first thing that Mr. Mellen said 
when he took the stand was that the 
money In question had betn used In 
political contributions In 1904. 

Fifty thousand dollars went to the 
Republican national campaign fund, he 
said, and other amounts to aid Repub- 
lican state campaigns In New York, 
Connecticut and Khode Island. Mr. 
Melle 1 advanced the money and the 
railroad company reimbursed him. 

He made this statement: 

"The transactions by which 19.835 
shares of New Haven stock were sold 
to me In .March, 1904, and I gave my 
notes to the New England Navigation 
company, have been questioned. This 

(Continued on page 11. fourth column.) 

DIRECT LEGISUTION 
WINS BY BIG FIGURE 



EXPIAINS MYSTERY 

OF RAILROAD FINANCE 




CHARLES S. MELLEN, 

President of the New York, New 

Haven & Hartford Railroad. 



PISTOL DUEL 
IN PULLMAN 

Giant Robber and Million- 
aire in Berth Fire Shots— 
Both Hurt. 



Returns From Michigan 

Election Are Officially 

Counted. 

Lansing. Mich.. May 2. — According 
to the official count made by the state 
board of canvassers, the Republican. 
Pemocratic and Progressive parties 
finished in the order named in the re- 
cent spring election in Michigan. The 
entire Republican state ticket won with 
pluralities ranging from 28,000 to 47.- 
000. and e<iual suffrage, which lost by 
a close vote last November, was de- 
ftattd by a majority of 96,144. The 
Republicans polled nearly twice as 
many votes as the Progressives. 

The amendments relating to the In- 
itiative and referendum on constitu- 
tional am»nrlments carried by a ma- 
jority of 42,404. The amendment con- 
cerning the initiative on statutes car- 
ried by 66,669. 

The recall amendment captured a 
majority of 92.331. 

The flrtmen pension amendment was 
defeated by a majoritv of 26,2.'56. 

jersFmen 

hearwilson 

President Talks Right Out 

About State Reform 

Bills. 



Bold Bandit Escapes at 

Kansas City With His 

Loot. 



Also 



Tells His View 
Election of Last 
Fall. 



of 



Jersey City, N. J., May 2. — Personal 
persuasion was Ptesident Wilson's In- 
strument of action today as he con- 
ferred upon Jury reform with Demo- 
cratic members of the state legislature. 
It was the alleged abandonment by 
some .of the legislators of the party 
pledge as to this reform and a revi- 
sion of the Constitution wnich brought 
Mr. Wilson to his home state to appeal 
to the electorate. 

The president had Invited the leg- 
islators to meet him here today, to ar- 
rive if possible at a common ' agree- 
ment on the particular form of a meas- 
ure which would take the power of 
drawing jtirles from the hands of 
■ herlffs. While In his speeches at 
Elizabeth and NewarK last night Mr. 
Wilson denounced some of the assem- 
blymen who failed to support the party 
promises as affiliated with James Nu- 
gent. Jr.. and his political organlia- 
t lons. the president adm itted that 

(Continued on page 11. third column.) 



Kansas City, Mo., May 2. — To rob the 
Joplin millionaire, Jesse M. Short, was 
the real object of the giant bandit who 
held up a Kansas City Southern pas- 
senger train in the Kansas City sub- 
urbs early today and the 'holding up" 
of several passengers were merely in- 
cidental, according to the theory of 
the police who began a thorough 
search for the robber today. 

After a lively duel with Mr. Short 
In the narrow Pullman, the robber fell 
off the train wounded, carrying jl.OOO 
of Short's money, and the wealthy 
mint owner was left lying In his berth 
with three bullets in his body. 

Phy.sicians attending Short at a local 
hospital say he will recover unless un- 
foreseen complications arise. 

Two bullets were removed from 
Short's body today. One was taken 
from below the left shoulder blade. 
Another was removed from above the 
left knee. The robber's third bullet 
grazed the mining mans head, intllct- 
ing a .'flight wound. 

Fired Seven Tlmea. 

Mr. Short said he fired seven times 
at the robber. Only two bullets were 
found. 

The fact that a mysterious person 
of such stature liad been seen about a 
local hotel where Mr. Short stopped 
reached the ears of the police, and 
eventually resulted in the theory that 
the bandit, who wa.s considerably over 
six feet tall, had shadowed the mil- 
lionaire and believed a Pullman berth 
the be?t place to rob him. 

According to a telegram sent the po- 

(Contlnued on page 11. second column.) 

farmeMTttack 
harvester concern 



Charge Independent's Offi- 
cers With Fraud in Sell- 
ing Stock. 

Chicago, May 2. — Suit directed at the 
Independent Harvester company, a 
$10,000,000 corporation with a plant at 
Piano. 111., was filed in the United 
States district court here today. 

The bill of complaint was filed by 
a committee said to represent 27.000 
farmers who hold stock in the com- 
pany. It charges the directors of the 
company with misrepresentation in 
selling stock, mismanagement of the 
affairs of the company and rcMU-.sts 
that the defendants lie reslmintd from 
selling more stock und from interfer- 
ing with the plaintiff's investigation 
of the books of the corporation. 

Stock of the aggregate value of 
$6,000,000 Is said to be held by farm- 
ers, and It Is alleged that they were 
duped Into paying $15 to $25 a share 
more than the stock was worth. One 
of the arguments said to have been 
used In selling shares was that the 
company was organized to "buck th« 
trust off the map." 



SQUEEZE THE |CHINESE REPUBLIC 

LEMON TARIFF 



Opponents of Underwood 

Bill Attack Schedules 

on Fruits. 



Amendments to "Market 

Basket" Duties Are 

Voted Down. 



Washington, May 2. — The fight over 
the proposed reduction of duties on cit- 
rus fruits opened today's debate on the 
tariff bill in the house. Despite the 
pressing of the bill as rapidly as possi- 
ble by the Democratic leaders, the ag- 
ricultural schedule, perhaps the ve- 
hicle of the last vigorous opposition 

by the minority, had not been finished 
at last night's session. 

The schedules relating to wines, 
j^pirits, beverages, cotton, wool, silk, 
paper and sundries were In sight early 
tyday as likely to be acted upon be- 
fore the close of tonight's session, ex- 
cept In the contingency of an unex- 
pectedly protracted struggle against 
free raw wool. 

The California delegation in the 
house opposes the proposed cutting of 
the rates on lemons, limes, oranges and 
other citrus fruits, which It claims 
would be Injurious to their Industry 
and open the gates to the foreign fruit 
industry. 

The main opposition Is to the provi- 
sion that lemons in packages exceed- 
ing five cubic feet or in bulk shall be 
taxed one-half of 1 cent a pound. This 
i.s a cut of 50 per cent in the present 
tariff and the representatives of the 
citrus growing districts have been on 
guard against letting it pass without 
strenuous protest. 

"Market Basket" Intact. 

All efforts of the oppositit)n to dis- 
turb the "market basket" reductions 
In the Democratic bill failed yesterday 
despite the fact that Republican ora- 
tors sounded warnings of ruined In- 
dustries, enforced Idleness and empty 
cupboards to follow the enactment of 
the Underwood bill. 

The first break from the solid front 
of the majority came when Louisiana 
Democrats, led by Representative 
Broussprd, appealed to Republican 
Leader Mann for a share of time in 
which to speak against the sugar 
schedule, and when Representative 
Kinkead, a New Jersey Democrat, ut- 
tered a prediction that the senate would 
strike out the ways and means com- 
mittee's 10 per cent rates on livestock. 

The test vote on sugar came on an 
amendment offered by Minority Lead- 
er Mann to strike out the provision 

(Continued on page 11, first column.) 



■T" 'T» ^ ^* >p /p 0^"^ 

^ 500 I.OVE I-RTTEIIS * 

OF BROW.'VINGS SOLD. £ 



IS RECOGNIZED BY 
WASHINGTON FIRST 



SUFFRAGiSTS 



IN 




RALLY 



Leaders Expect to Have 

30,000 in Parade in 

New York. 



Roosevelt and fiordica Will 

Have Part in the 

Exorcises. 



New York, May 2 — "With parade, 
pageant and appeal from the public 
platform, the women ol New York city 
who believe in woma.r suffrage will 
hold a demonstration tonight and to- 
morrow in favor of their cause. Theo- 
dore Roosevelt has cons -nted to be one 
of the speakers, and with Dr. Anna 
Howard Shaw, prestdttit of the Na- 
tional American Womrn Suffrage asso- 
ciation, will deliver -ri address to- 
night at the pa,i:eant dr^plcting wom- 
an's dream of freedom to be given at 
the Metropolitan opera house. 

Tomorrow afttrnoon .viiat is expect- 
ed to be the greatest " '■"-f.an suffrage 
parade ever held — 30. strong — will 

move up Fifth aveni* When it Is 
over men and women • \*or8 In auto 



Charge d'Affaires at Pekin 

Acts on Bryan's 

Order. 



Interesting Situation in In- 
ternational Affairs Is 
Created. 



mobiles will ap;peal 



Si 



The peoi)le In 



the plaza at Fi'th avoL^ >»hd 'Fifty 
ninth street and a g;'^^' *kj -etlng will 



be held In Caruegt* 
prominent men artrt 



V^», 



at which 
lien workers 



(Continued on page 1j. -Mrd column.) 

YELL SCARES WOMAN; 
MOTOR KILLS HER 



t 



■^ ^-anl of .100 love lettemt of Robert $ 

^ and Klixabetb Barrett BroMninu: -jt/i 

^ ivaN houicht at auction today for ^ 

^ *.H2,750 by a .»« York dealer. The ^ 

^ bidding .started nt 9»,0OO and rose ^ 

4 rapidly by bIdM of $250 each. ^ 

3|t 5Hj|RJ|tJ|lJ(t^J^^^^J^ ^ ^ ^ jfi ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ Jf^ 'afr TJHft "slt 



Girl Learning to Drive Ma- 
chine Exonerated at 
Inquest. 

Elgin, 111., Mav' 2. — Bewildered by a 
shout as she stepped in front of an 
automobile last light, Mrs. Nancy Van 
Wlcklln, aged 72, of Klgln, was run 
down and crushed to death. Katherlne 
Pleavln. who wan learning to drive the 
automobile, and her Instructor O. G. 
Elfrlng. were exonerated by the cor- 
oner's Jury. 



Washington. May 2. — The new Chi- 
nese republic was formally recognleed 
today by the United States. Charge 
d'Affaires Williams at Pekin cabled that 
he had delivered the formal recogni- 
tion, as he was authorized to do upon 
complete organization of the new gov- 
ernment. 

Before Secretary of State Bryan left 
Washington for California, he an- 
nounced that Charge d'Affalies Will- 
iams nt Pekin had been instructed to 
extend formal recognition to the new 
republic of China as soon as the con- 
stitutional assembly had l:»een properly 
organized in all Its branches and pro- 
vision had been made for the election 
of administrative officers. At that 
time It was expected that these pre- 
liminaries would occupy only a few 
days, but party divisions sprang up 
in the lower branch of the legislature 
resulting in deferring the completion 
of the work of organization. 
Condition Is Fulfilled. 

Now. however, with the election of 
Taog Hua Sung as speaker of the 
house, organization Is perfected Ip 
both branches, the senate already hav- 
ing organized. The American charge 
was able to carry out his instructions 
from Recretary Bryan, and America is 
the first of the grcHt powers to extend 
recognition to the Infant republic. 

It is expected tha t a new minister 

(Continued on page 11, first column.) 

BULL HURLS DART; 
SPECTATOR KILLED 



Peculiar Accident Occurs at 

Arena at Valence, 

France. 

Valence Department of the Drome, 
France, Alay 2. — An infuriated fighting 
bull in the bull ring here today shook 
its head so violently in trying to rid 
Itself of the steel-tipped darts with 
which the banderillos had pierced Its 
shoulders and neck, that one of the 
darts was torn out of the flesh and 
hurled among the spectators in the am- 
phitheater. It penetrated the heart of 
a young man, who was instantly killed. 
A moment later the matador killed the 
bull. 



Z/:- 



THIS LITTLE BOY IS LIABLE TO GET IN TROUBLE. 




WILL Bt GIFT TO DULUTH 
BY ONE OF ITS CITIZENS 



FIRST STEPS 

UNDER WAY 



HAS CHARGE OF PLANS 
FOR GREAT BOULEVARD 




MAYOR W. I. PRINCE. 

PEAcnrrr 

UNCLE SAM 

Paul Reinsch Says America 

Will Largely Decide 

World Policy. 



Will Extend From Eighth 

Avenue to Lake County 

Seat. 



City Has Authority to Ac- 
quire Land Outside City 
Limits. 



Will Be One of Most Beau- 
tiful Scenic Highways 
in World. 



Prof. Hull Predicts Supreme 

Court of United 

Nations. 



St. Louis, Mo., May 2. — "Upon our 
action, our self-restraint and our sense 
of justice in dealing with such mat- 
ters as Panama tolls, the policy of 
commercial equity known as the open 
door, and the tieatment of aliens 
within our limits, our international 
credit depends." 

This was the statement of Prof. Paul 
S. Reinsch of the University of Wis- 
consin, addrersing the Fourth Ameri- 
can peace congress today. 

"No single thing," he said, "would 
weaken the position of American lead- 
ership more than if we should refuse 
to arbitrate or to settl e in some other 
satisfaclo»-y manner the question of 
Panama tolls." 

Prof. Reinsch said the success of the 
next Hague conference depends largelv 
on the influmce of the United States. 
•*A\'orld Supreme Court." 

Prof. William 1. Hull of Swarthmore 
college, spoke on "The Hague Tribunal, 
Its Present Meaning and Future Prom- 
ise." He said in part: 

'"Out of the difficulties which now 
attend the international peace move- 
ment, ultimately will be evolved apian 
whereby war will be abolished. The 
Hague tribunal can never be, of course, 
supreme of itself. Its riglit to ex- 
istence, as well as iig charter of liber- 
ties, arises from tlie international con- 
vention which has established It, while 
back of the international convention, 
lies the will of the nations. The I'nlted 
States supreme court is the visible and 
audible conscience of the American 
people; the international tribunal must 



Along the rugged, hill-bordered 
shore of Lake Superior, stretching from 
the heart of Duluth to T>'o Harbors, 
will be constructed one of the most 
l)eautiful, parked driveways in the 
world. 

The Improvement, costing approxi- 
mately 11,000.000, will be a gift to the 
public by a Duluth millionaire whose 
name for the present is withheld. 

Duluth's new city commission, un- 
der the direction of Mayor W. L Prince. 
has the preliminary arrangements for 
the acquisition of the right of way 
in course of preparation. Within a 
short time the first offif'lal steps look- 
.ug to Its accompiishment will b« 
taken In tli« form of a resolution to 
be Introduced at an early meeting of 
the commission. 

The proposed boulevard will start 
at Eighth avenue east and London 
road. It will embrace London road 
for practically its full length. From 
Lester Park It will extend along the 
shores of Lake Superior to Two Har- 
bors the route going through parts of 
St. Louis and Lake counties, a dis- 
tance of nearly thirty miles. 
Have Authority. 

The legislation giving the citv coun- 
cil the authority necessary to acquire 
the right of way outside the citv lim- 
its was passed at the IStOJt session of 
the Minnesota legislature, four wars 
ago. Since that time the imrfiense 
improvement has been graduallv as- 
sumlng sh ape for final action a"nd It 

(Continued on page 19, fifth column.) 

_ 

Duchess Xot l»a«t CHsIk. 

London, May 2. — Thi.- duthess of 
Connaught, wife of the governor-gen- 
eral of Canada, who was operated on 
a second time last Tuesdav for abdom- 
inal trouble, passed a fair night, but 
her condition still causes anxiety. 

newIiFl ON 

ALIEN LANDS 



California Assembly Has 

Possible Webb Bill 

Substitute. 



(Continued on pa^e 11. third column, i 

WOMEN PROMINENT 
IN STRIKE RIOTING 



Wives of Foreign Laborers 

Help Rescue Men From 

Police. 

Burllngion, N. J., May 2. — Women 
again took a prominent part today in 
the most serious riot that has yet oc- 
curred during the strike of the work- 
ers of the several iron mills in this 
city. The women, who are mostly the 
wives of foreign laborers, with the 
help of men overpowered the police 
and deputy sheriffs and rescued a pa- 
trol wagon load of prisoners. The 
police and deputies used their clubs 
freely on the men. but no one was 
seriously injured. 

The trouble started at the plant of 
the I'nlted States foundry, where 250 
men returned to work. 



i THE DAY IN CONGRESS I 



SKXATK. 

Xot In session I inertH Monday. 

Territories eummttter heKHn 
hearing on .Viaskan railroad prob- 
lem. 

HOl'SK. 

Met at 11 «. m. and rrsamed 

r<>adlnK »t (arifT bill undrr ilv^- 

mlnute rule for amendment, a^rl- 

oultural schedule bclns completed. 



* 

s 



Japanese Are Excited Again 

Over the Situation 

There. 






DELAY FINAL Al TIOX. 



||H|bJP slW""""'*^^^^^^*l^'W"'PlplslPl|ii|ll|l 



^ Sacramento, fal.. May 2. — Final * 
^ action liy the Menate on the auti- ^ 
^ alien land la^v \Min iMtstponed * 

* airnin today and the meaNiire t^lll i 
^ not come up for a vote until next * 
4f- ^veek. jk 

* * 

^ AVaNhluKton, May 2 Secretary ^ 

^ Bryan telegraphed today he had -^e 
^ reconsidered hli« purpowe to wtart # 
^ at onee for \\ a«>hinKt<>n and uonid ^ 
^ remain In Sacramento until the 
^ alien land leKiMlatl«»n la concluded. 

V V^V W' W^ W' ^ W' ^ W^ ^ T ^ ^ ^ ^ ^^^^^^j^^ ifrilr 

Sacramento. Cal., May 2. — Another 
anti-alien land bill, compiled di- 
rectly from the Webb act. now 
before the senate, but with a clause 
added, permltt'ng aliens Ineligible to 
citizenship to lease farming lands for 
a period of not exceeding three years, 
was Introduced last night In the as- 
sembly. Its author, Assemblyman 
Jiloodgood, Progressive, said he had 
obtained a statement from (Tovernor 
Johnson that he had no olij<ctlon8 to 
the new plan. The chief purpose served 
by introducing the bill, said Hlood- 
pood, was to get the Webb act before 
the assembly so that no time would be 
lost when the senate bill Is passed and 
sent across to the lower house, which 
will then have both the original Webb 
draft and the new draft with the ex- 
emption of the clause pertaining to 
leases, from which to choose. 

The plan which exempts leases from 

(Continued on page 11, fifth column.) 



f 





(F<^gM£aM^Hp^ayr-: ' 




mv»f ^ 





Friday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



May 2, 1913. 




Weather: Showers tonigrht and riaturday. Not much change in temperature. 




OPEN LATE SATURDAY NIGHT-MEET YOUR FRIENDS HERE 



New Broadway 
Neckwear 50c 

New Emery 
Shirts $1.50 




OAK HALL BLDC. 



New Adler 
Gloves $1.00 

New Spring 
Underwear 50c 



<I| YOU GET VALUE for every dollar spent at this 

store, with the assurance of highest quality, smartest styles and the 
most wonderful values— excellence of merchandise— latest styles- 
extreme values, and the guarantee of a lasting satisfaction has made 
this— 'This Busiest Men's and Boys' Store." 

When You Enter This Store- you may leave at the door all 
doubt about Quality and Value, We guarantee Sattsf ac- 
tion for a Week, a Month, a Year, or as much longer as 
you think there is any doubt about it. You can have 
your money back whenever you think you ought to have it. 



THE VERY BEST 
SUITS YOU EVER 
SAW AT — ^ 



$ 



10, '15, '18, '20, '25, '30 



Hinh Art Custom- Made Suits 



$ 



at 



18 



.00 



Perfection in workmanship; hand-tailored garments, 
equal in every respect to the most expensive custom-tai- 
lor make ; the sea.son's choicest fabrics— fabrics from the 
looms of America's foremost cloth makers. 



Attractive Histi-Grade Spring Suits 

.45 



"AT THE END 
OF HIS ROPE" 



John QuUty, Honest Work- 
man, is 83, Blind and 
^^Broke." 



''You Might as Well Tote 
Me to the Poor- 
house." 



$ 



at 



14 



Rich new spring colorings, soft-toned grays, neat hair- 
line stripes; perfect fitting clothes; extreme quality, ex- 
treme style; an assortment of handsome spring patterns 
and latest colors ; high-grade, new weave fabrics. 



Men 's and Young Men 's Stylish Suits 




They are wonderful values at this price. Lively pat- 
terns and new spring shades ; fashion's most popular 
weaves of fabric ; models that sparkle with individuality ; 
garments that will please the young fellows; we'll fit 
you carefully and correctly. 



"Llssen, pard. When a man's 83, and 
has worked hard and fought for every- 
thing he'a ever had, and has always 
played th.e game on the square, I gueas 
he's just about got to the end of tho 
rope when he finds himself too old to 
work, and broke. That's where I stand, 
pardner, and I gueds you might as well 
toto me out to the poorhouse." 

This Is the manner in wliich John 
Quilty, a homele:5.s and friendhss man 
of S3, expressed himself yesterday to 
Charles .Shogran, clerk of the poor 
uommisslon. Quilty asked to be taken 
out to the poor farm. He said that he 
had a tough time of it lately trying to 
make both ends meet. Disabilities, in- 
cidental to old age, he claimed, had 
made it impossi y\ii for him to secure 
work. He was :^ent to the i)oor com- 
mis.slon by the Hibblng authorities. 

Quilty told the clerk that he was a 
native of New Brunswick, but that he 
knew of no relatives who were now 
living. He also stated that he had no 
immediate friends. The past eight 
years, he said, had been spent on tho 
iron range, where up to recently ho 
had been emp oyed as a common 
laborer. 

Several years ago, while living in 
Wisconsin, he was Injured in a dyna- 
mite explosion, v/hich left his face dis- 
figured for life and impaired his eye- 
sight very seriously. The explosion 
occurred while Quilty was blasting 
stumps. Following the accident his 
mind was temporarily deranged, and 
eight months wtre spent in a slate in- 
stitution for the Insane. An operation 
was performed finally, which restored 
him to his menial capacity. His eye- 
sight, however, was permanently dis- 
abled. 

Quilty's only possessions are a suit 
of clothes, an overcoat and a pipe. He 
was removed to ttie county poor farm 
yesterday. 





DULUTH WOMAN IS 
CHOSEN PRESIDENT 



TWO FARMERS ARE 
BIG FIRE LOSERS 



Homes and Farm Equip- 
ment Near Jenkins, Minn., 
Destroyed By Fire. 

pine River. Minn., May 2.— (Special 
to The Herald.) — Two settlers, one liv- 
ing east and the other west of Jen- 
kins, seven miles south of here, lost 
their homes and contents besides their 



machinery and implements by fires 
Wednesday. 

The high wind that was blowing 
tanned meadow burnings into tho 
brush and large stretches of the coun- 
try have been burned bare of small 
trees and underbrush. 

William Dudgeon lost his house and 
contents and a lot of machinery and 
implements. 

Fire Taken Everythlnjc, 

Peter Peterson lost everytliing prac- 
tically on the farm that the flames 
could consume. House and barn and 
contents of both were destroyed be- 
sides wagons and Implements. Even 
the plo A' he was using at the time had 
the handles and beam burned. The 
flames came with such speed that he 
barely had time to unhitch his oxen 
from the plow and turn them loose. No 
insurance was carried by either of the 
losers. 



Mrs. Copper Heads Home 

Missionary Society— Next 

Meet at Brainerd. 

Aitkin. Minn., May 2. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — The convention of the 
Woman's Home Missionary society of 
the Duluth district came to a close 
yesterday and the following officers 
were elected: 

President. Mrs. E. K. Copper, Duluth; 
vice president, Mrs. A. L. Richardson, 
Aitkin; corresponding secretary, Mrs. 
J E. Goodwin, Duluth; recorcling sec- 
retary, Mrs. J. F. Pickard, Two Har- 
bors; treasurer. Mrs. John Carlson, 
Duluth; secretary of literature, Mrs. L. 
A Larson, Duluth; secretary of sup- 
plies, Mrs. Edith Armstead, Aitkin; 
secretary of mite boxes, Mrs. F. J. 
Slipp, Brainerd; secretary of evangel- 
l.sm, Mrs. J. W. Smith, Brainerd; sec- 
retary of young people's work, Mr.<i. 
J F. Dvson, Henrietta; secretary of 
children's work, Mrs. E. E. Satterlee. 
Brainerd. . „ , 

The Invitation extended by the Brain- 
erd sociity for the convention next 
year was accepted. 

. « 

Plan Akeley Celebration. 

Akeley, Minn.. May 2.— Akeley pro- 
poses to have an old time celebration 
I of the Fourth here this year and to 
that end the Akeley Athletic club has 
appointed a committee consisting of 
Charles F. Scheers, R. F. Pray and M. 
J Wooley to make arrangements. The 
i organization of a baseball team was 
discussed at some length, and the mat- 
ter was placed In the hands of the 
following committee: R. F. Pray, John 
Bell and J. J. Patten, to confer with 
the Commercial club. 





lira 




We aUow none of our stock to accumulate long enough to get old. Each 

day's stock cut previous evening. 



3.000 Extra Fine Pink and 
White Killarney and Rich- 
mond Roses, per doz f^i\^ 
$1.00, 75c and 3UC 

Carnations, extra 
fresh stock, doz. . . 



Sweet Peas, per 
bunch, 50c and. 

Iris, yellow and 
white, doz 



Daisies. 2 dozen in 
a bunch 



50c 

25c 
$1.25 
50c 



Pink and White CA^ 
Sweet Peas, bunch. .3UC 

American Beauties — nothing 
more beautiful, 
$1.50 and 

Lilies of the ^ | A A 
Valley, doz. .^. . .p 1 •UU 

Extra beautiful, fracrrant 
Yellow Roses, 
dozen 



$1.00 
$1.00 

1, fragrant 

$1.50 



Beautiful Fancy Stock of 

Geraniums Ready for 

Planting 



Now Is the Time to 
Beautify Your Home 
and Do Your Planting. 

2000 F.xtra Fancy Rose 
Bushes Arrivt'd Today. 

American Beau- 
ties, per doz. . . . 

Pink Kilarneys, 
per dozen 

Richmcnds, 
per dozen 

Marylands, 

per dozen 



$2.00 
$1.50 
$1.50 
$1.50 



FULL LINE OF THE VERY FRESHEST LAWN GRASS, VEGETABLE AND 

FLOWER SEEDS. 
POTTED FERNS 75c and 50c 

REiVIEMBER, WE HAVE TWO BRANCH STORES^ 

THE ARCADE FLORIST— 110 WEST SUPERIOR STREET 
AND 226-228 WEST SUPERIOR ST., NEXT TO AMERICAN EXCHANGE BANK 
FLOWERS FOR ALL OCCASIONS. Special Floral Designs for Funerals. 





FL0BIIST 



302, 304 AND 306 EAST SUPERIOR STREET. 



nmusenients 



TONIGHT'S ATTRACTIONS. 



LVCKUM— Kinemacolor 

tuies. 
OIIPHKCM— Vaudeville 

motion pictures. 
KMPRESS — "Tht) Time, the Place and 
the Girl." 



motion pic- 
and talking 




Amusement Notes. 

Today and tomorrow will be "Fash- 
ion day" at th i Lyceum. The latest 
Parisian and Ottw York, fashions will 
be .shown in Kinemacolor. In addition 
to tlie fashion.'?, the Bernese Alps with 
their muBuil. iiuw -capped moun- 

tains and the ''■' x^-'i^ra will be shown. 
"The Substlti:' -^ ' « two-reel drama, 
is also liHiUilf,'-"JJ;i_i,liy prujfram. Tlic 
special featui'e^ "^'r today and tomor- 
row will be "A,»*"uthern Cinderella," a 
Broncho threid-i «ei production full of 
vivid war scene's, s«ft .off with excel- 
lent photography and a delightful 
storj' that is effectual for its romance 
and human interest. 

" • • 
William H. Crane, who Is booked for 

an early appearance here In his new- 
est hit, "The .Senator Keeps House," 
has returned from Europe and opened 
the most extensive tour he has made In 
years In the East. By the time the 
tour ends In June Mr. Crane will have 
covered every aection of importance in 
America and will also make his first 
visit to the P^vcific coast in several 
years. 

» * • 

For about the ten thousandth time 
the battered trdiiln the broken trom- 
bone and the .-bass drum were dragged 
on to the etige last evening by Mc- 
Intyre & Heiitn at the Orpheum thea- 
ter, and the big audience seemed to 
get just as keen enjoyment out of the 
old 'Georgia -\J.Instrels" as If It were 
produced for th* first time. 

Probably 90 per cent of the people 
in the audlertce last evening had seen 
the sketch before. The jokes were fa- 
miliar, but they were greeted like old 
friends. Mclntyre and Heath have 
been presenting "The Georgia Min- 
strels" for something like twenty 
years, and th4 llgur^ of 10.000 perform- 
ances mentioaei aljpve Is probably not 
excessive. Bit Mr. Mclntyre's imper- 
sonation of trte woebegone livery stable 
negro, who hM been dragged from his 
comfortable home to join a minstrel 
troupe, would^k'^ flinny if he didn't say 
a word. Heath Is^ just as amusing in 
his role of th^ conceited, tlashy worldly 
wis« colored*, man.' There Is no star 
to this little troupe. Each is a perfect 
foil for the oillier, and the absence of 
either would leive a vacancy that could 
not be filled. 'The Georgia Minstrels 
is no longer hilariously funny because 
it is so familiar, but the enjoyment of 
watching It aKaln is just as keen as 
the pleasure one derives from reading 
an old favorite book for the second 

or thhd time. . ^ .. , ^* a *^ 

It will be repeated tonight, ana to- 
morrow Mclntyre and Heath will offer 
the sketch for which the most requests 
have been received during the week. 
Thev have three, •;^'aitlng at The 
Chu'ich" "The Man From Montana, 
and -The Georgia Minstrels." 
• • • 

Changed from a musical comedy to a 
tabloid "production, "The Time The 
Place and The Olrl." proved a distinct 
hit at the opening performance of the 
Empress theater yesterday. 

Although th » plot is an old one it 
has been ronsMerably changed and im- 
proved by the tabloid writers, who have 
Injected newer songs. Jokes and spe- 
cialty numbers. The change Is a pleas. 
Ing one and should prove popular with 
Empress theatergoers. 

The leading character, .Johnny Hicks 
a gambler, is very cleverly portrayed 
by Thomas Wlilften, whose slang 
phrases scored a hit yesterday. He Is 
also tho possessor of a pleasing voice, 
which he use.^ successfully in several 
selo and duet numbers with Miss Fran- 
ces Cosaar, who plays Molly, tho nurse. 

Miss .Jessie Houston introduces sev- 
eral new songs and dances, with the aid 
of a large chorus of young women. 
The numbers were all well received. 
Miss Houston appears In several .stun- 
ning gowns. Jack McGowan introduces 
a new rag-tlma dance that Is a novelty 
and well wortli seeing. 

The regular double reel motion pic- 
ture opened tlie bill. "The Time, Tho 
Place and The Girl" will continue until 
tomorrow eventing, with daily matinees. 

CLOQUEirPUPILS 

RENDER PROGRAM 




First Grade Children of 

Washington School in 

May Day Festival. 

(Moquet, Minn., ^ay 2. — (.Special to 
The Herald.) — A v«ty pretty May Day 
festival was given yesterday after- 



Dulutfi 



Cincinnati 



New York 



Paris 





"Correct Dress for Women 



and Girls' 



CONTINUE THEIR 



Sale of Coats 

$13.75 $19.50 $29.50 



$19.50 Value 



$25.00 Value 



$35.00 & $37.50 
Values 



Fine Serge Coats, some with yoke linings, others 
Hned with satin all through — Fashionable Medici Coats 
in Eponge and good quality Bedford Cord with beauti- 
ful messaline linings — new draped effects — copies of 
latest Parisian models. 



Middy 
Blouses 

Special Section on the 
Main Floor. 

Regulation Mi ddies . $1.50 

CoUarless Stylcs^^^J^:^ 
HaU-belt Models.. . .$1.50 

Norfolks^ .$1.50 and $2.25 

San^Toy Blouse s. . .$1.75 

The Greatest Variety of 
Middy Blouses in the City. 



For Real Gidding Values See the Suits We Have on Display at ^O C (\(\ 

(In the Suit Salon, Second Floor) ^£i%Jm\J\J 

Plain Tailored Styles and reprodudlions of imported models — a variety of materials and colors. 



Millinery for Saturday 

A Special Sale of Smart Hats 



C r Q f) formerly selling 

at ^^-^^ up to $10.00 



$ 1 nOO formerly selling 
at^ I U'^^ up to $15.00 



Perrins' Long Kid Gloves 

Ist quality — $3.75 regularly — 
For Absolute Clearance Tomorrow 



$1.00 



Corsets for the "Miss" 

is a part of our specialized Corset service. 
We give proper attention to the Girls' "'first 
Corset." Priced $1.00, $1.50, $2.00 to $5.00 

Ideal Waists, 50c and up. 

(The Corset Shop, 3rd Floor). 



GO TO THE 

ORIGINAL 

$15 TAILORS 

— the only store in 
town where you 
can get 

REAL $25 

SUITS 

MADE TO ORDER 




'Correct Dress for Women^^ and Girls" 




OFFER IN THEIR 

Girlshop 
For Saturday 



A number of 



The old reliable 
Glasgow Woolen 
Mills. Our imitators 
will do their best to 
confuse you. To 
protect yourself, re- 
member THIS name 
and address. 



Stylish Junior Coats st^ ct 1 Q 

Colors, Navy Serge and Checks M^ ■ ^^ 

Nobby Blue Serge Norfolks 

v^'ith suede belts and crash collars; 
all lined. 

Sizes 5, 6 and 8 $7.50 

Sizes 10, 12 and 14 $10.00 



A Whole Rack of Girls' Coats 
One and two of a style — great values 



$4.90 




$35 Poiret Sash Suits at $25 $13.75 



Just the suit for a high school girl. Colors, 
navy, trimmed with red or blue and shep- 
herd checks. 

Wash Dresses Special at $5 

for girls 6 to 14. A big selection Saturday. 
A variety of materials. Don't fail to see 
them. 



for this 

Stylish Sash 

Coat 



A reproduction 
of a new Paris 
model; all colors; 
sizes 6 to 14. 



GKO. H. MILLS, .Manager. 

333 W. SUP. ST. 



cei»vai4«iTi.o-«oi»-t.*. 



MAIL ORIJKKS — Write Cor free »am- 
lea aod •el(-me««urlnit blaakii. 




50 Hats for Girls 
at $2.50 

$3.00, $3.50, $4.00 and $5.00 regularly; 
fine Milans trimmed with velvet, etc., also 
extensive showing from $1.00 to $10.00. 

(MUsea* and GlrU' Hata. Third Fluor Salon). 



noon In Miss Pearl BJsson's first grade 
at the Washington school. The room 
was appropriately decorated with 
greens and there were more visitors 
than the room could comfortably ac- 
commodate. 

Following was the program: Open- 
ing song, "Golden and Crimson Tulips;' 
butterflv game. Spring song; boys' 
drill; address to queen, Roy Sarchet; 
flowers' arrival: concert recitation. 
'The Doves;" closing song. "What 
Robin Savs to Us." Jean Fleming, lit- 
tle daughter of Dr. and Mr.s. .lames 
Fleming, was the uueen of May and 
was seated on a throne covered witli 
cedar boughs. Her attendants were 
Alice Thomson. Marion Cartwright, 
Kxhilda Keable, Gladys Le Blanc. The 
roses were Isabel Caron, Cora Lave, 
Lillian Newton; daisies, Lena Joyor, 
Flsie Swanson, Emma Swanson; vio- 
lets Rebokah Collins. Lillian Nelson, 
Margaret Bsuker; buttercups, Hannah 
Thomson Orpha Fulton; toadstools, 
Vivian Gleason. Myrtle Braafladt, Max- 
Ine l')olan. Margaret Ackerman; ferns. 
Hattlo ICilers. Blanche Ilawley; queens 
guard, all the boys in the grade. 

caughtTnraid. 

Polk County Sheriff Arrests Blind- 
Piggers at Gully. 

Crookston, Minn., .May 2.— (Special 

to The Herald.) — Gully was the scene 

of the first blind-pig raid of the sea- 

Hon yesterday when Sheriff Kelly and 

Deputy Holt arrested six men charged 

with blind-plKglng or aelllng llqujr 

without a license. 

The accused are Siv.M- Hole and Al- 
bert Amundson. whc operate a res- 
taurant. J. Hogg and John liowers, 
who operate a drug store. Ole Nelson 
on two charges of selling liquor with- 
out a Uc'euse and bUad-plKglng, and 



Robert Schmock. who is charged with 
allowing tho sale of liquor in his liv- 
ery stable. All the complaints were 
sworn out by W. A. Dodge, a citizen 



of Gully. All the accused, barring 
Bowers, who was 111, were arraigned 
before Judge Gossman and held under 
1500 bonds for each charge. 




El l^rincii)e<*-® ales 

Clear Havana 
Cigars 

Crop of 1912 Vuelta Abajo, exclu- 
sively used in 

Efl Fonadipo dies (Ssolbs 

and pronounced by connoisseurs to 
be the finest Havana Tobacco ^rown 
on the Island of Cuba since 1905. 




QOWAN-LENNiNQ-BROWN CO., Dl«trlbutor« 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



BANKS WANT SHARE 
OF $10,000,000 FUND 

Secretary McAdoo Tells of 
Plan to Charge In- 
terest. 

"Washington. May 2. — Numerous 
appeals from national banks for 
an additional share of the $10,- 
000,000 of government funds which 
will soon be deposited by the treasury 
dei<artment have been received by Sec- 
retary McAdoo. Some of the banks 
wanted as much as a h.ilf million dol- 
lars. Within a few davs the treasury 
department will formally advise the 
bunks of the plan to charge 2 per coiit 
• -n government deposits and will then 
make arrangonienta to distribute the 
$10,000,0000. 

In a statement replying to Inquiries, 
Secretary McAdoo said that if the 
banks had been required to pay 2 per 
cent Interest on their averaKo govern- 
ment balances during the last sixteen 
years, the treasury would have been 
enriched by $30,610,381. He added that 
the largest amount of government 
money on deposit with the na- 
tional banks at any one time during 
the last sixteen years was in Decem- 
ber, 1907, when the total reached 
1259,994,000. 

FAIRBi»l»(rfALKS 
ABOUT CANAL TOLLS 



i 



Complete Stocks of 

Kayser's Guaranteed Silk Gloves 
Kayser's Guaranteed Silk Hose 
Kayser's Underwear 




ilberstein& 




Company 



ond 

Established 

I870 



Beautiful New Veiling 

just arrived in all the rich and 
beautiful colors and fancy meshes 
—25c, 35c, 50c, 65c and 75c yard. 



•}. 



Former Vice President Op- 
poses Free Passage for 
American Ships. 

St. Louis, Mo., May 2. — That the 
United States is under a moral obli- 
gation to admit the ships of other na- 
tions to the Panama canal on the same 
terms on which It admits American 
vessels, was urged in an address be- 
for the American peace congress here 
by Former Vice President Charles W. 
Fairbanks. 

•I do not believe." he said, "that 
we should put Great Britain to the 
trouble of resorting to an arbitral tri- 
bunal to determine a question that has 
no basis either in fact or on good con- 
science. The question is one which 
from every consideration of national 
good faith and national honor should 
be settled by ourselves, and if we right, 
ly understand it, there can be no doubt 
that It will be settled in entire har- 
mony with our manifest national duty. 

"In the event, however, that we are 
unable to accept the view that we are 
not entitled to preferential treatment, 
then we owe It to ourselves and to 
Great Britain and other nations to sub. 
mlt the question to the determination 
of an impartial tribunal." 

Mr. Fairbanks reviewed the history 
of the canal negotiations. 




of Millinery ! 



An opportunity for ladies who have been waiting to buy their New Spring Hat. For Saturday 
only we are going to sell our entire stock of colored millinery at tremendous reductions. 







~WS> 



ALASKA GOVERNOR 
VETOES JAP BILL 



Legislature Makes No Ef- 
fort to Pass It Over 
His Act. 

Juneau, Alaska. May 2. — Governor 
Walter F. Clark vetoed the anti-alien 
fishing bill aimed at Japanese; fisher- 
men. Just before thf .\laska legisla- 
ture adjourned sine die. 

The bill passed both houses unani- 
mously, but when the governors mes- 
sage was received, there was no at- 1 
tempt to pass it over his veto. 

The legislature. Alaska'.s first law- i 
making body, had been in session since | 
March 1. Among its notable achieve- j 
inents were the enactment of the fol- | 
lowing laws: i 

Vote.s for women; laborers lien mln- I 
Ing laws, anti-white slave laws, es- I 
tabllshmf-nt of prospectors' homes at 
Fairbanks and Sitka; creation of ju- 
venile courts; repeal of poll tax and 
providing for an occupation tax. 




Fifty Hats 



Values 
to $12. 






w 





i^ Please remember, this sale is positively for Saturday only "^i 



The Daintiest of Summer Dresses 
for tnc 1 oung Miss 

Dainty White Dresses for Confirmation and Gradu- 
ation at $1.50 to $12.50. 

Tub Dresses of gingham, percale and linen at $1.00 to 
$6.75. 

New White Voile Dresses with hand lace and hand 
embroidered, at $5.00 to $14.50. 

New Balkan Misses' Dresses of linen and ratine ; spe- 
cial values at $1.00, $1.26 and $1.50. 



Our Suits at $25.00 

are the greatest values ever offered to Duluth women. 
They come in the newest colorings and fabrics. Just 
compare ihem with suits that others are showing- at 
$29.50 and $35.00. 

If any young woman needs a beautiful Crepe de Chine 
Dress ami has $15.00 to spend, we have them in 
Copenhagen, Navy Blue, Nell Rose and Black, beauti- 
fully trimmed. They have the new style draped 
effect skim. 



Closing Out Our Stock of 
Men s Umbrellas at 



V2P 



rice 



All silk, and the best make; good style umbrellas. 
Also about 25 Ladies' Short and Long Handled Um- 
brellas in silk at ONE-HALF PRICE. 



NO DEATH DUTY ON 
MGHOAN TREASURES 



New York Senate Passes 
Bill of Exemption — Col- 
lection Is Insured. 

Albany. N. Y.. May 2. — Under the 
provision of a bill passed by the senate 
the J. P. Morgan art collection will 
be e.Kfmpted from the state inheri- 
tance tax, provided the collection la 
turned over "to a municipal corpora- 
tion of the state for educational, 
stientiflc, literary, library or historical 
purposes within two years." 



I ana red for VS.^OOO.OOO. 

New York, May 2. — Contracts have- 
bffM drawn Insuring the art collection 
of the late J. P. Morgan for $23,000,000. 



The premium will be $102,800. All the 
fire insurance companies authorized to 
do business in this state have taken 
their full Quota of the insurance, and 
about 14.000,000 has been placed abroad. 
The portion of the collection in the 
Metropolitan museum carries $15,000,- 
000 at a rate of 60 cents per $100, and 
the books and art objects In the Mor- 
gan library are insured for $8,000,000 
at a rate of 16 cents per $100. 

NEILL CONFIRMED. 

Senate Also Approves Appointments 
of Strong and Smith. 

Washington, May 2. — The senate has 
confirmed the nominations of Charles 
P. Nelll as commissioner of labor stat- 
istics; J. F. A. Strong of Juneau as 
governor of Alaska, and H. M. Smith 
as commissioner of fisheries. 

The expected opposition to Dr. Neill 
did not develop much strength, Over- 
man confining himself to a statement 
of his objections, but refused to resort 
to dilatory tactics. Nearly two hours 
were spent In a discussion of the re- 
ported policy of Secretary McAddoo to 
make changes in the customs service 
and replace present incumbents with 
men "more in sympathy with the ad- 
ministration." 

Senator Penrose wanted an Investi- 
gation made of the case of Chester W. 
Hill, collector of the port of Philadel- 
phia, who was asked to resign so that 
a man more in sympathy with the ad- 



{ ministration could be given his job. 

1 Rejiublicans were anxious to know 
what being In sympathy meant and 
whether or not William H. Berry, nom- 
inated by President Wilson for the post 
had that sort of a disposition. A reso- 
lution to Investigate Hill's resigna- 
tion failed, with a quorum not present 
and adjournment was taken with this 
patronage question still unsettled. 
Berry was not confirmed. 



Special 




roains 



AT OUR ANNUAL SPRING SALE OF TRUNKS, BAGS AND SUIT CASES 



9 inches 

deep, 

heavy 

leather 

Suit Cases 

just 

like cut, 



f%S\5: 




DULUTH 



CHICAGO 



WOMEN DEMAND 

NEGRO 'S DEATH. 

Washington. May 2. — Women of 
Washington went to the District of 
Columbia court of appeals yesterday 
with a protest against the law's delay 
in the execution of Nathaniel Greene, a 
negro convicted and sentenced to be 
hanged for assaulting Mrs. Adelaide 
Grant. 

The crime was committed last 
Christmas night, almost in the shadow 
of the dome of the national capital. 
Greene was sentenced to die March 25, 
but has been reprieved twice, his coun- 
sel fighting for a new trial on the 
ground that the court erred in refusing 
to accept a plea of guilty which would 
have made tne negro immune from the 
death penalty. 

The women urged an amendment of 
the statute which provides that unless 
the jury recommends capital punish- 
ment in assault cases, the maximum 
penalty shall be thirty years in prison. 
• _ 

Plan Aeronautical '<Lab." 

Washington, May 2. — A national 
aeronautical experiment plant to be 
known as the "Langley Aerodynamic 
Laboratory," is to be established by 
the Smithsonian Institution. 



NEW PASTOR IS INSTALLED 




18-inch Hand Sewed Bags, 
Leather lined ijust like cut) 





Ladies' 

18-in. Bags, 

Leather 

Lined 



■iJbltiJMi 






QUINCJ 



LIMA 



REMEMBER, OUR OWN FACTORY. 



NORTHERN TRUNK COMPANY, 



Eilert Bros. 



228 WEST FIRST STREET. 



REV. CARL O. SWAN. 

Rev. C, O. Swan was last ovenlnK 
officially Installed as pastor of th«' 
First Swedish Lutheran church, Sixth 
avenue east and Third street. 

Dr. P. A Mattson of Cannon Falls, 
Minn., president of the Minnesota con- 
ference of Swedish Lutheran churcties. 
presided at the inBtallation and deliv- 
ered the inHtallatlon sermon, lie was 
assisted by the Duiuth and Superior 
pastors of the conference. 

Rev. Mr. Swan came to Duluth about 
a year ago from Minneapolis and (lur- 
ing his charge here has done very 
effective work for his parish. 





leiser. 



^vtnpamf 



24 and 26 West Superior Street, Near First Avenue West. 



This Is an Expansion Sale 
of Utmost Importance 

And Duluth sensed it at once, as the marvelous 
selling during the last two days has demonstrat ed 

There is no time to lose; workmen need the room; stock 
must be moved quickly, and to accomplish this, our en- 
tire stock has been sacrificed -High-class garments can 
^ now be had at little prices- — 



SVITS 
$10.75 

^14:75 

$17.50 
$22.50 

Former Selling Prices 
$15.00 to $35.00 



COATS 

$9.75 
$12.75 
$16.50 
$19.75 

Former Selling Prices 
$12,75 to $27,50 





$3.98 

$7.98 

$9.75 

$12.75 

Former Selling Prices 
$6,98 to $27.50 



I y f\£Xi SPECIAL BIG FEATL^RE « i /\^ #• 

/3 UII Evening Gowns & Street Dresses 73 Oil 



/Complete showing of the smartest features of summer 
^^ Dresses— Novelties in 2-piece Balkans and l-piece 

Dresses, particularly striking for tfjfj (\Q il^C! fhfland 

Misses and Women— priced at ip^mifOj ^^^•\J\J Up, 





More House and Street Dresses 

In new styles — at Lciser's special prices 

59c, $1.00 and $1.50 

Nobby Tailored Skirts in Two 
Lots-at $2.98 and $5.00 

r 

i .A . 



Waists: Leading Styles Here 

100 dozen, over 25 different stvles, Lingerie Waists* qq 

clever designs— special at .' .'...OOC 

Others at $1.50 and $1.95. 

At $S rtft ^'^'^'-'^ts in Novelty Silks. Crepes, Voiles, Chiffons 
ni fff^*\F\M Crepe de Chines; pretty, smart styles at $5.00. 






^mSMP, 




jiiiiiiiiijiiiiiyiaHtaii^ 




4 



Friday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



May 2, 1913. 



D. H.. May 2. 1913. 

THE COLUMBIA. DULUTH. AT THIRD AVENUE WEST 



Join the 
New Thing Club. 
Its headquarters 

are In the 

Columbia Hat 

Shop. 



t 




The Columbia 
sells of good 

thinj^s the best 

at reasonable 

prices. 



Foot Note: 

Hunan Shoes 

for men 
and women. 



THE COLUMBIA, DULUTH, AT THIRD AVENUE WEST 



WANTS $41 1 
FOR DOG-BITE 



GEN. AUBERT 
JOIN^ REBELS 




Isaac Maki Sues St. Croix Huerta's Loader in North- 
Avenue Resort Keeper west Mexico Goes Over 



for Damages. 

Says He Was Attacked and 

Bitten By ''Ferocious" 

Canine. 



to Carranza. 



Foreigners Are Warned to 

to Leave the Mexican 

Capital. 



Nellie Blaine, a resort keeper on St 
Croix avenue, is defendant in a civil 
action brought in district court by 
Isaac Maki. who wants |412 damages 
for being bitten by a vicious dog said 
to be owned by the woman. 

Maki claims that on the evening of 
March 15. last, while walking along 
the public street, more particularly the 
alley in the red light district, ho was 
set upon by a ferocious dog. 

The canine, he claims, was possessed 
of a sullen and vicious temperament 
and of an Irrestible desire to attack, 
terrify and pursue him. The curs 
teeth, he claims, got mixed up with 
the calves of his legs and a severe 
llpsh wound was the consequence. 

Maki says he called In medical at- 
tendance which cost him |12. In au- 
dition to this he asks $400 damages to 
his feelings. . , , „„ii^„ 

The episode wa.s aired In POllce 
court shortly after its occurrence The 
Blaine woman was acquitted of the 
criminal charge of keeping a vl^'O"^ 
dog. The police judge stated at the 
time that Maki probably had some re- 
dress in the civil courts. 

AUSTRiniKELfTO 
MOVE BUT SLOWLY 

London Expects No Precip- 
itate Action Against 
Montenegro. 

London. May 2.— Precipitate coercion 
against Montenegro by Austria-Hun- 
gary l3 not likely, according to in- 
formation reaching diplomatic circles 
In IJondon today. The powers. It is 
believed, will be allowed further op- 
portunity of bringing pressure to bear 

at Cettinje. w. * „«- 

The council of the joint cabinet of 
Austria-Hungary in Its session at 
Vi»^nna today, while it will discuss the 
details of tlie financial and military 
operations which may possibly be nec- 
essary ultimately to force the evacu- 
ation of Scutari by the Montenegrin 
troops, will, it is believed here, post- 
pone any overt action. 

Tip From Rnif»ta. 

Cettinje, May 2. — The Russian min- 
ister to Montenegro has presented a 
curt note to the government urging 
immediate compliance by Montenegro 
with the demands of the European 
powers for the evacuation of Scutari 
and intimating that a policy of dhs- 
fiance was likely to lead to the ruin 
of Montenegro. 



Eagle Pass, Tex., May 2. — Officials of 
the Carranza re,?ime announced today 
from the const lutional headquarters 
at Piedras Negcjis that Qen. Trucy Au- 
bert, the Huertu leader In Northwest 
Mexico, had joined forces with Gov- 
ernor Carranza. 



No CompruiulMe on l>iaz. 

Washington, Vlay 2. — The Carranza 
forces claim all the territory about 
Torreon by occuDatlon. 

Confidential agtints of the constitu- 
tionalists' movtment here today re- 
ceived telegrams from Governor Car- 
ranza declaring he would never accept 
Felix Diaz as a compromise candidate 
for president, but would continue his 
fight. 

A request was received from Senor 
Larro, director of posts of Mexico, at 
the postoffice d.partment, that Ameri- 
can mail intended for destinations in 
Mexico be rout-Jd via Mexico City to 
insure its safely. Department offi- 
cials assert that mail to Mexico al- 
ready was rout id by Mexico City ex- 
cept In the case.'! of two or three towns 
in Nortern Sonora and Chihuahua, to 
v.-hich the American mall may be sent 
direct with assfurance of safe trans- 
mission. 

— » 

AmerlcnnH Warned to Leave. 

San Antonio, Tex., May 2. — A warn- 
ing to Americans and oVher foreigners 
to leave the Mexico City while there 
i.'? still rail connection with the coast, 
has been issued here by a representa- 
tive of the Carranza government. The 
note asserts that Southern constitu- 
tionalists are pr^'paring to advance on 

the Mexican capital. 

^ 

Einpalne In Shelle<\, 

Nogales. ArU., May 2.— Insurgent 
forces evacuated Empalme today, after 
which the Mexican gunboat Guerrero 
began shelling the California gult 
town preliminary to a land movement 
from GuayamaH. where the Federal 
garrison was strongly reinforced yes- 
terday. At Empalme are many Anierl- 
nan railway men. Including Supt. J. H 
Temple of the Southern Pacific of 

Mexico. 

» 

Train I.«« Dynamited. 

Mexico City. May 2.— Zapata forces 
have dynamited a train on the Inter- 
oceanlc railwaj near La Cascade, kill- 
ing many and wrecking and burning 
tTve train. Horvr many are dead is not 
known. 




ailroads 



Superior 



Superior yesterday. Following the trip 
Mr. Hicken stated that he had been 
much impressed with the number of 
rt-sidents along the route, but would 
not give out a statement as to whether 
the route would be established. It is 
generally believed that this will be 
I recommended to the department. 



STATE COWlWilSSION 

TO HEAR PLAINTS. 

Grand Forks, N. D., May 2.— (Special 
to The Herald.) — For the purpose of 
hearing several complaints that have 
been filed recently, the state railroad 
commissioners will leave here aboard a 
special train next Tuesday, covering 
all uoints between thi'j citj and Willis- 
ton Three days will be spent on the 
tour of investigation, the principal 
cities at which stops and hearinars will 
be held being Peter.qburg. Church's 
Ferry. Rugby. Minot, Williston, as well 
as several intervening places. 

The commission will close its trip in 
Grand Forks Friday night of next 
week. 

BROKEN jIiURNAL 

CAUSE S TRA IN DELAY. 

Grand Rapld.s. Minn.. "May 2.— (Spe- 
cial to The Herald.) — The Great North- 
ern train east, due in town at 5:40 
vesterday morning was delayed until 
after 9 o'clock about three miles west 
of town, by a freight car with a brok- 
en journal which jumped the track, 
and blockaded traffic entirely until 
thf arrival of the wrecking crew. 



May Get Rural Carrier. 

W. J. Hicken, postoffice inspector 
of the Chicago division and Postmas- 
ter Anderson took an insp'jction trip , 
over the proposed rural route south of 









NEW 
!< WALL 

DECORATIONS 

The new season's pat- 
t'^rns are marked by an 
immense variety of pat- 
terns, textures and color- 
ings. Leather effects and rjj. 
Tiffany blends, with panel *x 
borders to match, in shades •*•* 
of tan. brown and mul- 
berry; English chintz and 
I*re3d*>n effects; two-tone 
.stripes, crown hangings, 
silk brocades and repro- 
ductions of the Important 
periods. If you have In 
view the decorating of any 
part of your home, you will 
be Interested. 

We prepare estimates and 
color schenits on short no- 
tice. 

COWEN & 
ZIMMERMAN, 

Interior Deoomtors and 
UpholMtercr*, 

# (131 E«at Superior Street. 

I^j Melrose, 8489. Grand, 204. 



i,*, ***.«- .«.jt-* 



Runaways Caught. 

Frank McTuwice, 1.5 years old. and 
Robert Warren of the same age, run- 
away boys from Hurley, Wis., were 
picked up by the police last night. 
The boys ran away from home about 
two weeks ago and have been tranr\p- 
ing about the country since. Their 
parents have been notified. 
^ — 

Boat Club Meeting. 

The Superior Boat club will hold its 
annual election at a meeting to be 
held in the clubhouse at Billings park 
on May 6. Plans for the year will be 
made. It is expected that a large 
number of applicants for membership 
will be received. 

♦ 

Assessors Begin Work. 

City Assessor WlUJam Tiedeman and 
a corps of assistants commenced the 
annual work of assessing Superior 
property yesterday. It is expected that 
the work will take about a month. 

POTATOCONFERENCE. 

Will Be Held at Marquette, Mich., 
Next Saturday. 

Marquettp. Mich,. May 2. — Leo M. 
Gelsmar. upper peninsula representa- 
tive of the Michigan agricultural ool- 

I lege extension bureau, and Col. C. W. 

' Mott, of Menominee. secretary and 
manager of the Upper Peninsula De- 
velopment bureau, will hold a "potato 

conference" with the farmers of the 
county at the city hall Saturday. The 
program will consist puroly of Im- 
promptu discussions. It Is expected 
that the farmers who attend will agree 
to raise uniform potato crops, that 
.-shipments may be made In carload 

lots. 

« 

^jortli Dakota Postmasters Meet. 

.Jamestown, N. D., May 2. — (Special to 

The Herald.) — All postmasters of North 

Dakota have been granted a five-day 
leave of absence by Postmaster Gen- 
eral Burle.son to attend the state meet- 
ing at Jamestown, July 22 and 23. An 
effort is also being made by the pro- 
gram committee to secure a represen- 
tative of the department at Washing- 
ton for an address. 



CAR ORDERS 



The Northern Pacific has ordered 
twelve postal cars from the Pressed 
Steel Car company. , , of.^ 

The Illinois Central has ordered 800 
furniture oars. 500 refrigerator cars 
and 500 stock cars from the American 
Car & Foundry company. 

The Seaboard Air line has ordered 500 
box cars from the Pressed Steel Car 
company. 250 flat cars 'rom the Ameri- 
can Car & Foundry company and 250 
hopper cars from the Standard Steel 

Car company. ^ . ■, nnc^ 

The Grand Trunk has ordered 1,000 
additional box cars from the Pressed 
Steel Car company, and has ordered 
3,000 freight cars from the Canadian 
Car & Foundry company. 

The Missouri Pacific la In the mar- 
ket for 1.000 40-ton stock cars. 

WANT RURAL ROUTE. 

Proposed to Have It Established 
From Aitkin to Clear Lake. 

Aitkin. Minn.. May 2.— (Special to 
The Herald.) — A petition Is being cir- 
culated by N. O. Johnson who lives two 
on one-half miles from Aitkin for a 
new rural route to be established on 
the Clear Lake road. The proposed 
route will begin at Aitkin, K'\«nff put 
on the Clear Lake road to within two 
miles of GUn. thence to the south side 
of Long lake, thence to Dam lake, fol- 
lowing the road to Klmberly and re- 
turn to Aitkin. If this route is estab- 
lished, two of the postoffices now at 
Valparaiso, Erlck and Ro.ssburg will 
be (llscontinued. Glen would prob.ably 
bo served from Malmo. The proposed 
route covers a distance of seventy-five 
mllps and would serve more than 100 

^Rural routes Noa. 1 and 2 were start- 
ed yesterday morning with E. A. Marsh 
and Ed Fa.ssett a.s carrier.^. No appoint- 
ments have yet been made am-nrg the 
candidates who took the examination, 
April 12. temporary carriers serving in 
the meantime. 

Primary Beaten .Vgaln. 

Albany. N. Y.. May 2.— C»ovcrnor Sul- 
ztr's state-wide direct primary bill w.as 
defeated by the assembly early today 
after a long debate by a vc\te of 4( 
ayes and 93 no«>s. 

The hill was defeated In the senate 
Wednesday- 



BANQUET F^ WARNER. 

Aitkin Business Men Will Honor Mem- 
ber of Lower House. 

Aitkin. Minn,. May 2.— (Special to 
The Herald.) — A committee of business 
men compose-A of Dr. W. T. Courtney. 
J. A. Casey. HI- R- Foley. Jr.. E. H 
Krelwitz, andNtt P. Botsford has been 
appointed to. arrange for a banquet 
to be given ne:ct week for Representa- 
tive C. H. Warner to show the ap- 
preciation of the Aitkin people of the 
work Mr. Warner ha* done in the ses- 
sion of the leKislature_Jvjst_ closed. 

AGEDFARMER DIES. 

Andrew Moe, Living Near Midway, 
Passes Away After Long Illness. 

Midway. Mirn.. May 2.— (Special to 
The Herald.)— Andrew Moe, an aged 
farmer living In Carlton county near 
the Midway line, died yesterday morn- 
ing after an Illness of several months. 
He leaves a widow, two sons, and two 
married daygl ters. About two years 
ago his oldest son was accidentally 
shot and killed by a brother, who mis- 
took him for a deer^ ^^ 

LEAP FROWTSPEEDER 

I N NICK OF TIME, 

McKenzie. N D.. May 2.— (Special to 
The Herald.)— Charles Lunner and two 
companions lefiped from a speeder just 
in time to save themselves from being 
struck by an etiglue, running light. The 
Ipecder was h^rted into the air a^d 
demolished. Lunner and his c"n;Pa.n- 
lons met the engine In a deep cut and 
at a curve, and had only tlnie to escape 
from the speeder before the collision 
came. _ 

Lawleits Ih Police Cliief. 

International Falls. Minn.. May 2.— 
John Lawless has been appointed chief 
of police by .Mayor Kane. He has been 
on the force several years. K. L.. ivirK- 
patrlck and VHlllam Dougherty have 
been appointed patrolmen. Daugherty 
I, as served on the extra force at times 
Mr. Kirkpatrlck has been employed at 
the paper mill. 

«5..'M^>0 For Husband. 

Ashland \M3., May 2.— A circuit 
nourt Jury awarded Mrs. Caroline Se- 
cord $5.5(y0 for the death of her hus- 
band in her suit for $10,000 against 
th'i John Schroeder Lumber conipany, 
In whose mil here her husband was 
killed last fa'I^whlle putting a belt 
on a trolley. She sued for $10,000. 



SURELY SETTLES 

UPSET STOMACHS 

"Papers Dilapepsin" Ends In- 
digestion, Gas, Sourness 
in Five Minutes. 

"Really does" put bad stomachs In 
order — "really does" overcome indi- 
gestion, dysp.ipsia, gas, heartburn and 
sourness in five minutes— that— Just 
that— makes Pape's Elapepsln the 
largest ?olllr(? stomach regulator In 
the world. If what you eat ferments 
into stubbon lumps, you belch ga.s 
and eructato sbur. undigested food 
and acid; haad is dizzy and aches; 
breath foul; tongue coated: your In- 
sides filled vrtth bile and indigestible 
wa-ste remember the moment Diapep- 
.sin comes In contact with the stomach 
all such distress vanishes. It's truly 
astonishing — almost marvelous, and 
the joy is its harmlessness. 

A largo G!:ty-gent case of Pape's 
Dlapepsin will give you a hundred 
dollars' worth of .satisfaction or your 
druggist hanls you your money back. 

It'.'^ worth its weight in gold to 
men and women who can't get their 
stomachs ri-&ulated. It belongs in 
your home-^-shoVild always be kept 
handy in ca!«.e of a sick, sour, up.set 
stomach during the day or at night. 
It's the f4Uicke8t, .surest and most 
harmless sto«nach doctor in the world. 



A W2if£ 

T^ hrough 

the store will acquaint 
you with hundreds of 
special values earrving 
price tickets marked 
Ilarfraiuii '<Not Adver- 
tiMed." 



Melrose 21 55-BOTH PHONES-Grand 522 




Vi 



The shop where natiiifaclion follows every transaction | 



fjear in 

]y[ind 

we are sole selling 
agents in Duluth for 
women's Knox Hats, Red 
Cross Shoes, Nemo and 
Smart Set Corsets. But- 
terlck Patterns. 



M arvelous C9£l V t^hies 

$25 to $29.50 Coats for $19.50 

300 New, Nobby Coats, the Result of a Large Cash Pur chase of 
High-Grade Garments in a Wide Range of Fabrics and Colors. 

[n this lot are Whipcords, Eponges, Ratines, Etamines, 
Serges, Diagonals, Satin Stripes and Checks — in colors of 
Tan, Brown, Copenhagen, Navy, White and Black, fancy 
Checks and Stripes. Lined throughout with rich colors of 
Peau de Cygne and produced in plain tailored models, 
draped revers and draped skirt models. They are copies of 
highest class garments and workmanship and fit is the best. 

Don't Miss This Great Sale. The most 



\ 



wonderful values we ever $ 
offered 



19 



.50 



M 



^t"*^. 



^ 24.50 for S uits re"'"^l*35 

Fine Ratine and Eponge Suits, 
Fine White Serge Suits, Fine Bedford Cord Suits, 
Fine Balkan Blouse Suits, Fine Men's Wear Serge Suits, 
Fine Blouse Suits, Fine Whipcord Suits. 

These suits are in white, black, Copenhagen, navy, royal, 
medium and invisible blues, tan, brown, mole and gray- 
also fancies and colors. Every garment is new for this sale, 
and comprise some very clever models — draped skirts, plain 
and dressy model, smart cutaway style of coats, all lined 
with highest grade peau de cygne; worth <fiOA Q^ 

r $35.00; anniversary sale price %p^^±»i7%J 



J^ai lored and S emi- ri ress fjats 




H«^ 



A Most Remarkable Sale 

Values to HS"^^ $ 

This Announcement Will Bring 
Hundreds of Women Here Tomorrow. 




A special purchase permits us to offer tomorrow 500 beautiful 
new hats, embracing all the gaiety of the season. No two alike. 

There are Hats of Hemp, Mi- 
lan and Rajah Braid Hats of 
every desirable shape from the 
Gabby hat to the large shep- 
herdess sailor hats, In colors 
to match the season's favorite 
costume shades — Hats from 
the rich Royal Purple to the 
softest of Blues, with plenty of 
bright new Greens, Nellrose, 
Navy and Balkan Colorings. 

Hats trimmed in ribbons, f lower s, feather s, tf 
ostrich, wings and velvet, in Numidi effects. ^ 
The most pleasing styles are here— fif^Ut 

1^ and a becomming hat for every face V-rii-i.t| 






ff osicr^ and f J nderwear 

Specials for Saturday's Selling. 



50c Combination Suits, 39c 
—Ladies' Fine Ribbed Cot- 
ton Combination Suits; low 
neck, no sleeves, lace trim- 
med, knee length ; m e r - 
cerized taped and crocheted 
around neck and QQ/» 

armlets p*^^ 

Ladies' Summer Vests- 
Fine Lisle Gauze Vests, low 
neck, no sleeves; fancy lace 
yokes, silk taped ; 25c value 

2 for 25c 

Ladies' Cotton Stockings- 
Ladies' Fine Gauze Light 
Summer Weight Cotton 
Stockings; double heel and 
toe; garter top; black, at — 

2 Pairs for 25c 



'» I 



Children's Warrior Stock- 
ings — Our special value, 
15c pair — A guaranteed 
garter top hose — it is ac- 
knowledged the best in 
the city ; made of selected 
yarn ; all sizes 6 to 10, 
special— j ctg% 

pair X*^C 

Children's Silk Lisle Hos- 
iery — Children's Fine 
Ribbed Stockings — All 
sizes 6 to 10 inclusive — a 
fast black mercerized fin- 
ish ; very elastic, double 
linen heels and toes and 
seamless soles — a verv 
dressy stocking, 
the pair 



25c 



The New, Smart 

P^ nglish W[<Mdn£ 
Root 

The most serv- 

i c e a b 1 e boot 

made; Russia 

calf and gun 

metal; fancy 

stitched soles 

and blind eye 

lets — just like 

cut; $5.00 value on sale special 

Saturday — 




$4. 



A 



J ust a p ew R eminders of ]\foving jyay and H ousecleaning 

ELECTRIC LIGHTS. 



■\>, 



Fit your house 
with Genuine 
Mazda Electric 
Lights — the 
very best light 
at the least ex- 
pense. 



25- watt Mazda Light. 40c 
40-watt Mazda Light. 45c 
60- watt Mazda Light. 60c 




O-Cedar Oil 
and Mops 
0-Cedar Mops, 
.. ..75c and $1.50 
O-Cedar Oil at 
25c, 50c and $1.00 
to the gallon size 
at $2.50 

O-Cedar Oil 

and Mops 
Get the Genuine 
b-Cedar Mops at 
.. ..75c and $1.50 

4 oz. O-Cedar Oil at 25c 

12 oz. 0-Ccdar Oil at. 50c 

Quart size $1-00 

yj gallon ..; $1.50 

1 gallon $2.50 



Headquarters for Garden 
Tools, Poultry Net- 
ting, Seeds, Etc. 




Garden Rakes 23c to 85c 

Garden Spades 59c to 89c 

Garden Hoes 23c to 69c 

Garden Cultivators .. .25c to 95c 

Paints and Varnishes. 

Complete line of Floor and 
House Paint at, per quart. 40c; 
H gallon, 75c; 1 gallon. $1.45. 
Jap-a-Lac Varnishes from 15c 
to $3.00 per can — or galloi 



1^ 





A-^TXm 



Friday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



May 2, 1913. 



Cbe 6la$$ Block $tm 



"The Shopping Center of Duluth 



* » 



GREAT 



Millinery Sale 

Saturday at $3 




TRIMMED HATS— Glass Block Styles- 
worth up to $12.00 — only — 

Three Dollars 

Children's Hats 

Saturday Night Sale, 7 to 8 o'clock. 
200 CHILDREN'S AND MISSES' HATS— 



worth up to $5.00 — only — 




One 
Dollar 



$1 



Flowers! Flowers! 

So much used this season. 

5c, 15c, 25c, 50c 

and $1.00 

(Worth up to $3.00.) 

COME EARLY— IT PAYS— 
YOU GET FIRST CHOICE. 



Special Sale of Waists for Saturday 




Milady's Blousfs have never been so charmingly pretty ^ 
as this season. We have some of the daintltst, summeriest ^ 
models to be found, and all at moderate price?. 

For ton. ^ ow we feature four very spe(*ial values. 

LOT 1— Waists worth 
$1.00 special at 

Pretty LinRerie and plain tailored effects. 

LOT 2— Waists worth 
$1.25, special at 

Mostly all in pretty lingerie styles; lace and embroidery trimmed. 

$1.50 Waists 98c 

Dainty Lingerie in a variety of smart styles to select from. 

$2.50 Lingerie Waists $1.95 

Fine Batiste and Voiles, prettily trimmed with dainty lace and em- 
broidery. 



49c 
69c 



Framed Carbons 94c 

With 1-inch walnut frames ; copies of various old 
masters, special, 94c. 



Tomorrow Is the Last Day of the 

The Great Glove Sale 

If you haven't taken advantage of the savings, come tomor- 
row; still good choosing. 



Table d 'Hole Dinner 

Tomorrow Kvening from 
6 to 8 p. m. 

Delightful menu and excellent 
service as well aa pleasant sur- 
roundings. 




Him Block Store 



Candy Special 

Fresh Toasted Marsh- 
mallows, per lb 

Fresh Chocolate Nut Creams; 
regular selling at 50c, O^g* 

Saturday at *i*/V» 



20c 



4* 



The Shopping Center of Duluth" 



Please the Boy by Fitting Him Out 

in One of These 
"Best-Ever" $5.00 Suits 

The "Best-Ever" Suits for boys are differ- 
ent from the ordinary boys' suits; they con- 
tain novel features which will app-cal to their 
boyish hearts. Boyish styles made with man- 
nish care. 

Made of fine All-wool Navy Serge and 
Mixtures, in smart Norfolk style, full 
Knickerbocker pants. The: greatesT 
suit in America for $5.00 




Wash Suits for Small Boys 

Wade of cool linen, gingham, percale and 
G.'.iatea cloth, in neat stripes and plain colors. 

You may choose from Russian Blouse, 
Buster Brown and Sailor styles; the 
markings are from $1.49 to $4.98. 

Boys' "Mother's Friend" 
Blouses and Shirts 

Made of percale, madras and plani chambray in smart styles 
with soft military collar. 

fi?"ses 50c up to $1.00 

Sh""ts 50c up to $1.25 



Women's $1 Union Suits at 79c 

Pure white lisle yarn, long sleeves, ankle 
length style. Just the right weight for present 
Mear. A good $1.00 value, special Saturday 
at 79c. 




Women's Cotton 
Union Suits — Dutch 
neck, elbow sleeves, 
knee length, at 59c, 
75c, $1.00 and $1.25. 



Women's Union 
Suits— Either loose 
and tight knee, in 
the popular dip 
styles; prices 50c, 
75c and $1.00. 

Children's Underwear in All Sorts 

Light weight cotton, two-piece garments; 
all styles and shapes; prices 10c to 35c. 
Union Suits— In all the desirable styles "and 
weights; prices 50c, 65c, 75c and $1.00. 

Children's Union Suitn at 25c 

Light weight fleece lined, in white and 
gray; sizes from 2 to 10 years, and a very 
special value at 25c. 



Women's 50c Lisle Hose 35c 



Special lot Women's fine black Lisle Hose; embroidered in 
colors, in pretty designs; double garter top, spliced heel and toe; 
regular 50c value on sale Saturday at 35c pair. 

Children's Fine Cotton Hose — 

Black and tan; all sizes; 5 to 



Women's Black Cotton Hose- 
Ribbed top, medium weight, 
double heel and toe; 
pair 

Or 2 pairs for 25c. 



15c 



9^; extra good quality; 
special, pair 



19c 



Children's Play Dresses alt 25c 



25c 



Pretty little dresses made of fine 
percale in washable colors, checks, 
stripes and plain; pretty styles; ages 
1 to 6 years, at 25c. 

Children's Wash Dresses 

Worth from 75c 
to $1.49, for.... 

Just a small lot, broken lines, from 
regular stock, in percale and gingham, 
checks, stripes and plaids ; good colors. 

Infants' and Children's 
Straw Bonnets 

In all shapes and styles; prettily trim- 
med with flowers and dainty ribbon. 
Regular value from 1 A^ f^ • 

50c up to $2.00 V2 1 rice 



Children's Stockings 
Half Price 

Silk and wool mixed and 
fine mercerized lisle; sizes 4 
to 6; in white, tan, pink, 
blue and black. 

25c sort for I2V2C 

50c values for 25c 




Sale Kinonos 



Made of figured lawn, 
pretty new styles, shirred 
and plain back. 

98c values for , . . 75c 
$1.25 values for. . . 98c 
$1.50 values for... $1.10 



Some Saturday Drug Specials 



lOc Colonial Bath Soap 7o 

$1.85 "Very" Brush — new ttyle; 
reinforced edges, d*! Cr| 

special «P -l *^^ 

Guaranteed Maroon Fountain 
Syringe; 2-quart size; (iCLg% 

rapid flow, .special OOC 

26c bottle Pure Olive Oil... 19c 



Two 5c pkgs. Moth Balls 6c 

4 lb bar Bocabelll Spanish Cas- 
tile Soap, best made, fiCJr* 



special 

25c Red Cross Guaran- 
teed Tooth Brush 



18c 

25c Lyon's Tooth Powder... 18c 










Tomorrow we start a great event in the Ready-to-Wcar Section. 

Great May Reduction Sale 

Suits, Coats and Dresses 

AT SUBSTANTIAL REDUCTIONS 

This Great May Sale embraces over a Thousand Garments — there are nearly 600 
Suits alone, say nothing about the Coats and Dresses. 

Space must be made for the summer stock of Suits and Dresses ready to come in. 

These present a combination of style, quality and desirability that will appeal to every 
taste and will satisfy every want. 

Garments suitable to wear for any occasion, for afternoon, for evening, for dinner? 
and street wear. 

In most cases, only one or two of a kind, as our stock has become pretty 
well broken from the heavy selling during the season. 

Nearly 600 Suits Go on Sale 

Included in this are many very high class individual garments, as well as handsome 
custom made suits — scores of styles to choose from — in every fashionable material, such 
as Serges, Bedford Cords, Wide Wale Worsteds, Eponges, Fancy Mixtures and other 
desirable fabrics, and all colors. 

In every wanted style, such as plain tailored, smart cutaways, 
new long back and Balkan models. Women can find the proper 
suit for travel, church-going or afternoon affairs. 




$17.50 Suits at $12.75 

$19.50 Suits at $16.50 

$22.50 Suits at $18.50 

$37.50 Tailored and Dressy 



$25.00 Suits at $19.50 

$29.50 Suits at $25.00 

$32.50 Suits at $27.50 

Suits at $32.50 



Coats for Women, Misses and Juniors 

Presenting every desirable style of the season. The popular 45 and 48-inch cut- 
aways as well as the serviceable full length. 

The materials are Heavy Serges, Bedford Cords, Eponges. Black 
and White Checks and fashionable mixtures. The variety of colors 
comprises most every shade. 





$7.50 Coats at $6.45 

$9.50 Coats at $7.50 

$13.50 Coats at $10.50 

$15.00 Coats at $11.95 



$17.50 Coats at $14.59 

$19.50 Coats at $14.50 

$24.50 Coats at $18.50 

$34.50 Coats at $25.00 



Handsome Dresses for Women & Misses 



Dresses that will appeal to every taste a 
afternoon, for evening, for parties and for st 
Plain and Fancy Messaline, Faille, Foulard, 
soft silk weaves. The variety of colors com 
ionable and popular. 

No matter for what purpose you need 
you among this wonderful collection a 

$14.50 Dresses at $10.95 i 

$16.50 Dresses at $12.75 1 

$19.50 Dresses at $14.95 | 

Other dresses higher in price reduced in 



nd satisfy every want. There are dresses for 

reet wear. The materials include Charmeuse. 

Silk Rep, Silk Poplin and other fashionable 

prises almost every wanted shade that is fash- 

a dress, you'll surely find one to suit 
nd at remarkably low prices. 

$22.50 Dresses at $16.95 

$25.00 Dresses at $18.95 

, $27.50 Dresses at $19.75 

same proportion. 



L 




'EC?'' Footwear J?:ir;.7u.. Family Men's $1.00 and $i. so shirts 



Shoe .service at the Glass Block means properly designed shoes. If low cut, then the pump or oxford 
must hug the heel. Reliable leathers, selected sorts at whatever the price. Careful shoemaking, especially 
In the parts not seeable — shoes that wear, that give a hundred cents' worth of wear — more if possible — for 
every dollar. Shoes that are stylish and hold their looks; prompt and painstaking attention by shoe people 
who know their business. 

The Famous Geo. W. Baker New Pumps at $5.00 



deserv^e particular mention. The line.^ are graceful .nnd cling to the foot; 
In Satin, Patent Colt, Gun Metal, Mat Kid — in H'veral lastw to select 

New Oxfords at $2.50 to $5.00 

The demand for three or four-button Oxfords Is great. 
We have n complete line In all leathers, such as black 
buckskin, mat kid, black Russia calf, volour calf, gun 
metal calf with medium or high hce;, flexible solo; all 
the new lasts, $2.50 to $5.00 the pair. 

Women's Shoes at $3.00 :o $4.00 

In velvet, black and white buckskin, gun metal calf, satin, 
oravenette, tan, patent leather, white canvas, medium or 
high heel; In all fashionable spring and summer styles. 
Every pair made to our standard. I'rlces from $3.00 to 
$4.00 a pair. 

Shoes for Children Should Be Given Very 
Careful Attention. 

As the child's foot is squeezed and cramped by misfit- 
ting shoos, so will there be corn.s, bunions and ill ease 
for the feet when grown. Get slioes that FIT first, 
la.st and nil ihci (Imo. fJBring the little folks and 
Miss Mildred Nollson, who has supervision of 
this s<.'Cli<)n, will fit the mwlth the proper 
shoe. f[Our hIiooh are <'orrootIy d<'Hignod, 
htiirdy, comf ortiibl L% Korvioeuble and 
iityllish. 



medium or high heel. 
from. Stylf« that are correct. 




Men Find the 

Nettleton Shoe 

Fill the Bill Best 

New OxforcLs have just ar- 
rived, in tan, Russia calf, gun 
metal calf, vici kid, wax calf, 
hlp:h or medium toe and heel. 
Carefully made and d*/* f\f\ 
Btylish; price, pair, . «pO«\/V/ 

Men's Tan and Gun Metal Ox- 
fords — In 14 distinct new spring 
styles to wear for an yoccasion. 
Priced, the pair, 
$4.50 and 



\ voccasion. 

$3.50 



On Sale Satur- 
day for a Quick 
Cleati'Up at 



39c 



Not many, so if you want to share be here 
early tomorrow morning-. 

Rcpfular $1.00 and $l.oO Shirts, Odds and 
Ends from our regular stock, some are 
slightly soiled. 

Plain and plaited bostom, at- 
tached and detached cufFs — 
fancy striped and p lain colors. 

Ss^ Union Suits 75c 

Slight imperfections, but they run so nice that you can hardly 
notice it— Balbriggfan, Jersey ribbed, long sleeve's, ankle length 
and athletic style in white and ecru. 

$1.50 Quality on Sale at 98c 








Friday, 



THE DULU'TH HERALD 



May 2, 1913. 




BIG SCHEME 
PROJECTED 



Plan to Gridiron Province of 

Ontario With Electric 

Railways. 





To Be in Connection With 

Government's Cheap 

Power System. 








-Never Miss the Money 



f 



REPAIRED AND 
REMODELED AT 

HALF 

PRICE 




Durino: the Spring 
and Summer and 
stored and insured 

FREE 

OF CHARGE 

BECKMAN'S 

FUR FACTORY 

16 East Superior St. 

Melroie 426 Grand 3 1 i -D 




Our 

Examinations 

are conducted with a complete 
knowledge of the eye— a fact 
which commends our services to 
all people troubled with Eyeache, 
Headache or Nervousness, gener- 
ally the result of Eyestrain. 

If you have trouble with your 
eyes, or do not see well — call on 

Bagley fer' Company 

JEWELERS AND OPTICIANS. 

315 West Superior St. 



DULUTH TRUNK CO., 

MANUFACTURERS 

220 WEST SUPERIOR ST. 



Quality Trunks, Bags 

and Suit Cases at 

Factory Prices, 



" CHICKERING 
PIANO 

Howard, Farw8l!& Co. 

120 East Superior St. 

W. J. ALLEN. Mgr. 



Toronto. Ont.. May 2. — The project of 
grldironlnff the province with electric 
railways in connection with the gov- 
ernment cheap power system has been 
advanced a stage. The step now be- 
ing taken does not carry out the idea 
of state-owned electric lines. The gov- 
ernment has been cautious enough to 
avoid any financial respunalbllity 
while providing a plan under which 
the Construction of more radlals be- 
.•omes possible. The various munic- 
ipalities of the province will get the 
railways on much the same basi-s as 
they now get the power, the govern- 
ment showing the way. 

There is to be new legislation pro- 
viding for the public construction and 
operation of electric railways. Under 
it municipalities will get what rail- 
ways they want by applying to the 
commission, and will foot the bill by 
is.sulng debentures. The actual build- 
ing of the railways can be done In any 
one of thrt-e ways. The municipalities 
may build, maintain and operate, or 
they may maintain and operate after 
the province has done the building, or 
they may decide to let the province 
build, maintain and operate. Which- 
ever way it is done, the municipality 
crets a railway, with cheap power for 
its operation and the hydro-electric 
power commission gets another cus- 
tomer The new lines can be built on 
the right of way of the power coni- 
mlsHlon and this right will probably be 
everclsed to a great extent, the munlc- 
iliallty paying a rental to the comnus- 

^"r'he scheme, if full advantage is 
taken of it, will mt-an the increased 
development of the provincial Power 
project on a very large scale. It win 
very largely Increase the consumption 
of power supplied by the hydro-eloc- 
trlc power commission, and this in- 
oreas*>d con.sumption will mean a gen- 
eral lowering of the cost to power 
users. The municipalities going into 
the scheme must, of course, contract tn 
buy their power from the provincial 
commission. The credit of the pro- 
vince Is not to be pledged In uny way 
toward the work of construction the 
government being apparently of tne 
opinion that radial railways are not 
very sure moneymakers. At the same 
time, there is sometliing In the scheme 
for the municipalities, and a good deal 
in It for the cheap power project. Ibe 
government Is providing a market for 
Us own product. 

Shall the City Buy? 
Toronto woke up the other day and 
found the Toronto railway and the 
Toronto Electric Light company sit- 
ting on the doorstep. This was a sur- 
nrlse The city has been yearning 
mightily for a chance to get hold ot 
he railway these many years and has 
been looking forward to the time when 
_}„ i9>i_the company's franchise 
would lapse and the whole system 
could be taken over. It has been dark- 
y hinted from time to time that when 
the time arrived the company wouldr^ t 
iret anv fancy price for its plant, but 
would have to sell it to the city on a 
scrap-heap basis. This has always 
"been a gloomy pro.spect for the share- 
holders of the railway and a bright 
and pleasing prospect to the s raphold- 
^rs. Moreover, the city has lamented 
dally over the Inferiority of the service 
provided. So when the announcement 
was made that the company would 
readily sell to the city, not only the 
ran way. but the electrlc-llght outfit. 
there was a shout of Joy. .„„,^ ^. 

Mayor Hocken convened the board of 
control, poured his story into their ear. 
and th>v all dashed up to the parlia- 
ment buildings with a demand for spe- 
cial legislation to enable the clt> to 
grab the bargain. While this was do- 
ing the stock of the railway was hop- 
nine about as if there really was some- 
h?n^r doing The street rumor was 
SL7the"!ty would have to put up 
«•>,> .-(rto oOO Later the $20.000,OOD in 
creased to $21,000,000, and then an- 
othtr $r,000.000 was added to pay f'>r 
tie ele'ctrlc light plant Jhe total o 
$'>7 000 000 looks large to a lot or Peo 
Jie and when the p'-"P«^ty owners are 
railed upon to vote for the purcnase 
there will be many who will vote in 
the negative ^^^ ^^eken.le. 

The arrival of Sir William Mackenzie, 
fr Ji^iVngland ^..ll put the ^eg^^^^^^ 

;'" \ '^^'fnFngland in connection with 
K Srances';7the Canadian Northern 
raUwav- of which he is president. The 
Canadian Northern is now in the trans- 
continental class, or nearly so. and Us 
affairs call for much attention Sn 
Wimam fs said to be Quite ready to 
.li^noso of such side lines as the To- 
ronto raUwav and confine his attention 
[o the Ur^er undertaking Moreove^r^ 
the millions which would go to the 
MackTnVle-Mann Interests from the 
sa^e of the railway would Probably bo 

15if« advantage In connection with 
I'he other M^ckenzle-Mann enterprUes 
<n these davs of scarce money. 

There is some opposition to the pro- 
noled deal from friends of the provin- 
cial hydro-electric power ^omm ssion 
^f which the Hon. Adam Beck Is the 
head The Mackenzie Interests fought 
l^h^ nrovinclal power scheme for years. 

and a Mackenzie concern. The BecK 
ana a "V^^, *„ havlnc one of theii 

the MacKcn/.i i 'Vi,x.rv at the cheap 
!;;;!;°r'moJ-meit Jnd .7er won't allow 
Thl^ Mow to tall It they fan help It. 

Viifs rpoj.uv'e" to' Kr''.''<.'io';',a';ron%'rn 

may haye to l.e postponed for a wl.ll,-, 

frecklPace 



sun and Wind Bring Out Igly Spot«. 
How to Hemove Kantly. 

Here's a chance. Miss Freckle-face, 
to try a remedy for freckles with the 
guarantee of a reliable dealer that U 
win not cost you a penny unless It 
removes the freckles; while If It does 
give you a clear complexion the ex- 
pense is trifling. 

Simply get an ounce of othine— 
double strength from Boyce's drug 
store and a few applications should 
show you how easy it is to rid yourself 
of the homely freckles and get a beau- 
tiful complexion. Rarely Is moro than 
one ounce needed for the worst case. 
Be sure to ask the druggist for the 
double strength othine as this Is the 
prescription sold under guarantee of 
money back If It falls to remove 
Crecklaa. 





An Endles s Assortment of N ew^StylesJn 
Women'iand Miss es' Suits, Coats, Dresses. 

styles that are very popular with women and misses who desire some- 
thing different and something that will give service and always look well. 

In suits we show everyth'iig from the strictly 
tailored cutaway to the veiy popular Bulgarian 
Blouse ett'ects— materials are Mistral Cloth, 
Eponges, Serges, Whipcords, Wide Wales and Fancy Cash- 
meres in a wide range of colors. All popular prices— 514.7&, 
$16.75, $19.50, $22.50, $24.50 and up. ^ 

CrR\ /Sy«T?^ We have a wonderful collection of coats in a 
OA ^ full line of sizes and styles in Serges, Checks, 
^ Eponges, Stripes, Satins, Whipcords, in all the 

leading colors. Values that help to make Gately s PoP^l^r. 
You'll agree with us when you see the coats ottered at ^lO.UU, 
$14.75, $16.50, $19.50 upwards. 

A new showing of Eponge, Crepe Meteor 
Peau de Cygne, Serge, Whipcord and 
Linen Dresses, priced from $6.75 to ^IS.OU. 
They include the new Bulgarian Blouse__ effects, new draped 
skirts and new trimmings — $6.75 to $18.50. 




Millinery, Skirts, Waists, French and Willow Plumes. 

YOUR CREDIIT I: 



GOOD 



Our "Dress Well-Never-Miss-the-Money Plan wU pro- 
vide for all your clothing needs-, as a payment down and ^l.W 
per week is all we ask. Come in tomorrow— Saturday. 




fe 






S mi mum HEi'S SEIB¥GOE^iLiE 
SPBii© OLOTG^Si© 

We pride ourselves on selling clothing that gives service. It's 
our principle to see that for every dollar we give as much service 
as possible— clothing that will wear well— at $15.00, $18.00, $20.00 
and $22.50. 

SyiT Tiil0ii^0W kl $2® . 

Comes in plain gray, tan or brown cashmere— something differ- 
ent in a Norfolk suit and a suit that's full of gmger and snap- 
tomorrow, $20.00. 



Y®yi© MEM- 



Here's an advantage for you if 
you can wear a suit under size 36. 
We are offering some wonderful 
values at $15.00. 

Raincoats for all size men — $7.50, 
$10.00 and $15.00. 



We have suits here you are sure 
to like and at the right prices, $4.50 
to $10.00. 

FREE — Remember you get a knife 
wortb $1 with a purcliase of $5 or more. 



:i> 



Alterations 
FREE 





DULITH— SUPERIOR— VIRGINIA 



Alterations 
FREE 




FINDS SACRED 
LAREOf LIFE 

startling Experiences of 
British Official in South- 
ern Nigeria. 



Tribe in Which Men Are 

Slaves to the 

Women. 



London, May 2.-That enterprising: 
rppreeentativo of King George V. P. 
\maury Talbot, district commissioner 
of .southern Nigeria, has been making 
more queer discoveries and having 
more adventures. Incidentally, he re- 
tently escaped being butchered by na- 
tives who were laboring under a mis- 
apprehension regarding his Intentions 
toward themselves, only by the skin of 
M^ teeth but he must be getting used 
thnVhv now For. besides being the 
to that oy """• ^IV; ■ ,,, fntcd oxnedl- 
only aurvlvor of ^he lll-fatyi expeai 
tinn that was captained by tne lait, 

leut Boyd- Alexander. Talbot, since 
hi has been In Africa, has had one 
close call after another, sometimes n 
iifhts w th the blacks, sometimes In 
imnunters wiih wild beasts, and on.-« 
twVpp It the hands of the accom- 
nUsh^ native poisoners of his district, 
where It is impolitic to go out to din- 
ner without taking an antidote or two 

tureramons the latl,r and annons fnen 

with buffalo aouls. originally ^»"'"^?!' 
1^ ill. rorrfSDondence. were set tortti 
\l gJeateTdeTail In his recent book. In 
tht. "Sdawow of the Bush. 
Lake oC Life. 
Ronn after Talbot and his equally 
intre°p"d wife «ot back to Africa again. 



after their holiday In this country, the 
commissioner st^'^ed out on a new ex- 
pedition, which resulted in the discov- 
ery of a sacrad Lake of Lite, the ex- 
istence of which had been kept as a 
ealoul secret from the knowledge of 
Europeans, g.omethlng about this lat- 
est discoviry of the commissioner was 
DublisW in the London newspapers 
Eut Talbot g.ves fuller details .^^^^^^e 
course of a letter dated Lket. near 
Calabar, whif.h I have Just reoelvea 

''°'o"nTe safeguarding of tMs I^ke of 
Life, according to local ^«l;e£«. ^^'^ 
writes "the welfare of over J&u.uuu 

Tbibios depends.- and the" „^«^ifi,*^e"om! 
tell how closj a shave he and his com 
panlons had from passing in their 

checks. , A„„..i,^o 

It seems that what we in America 
call grafT is practiced pretty extenslve- 
w hv the up-to-date native officials of 
T^lhot's dls?Tict. soon after his return 
S^ fact the commissioner discovered 
that the dusky clerks in the region lad 

events y.,^„ped By Accident. 

It was only owing to the accidental 
faUur^ of a signal that the commission- 
t^r escaoed Afterward, however, lal- 
bot received a charming apology from 
fhe chiefs expressing their satisfact on 
thit they had not been led Into the 
Irror of killing hira before they found 
that the reports as to his intentions 

''^ ••Thrt'r'o'uble with life out here " re- 
marksValbot. ^^^tentlously "Is tl at it 
r^rintalns a superabundance of thrills. 

"to give you an idea of everyday oo- 
Purrences Last week a boy of 8 
was brouKh. up to me for stabbing a 
layniate til rough the heart, because 
he Tatter tried to take away a J.t of 
string! Ne>.t day a woman with her 
fnrehead cut through to the bone from 
f he hair Une to the top of the nose 
came^^'o con.plaln that her brother had 
done It because they could "ot agn.e aa 
tn the owner.shlp of a few feet of >am 
patch Inotber^day a white man told 



us that In bicycling along a track 
which leads through one of the sacred 
crocodile swamps he fell over the rot- 
ting body of a woman, the skull cleft 
through and laid out as if in sacrifice 
with dozens of broken Jars set round 

her. J ^. i 

"Today we have Just learned that an- 
other man and woman are guilty of de- 
stroying the twin.s that were born to 
them I Just mention these cases to 
show you the sort of incident that Is 
always happening out here." 



Hood^ 



Best family physic 
Do not gripe or cause 
pain. Purely vegeta- 
ble, easy to '^ke. 25c 



Pills 



SIXTY SPEAKERS 
ALREADY ASSURED 

For the Recreation Con- 
gress to Be Held at Rich- 
mond, Va. 

New York. May 2. — The general In- 
terest in the Recreation congress, to be 
held at Richmond. Va.. May 6 to 10. is 
.shown by the number of local com- 
mittees appointed — more than 600 in 
all.' Practically every state is repre- 
sented. Some sixty speakers are al- 
ready assured. Joseph Lee of Boston, 
the United States commissioner of edu- 
cation: B. P. Claxton, Dr. Richard ea- 
bot of the Massachusetts general hos- 
pital. Charles W. Birlwell of the^ hex 
Hvglcne association. Seumas Mac- 
Manu.s. the Inimitable Irish story teller; 
Thomas Nelson Page, and others are 
upon the program. 

So mu<'h interest has been shown in 
the introduction of vocal and instru- 
mental music to the playground an.1 
recreation center, that It Is hoped to 
have a demonstration of this delightful 

form of play at the c""*''^^- fi,^,'' nnn* 
demonstration was given at the con- 
gress in Washington In lOU. arid 
proved both beautiful and suggestive 
for further efforts along this line 

The evening recreation center mo\o- 
ment— which has received bo much at- 
tentlon during the last year, and In 
which the daughter of the president. 
Miss Margaret W. WUson, has showji 
so great an Interest— will receive con- 
Ihleratton at this series of meetings 
from experts In recreation for adults. 
MlM Mary P. FoUett of Boston, who 
wi^ Instrumental in Inltiat ng he 
movement in Boston, will speak on the 
"Alms of Adult recreation. ? J JJ 
.^..of^fi.'al exDerleocee in tne Duiiani» 
Sp of this department under the Boston 
public sohool gyatem. 



MUCH INTEREST IN THE 
C. p. P. PARCEL POST. 

Washington, May 2.— Farmers are 
dlSDlaving a keen interest In the col- 
lect on delivery feature of the parcel 
^l.'^s'tThlch ls^o be inaugurated on 
the first of next July. OJ the many 
letters that have been received re- 
cently asking for Information. at 
fe^s SO per cent have been pertaln- 
ng to this subject. The lettexs. which 
come from every section of thecoun- 



try, indicate that the farmers are pre- 
paring to make extensive use of the 
C. O. D. feature as soon as It be- 
comes operative. The postmasters ot 
many of the smaller offices of the 
country report that they are receiv- 
ing many Intjuiries about the new 
feature. At the present time the rural 
parcel post business Is proportionate- 
ly smaller than in the cities. The rea- 
son for this It Is reported. Is that the 
people outside of the thickly populated 
sections are not familiar with the 
"possibilities of the new service. 



Fine Remedy For 
a Backward Child 



Continue It For Only a Brief 
Period and the Good Re- 
sults Will Surprise You. 

A low state of the »^"^!:^,,2Sl*i'rd- 
now the accented cause of backv^ara 

ness in children. So in the case oi • 
backward child it is best to look to- 

m ,iitrUtlon Hence care should be 
trken m t e"kind of food given to the 
child This, with plenty of air and ex- 
ercise, should bring about a change for 

**'watch''the conditions of the bowels, 
to note whether the waste is being 
nlssed off or not. or whether it is be- 
ufi passed too fr'.ely. If ^jther condi- 
tion prevails give a small dose of that 
eentlest of all laxative tonics. Dr (,ald- 
wel's Syrup Popsln. Thousands of 
mothers will testify to the wonders It 
has wrought in the lives of their own 
children, and for that reason legions 
of families like those of Mrs. J- E. 
Brunty 1903 9th Ave.. Nashville. Tenn.. 
are never without it in the house. Mrs. 
Brunty writes: "Harry had always been 
^Jn^Tt'l^a^ted until I gave him Dr. Cald- 
well's Syrup Pepeln. I am oertaimy 
eolng to keep this medicine In the 
ttl in futu?e for I know It to be 
Kood '■ It is pleasant to the taste and 
fo perfectly safe that It is J^'v^^ to n 
?nnta and yet Is equally effective tor 
g^rown people All druggists sell It and 
the Drlc3 is only fifty cents and one dol- 
lar J bottle, the latter for families who 
need it regularly. 




HAKHV HKLXTY. 

Svrup Pepsin has no equal as a cure 
for"c(Snstlpatlon, indigestion, bilious- 
ne.ss lu-adache.s, sour .stumach, ga.s on 
the stomach, liver trouble and kindred 
comjilaints. It has so many advantaipe* 
that those who once u^=e it forewr after 
discard cathartics, salts, pills and of'ior 
coarse remedies, for they are seldom 
advisable and should never be given lu 

children. , .. .. 

if no member of your family has ever 
used Sf\rup Pepsin and you would liko 
to make a personal trial of it before 
buying It In the regular way of a drug- 
iriat send your address — a postal win 
§o— to Dr. W. B. Caldwell. 417 Wash- 
ington St.. Montlcello. 111., and a tr— 
sample bottle \rlll be mailed you. 



Friday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



May 2, 1913. 




•^ 



PACKARD SHOES 



EMERY SHIRTS 



JOHN B. STETSON HATS 




NOT WHAT YOU PAY, BUT 
WHAT YOU GET FOR WHAT YOU PAY 



And you need take no chance whatever in getting the most for what you pay. It's a certainty ^^ 
here. Ready for you now and just in are all the new May styles in Suits. Topcoats and Slip-Ons, ^^^ 




^ii YOUi 




$ 




FE(Si^LLY FBDOEi M 



15 



We call these Suits our Twin Ports Special, 
and you will get $7.50 more value in these suits 
than in any other clothes at the same price else- 
where. 

We ht the stout or slim, short or tall, as well 
as the regular build. 

A large variety of patterns to select from, guar- 
anteed all-wool, hand-tailored, of superior quality, 
workmanship and fit. 

50c Silk Hose 35c 

75c Suspenders 32c 

$4.00 Light Wool Union Suits. . . .$1.98 
$1.50 Derby Ribbed Union Suits. . .79c 

$1.00 Boys' Hats 69c 

$2.00 Driving Gloves 89c 



Young IMen. it will be to your advantage to 
see our line of All-wool Suits that we are selling 
for $10. We have them in two and three button, 
also Norfolk styles. 

Alfred Benjamin & Co. Suits 

We alone sell Alfred Benjamin & Co., New 
York Ck'thcs, for men and young men, priced 
from $18.00 to $30.00. 




i^enJaiTxin Clothe^ 



$3.50 Light Flannel Shirts $1.98 

50c Silk Neckwear 29c 

$1.50 and $1.00 Negligee Shirts, 
with soft collars to match 75c 

$3.00 Soft Hats $1.85 

$2.00 Boys' Jersey Sweaters $1.16 



Special Bargain Tomorrow 

Broken lots from our regular lines, at 
prices that are tempting. 



Cook & Gittelson, 
Successors 



405 and 407 West Superior Sf. 




Money A Iways Cheer- 
fully Refunded 



405 and 407 Wesit Superior Si. 



SURE NOW IT 
WAS_AGHOST 

Sentry Is Startled By a 

Dancing, Merry White 

Shape. 



Discovery of Dungarees 

Does Not Relieve His 

Mind. 



a= 



TO GIVE GIRLS 

EQUAL CHANGE 

New Jersey Women Are 
Planning a Free Col- 
lege Course. 

Jersey City. N. J., May 2-. — The New 

Jersey State Federation of Women has 

taken up the project of securing a free 

collt ge course at Rutgers college. New 

Brunswick, for girl graduates of the 

New Jersey high schools similar to that 

now opened to boys. 

It is argued by the women who have 
taken up the movement that the state 
college not only receives state, but na- 
tional aid. and It owes the youth of the 
state the euulvalent In educational fa- 
cilities which they cannot gain else- 



where. The college already receives 
boy tjraduates of the high schools into 
its agricultural department, but has no 
provision for girls, who are compelled 
either to go to college at their own ex- 
pense — and few^ graduates of the high 
school are able to do this— or to forego 
higher education. 

It l.s estimated that In June 2,400 pu- 
pils will be graduated from the state's 
high schools and that two-thirds of this 
number will be glrl.s, the future moth- 
ers and teachers of New Jersey. The 
state provides no education for them 
except at the normal school, and yet, 
according to the rules of most boards 
of education, a college course is re- 
quired to teach most high-school sub- 
jects. 

Mrs. William .Shipman Douglas of 
this city, chairman of the federation's 
committee on state college, has inaug- 
urated a movement whereby the citi- 
zens of New Jersey shall be called up- 
on to pay for the erection of a girls' 
building and dormitory near Rutgers In 
order that the state may not have the 
excuse that It has not accommodations 
and has not the appropriation to erect 
them. It is estimated that It will cost 



$100,000 to erect a suitable building, and 
the women have undertaken to raise 
this sum by means of a $1 contribution 
fund to be subscribed by the public. 

The women's plan, which nas been 
indorsed by President Demarest of Rut- 
gers, Is to build an affiliated college 
under an arrangement similar to that 
which exists now between Barnard and 
Columbia and to allow the girls full 
academic, scientific and agricultural 
courses^ with the use of the library, 
museum, laboratories and college farm 
In common with the men. Instruction 
will be given in separate buildings and 
the college will not in the strict sense 
be co-educational. 

It is the aim of those who are work- 
ing for the project to have the money 
.<?iib.<?cribed and the building erected by 
1916. 



ECCENTRIC SYMPATHY 
FOR SUSPENDED BOYS. 

Greensburg, Pa., May 2. — Carrying 
into school a bulldog decked out in 



class colors and pressing their kisses 
on the canine before their scandalized 
teachers, the nine girl menabers of the 
Alverton high school joined five boy 
ftllow-members of the graduating class 
in a strike, whlcl. threatens to wreck 
the graduating ejiercises. 

The boys were suspended following 
their refusal to take down their class 
flag from the flagpole, where they had 
flung it to the breeze. The girls left 
in sympathy with their cl&smates, but 
were Induced to rtturn. However, they 
insi.«ited on bringing their mascot, the 
bulldog, to classes with them, and pas- 
sionately fondled end kissed him before 
their teachers. 






New Northern Pacific Service 

Duluth and Superior to the West 

The new "Twin Ports Limited" — fast, de luxe Observation-Car 
and Dining-Car train, affording direct service, in connection with 

Train No. 1, the "North Coast Limited," and ) -i^r u 
Train No. 5, the "Pacific Coast Express" f ^ ^stbound 

and Train No. 4, the "Northern Pacific Express" — Eastbound 

to and from Fargo, Jamestown, Bismarck, Mandan, Glendive, 
Terry, Miles City, Billings, Butte, Helena, Missoula, Spokane^ 
Seattle, Tacoma, Portland, Vancouver, California Points, etc. 
Reservations of Sleeping Car space to all points upon request. 



YOU DON'T HAVE TO 

TIP^ARBAGE MAN. 

Cincinnati, Ohlc, May 2. — "Do not 
tip anyone. It is decidedly un-Ameri- 
can to tip anyonti who get.? paid for 
what he does. I liope that neither you 
nor anyone else will tip a public serv- 
ant." 
, With this advice Judge Fr>v;ke, In 
I police court, dismissed Mr.^. Louisa 
I Smith, who was airalgned ojri a charge 

I of failing to have a garbage can cov- 

I ered. She was cited to appear in court 

I by Mounted Patrolman Rawson. Mrs. 

: Smith said that the collector* of gar- 

1 bage were rough in their handling of 

the can and lid, end that they threw 

the lid to all parts of the yard. .She 

said that three Wieks ago she found 

tixe cover of the <an lying in the car 

tracks, twisted out of shape. 

"Besides, Judge, I do not tip any- 
body, f:ither." 

This remark drew the statement from 
the Judge. However, he will help the 
police to enforce the covered garbage 
can ordinance. 



NEED A DISTINCT AMERICAN LAN- 
> GU.^GB. 

Arthur Ransome in the New Wit- 
ness: When the American language 
throws off its preiense of being Eng- 
lish and learns a natural pride, when 
It is possible to vrrlte American with 
the same scholarlv care that Mark 
Twain devoted to the dialect of "Jluck 
; Finn;*' then the ^^imerlcan spirit will 
I embody Itself In literature. Far more 
, intimate will be that embodiment than 
'any description of .American life, how- 
i ever vivid. In a language that fluc- 
' tuates between Anierlcan and Eujrllsh, 
In words with two traditions, one Eng- 
lish and one Ameilcan, turn and turn 
'about In the writer's mind. Nothing 
so much Impedes English readers in 
i their enjOyment of American writing 
I as their obstinate 8S.sumptlon that they 
' are reading their liwn language. 



MAKES RHEUMATISM 
PROMPTLY DISAPPEAR 



•TWIN PORTS LIMITED" 
Westbound. 

Lv Duluth 10:00 am daily 

Lv Superior 10:29 am daily 

Lv Aitkin 1:00 pm dally 

Lv Deerwood 1:18 pm dally 

Lv Hralnerd 1:47 pm daily 

Ar Staples 2:40 pm daily 

Train No. 1 Train No. 6 

Lv Staples 2:65 pm 8:10 pm 

Ar Fargo 6:47 pm 

Ar Jamestown 8:16 pm 

Ar Bismarck 10:56 pm 

Ar Billings 10:50 am 

Ar Butte 7:00 pm 

Ar Helena 8:05 pm 

Ar Missoula 10:40 pm 

Ar Spokane 6:20 am 

Ar Seattle 8:15 pm 

Ar. Tacoma 8:15 pm 

Ar Portland 7:45 pm 



6:02 pm 

8:34 pm 

11:20 pm 

11:30 am 

8:50 pm 

8:05 pm 

11:59 pm 

7:05 am 

9:50 pm 

9:50 pm 

7:45 pm 



"TWIN PORTS lilMTTED" 
Eastbound 

T ^ , . Train No. 4 

Lv Portland 9:55 am 

Lv Tacoma 8:45 am 

^v^*^*i^'e 8:45 am 

^v Spokane 10:16 pm 

Lv Missoula 7:30 am 

Lv He ena 11:45 am 

LvBu te 10:45 am 

LvBlllnga 7:22 pm 

Lv Bismarck 10:14 am 

Lv Jamestown jos pm 

Lv Fargo 8:'65 pm 

Ar Staples 6:66 pm 

Lv Staples 7:05 pm 

Lv Brainerd 7:58 pm 

Lv Deerwood 8:19 pm 

Lv Aitkin 8:36 pm 

Ar Superior 11:10 pm 

Ar Duluth 11:25 pm 



I 



The "Twin Ports Limited" is entirely electric lighted. Observation-IJbrary- 
.ounging- Car of North Coast Limited style; Dining Car and Large-easy-rid- 
ing Coaches. De luxe service to and from St. Paul and Minneapolis, also. 

C. p. O'DONNELL, C. P. A.. 334 W. Superior St., Duluth. J. E. PEDERSON, 920 Tower Ave.. Superior 

J. L THOMAS. General Agent. DULUTH. 



(d 



Northern Pacific Railway » 



Route of the Great Big Baked Potato." 



Crippled-up Suffsrers Find Relief 

After Few Dones of Groxone 

Are Taken. 



Brooklyn, N. Y., May 2. — Ever Blnco 
the battleship Arkansas put In at the 
navy yard for repairs and wa.s berthed 
in drydock No. 4, the men of the crew 
have been half dreading something un- 
usual mlRht happen. Sailors tht world 
over are superstitious and the men on 
the Arkan.sas are no exception. Tied 
up high and dry to a dock labeled 
hoodoo Is not regarded by the men at 
the yard as a good omen; something 
Is bound to happen, they reason. 

The crew has had misgiving from 
the day the big vessel entered the yard 
and was made snug in the hoodoo dry- 
dock. No doubt if there had been an- 
other vacant drydock large enough to 
accommodate the Arkansas the captain 
of the yard or the navy department ai 
Washington would have been appealed 
to and requested that the Arkansas be 
assigned to another drydock. 

The power of that name lioodoo lurks 
continually about the battiehsip now 
and is felt by everyone. Therefore, it 
did not occasion a great deal of sur- 
prise when the news spread through- 
out the yard that the hoodoo duck, 
where fear itself luik.s, was haunted. 
A Dancing (jihoMt. 
Sailors and marines shook their 
heads and exclaimed: "I knew some- 
thing would hapen before the Arkan- 
sas left the yard." A ghost, the mer- 
riest kind of a ghost it Is reported, was 
observed by a sentry the other night, 
stalking, or, rather, dancing merrily 
in a corner at the bottom of the dock. 
Through the rain and darkness the 
sentry could just make out a myster- 
ious white something as he describes 
it. jumping about with antics singu- 
larly like the turkey trot movements 
of the cabaret performers It was the 
witching hour of midnight, with the 
stillness of desolation broodln"' over 
the yard. The sentry thought of the 
fatalities that have occurred In and 
about the drydock that caused It to be 
known In the navy as the hoodoo dock, 
and the thought terrified him. A civil- 
Ian under the circumstances would 
have been scared to death, but the 
sentry was armed and prepared for the 
worst. 

F,o far as he could nfiake out the ap- 
parition had no particular shape, and 
from where he stood the sentry could 
not distinguish either head, legs or 
body to the object, but eomethlng, ho 
says, that shrun': at intervals to the 
size of a knapsack and then spread 
out as large as an army blanket and 
seemeQ to be struggling with snakelike 
motions to get a foothold on the 
smooth, wet surface of the stone blocks 
"I never took much stock In ghosts," 
murmured the gentry, "but his merry 
nibs there certainly looks like one. 
Mavbe he's a spy disguised as a 
ghost." 

"Halt! Who goes there?" shouted the 
sentry, resolved to take no chances. No 
reply came from the bottom of the 
dock. The sentry raised his gun, aimed, 
but on second thought lowered his gun 
without firing. 

Dill Not ^hoot. 
"If I shoot, I'll wake up the ship's 
crew," he thought, "and If his nibs be- 
low l8 a ghost, I'll be laughed out of 
the service." 

As he stood undecided peering down 
through the darkness a gust of wind 
sweeping around the stern of the Ar- 
kansas swept the indistinct and appar- 
ently Incorporeal f(trm away and It was 
lost to the sentry's view. He fought 
clown his uncanny feeling, but, never- 
theless, ha was glad when the relief 
sentrv camo along .and he was ahlo to 
go to' his hunk. Ho liad a restless sleep, 
and It is declared by his mates that 
several times he jumped from his cot 
shouting at some imaginary object in 
the room. 

The next day a sailor who had learn- 
ed of the incident found a suit of white 
dungarees that had been used by a 
painter, twisted around a rope that was 
stretched from the Arkansas' rudder 
to a post in the corner of the drydock. 
Tt Is tho\ight by some that the appari- 
tion the sentry saw was nothing more 
or less th.qn the trouser legs dangling 
fantastically In the air. 

When this discovery was reported to 
the sentry hf> still had his doubts. 

"Mavbe It was dungarees I saw," he 
said, '"'but Just the same. I don't like 
sentry duty nt night In the vicinity of 
that dock. Tt'a got a bad past." 

LAWYERS PREY" 

ON THE GOHViCTS 



MMXMHMMMMMIIMMMMMMMMMHMMMlill 



Economy Basement 



EVERY STEP DOWN SAVES YCU MONEY 



Women's Street or Dress Pumps, in suede, 
velvet, patent, tan, gun metal or $o QK 
kid: light or heavy soles;ourprice ^.t/%J 



m 
m 
m 
m 

m 

M 

M 

m 
m 
m 
m 
m 
m 
m 
m 
m 
m 
m 
m 
m 
m 
m 
m 
n 
m 
m 
m 
m 
m 
m 

m 
m 
m 
m 
n 
m 
m 



OXFORDS— In tan, gun metal or patent; 
hi toes, short vamps, or recede $0 QK 
toes, A to E— Special . . . .^•^O 

See our Dexter Last — button oxford— just the 
thing to replace those short vamp hi shoes; come 
in black or tan. 

HI SHOES— We have all of the new toes 
in all of the desirable leathers or combina- 
tion of leathers— Priced at 

$2.45 and $2.95 

Qr^Oi^Ial ^^^"'s Shoes— small (^1 r\r\ 
OpcLldi sizes— per pair . . . M^LUU 




TKe North Country's Largest Shoe Store 

218 West Superior 5treet 




m 
m 
m 
m 

M 

m 

M 

m 
m 
n 
m 
m 
m 
m 
m 
m 
m 
m 
m 

M 

M 
M 

m 
m 
m 
m 
m 
m 
m 
m 
m 
m 
m 
m 
m 
m 
m 
m 
m 



were so employed there was not one 
escape. 

The experiment proved so successful 
that the board Is anxious to extend 
the W9rk, and now that provision has 
been made by the legislature to allow 
them wages for such work, it is be- 
lieved that it will be an Incentive for 
them to give even better service. 



It is needless to suffer any longer 
with rheumatism, and be all crippled 
up, and bent out of shape with Its 
heart-wrenching piins, when you can 
surely avoid It. 

Rheumatism corne.s from weak, in- 
active kidneys, that fall to filter from 
the blood, the poisonous waste mat- 
ter and uric acid; and it Is useless 
to rub on linlmen :s or take ordinary 
remedies to relIc^■e the pain. This 
only prolongs the misery. 

The only way to cure rheumatism la 
to remove the catise. The new dis- 
covery, Croxone, does this because It 
neutralizes and dl.'jsolves all the poi- 
sonous substances and uric acid that 
lodge in the joints and muscles, to 
scratch and Irritate and cause rheu- 
matism, and cleann out and strength- 
ens the stopped u]>, inactive kidneys, 
so they can filter nil the poison from 
the blood, and drJA'^e It on and out of 
the system. 

Croxone Is the most wonderful med- 
icine ever made fcr chronic rheuma- 
tism, kidney troubles, and bladder 
disorders. You will find It different 
from all other rtmedies. There Is 
nothing else on eaith like It. It mat- 
terns not how old you are, or how 
long you have suffered, It Is prac- 
tically Impossible no take It Into the 
human system without results. You 
will find relief fiom the first fow 
doses, and you will be surprised how 
quickly all misery and suffering will 
end. 

An original pa<kagG pf Croxone 
costs but a trifle sAyanfe first-class 
*1rug store. All drag^fBtsilre author- 
ized to sell It on a poslilvo money- 
back guarantee. Three do.sea n day 
foi a fow days 1b often all that Is 
ever needed to oATrrome the worst 
backache or urlnwy disorder!. 



Claims of Influence No Mat- 
ter How Hopeless the 
Case. 

Jefferson City, Mo.. May 2.— That 
there are many lawyers and others In 
Missouri who make the big end of 
their living by preying upon convicts 
in the state penitentiary and upon their 
wives and relatives, was the assertion 
of Commissioner Blanton, member of 
the board of pardons and paroles. 

He sa.v.s these men go to the convicts 
themselves or to their families and 
hold out the clelni that they caa Im- 
mediately procure their release if 
enough money can bo raised with 
which to prepare the application and 
defray the expenses. 

"They will even take the money of 
the wife who earns It by long hours 
over the washtub," said Blanton. "I 
have learned that It makes no differ- 
ence whether the case Is one that 
merits executive clemency or not. The 
same claims of Influence are made no 
matter how hopeless the case." 

Judge Charles A. Dimton, who was 
pardon attorney during Covernor Had- 
ley's administration, first discovered the 
pardon brokerage system which oper- 
ates In Missouri, and he strongly ft<3- 
vl.«:ed the convicts and their relatives 
with whom he came In contact, to avoid 
the payments of money to lawyers. To 
discourage the practice he Anally an- 
nounced he would parole no convict 
where he discovered that the lawyer 
was to receive a fee for presenting the 
application and making an argument. 

prisonTabortobe 
used on^io roads. 

Columbus, Ohio. May 2. — The em- 
ployment of prisoners of the state In 
road building Is to be tried out again 
this year by the board of administra- 
tion. Highway Commissioner .Tames 
R. Marker cnlled on President Davey 
of the administration board during the 
last week, trying to make arrange- 
ments for prisoners to work on a 
strip of experiment roadway that will 
be built near West Jefferson. 

Last year one road was built by 
prisoners, and Mr. Marker declareM 
that it Is one of the best pieces of 
road In the state*. At that time no 
provision \<ras made for the payment 
of any wages to the men, but they 
seemed glad to get out of the Idle 
hoiise and get a ohance to do some 
work. They were housed near the 
work, and during the entire time they 



HAS UNDERTAKEN 
QUITE A CONTRACT 

Gospel Pete Has Taken Job 

of Converting All 

Chicago. 

Chicago, 111., May 2. — Gospel Tete 
stood in the doorway of his sign dec- 
orated shack at Seventy-first street and 
Jackson avenue and told of his desire 
to become an evangelist and "fire bul- 
lets of truth" at every Chlcagoan. 

For fifteen years. In fact ever since 
Jan. 2, 1898. Peter Z. Pierson, preacher, 
author and itinerant upholsterer, has 
sought to reach the souls of men 
through his songs and preachings. His 
work-tshop is his front yard and wliilo 
mending furniture he addresses pass- 
ers-by or the crowds who wait for 
trains at the Parkside Btati^n, just 
across the street. 

Over the door of his small cottage, 
Pierson has placed a large sign read- 
ing, Prepare to Meet Thy God. 

"You Are Living the Lie! Turn Be- 
fore Too Late. Amen." 

This has been chalked at 
the door, and within the 
room house there are many 
tatlons, some original and 
the Bible. 

"My work here is limited. T am 
wasting time talking to few. Soon I 
will close my house and try to find 
someone who will back me fln.ancially. 
I want a tent, a huge tent with < pera 
chairs and electric lights. Then I can 
move to different sections of the city 
and deliver my message to thousands. 

"No man can preach the gospel un- 
less he is imbued with the spirit of 
God. Most ministers preach the doc- 
trines of men and the devils. 

"My signs already have converted 
souls. I was told last week of ;i man 
who saw my sign from a train window 
while going up to his home in Ohio. He 
was not a Christian. Today he is re- 
formed and leading a good life. I do 
not go to church, for 'God dwells not 
in teriiples made by hand of man, 
In me." 

Gospel Pete says he Is going to 
forever. 

"My body will never die until the 
coming of Christ,"' he cried, and he 
brought down his iHt emphaslzlngly 
upon a nearby table. 

Pierson is tall and angular, a native 



V GUARANTEED CUkE FOR 

RHEUMATISlVt^ 



[Your money back li ddSi isixty.eizhtj-eijfht i fails to 
I ci;re yoii al;rr a reasonRtle trial. Vuu s*y tt.at'i la.r — 
Ithrn srnd NOW iot liie Vtee Book. ".Mrrt;co! Advice | 
Ion Rhciimaiifni"', with Syrapt&:n Chart and con.pl«'e I 
I rxpiar.ation of tmtinrrt to rei;e\e pain and c-re all 
Ivarictifs ol this pfrsirtent disease. Ask your ir:«id>.. 
■ "rine-irl.cr. no ' dope" itj 60S£. Read aU)ut the dis- 
..very ol this remeiy by a need specialist. Thousands 
have tj««n curetl — so can yea. Wriie } r 
free ht«,k SO.y. AV^-'!- 
Matt J. Johnson Co., 
Krit. I. 



SIXTY- BICHTY-EICHT 



LiiiU 



the side of 
little two- 
other quo- 
some from 



of Norway, and probn.'jlv 60 years old. 

He refuses to tell his age however, be- 
cause everything with him dates from 
his reformation as a drunkard fifteen 
years ago. 

"I am nearly 16 years old." he con- 
tinued, "for it was over fifteen yeari 
ago that a s';iiit cpiMe to nu wniie I 
was working. And vhe spirit sad. 
T'eter, I need you." I cried, 'i'es, Lordi/ 
and my pipe went sailing. 

"Never since then have I touciied to- 
bacco or liquor. -S' iw 1 in a warrior for 
God, and I'm afraid of nothing." 

Peter 8 home is practicallj- a wreck. 
Stones have been thrown through the 
windows — hy his enemies, he says. Dot 
Gospel Pete has boarded up the holes 
and c >ntinued his preaching. He also 
has written many poems and eongt. 
His chief song is entitled "The Lsuit 
Call, or One Step to Hell." 



but 

live 



THE CANOE FOOL SEASON. 

Cleveland Plain Dealer: It is not too 
early to talk about the canoe fool. Ho 
emerges from hibernation as soon at 
the ice is out of the rivers, and bo- 
gins to get himself drowned at one©. 
He keeps it up all summer, and com- 
pels the newspapers to record obituar- 
ies of his achievements. 

All canoeists are not canoe fools. The 
man who knows how to canoe, and also 
knows how to swim. Is by no means a 
fool. He can enjoy one of the most de- 
lightful of sports, and grow brown and 
healthy and add years to his life. 

The fool is the fellow who takes out 
U canoe because it looks like an easy 
way to show off. He Is doubly a tool 
If he does not know how to swim. And 
he is worse than a fool if he Imposes 
on others his Inexperienee and egotism. 
He is a dangerous fellow, who deserves 
abatement. 

There are two good canoeing dont'». 
Don't try to paddle a canoe unless you 
have been thoroughly instructed and 
unless you are a good swimmer. Dis- 
regard of this don't leads to involun- 
tary suicide. And don t coax a friend 
to place trust in your inexperience. This 
meai.o homicide, and places you be- 
yond human sympathy after you are 
yourself well drowned. 

In brief, have a little common sense. 



Duffy's Pure Malt Whiskey 

because of its known freedom from injurious ingredients and its long 
successful record as the best tonic-stimulant, is 

TOO GOOD TO ESCAPE 
IMITATION 

If a merchant tries to twist you 
away from DufTy's when you ask 
for it and offers something "just 
as good" or "more for the same 
money" he does so because he 
makes more money on the sale of 
inferior goods. 

When you ask for Duffy's be 
sure you get Duffy's. Take no 
other. Substitutes are imitations, 
and imitations are dangerous. Get 
what you go after and 

Refuse Substitutes 

Duffy's Pure Malt Whiskey is mado 
from barley and other strength-giv- 
ing nourishing grains, by skifled ex- 
perts. All the grain is thoroughly 
malted and only sound, perfect grain 
can bo malted, which Insures a rich, 
pure and wholesome dLstillatlon. 

Because of Its known purity Duffy'i 
Is used and Indorsed by doctors every- 

Facsimile of package and b.ttlc greatly reduced. po^ses^'orllV" "''''^^ '""" "^"-^^'^"*"*^^ ^'''' 

Be Sure You Get Duffy's 

, f?}*^ ^V^it'^*^ bottles only by most druggl.sts. grocers and dealer,^ at $1 dO a 
bottle. Write for doctors free advice and free valuable Illustrated nu^jjcal 
booklet. ' '>-». 

TIi« Dully Mall Wtilskey Co., Rochester. N. V. 




^waasttg^i 



f lA ' L. iJ'„.i,VI'!H^ ' UJAlJLllW i 



mmmmm 





>iihiiiiiiiwiini:iiii|iiiilii<i(nii> %i III* I II liiii ii • iii»i>1i II iiiTifffiii-'rrrin 





/ 



Friday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



May 2, 1913. 



COURT BARS 
MOOT CASES 



fine of $23 and coats, amounting to g?; 
$35.92. Lrfist Saturday, while learning <(<; 
to driv« a car, he knocked Swan Olson, 



road. 




Minnesota Tribunal 
Only Consider Real 
Issues. 



Will 



Upholds Lac Qui Parle 

County Liquor Suit 

Decision. 



St. Paul, Minn.. May 2. — (Special to 
The Herald. 1 — The Minnesota supreme 
court went on record today as refus- 
ing to consider moot cases. In a per 
curiam opinion the court says Us ac- 
tivities should be limited to real ca».'» 
troversies. and al-^o points out thi^ 
under the new rules the ca.se In qu«»- i 
tion could have been heard in time to 
mak'* a decision of some value. 

It appears that In the springr of 1*1:2 
the village of Loulsburg. Lac Qirf- 
Parle ountv. was In the throes of a 
saloon war. One Ole Anderson brought 
action to restrain tlie village council 
from issuing a ll-juor license, alleging 
the saloon was within l,5oO feet of a 
schoolhouse. The license applied for 
was t'> btgin Apiil 1 and run a year. 

In May the lower court decided tor 
And'ison. Judgment was entered Sept. 
•5 and an appeal was taken St-pt. 9, too 
late tor the uciober term of the su- 
preme court. 

The court affirms the lower court, 
but refuses to pa.ss on the legal points 
Involved, as ur>;ed by counsel in order 
that a precedent might be established. 
The court says there Is no r-'al con- 
troversy now' between the parties. 



CITY BRIEFS 



For MakJnK ThreatH. 

Emll Mehich was arrested this morn- 
ing on a warrant sworn out by Peter 
Cejovich charging him with having 
threatened the life of his wife. .Sophie 
Cejovich. He pleaded not guilty and 
will be tried Tuesday afternoon. 

— ^ 

For Mhop MftinK. 

Kmma Krickson, a domestic -'> years 
old, was arrested yesterday afternoon 
in the department store of J. J. Moe 
it Sons' company, on a charge of 
stealing a shlitwaist valued at $2. Tn 
P'lllce court this morning she was ad- 
judged guilty and got $20 and costs 
or thirty days in the county jail. 

IMeNds Not GvlHy. 

Lillie Adams, 21 years old and mar- 
ried, was arrested yesterday after- 
noon on a charge of conducting a 
house of ill lame at 1616 Pedraont ave- 
nue. In police court this morning she 
pleaded not guilty and her trial was 

set for Monday afternoon. 
^ — - — 

Ilurae Not Shod. 

Richard Barrett, a teamster, whs ar- 
rested yesterday afternoon by Humane 
Agent L.u.\on on a charge of cruelty 
to aninials. It Is claimed that the 
cruelty consisted of drlvng a horse 
with one hoof unshod. He pleaded 
not guilty and his trial set for this 
afternoon. • 



Temple .Servloen. 

"Breathe Thou a UK-.ssing," will be 
the subject of a sermon by llabbi 
Lefkovits, at Temple Emanuel this eve- 
ning. 

Saturday Half Holiday. 

Beginning tomonow all oft'icos of the 
city hall will close on Saturdays at 
noon. The half holiday will continue 
until October, as has been the custom 
ill other years. 



PERSONAL 



Uueer aeu-se ul' Iluiuor. 

Acting upon the message which was 
telephoned to the police yesterday aft- 
ernoon that Frank Sours, a switch- 
man, had been killed In the railroad 
yards at Twenty-eighth av.?nue west. 
Coroner McComb hurried to the scene. 
He was unable to find any one who had 
been killed or Injured. It looks as 
though some would-be smart person 
with a ghoulish sense of humor had 
seat the message to police headquar- 
ters. 



M. I- Stewart Company, 

Successors to Tii wing-Stewart Co.. 
Printers, Designers, Lithograiihers. 

— .^ 

School Board Meeting. 

The regular mon'.hly me»-tlng of tht- 
board of education will be held this 
evening at the Central high school. 
Th»- contract for the addition to the 
Ijakeside school will be let. Otherwise 
the V)r.slness of the meeting will bo 
routine, according to Clerk C, A. Bron- 
son. 

Dr. W. .1. Coventry and Dr. J. A. U Inter 

announce their new location. Suite 503- 
6 Fid-llty building. 

-•^ 

Rridgeman-KuMMell Co.'s 

Pasteurized milk is demanded when 
pure milk Is desired. 'Phone for our 
wagon to call. 

* 

Removal Notice. 

The Penn Mutuil Lif^- Insurance 
company. Henry I. Plnneo. general 
agent, has taken offices in G02 and 603 
Providence building. 

^ • — ■ 

Wife .\«k!» Divoree. 

Daisy Blackert yesterday filed suit 
for divorce in district court against 
Leland O. Blackert, to whom she was 
married at Le Sueur. Minn., on Nov. 13. 
1908. The decree is asked for on the 
grounds of desertion. .She claims that 
he abandoned her on July 31. 1910. and 
that he Is now residing at Selkirk. 
Man.. Can. She alleges that he has 
property in this county worth $5,000 
and that he Is capable of earning $150 
a month. She wants alimony accord- 
ingly. 



J. A, P. Neal 

Has changed his location and opened 
law ofrlcrs i;04-';"5 First National Bank 

building. 

• 

Dr. A. J. Braden 

Announces the removal of his office to 
415-416 Fidelity building. 

New Location. 

Dr. H. E. Webster has moved his of- 
fices from the Providence building to 
209 and 310 Lyceum building. 

♦ 

Will Run .411 Summer. 

The Empress theater will run all 
summer this year, featuring the new 
tabloid shows, which have become so 
popular with local theatergoers. The 
above announcement was made last 
evening by W. M. Abrahamson, man- 
ager of the theater, on his return from 
"L"hicat;o. where he made the arrange- 
ments for the summer season. The 
prices of the front rows downstairs 
are to be changed after next Sunday 
on this account. 



Al. G. Flournoy, representative of 
the Virginia & Rainy Lake Lumber 
company at Virginia, is a guest of the 
.Spalding today. 

George Lardeff of Stevens Point is 
:■- gi.stcred at the Spalding. 

J. E. Linn of Biwabik is at the 
Spalding. 

Harry Witt of Grand Forks Is reg- 
istered at the St. Louis. 

Tracey Granger of Crookston is at 
the St. Louis. 

J. S. Cherue of Virginia is at the St. 
Louis. 

.A. Mels of Sandstone is at the St. 
Louis. 

George Brozlch of Ely Is registered 
at the St. Louis. 

E. C. Bane of Bralnerd Is at the St. 
Louis. „ 

E. J. Ford of Hlbblng is at the St. 
Louis. 

Mrs. George Barlbeau of Ely Is at 
the McKay. 

Ed. Lovdahl of Crosby is at the Mc- 

J. " B. Haskell of Crosby is at the 
McKa.v. 

T J. Evans of Grank Forks is at 
the Holland. 

A. T. Cooper of Webster, S. D., la 
registered at the Holland. 

W. R. Mackenzie of Bemldjl Is at 
the Holland. 

I. B. Byers of Minneapolis is at the 
Holland. 

Fred Levins of the Soo is at the 
Lenox. 

Walter Craaty of Fort Frances is at 
the Lenox. 

Martin Shaw of Ashland Is at the 
Lenox. . ^ , 

.\lbert Abraham, president of the Oak 
Hall Clothing company Is In Chicago. 

DULyTHTATro" 

BE DELEGATE 



Milk LIcenNes Due. 

The li'^en.f^fs of all vendors of milk 
expired yesterday. The health depart- 
ment today is.-;ued a statement that 
unless the.v are renewed in compliance 
with the ordinance they will be re- 
.»^trained from selling their product. 
This applies to diarymen. grocers and 
nny one else who sells milk. 

♦ 

MoeniteN to Sell "NaiU." 

Some applications to sell cigarettes 
under the new Minnesota law are being 
made to Commissioner Hicken. head of 
the division of public satefy. City 
Clerk C. S. Palmer Is drawing up a 
form of application and will have them 
ready within a few days. The appli- 
cations will be acted upon by the coun- 
cil when they are introduced on the 
forms which will be provided. The li- 
cense fee Is $25 for a two-year term. 



Admltn Theft. 

Gus Aim admitted In police court 
yesterday afternoon that he had stolen 
a suitcase from .John Roes and got 
$50 and costs or thirty days In the 

county jail. 

«fc 

Drove ReekleMtly. 

Hjalmar Carlson, charged with reck- 
less driving, was convicted after a trial 
In police court yesterday. He paid a 



Carl Svenson Among Those 
Going to World's Ad- 
ventists Conference. 

Minneapolis, Minn., May 2. — (Special 
to The Herald.) — The Northern Union 
Conference of Seventh Day Adventlsts, 
which Includes the state conferences 
of Minnesota. Iowa. North Dakota 
and South Dakota, will be represented 
at the general conference, the world 
conference W the denomination, in 
VVashington.~D. C. May 15 to June 8, 
by a delegation of seventeen mem- 
bers, chosen by the executive commit- 
tee of the Northern Union conference, 
at a meeting held here, the headquar- 
ters of the union. 

The delegates will be as follows: 
Charles Thompson of Minneapolis, 
president of the Northern Union con- 
ference; W. H. Edwards of Minneapo- 
lis, secretary-treasurer of the confer- 
ence; G. W. Wells of Minneapolis, 
president of the Minnesota conference; 
A R. Ogden of Nevada, Iowa, president 
of the Iowa conference; C. J. Buhalts 
of Harvey. N. D., president of the 
North Dakota conference: C. M. Bab- 
cock of Redfield, S. D., president of the 
South Dakota conference; W. W. 
Ruble of Alexandria. Minn.. F. E. 
Painter of Minneapolis; C. W. Heald of 
Nevada. Iowa; M. L. Andreasen of 
Hutchinson, Minn.: Prof. J. G. Lainson 
of Nevada. Iowa, principal of the Oak 
Park academy; W. D. Parkhurst of 
Des Moines, Iowa: J. W. McComas of 
Sharpsburg. Iowa; 8. E. Jackson of 
Alexanclrl?, Minn.; Carl Svenson of 
Duluth; and M. J. Fritz of Freeman, 
S. D. 

Many Conferences to Attend. 
These persons will be among dele- 
gates that will represent every one 
of the twenty-flve union conferences in 
the United States, Canada. Europe, 
.\ustralia and .\frica. and the mission 
stations in .Africa and Asia. While the 
delegates will number between 300 and 
500 the number of persons to attend 
will swell to about 4,000. as believers 
from all iiarts of North America will 
flock to the scene to listen to the im- 
portant questions concerning the whole 
denomination that will come up foi- 
consideration, and the explanation of 
Bible themes by leading .ministers of 
the faith. 

Every state in -the Union will be 
represented by delegates; in fact, every 
country on the globe. All of the lead- 
ing ministers In the United States and 
Canada will be among those In attend- 
ance. The leaders of the denomina- 
tion in Europe and Australia, as well 
as those of the mission stations In 
Africa, .Asia and the islands of the 
si^a. will also come. 




THE LATEST FO« 
SPRING AND SUMMER 

r.l.h k, I'-r ,-.v:; ,u.d (Irav Suede. 

BUTTON OXFORDS 

$3.00 

-EE OUR WINDOWS. 




ORENSENS 

3 1 7 West Superior St. 

OPPOSITE ST. LOCIS HOTEL 



MRS. PAGE HEAD OF 

KINDERGARTNERS. 

Washington. May 2. — The Interna- 
tional KlndF.rgarten union today 
elected these officers; President, Mrs. 
Mary Boomer Page. Chicago; first vice 
president. Miss Stella L. Wood. Min- 
neapolis; second vice president, Mrs. 
Margaret J. Stannard, Boston; cor- 
responding secretary and treasurer. 
Miss Catherine R. Watklna, Washing- 
ten. 

Plans for the erection of a statue to 
Frederick Froebel, to be one of a gen- 
eral group of memorials in Washing- 
ton to great educators, are being com- 
pleted. The delegate s pledged mor? 
than $4,000 toward the statue, which 
is to c3St $25,000. 

— -, « 

(;raln Being «DlMoed*< In. 

Lakota. N. D.. May 2. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — Some grain Is being 
"disced' Into the ground this spring as 
a remit of the small amount of plow- 
ing done last year. This condition Is 
very unusual, as farmers have made 
the practice of plowing exceptionally 
well here In the last few years. 

.Seeding operation In Northern Traill 
county and Southern <^irand Forks 
county are about concluded so far as 
wheat Is concern'ed. 



$1.00 



0ZV.2I Umbrellas 

Tomorrow we offer choice of our men's 
and women's $1.25 I'mbrellas at $1.00. Thoy 
are covered with good-looking, iimt black 
cloth that sheds water — mounted on patent 
frames and neat handles. 

ChiUlrtMi's School rmlirt'lla-s — 
ginnl one."* — at 75<' »"<• $1.00. 

The right sizes for little folks. 



FOR PROMPT, SATISFACTORY SERVICE SEND YOUR MAIL ORDERS TO 





THR STORE THAT SELLS WOOLTEX. 
113-115-117-119 West Superior Street, Duluth, Minn. 



Cretonnes You Want for Trimming 

A riot of gay colorings marks some of tfie 
new cretonnes and similar fabric.-* Just re- 
ceived at nur Drapery Department on th.- 
third floor. They're just what are wanted 
for trimming hats and coats. They' ll give a 
smart touch to many 
things. 

Prlee»» 3Ro. 4Sc, ROc ^ 
and «0e for many «f the 
new klndM. A little goet, 
a long way. » 



Tomorrow We Plan on Surprising 
You By a Sale of Mighty Good- 
Looking Hats at $5.00. 

You may choose from a big assortment of small and 



$ 



Would You Like a $25 

Serge Coat for $19.50 

Tomorrow ? 

One of the styles is quite 
similar to the cut alongside. 
They are made of heavy Lewis 
serges and are lined throughout 
with good peau de cygne. 

They are cut in the new two- 
button, 48-inch length, in smart 
cutaway effects. They have 
long reveres trimmed with 
fancy silk collars. Choose from 
black, navy and tan in those 
heavy Lewis serges which, as 
you know, are one of the most 
satisfactory cloths on the mar- 
ket for many years. 



medium shapes trimmed in the season's most popular 
materials in the colorings of the hour. There are up- 
standing trims and flat trims. There are tailored 
and semi-dress hats. 

Duluth wornenjipprecia te style and 
and they will be quick to appreciate 
this opportunity to buy hats at $5. 

We advise an early visit. The values are so con- 
vincing as to insure quick sale. And milliners who know their business are here 
to serve you. Tailored styles, $5.00 to $12.00. Dress hats, $8.00 to $40.00. 



Hats for the Girls of Six to Sixteen 
Are Here in Glorious Variety 

Ready-to-wear hats of remarkable styles are priced at $1.50 to $4.00. 
itaticn Panamas, sash-trimmed, and hemp and hair hats trimmed with fl 



imitatic 

that wi .1 sell at $2.50 to $7.50 



There are also 
owers and ribbon 




Find Your Size and You 

May Have a $22.50 or 

$25 Suit for $17.50 

Diagonal serges, Bedford cords. 
Scotcli mixtures and other popu- 
lar fabrics are represented in 
the special lot cf suits on sale 
Saturday at $17.50. They are 
principally in 26-inch semi-fit- 
ted jacket and three-piece skirt 
styles. The jackets are lined 
with splendid wearing peau de 
cygne. Colors Include tans, 
browns. Kings blue and mix- 
tures. Some of the jackets are 
in cutaway effects, others In 
S(iuare corner models. Tht-y are 
from our most popular lines of 
$22.50 and $25.00 suits, and be- 
cause size lines art* broken we 
offer choice at $17.50. 



Gsrls* Dresses for School, 

for Vacation and Commencement Wear 

Yes, and we must tell of pretty little dresses for 
confirmation, too. For confirmation—for gradu- 
ation and for the wedding — the feminine fancy 
^^ justly requires dresses of unusual beauty 

And today we can onl}- mention 
that new lines of dresses for girls 
of 6 to 18 are here, and they are al- 
together remarkable for their 
charming style enhanced by hand- 
embroidered touches. 

These are .selling at $6.50 to $15.00, 
other pretty little dresses aro here at 
$2.50, $2.98, $3.50 and $4.50. 

We believe that any girl may be fitted. 
There are sizes 6 to 12 years in children's 
dresses, slze.s 13 to 17 in jun or dresses, 
sizes 14 to 18 in misses' dress<!S. 

In each line styles are distinct. They 
are fit'dng In line and fashion to the 
ages for which they 
are intended, and what 
a bother of making 
these save. See the 
above at the Children's 
Department, 2nd floor. 




98 



Will Buy 

CVery Dainty 
White VoUe 
Waists 



Little tots' 

dresses, sizes 

up to 4 years 

on .sale at 

Baby Shop, 

3rd floor 




You will be greatly surprised when you 
what fine waists are offered to you in 
lot. There are two styles, each 
style in various trimmings. 

One style is Dutch neck and 
short sleeves with Cluny edge 
and bands of insertion, 
the other is a high neck, 
long sleeve model 
embroidered fronts 
dainty medallions 

Both styles are 
mighty good val- 
ues at $1.50. Spe- 
cial for Saturday 
selling at 98c. 



Girls Who Need Coats Should 
Come Right Here Tomorrow 

If you have not heard why, you will know 
after you have seen the many cleveMktle 
coats. 

That same good maker who sent 
us those smart coats we sold to so 
many girls last season has sent us 
his newet models for spring. Pop- 
ular styles properly priced — at $5, 
$;7.50, $8.50, $10, $12.50 and $15. 

A coat similar to cut is here at $10.00 

Saturday We Will Sell Children's 
$2.50 Wash Dresses at $ 1 .98 

Sizes 6 to 14 years. 

Clever little styles, French and Bul- 
garian models in percales, ginghams 
and chambrays, with pretty yokes and 
belted effects. There are lans, Dutch 
blues, light blues, pinks and plaids ga- 
lore. One of New York's best makers 
made them for us to sell at $2.50— as 
a special treat we offer them at $1.93 
tomorrow. 




V-*ii^*PV^y^ ueparimeni, ^na noor. | ^^ - 

Have You Seen the Window of Winsome White Goods for Commencement Wear? 

^rM ^, uu^A ,.^;i^o cti.^w flnl-P voiles — dotted voiles — embroidered 



Attention, fair seniors — see the window display tomorrow of classy ma- 
terials for class day and commencement wear. Here are fabrics charmingly 
simpje as well as the more exquisitely elaborate 



There are nubbed voiles— snow flake yoil 
voiles— bordered voiles and various beautiful 
too, there are some decidedly attractive fabrics 



es — dotted voiles — embroidered 

batistes of extra qualitv. Then, 

for as little as 25c, 39c, 45c, 50c. 



75c Wliite Voiles, Special at 59c 
A very special offering is a su- 
perb quality' embroidered voile 
with a glisten- 
ing satiny fin- 
ish. It will drape 
very nicely; it is 
46 in. wide; reg- 
ularly it will sell at 75c; tomor- 
row and next week we offer it, 
while the present supply lasts, 
at 59c the yard. 



THESE SPECIALS FOR TOMORROW AND NEXT WEEK. 



59c 



89c 



for $1.25 Embroidered 
Crepe Voiles. 

These are 40 inches wide and 

will make very pretty dresses 
for confirmafion 
and comtnence- 
ment wear. The 
$1.25 quality is 
here offered for 

Saturday and all next week at 

89c the >ard. 



89c 



9dc for Some $ 1 .50 Em- 
broidered Voiles & Crepes 

A very select lot of einbroidered 
white goods including voiles with 
ratine stripes and figures; 30-inch 
embroidered voiles and embroi- 
dered crepes; regularly $1.25 to 
$1.50 at 98c the yard. 



50c for the Finest 45-inch 
French Lawns. 

This is a surpassing quality— it 
lends itself readily to tlie pres- 
ent styles. Reg- 
ularly it would 
sell for much 
more money; 
Saturday and 
next week we offer it special 
at 50c a yard. 



50c 



$1.59 for White Embroidered 
Batiste. 

This lot includes some of the 
very finest embroidered batistes 
in exquisite 
embroi- 
dered ef- 
fects. Spe- 
cial at $1.59 
tomorrow and next week — and 
of course the limited lots make 
promptness pay. 



$159 




The New Medium Weight 

Globe Underwear for 

May Is Here ! 

Perhaps you remember that in the Bioelow 
Papers Lowell says that in New England "May" 
is frequently "Mayn't"— inferring tha.t it wasn't 
safe to "change." 

This condition is equally true for this region. 

and yet winter weights in underwear are 

too heavy to be comfortable, and summer 

weights are too light for safety. 

To suit this period— the Globe Mills make under\year 
for the best New Ergland stores and for us. The weight 
is just right for early season's wear. Of course, the gar- 
ments are beautifully finished as all Globe underwear is. 
There are union suits, and separate garmcnt.s— high or 
low neck— long sleeves or short sleeves— ankle lengths 
and knee lengths in various sizes and various styles. 

Prices range $1.00, $1.19, $1.25, $1.35 and $1.60 the suit. 

The pants are made with band or tight tops and in 
ankle lengths or krjee lengths. Prices, 50c and 65c the 
pair. All sTzes. F'erhaps the tighv top suits are most 
favored because of prevailing styles in dress. 



Do Not Envy the Figure of 
tht Lady You So Much Ad- 
mire—Just Get Those Beau- 
ful Lines in Your Figure! 

If we could tell you all the good news 
w^e have heard about Bon Ton corsets 
since Mrs. Griffin's visit, you would sure- 
ly wish to see some of the ultra-fashion- 
able models. 

The present vogue demands a figure contour of 
lovely appearance— slender appearing and_bcst of 
all natural— it sets off the gown to perfection and 
is much admired. If you will take advantage of 
our excellent service and let our corsetierc assist 
in selecting the proper model for your figure, 
wc are sure you will have every reason to be 
pleased with the result. 

Bon Ton corsets fit and cling with 
kid glove nicety. No steel ends pro- 
trude, no unsightly edges show. The 
gown will have the fashionable ef- 
fect of an un-corscted figure. 
These corsets sell for $3.00 and up, and if you 
will have them fitted you will understand why 
they are the favorite of French dressmakers. 



RUSTABLC 




4 



V 



t 





II.... II.. ■.■.■.I 



:-jr 



'^''^rr 



Friday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



May 2, 1913. 



•V 



§> 



r 



AMERICA'S GREATEST 
CLOTHIiXa SPECIALISTS. 



\ 



BLUE 
SERGE 

NORFOLK 





AT THE 

"3 WINNERS" 
TOMORROW 

We have just received a 
shipment of 100 Blue Serge 
Norfolk Suits from our New 
York tailor shops, and tomor- 
row we will place them on 
I sale for only $10. They come 
in different models, with 
kx'Se and stitched down 
belts. Trousers are cut peg 
top, with or without cuff bot- 
toms — all sizes from 32 to 42. 
.Materials are guaranteed 
pure wool and fast col- 
or, and our expert tailors 
will see that you get a per- 
fect fit. 



TRUST P RETTY STRONG. 

lowd Implement Dealer Says Har- 
vester Co. Has Barnum Market. 

Sioux Falls, S. L>., May 2.— The In- 
ternational Harvester company has had 
everything Its own way in Earnum, 
Iowa, for a decade, according to the 
testimony of J. A. Eastman, implement 
dealer of that place who testified yes- 
terday In defense to the government 
ar.tl-trust suit against that company. 

Eastman says 100 per cent of the bind- 
ers, rakes, mowers and corn binders 
sold there during the iast ten years 
were products of that compp.ny's plants. 
Other dealers, mostly from Iowa, testi- 
fied that the International is at pres- 
ent 60 to 100 per cent strong in their 
territory. All declared they were not 
coerced into buying International ma- 
chinery. 

Twenty-six witnesses were exam- 
ined yesterday, seven of them being 
farmers. 



Pimples Should 

Be Watched 

May be Means of Absorbing Disease 

Germa in Most Unexpected 

Manner. 




Make Your Illood Pare and Immnne 
With S. S. S. 

Thp -world renowned laboratory of 
the Swift Specific Company has col- 
lected a vast amount of information 
regarding the spread of blood diseases. 
In thousands of instances the moat 
virulent types have been the result of 
coming in contact with disease germs 
In public places, and the apparently in- 
■ignificant pimple has been the cause. 
It spreads with astonishing rapidity, 
often infecting the entire system In a 
few days. 

It is fortunate, however, that there 
Is a remedy to cope quickly and thor- 
oughly with such a condition, and 
thanks to the energy of Its producers j 
the famous S. S. S. may now be had i 
at almost any drug store in the civil- 
ized world. 

This preparation stands alone as a 
blood purifier. It is somewhat revolu- 
tionary in its compositon, since it 
accomplishes all that wa.«j ever claimed i 
for mercury, iodides, arsenic, and other \ 
destructive/ mineral drugs, and yet It 
Is absolutely a purely vegetable prod- 
uct. It contains one ingredient which 
serves the active purpose of stimu- 
lating each tiny cellular part of the 
tissues to the healthy and Judicious 
selection of its own essential nutri- 
ment. There arc more cases of ar- 
ticular rheumatism, locomotor ataxia, 
paresis, neuritis, and similar diseases 
resultant from the use of minerals 
than most people are aware of. These 
facts are brought out in a highly In- 
teresting book compiled by the medical 
department of The Swift Specific Co., 
1.17 Swift llldg., Atlanta, Ga. It Is 
mailed free, together with a special let- 
ter of advice, to all who are struggling 
with a blood disease. 

Get a bottle of S. 9. S. to-day 
of your dnursrlst. It will surprise you 
With Its wonderful acUon in tho blood. 



MEAT PRICES 
AT HIGH POINT! 



Berries, Fruits and Vege- 
tables Are Plentiful and 
Lower in Price. 



Poultry Is Almost Unobtain- § 
able — Butter Has Pro- 
nounced Drop. 




In regard to the high cost of living, 
there is slight difference this week In 
the produce market. So far as berries, 
fruit and vegetables are concerned 
where there are changes of price at 
all, the tendency is toward lower fig- 
ures. There are quite a number of 
changes too, and almost all in import 
ant items. However, meats are un- 
yielding and high. Meats of all kinds 

on which prices are quoted still cling 
to the high tenor that has character- 
ized them for woelts and show no sign 
of change as to price. 

Poultry is another department of 
provisions that sticks at the high 
latf, and it is predicted that it will 
remain around there for some time to 
come for poultry Is scarce and bought 
up quickly as soon as it shows on the 
market. The Armour Packing com- 
pany people here says tliat poultry is 
about cleaned up and is snapped up as 
rapidlly as it can be obtained — in fact 
it is almost impossible to get a supply 
sufficient to meet the demand. 

• * « 

Hens are practically unobtainable 
and this week instead of there being 
quoted a range of prices from 18 cents 
to 20 cents, the price Is made 20 cents 
flat. Frozen poultry is practically out 
of the market, all kinds suffering alike 
and in consecjuence the price has 
jumped materially. As to hens, it is 
not expected that there will be many 
obtainable until the spring laying sea- 
son Is over for just now "eggs is 
eggs" and mean money, as good prices 
are being paid for them and this prod- 
uct is of more value than the dead 
hen. After the laying season is over 
hens will again come into the market 
in plentiful quantities. 

• « • 

As to fruit, berries and vegetables, 
there is a tendenc.v for prices to drop. 
.Strawberries are the feature of the 
market. They are coming from 
Ijouisiana in pint boxes, and are of the 
finest (luality. Produce men declare 
that they have seldom seen these 
strawberries equalled at this time of 
the year. Also the price has dropped 
considerably from what it was last 
week. For a case containing twenty- 
four pints last week Louisiana straw- 
berries were bringing $L'.50 to $2.75. 
This week the price has dropped to 
12.35. 

• • • 

Green vegetables as a rule are 20 
per cent lower in price than a week 
ago, particularly green onions, rad- 
ishes and cucumbers. Parsley is out of 
the market. Head lettuce <s scarce 
and high — in fact is difficult to obtain. 

• « • 

The new Texas cabbage is whole- 
some and appetizing to look upon. It 
is bright, green and crisp and is sell- 
ing at a low figure. 

• * • 

Florida tomatoes are taking a high 
figure because of light receipts and 
so is Florida green top celery, which 
is the only celery in the market. Re- 
ceipts of this are very light and ac- 
cordingly the price has aviated. 
« « * 

Another toothsome table delicacy 
which is getting into the popular price 
game is asparagus. The price is rea- 
sonable and the stock is fancy. Last 
week it cost $1.35 per a dozen bunches. 
This week it is quoted on Michigan 
street at 95 cents for the same amount. 
It is claimed that the asparagus on 
the market at this lime is some of the 
finest seen here in a long time. 

• • • 

The better supply of old potatoes 
has made the market In spuds more 
reasonable than before, and the qual- 
ity of the stock received is holding up 
well also. The price is much more in 
keeping with the pocket book of the 
average householder than it has been. 
Last week old potatoes were quoted at 
43 cents the bushel. This week they 
are 3S cents, which helps considerable. 

• * * 

In butter there have been a few re- 
ductions, but in cheese and eggs there 
Is a slight increase. Creamery butter 
dropped during the past week 4 cents 
a pound, the price called for now be- 
ing 30 and 31 cents. I>airy butter 
dropped only 1 cent. In cheese there 
has been an Increase of price in three 
grades — Twins, Wheel Swiss No. 1. and 
brick — each going up 1 cent per pound. 
Etrgs increased a half cent during tlie 
week. 

• • • 

Cuban pineapples are obtainable at 
a very cheap price just now, a drop of 
75 cents a crate being registered dur- 
ing the past week. The grade of the 
pineapples is of high quality and at 
the price quoted the apples are looked 
upon as a bargain. 

• « • 

Grapefruit is still reasonable in 
price in the Duluth market, but indi- 
cations are said to be for an advance 
very soon, so this is considered a good 
time to buy. 



HAfiVARD MEN TO 



HAVE REUNION 



Seventeenth Annual Meet- 
ing to Be Held at St. 
Louis. 

St. Louis, Mo.. May 2. — Graduates of 
Harvard university from all parts of 
the United States will come to St. 
Louis May 22 to be "college men" again 
and march under banners of crimson 
to tunes of favorite college songs at 
the seventeenth annual meeting of the 
Associated Harvard clubs. Friday and 
Saturday, May 23-24. 

Members of the class of '84 will hob- 
nob with those of 1»12; the old battles 
of gridiron, river and diamond will be 
fought over, victories will be celebrat- 
ed again and defeats explained from 
new angles. 

The principal features of the meeting 
will be the banquet, which v/ill be 
given Saturday night In the great main 
dining room of Hotel Jefferson. Presi- 
dent Lowell of Harvard; MaJ. Gen. 
Leonard Wood, U. .S, A.; Dean Briggs. 
Secretary of Agriculture Houston, H. 
A. Leekley of Oklahoma, and Percy 
Haughton, Harvard's head football 
coach, will be the principal speakers. 

Coach Haughton will give a stere- 
opticon lecture on Harvard's 20 to 
football victory over Yale last Novem- 
ber. 

The meeting will officially begin 
Friday at noon with a luncheon at 
Hotel Jefferson which will be the 
delegates' headquarters, and where 
rooms have been engaged for th^'m. 
Immediately after the luncheon will 
come the business session. 

At 4 o'clock Friday afternoon the 
delegates will be taken In autos to 
Sunset Inn, in the foothills of the 
Ozark mountains. overlooking the 
Meramec river, thirteen miles from St. 
Louis, where dinner will be served on 
the porch. 

At 8:30 o'clock the curtain will rise 
on a musical play that should be as 
good as any ever produced by the fa- 



Summery Dresses of tan, 

pink, white and stripes — 

splendid array of styles at 
$4.08, $3.98 

and 



The coats are here in many different styles and colors — the 
new three-quarter length — all silk lined coats are decided fa- 
vorites, but tlie full length coats are still fairly in demand. 
You will find an abundant stock to choose from here, in 
both lengths. Three-quarter length silk d 
lined coats at 



$ 1 5.00 



Long Coats of Serge at $15.00, $12.50 
and 



$9.50 





Sale of Suits 







Ladies' Suits in Navy, Black and Grav Diagonal, Serge and 
Broadcloth, regtilarly sold at $25.00, $22.50 tt 1 1 QO 



and $19.50, on sale at 

Suits — one or two of a kind — some large sizes and a few 
misses' sizes; regular prices $15.00 and $12.50, 
on sale at 



$7.98 



Serge Dresses at 
$6.98 



$6.98 



Regular values, $10.00 and $12.50. Elegant styles of high 
grade Wool Serge Dresses, in all- colors 
and sizes; on sale at 

House Dresses at $1.25 

Entirely machine-made, of guaranteed fast-color percales, 
that have a combination of style, comfort and practic- 
ability with that perfection of detail not approached by 
any other make. The especially designed attractve fea- 
tures, such as the deep hem, neat buttonholes, extra 
width over the hips, fine, even stitching, back seams 
reinforced by shrunk tape, perfect fit at every point, are 
some of the features. Made by specialists, which makes 
these garments unequalled yet cost no more. Sizes, 16 
and 18 years. Sizes, 34 to 46. Exceptionally d» 1 ♦> ^ 
great values at ^P 1 • mt'^ 



Sale of Trimmed Hats 

at $2.98 and $3.98 

Wonderful array of beautiful hats, already trimmed with <f» ^ ^\0 
€|_thtr flowers, ribbons, stick-ups or ^plumes — on sale at JH^ ^O 



f3.0S and 



Untrimmed Straw and 
Milan Shapes 



Of great variety and assortment, 
Inc'iudinsr the new colors of Wil- 
son blue and Nell 
rose, (cerise), on sak- 
at, only 

Children's Straw Hats, 
7Cc, 60c and 



Misses' Straw Hats, 
9l.::5 and , 



$1.98 

25c 
98c 



FI.OWEU BARGAIN. 

Odd and end numbers of mil- 
linery flowers and fancy trim- 
mings; regular 25c to 
50c values; on sale 
at 



lOc 



Children's Bonnets, of 
gold braid, Tuscan 

straw, etc., at 

Infants' Lawn Bonnets, 
48c and 



$1.25 

25c 




Girls' Coats 



For Spring and Summer 
Wear at Only 




Bargain 

They display wonderful offerings at 
extraordinary savings. 
English Torchon Lace, Insertions 'C^ 

an<l Edgings to match, at *^C 

Embroidery, 6 inches wide, in- 1 Ckfs 
sertions and edgings, at • ww 

Taffeta, Satin and Moire Ribbons, ^^ 
^ to 2^ inches wide, at >3\^ 

27-inch Embroidery Skirt ^LQf*^ 

Flouncings; 50c value, at. ...... .^^^ 

LaJies' tan Guaranteed 42 OA 

Rancoats at ip^.^fj 

Boys' Wash Suits that wash; ilQr* 
tan and other colors, at O-rC 

Ladies' White Waists, shelf Aff fs 

worn, $L00 and $1.25 values at..H»€ C 



Tables 



36-inch Bleached Muslin, soft finished — 
no starch — a \2y2C value on bar- 1 C\g^ 
gain table, 3,000 yards, at, yard. . . I vC 

Men's 50c Ribbed Shirts and ^Qr* 
Drawers at %^^V^ 

Part Wool Gray Sweater Coats for 
ladies and misses, d* 1 OO 

Children's $1.00 Wool Sweat- fJCkfs 
ers at \#^C 

12j/^c Zephyr Ginghams, 33 1 /\^ 

inches wide, at • \J\^ 

Huck Towels, large size, | ^^ 



L 









Little Girls' Coats, sizes 2 to 6, made up 
in tan Bedford cord cloth and also 
shepherd check cloth; great ^ 1 QA 
value at «P 1 #^0 

Little Girls' Black Satin Coats; all 
lined; sizes 2 to 6; ^^ OA 

Girls' Blue Serge Coats; sizes 8, 10 and 
12; at $4.98 ^\ QO 

and %P*^»71# 

Girls' Black Satin Coats; all lined; sizes 
8, 10 and 12; at $5.98 ^A QO 

and ^M'.^U 



Get 

Your 

Pumps 

and 

Oxfords 

here at 

$2.48 & 

$1.98 



$2.48 and 



L adies* Pumps and Oxfords— I? 98 



Velvet Pumps — Black, 2 0-t 

straps, at ^ ■■• 

Velvet Pumps — No strap; ^-l 

black; wide silk bow, at V-* 

Patent nnti Gun Metal Pumps fij-i 

— no strap; wide silk bow V-*- 

Gun Metal Two-Strap Pumps ^O 

— short vamp, high heel, at. . . .V^ 

I.ai lies' Patent Kid Bliicher ^-i 
Slices — high heels, at V* 

Girls' 2 -St rap Patent Piunps Qi\ 

— £:i:es to 2; $1.50, $1.35 and...V.*. 



.9S 
.98 
.98 
.48 
.98 
.25 



$2.48 

t'her and 

$1.98 



Ladles' Black Suede 
Pumps at 

Ladles' Tan lUissla Calf Bluoher and 
Button Oxfords — "Radcliffe" 

$3.00 brand, at 

Ladies' Patent 4-Button Oxfords — "Rad- 
cliffe" $3.50 brand, for ^O 4© 

Ladies' 4-Buttoii Gun Metal Calf Good- 
year Welt Button Ox- ^O JO 

fords at ^^.MO 

li.ulies' A\lilto Canvas <&-i OC 

Pumps at ^ J..AO 




Dark and medium brown colored Suits 
for boys of all ages up to 17; values 
$2.50 and $3.00; good as- ^ 1 QO 

sortmcnt of sizes at ^ ^ •^O 

Boys' heavy blue Serge Norfolk Suits; 
sizes 10 to 17; on sale ^A. ASk. 

Boys' Wash Suits; ^€\^ 

98c and 07C 

Boys' Knickerbocker Pants AQ ^ 

at fl'OC 

Boys' Bloomer Pants ^ C 

Boys' black, blue or striped ^ ^/«* 

Blouses at 4^^C 

Boys' Ribbed Union Suits; all ^ C^ 
sizes up to 34] at 4v^C 

Boys' Blue Serge Caps O^/* 



I 



I 



1^^^^^^ 



mous "Hasty Pudding" club. The mu- 
sic has been written by Max Zach, 
formerly conductor of the popular con- 
certs of the Boston Symphony orchoe- 
tra and now conductor of the St. Louis 
.Symphony orchestra, and the words by 
Eugene H. Angert. a St. Louis Har- 
vard man. and his sister, Miss Joseph- 
ine Angert. 

At 10 o'clock Saturday morning the 
delegates will march along the streets 
behind a band of music to the river, 
where a boat will be Ifi readiness to 
take them for a river trip. Lunch 
will be served either on the boat or at 
a landing place yet to be selected. The 
return trip will be made in tlmo for 
the banquet. 



ORRINE 

CURES DRINK HABIT 

So uniformly successful has OR- 
RINE been In reatoring the victims 
of the "Drink Habit" into sober and 
u.seful citizens, and so strong Is our 
confidence In Its curative powers, that 
we want to emphasize the fact that 
ORRINE is sold under this positive 
guarantee. If, after a trial, you got 
no benefit, your money will bo re- 
funded. ORRINE co.sta only $1.00 
per box. Ask for Free Booklet. 

W. A. Abbctt, 20 5 West Superior 
St., 932 East Second St. and 101 West 
Fourth St 



TRY NAVAL OFFICERS. 

Captain and Navigator of the Ark- 
ansas Accused. 

Washington. May 2. — The navy de- 
partment has ordered the trial by gen- 
eral courtmartlal of Capt. Roy C. 
Smith, commander of the battleship 
Arkansas, and Llett. W. W. Smythe, 
who was acting navigator of that ves- 
sel when 8h« was Samagtd last Feb- 
ruary by running upon a .'^hoal in the 
vicinity of Ceiba bi.nk, off tlie south- 
ern coast of Cuba. 

The ease will be heard at the New 
York navy yard May 12. Capt. Smith 
will be tried upon [he charge of hav- 
ing improperly haze.rflod the vessel by 
taking her over a course which lay 
dangerously close to a shoal when 
there was available a wide channel 
showing deep and regular soundings. 

The charges against Lieut. Smythe 
involve the yuestionB whether he failed 
In his duty as actini? navigator in that 
he did not fix the position of tho ship 
by exact method, an 1 whether he failed 
to Inform the captfiin of the distance 
at which the ship would nass the chart- 
ed position of the shoal. 

The damage to the Arkansas result- 
ing from the accident cost the gov- 
ernment |r»o,ooo. 

CELEB RAf|V/jJH~b EWEY. 

Washington, May 2. — Twenty-one oi' 
•the surviving offlcV-rH who fought un- 
der Admiral (Jeorge Dewuy in Ln« bat- 



tle of Manila bay, celebrated the fif- 
teenth anniversary of the famous naval 
engagement here at the annual re- 
union and banquet of the Society of 
Manila bay. The officers, including 
Rear Admiral Asa Walker, who com- 
manded the cruiser Concord, and the 
only survivor of Dewev's Heet captains, 
gathered around the banquet table to 
do honor to Admiral Dewey, president 
of the society. 

Personal reminiscences of the battle 
were given by the diners. Those pres- 
ent were: 

Admiral Dewey, Rear Admirals Asa 
Walker, Frank H. Bailey. George H. 
Colvocoresses, Hutch I. Cone, Bradley 
A. Fiske, John D. Ford and Thomas B. 
Howard, Medical Director John C. Wise. 
Lieutenant Commanders Henry V. But- 
ler and William P. Scott, pay directors; 
William G. Gait and John R. Martin, 
commanders; Samuel H. Robinson and 
Montgomery M. Taylor, captains; Rey- 
nold T. Hall. Patrick W. Hourlgan, 
Oustav Kemmerllng and Charles M. 
McCormick, pay inspector; Eugene D. 
Ryan, surgeon; E. M. H. Marsteller. 
Edward W. Harden of New York and 
John F. Marshall of Norfolk. Va. 



year, there is a surplus of ordinary 
receipts over ordinarv disbursements 
of 18,966.000. against a deficit a year 
ago of $12,580,000. 

Customs receipts for last month fell 
off 12,500,000. as compared with April. 
1912, while Internal revenue receipts 
Increased 12,000,000. A big factor in 
the increased expenditures for the 
month just closed was the pension 
payments under tho new law. These 
exceeded the pension disbursement of 
April, 1912, by $3,217,000. 

Tlip total general fund May 1 was 
$141,333,043. including a working bal- 
.'tnce for the government of $73,077,000, 
which it is expected, will soon be de- 
creased by $10,000,000 under Secretary 



SURPLUS IN THE 

N ATION 'S PURSE. 

Washington, May 2. — Footing up ac- 
counts for May 1. Uncle Sam found a 
deficl'^ncy of $3,654,000 for the month 
of April. Exclusive of Panama canal 
and public trniisactlons, the receipts 
for April amounted to $53,452,000, while 
(lisbursomentB reached $57,106,000. 

Up to date, for the current fiscal 



I 



McAdoc s authorization for additional 
deposits in thi^ national banks. Trust 
funds In the treasury at this time in* 
elude $"1,075,198,000 in gold coin and 
bullion. The mints during April coined 
$4,250,000 in gold. 

The circulation of the 7.460 national 
banks amounted to $731,044,591. 
— • 

Hnnnn iHsuea RequlaKlon. 

Bismarck. N. D.. May 2. — Governor 
Hanna has Issued requisition paix rs 
for Ben Rook of McLean county, who 
is wanted for mortgaging property he 
did not own and thus obtaining money 
under false pretenses. Sheriff Simon 
left yesterday for New Ulm. Minn., 
where the man is being held awattinft 
the arrival of North Dakota officers. 



SHOE 
POLISH 








( 



10 



T } 


1 


^ 










• 


Friday, 


THE DUL 


U T H H E R A L D May 2, 1913 




THE MOST NOTABLE CLOTHES SHOP 
IN DULUTH IS THAT OF THE 

Fitwell Store 



This store offers every man and young 
man the opportunity of seeing the au- 
thoritative styles of Spring and Sum- 
mer Suits at three very popular prices 




15 




$ 



25 



PROSECUTOR 
IS DENOUNCED 

Socialists Ask Investigation 

of Conduct of Crow Wing 

County A.ttorney. 



It brings within easy reach certain designs which 
are entirely exclusive, both in patterns and style 
that are correct for this spring's wear. 

You Men Who Are Anxious to Save Money 

and dress correctly, should look into our center 
showcase and see the special line of Suits on dis- 
play; .workmanship and quality guaranteed;,, 
specially priced at — 



Great Crowd Participates 

in International Labor 

Day Celebration. 



See Them in 

Our Center 

Showcase 




See Them in 

Our Center 

Showcase 




All clothes 
purchased of 
us we 
guarantee 
to keep in 
repair and 
pressed 
free of 
charge. 



Quality 




Clothes 



Ctt>K 



112 WEST SUPEKIUK STttEET, DILIJIU. 





WHEN WHISTLE BLOWS 
CAT AWAKENS MASTER. 

Sharon, Pa.. May 2. — Mark MoeUer, 
a 8tb*^l worker of near Farrell, ■would 
ri'^t trade his pet Maltese act for th>3 
1 •. alarm clock ever invented. He 
\ . uh»'3 for the story that within the 
last vear he has not once arrived late 
at his work, while before "Tom" came 
Into the family circle he was fre- 
Qu« ntly tardy, 

Moellar's cat wakens him every 
morning at 6 o'clock, and if he turns 
over for Just a few more winks the 
feline beffins clawing at the covers 
until Moeller arises. 

Moeller used to have an alarm clock. 
Eometimes he would forget to wind it. 
He would overshop and arrive late at 
work. There is a whistle at a factory 
close by, and this always blows at 6 
o'clock. The t-at knows when the 
Whistle blows It is time for Moeller 
to arise, and it juinps on the bed and 
stays there until the sleeper is aroused. 



The cat has been more reliable than 
the clock, and has not missed awaken- 
ing- Moeller, except Sundays, for sev- 
eral months. 

MAILSAC'OCOAMUT. 

Case Where Postoffice Carries a 
Package Containing Liquid. 

Indianapolis, Ind., May 2.— "Guess 
you'd better handle this carefully. 
Sounds like It mUht break," said a 
postman as he gingerly handed a big 
brown package ovei* the desk at the 
Hotel English. 

The clerk looked first at the pack- 
age, then at the postman, with a 
puzzled expression on his countenance. 
He picked up the package and shook 
it. There was a sound of dashing 
water, th'^n he saw the label, "Palm 
Beach cocoanut," and he laughed. It 
was not a patent bottle or an ostrich 
egg. It was Just a cocoanut, but dif- 
ferent in appearance from the kind 



offered In the local market. The 
smooth outer shell had not been re- 
moved, and the label and postage were 
pasted right on the nut. 

The cocoanut weighed three pounds 
and it cost 24 cents to send it by par- 
cel post from Palm Beach, Fla. The 
rut was sent to Homer I. Cutsinger. 



INITIATION FESTIVAL 

May Be Held By Shriners in Panama 
Canal Lock. 

Mobile, Ala.. May 2. — Abba temple. 
Nobles of tho Mystic Shrine, propose 
to hold an initiation festival wherein 
•'unregenerate sons of the desert will 
cross the hot sands" in one of the 
Panama canal locks before the water 
is turned Into the lock this fall. Per- 
mission has been obtained from the 
government to use the lock and all 
that remains is to get the sanction 
of the Imperial council, which meets 
In Dallas. Tex., May 12 to 17. This 
probably will be granted. 






No. 223— 
Women's 
Pumps; all 
style*. 



9.IlClc|)o 

SHOES 

For Men and Women 




A resolution callingr on Attorney 
General Lyndon A. Smith to investi- 
gate the oonduct of County Attorney 
Fred Swanson oi: Crow Wing county 
who is claimed to be responsible for 
the release of George L. Payne, one 
of tho alleged k.dnapers of Theodore 
Sjogren, strike agitator, who was 
taken from Crosby to Bralnerd in an 
automobile, was passed by the Duluth 
Socialists at thei- International Labor 
Day mass meeting' at the Armory last 
evening. 

The resolution states that the mun- 
icipal judge at 'Jrosl)y dismissed the 
charge against Payne on tlio motion of 
Mr. Swanson, who represented to the 
court that inasiauch as there were 
others who were equally guilty of the 
ciiarge, it would be unfair to prose- 
cute Payne. 

Tlie May festival of the local Social- 
ists was precede! by a parade which 
Btarted at the court house and which 
extended a distance of ten blocks. 
There were about 1.400 people in the 
line. The mass meeting was one of 
the largest in the hi-story of the local 
organization. Red flags and red badg- 
es were much In evijience. A Finnish 
band headed tht: prooession and the 
Zenith City banc, a Scandinavian or- 
ganization brought up the rear. 

John Alvln Julmsofi presided at the 
meeting. He stited that Labor Day 
as observed In tleptember is only the 
badge of capitalism i;nd the "intellec- 
tual prostitutes of the press and pul- 
pit vie with each other in praising this 
token of serfdom." The International 
Labor Day, he sild was the only real 
celebration by tie working class. 
The Cuyuna .Strike. 
A. Miller gave a »hort talk in Po- 
lish wliich was lollo%'ed by a few re- 
n)arks from O. K.. Thompson, state or- 
ganizer for the Municipal Ownership 
party in Minnesota^, on the miners 
strike on the Ouyuna range. Mr. 
Thompson stated that the press did 
not give a clear view of the situation. 
He said: 

"The men went back to work at an 
advance from $:J.50 per shift to $3 
and $3.25," he said. "They were 
given four of tlie t>lx demands they 
made, and their wrongs were In a 
measure righted. 

"These men deserve great credit. 
They had no organization, yet they 
went on a stri/t^, did not get into 
trouble, and helped to preserve order. 
It is the only time in history where 
laboring men have really stood by 
each other. They even requested that 
the saloons be closed for fear the 
deputy sheriffs mlglit become Intoxi- 
cated."- 

Mr. Thompson also declared that It 
was owing to -thi 'spineless county at- 
torney of Crow Wing county" that 
Payne did not receive a term in state's 
prison as he so richly deserved. The 
speaker declared that the attorney 
general had promised to investigate 
the incident. 

The mass mee:ing also passed a res- 
olution censuring the West Virginia 
authorities and Gov«rnor Hatfield for 
keeping "Mother ' Jones In prison. Tlie 
resolution demands her release. 

Allen Strong liroms of St. Paul gave 
a talk in which he declared that an- 
archy would not redress conditions. He 
advLsed second sober thouglit on all 
questions affecting Socialism. 

Miss Agnes JIae Johnson gave an 
interesting reading. She was decked 
out in Socialist red. 

WILSONWIRES 
CALIFORNIA 

Asks Caution in the Pass- 
age of Alien Land 
Measures. 



No. 25 — Wom- 
en's Blucher 
Oxford, black 
and tan. 



125 Handsome and Perfect Fitting Styles 

Comfortable as Custom Made 

Made of the Best Leather by Expert Shoemai<ers 

Wcar-Proo 

As Good Leather Can Be, What 
More Can You Buy at Any Price. 




No. 21 n — Tale 
Toe; black 
and tan. 




Governor Johnson Opens 

Way to Suggestion From 

President. 



\ 



\i 



K| 

N 

Kj 
K| 
K 
Ki 
K 
Kl 



/ 



just 

they 

off- 



Our clothes cost you 
the same price now that 
will cost in July. We have no 
price sales and you don't have to pay 
W7 an exorbitant profit now to make up 
S^ for the other fellow who waits for a sale. 
Y You pay us a fair price for as good a suit 
as you can buy anywhere and at any time 
for $15 and $18. We don't tell you our clothes 
are the finest, the best, the most beautiful, 
the niftiest, and a lot of silly talk. We do 
tell you they're absolutely all wool, perfect 
in style and fit, and we guarantee satisfactory 
service. 

We make them in our Cleveland factory 
and we sell them direct to you. You save the 
middleman's profit of $5 to $8. 

CHOICE OF ANY SUIT IN 
OUR STORE ALWAYS 



.'•': 



■^ 



J 



I 



20 WEST SUPERIOR ST. 



ST. PAUL STORE— 

44 East Seventh Street. 



MIXXEAPOLIS STORE — 

245 Nicollet Avenue. 



ONLY FOURTEEN 

VETERANS LISTED 



No. IGl— 
Latest London 
toe, black and 
taa. 



EVERY P 




WARRANTED 



Sold Direct by the Maker in Waldorf Shoe Stores. 
^Saving You the Three Profits of Retailer, Jobber 

and Middleman. 

Waldorfs Are Known as Reli- 
able Shoes All Over the World. 




To. 863 — 
Russia and 
Uaok Calf. 



ALDORF 

SHOE STORE 




N'o. 409 — 
Jiarvard toe — 
Groati^st value 
ever for style 
and wear. 



R. H. LONG, Maker. 



313 WEST SUPERIOR ST. 

Factory: Framing:ham, Mass. 



Sacramento, Oal., May 2. — The fol- 
lowing telegram from President Wil- 
son was received here today by Gov- 
ernor Johnson: 

"I take the liberty of calling your 
attention to the Webb bill which 
would involve an appeal to the courts 
on question of treaty rights and bring 
on what might be long and delicate 
litigation." 

Governor Johnson Immediately re- 
plied: 

"I thank you very much for your 
suggestion. The fault may be due to 
the fact that ive have endeavored to 
preserve affirmatively upon the face 
of our bill the existing treaty. I have 
referred the matter at once to our at- 
torney general and I would be ex- 
tremely grateful for any suggestions 
that would avJld the objection you 

mention." 

» — 

Defer Aotlon One Day. 

Sacramento, Cal., May 2.— When the 
Webb redraft of the anti-alien land 
bill was reached in the senate yester- 
day Senator Curtin introduced a reso- 
lution proposing that tlie legislature 
defer to the wishes of President Wil- 
son as expressed by Secretary of 

State Bryan. . „ .v. .... * »- 

The resolution set forth the facts 
purrounding the visit of Mr. Bryan to 
California and his conference with the 
legislators, ard promised that the 
alien land bills would not be passed 
thLs seSKlon. However, It urged Presi- 
dent Wilson to endeavor to obtain 
such treaty agi'eements as would reach 
the desired en 3. , ^, ^ 

At the earnest plea of the Demo- 
crats for more time in which to .itudy 
the Webb redraft of the antl-allen 
law, the majority leaders in the sen- 
ate agreed t3; a postponement for 
further consld?ratlon of the measure. 
Nu KebonHldoratlon. 

The agreement wa.'s made with the 
understanding on all .'<ides that the 
bill shall com ' to a final vote today, 
and that no motion to reconsider shall 
be made on behalf of either side after 
the last roll call. 

During the argun^ent on a motion 
by Senator Curllp to postpone, nearly 
every member Cif the Democrattc mi- 
nority on the floor declared he had 
not read the till" thoroughly, if at all. 

On this representation Senator 
Thompson, majority leader, said there 
was no desire tq eraharrass any one, 
and unanimous approval was given to 
Senator Curtin's motion. 



Capt. Pressnell Getting in 

Touch With Those Eligible 

for Gettysburg Trip. 

Capt. T. H. Pressnell has announced 
a list of fourteen veterans of the Civil 
war, living in Duluth and vicinity, 
who are eligible to attend the Gettys- 
burg reunion at the expense of the 
state. 

Capt. Pressnell believes there are 
many other veterans In the city and 
nearby towns who are eligible to make 
the trip and he is anxious to hear from 
them. Members of the First Minne- 
sota, two companies of sharpshooters 
or any other regiments which took 
part in the battle of Gettysburg are 
eligible. ^ ^ 

Tlie list 80 far compiled by Capt. 
Presiinell follows: 

Charles H. Safford, Company F, 
Fifth Michigan cavalry, Duluth. 

Harrison Lyons. Company A, First 
Minnesota, Gettysburg, and wounded 
July 2, Verndale. 

Jeremiah Glunt, Battery E, Penn- 
svlvanla light artillery, Bralnerd. 

" David Archibald, Company L, First 
Minnesota. Bay Lake. 

Newton N. Paine, Company H. One 
Hundred Eleventh New York infantry. 
Brainerd. 

Charles E. Harris. Company T, Sev- 
enth Wisconsin Infantry, detached to 
Battery B, Fourth United States artil- 
lery at Gettysburg, 1723 East Fifth 
street, Duluth. 

Otis H. Dyer, Seventeenth Maine in- 
fantry, Barnum, Carlton county. 

Charles E. Holt. Company C, Sixth 



Ohio cavalry, 609 West Third street, 
Duluth. 

Franklin Paine, Company L. First 
Minnesota infantry, 5349 London road, 
Duluth. 

George H. Dufree, Company K. First 
Minnesota infantry. Grand Marais. 

William P. Strickland, Company K, 
One Hundred Twenty-flrst New York 
infantry, 21 Carlisle avenue, Duluth. 

Charles H. Graves captain Thirty- 
fourth infantry, U. S. A., and brevet 
lieutenant-colonel. U, S. A. Was on 
Gen. Graham's staff at Getty.sburg. 
Address U. S. ambassador, Stockholm, 
Sweden. Col. Graves writes that he 
wants his name on the list and hopes 
to be here to go. He is anxiously await- 
ing the appointment of his successor. 

S. A. Clark, Company F, Fourth i 
Massachusetts cavalry. 1407 East Third 
street, Duluth, 

T. H. Pressnell. Company C, First 
Minnesota, Duluth. 

• 

Skinner Operated Oa. 

Indianapolis, ind.. May 2. — Otis Skin- 



ner, the actor, underwent an operation 
here yesterday for the removal of an 
abscess back of the ear. Dr. Lafayette 
Page, who performed the operation, 
.said that while Mr. Skinner withstood 
the knife in good shape, his condition 
was serious. 

CONSUL ASKS RIGHT 

TO HANDLE FUNDS. 

Edsar Prochnlk, Austro-Hungarlan 
consul, with headquarters at St. Paul, 
yesterday petitioned the district court 
for authoritv to handle and distribute 
the funds of the estates of two of his 
fellow countrymen In this county. 
They are Bozo Rukavina, who died 
July 3 1912. leaving an estate of 
$117.96' and a claim for wrongful death 
against the Wisconsin Steel company, 
and Mike Lamaitlch, who died on Juiy 
17 1912 leaving a personal estate of 
$316. FvO "and a cause of action against 
the Oliver Iron Mining company. 



Here's a Chance to Get a 
Motor Cycle Cheap 



It is Human to discriminate! 
W TURKISH BLEND ^ 

CIGARETTES 

owe their wonderful popularity to 
their pure and choice tobaccos. 
Men like Fatima— like the good 
tobacco— like the blend— a "dis- 
tinctively individual" character 
that pleases the whole country! 






We have some second-hand Motor 
Cycles taken in exchange for new Ex- 
celsior machines that are in A-1 con- 
dition and guaranteed to be in first 
class running order. Read the list: 

One 4-h. p. single Wagner Motor Cycle 

$120 

One 6-h. p. twin Indian Motor Cycle 



BUTTON, 

BUTTON, 

WHO'S GOT 

THE 
BUTTON! 



$115 




One 4-h. p. single Wagner Motor Cycle 

$130 

One 5-h. p. 1912 model, twin cylinder 
Thor — good as new 

$165 

Another shipment of 10 Excelsiors arrived yesterday. We 
are ready to give you immediate delivery on this machine. 
Have you noticed the large number of Excelsiors on Du- 
luth streets? Come in and look over the best made. 







r\ 



-- mwiwMaMB 



>l> ■ » ^Jl '^P" 



Friday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



May 2, 1913. 



11 





HOMECROFTERS' 
CORNER 

Conducted by C. E. ROE. 

Questions will be answered by Mr. Ro« 
JD this column. 



<^^^, 





a uylen passengers, 



In some sections of Duluth, gooil 
stable manure Is scarce and the prices 
asked for hauling Is seem almost pro- 
hibitive to wage earners. Yet the fer- 
tility of the soil must be maintained 
If the garden Is to thrive and yield re- 
sults worth while. While there Is no 
one commtrclul fertilizer which can 
adequately take tht- place of stable ma- 
nure, thtre are sevt-ral which will 
prove valuable where the supply of 
stable manure Is inadeciuate. 

Everyone who lias chickens should 
carefully store all refuse from the 
chicken coop in a drv place. Before 
applying- to the garden thi.s should be 
thiTOU(?hly mixed with land plaster or 
with crushed Tennessee phosphate 
rock. I>o not mix with wood a^Jhes or 
alr-s!aked lime as the lime immediate- 
ly free the ammonia in tho hin ma- 
nure and robs It of more than half of 
Its value. Land plaster is cheap and 
easily secured from any of the dealers 
In lime and cement. Broadcast the mix- 
ture sparinsrly after tl.e garden has 
been spaded and rake thoroughly into 
the soil. 

Wood ashes and air-slaked lime are 
both valuable fertilizt-rs when used 
alone or together. The lime and pot- 
ash contained in wood ashes are of 
special value to Duluth stiils, but they 
should l«e stored where they can be 
kept dry until used upon the land. Air- 
slaked lime is not only valuable as a 
fertilizer but it will help to sweeten 
heavy soils and will destroy any harm- 
ful funfcus which may have found lodg- 
ment in the soil. The soil here is de- 
ficient in lime and either of the above 
will furnish tlie necessary supply. They 
may be applied in the same manner i 



recommended for chicken manure. 

Bone meal or ground bone is almost 
an ideal fertilizer, but it should be 
used sparingly and thoroughly mixed 
with the soil. When used for hill crop.s, 
such as corn, a handful Is sufficient 
for four or five hills. It Is a good 
plan to hoe it in when you cultivate 
your corn for the first time. This fer- 
tilizer is sold by all of the large meat 
packing houses. 

All stable manure contains a low 
percentaj^e of phosphorus, which is 
largely used by the first crop after the 
manure is applied, youth Carolina or 
Tennessee rock phosphate is an excel- 
lent substitute for restoring this ele- 
ment. From 25 to GO rounds should be 
sufficient for the ordinary city gar- 
den or. about 300 pounds per acre. 

If you cannot get bone meal and 
want a fertilizer that contains practic- 
allv all of the elements essential to 
plant growth, try the following: 

Ten pounds nitrate of soda, five 
pounds muriate of potash, five pounds 
potassium sulphate, five pounds acid 
phosphate. 

The nitrate of soda is the most ex- 
pensive, but it is the only one in tlie 
list which will furnish the necessary 
supplv of nltropren. Where you have 
isod to turn under the decaying grass 
and roots will give you the needed sup- 
ply of this element and you may omit 
it from the list. Fertilizers mixed in 
about the above proportion may be pur- 
chased at from 3 to 5 cents per pound. 
If you have a supply of wood ashes 
use them instead of the muriate or 
potash and potassium sulphate. 

The great danger with the amateur 
is that he will use too much when he 
applies commercial fertilizers. 



SQUEEZE THE 

LEMO N TARIFF 

(Continued from page 1.) 



placing sugar on the free list In three 
years. It was lost 88 to 186. 

Representative Hardwick of Georgia, 
defended the rates for the majority, 
describing America's sugar industry 
as of the 'hothouse" variety, unable 
to stand on Its own feet and exacting 
excessive taxes from the people to 
support it. 

Analysed ^ugar Rates. 

Representative Underwood analyzed 
the sugar rates in the proposed bill, 
described the Louisiana cane Industry 
as one that could not survive, and as- 
serted that the rates In the bill would 
not affect the beet sugar industry. 

Placing sugar on the free list would 
result in the turning of the Hawaiian 
Islands* over to the Japanese, said a 
letter Senator Works had read in the 
senate from the Episcopal bishop of 
Honolulu. It would drive nine-tenths 
of the white population, other than 
the troops, from the islands and leave 
It In the hands of the Japanese who 
might be able to exist on the reduced 

firofits from work on sugar planta- 
lons, said the writer. 

Rejected Amendmenta. 
Amonp the rejected amendments to 
the agricultural schedule In the house 
are: 

By Representative Kent of Califor- 
nia, to put cattle on the free list; Wil- 
lis of Ohio, sheep from 10 per cent to 
Jl per head; Woods of Iowa, meat 
rom free list to 25 per cent; Sloan of 
Nebraska, meats to 15 per cent; Ford- 
ney of Michigan, all livestock from 10 
to 25 per cent; Steenerson of Minne- 
sota, potatoes from the free list to 25 
cents a bushel of 60 pounds; Helgeson 
of South L>akota, barley from 15 cents 
to 25 cents _a bushel; Morgan of Okla- 
homa, broom corn from the free list 
to $35 a ton; Fordney. barley malt 
from 25 cents to 45 cents per bushel: 
Browning of New Jersey, macaroni 
from 1 to 11^ cents per pound; Ford- 
ney, oats from 10 to 15 cents a bushel. 



CHINESE REPUBLIC 
IS RECOGNIZED BY 
WASHINGTON FIRST 

(Continued from page 1.) 

to China, accredited to the republic, 
will be designated to succeed Mr. Cal- 
houn, who is now on his way home. 
Mr. Chang, the resident minister of 
China, probably will scon receive cre- 
dentials from Yuan Shi Kai, the pro- 
visional pr»fsident of I'hina, in place 
of the credentials issued to him by 
the late Manthu government. 
MeMNHtse Frum WilMon. 

The formal recognition of the United 
States was extended when Charge d'Af- 
falrs Williams delivered to President 
Yuan .Shi Kal the following message 
from Presid^-nt Wilson: 

"The government and people of the 
United States of America. having 
abundantly tt stifled their sympathy 
■with the people of China upon their 
assumption of the attributes and pow- 
ers of self-government, deem it oppor- 
tune ar this time, when the represen- 
tative natK'nal assembly has met, to 
disctiarge the high duty of setting the 
seal of full accomplishment upon the 
aspirations of Chinese people, that I 
extend, in the name of my government 
and of my countrymen, a greeting of 
welcome to the new China thus enter- 
ing into the family of nations. 

"In taking this step I entertain the 
confident hope and expectation that 
In perf»ftirig a republican form of gov- 
ernment, the Chinese nation will at- 
tain to the highest degree of develoe- 
ment and that under the new rule all 
the (s'ablished obligations of China 



which pass to the provisional govern- 
ment will in turn pass and be ob- 
served by the government established 
by the assembly." 

ReNpoDse by Yuan Shi Kal. 

President Yuan Shi Kais response 
said: 

"In the name of the Republic of 
China, I tl.ank you most heartily for 
the message of recognition you have 
sent me, the sentiments of amity and 
good will which It bespeaks. The ex- 
pression of greeting and welcome 
which it conveys at once testifies to 
the American spirit of mutual helpful- 
ness, and adds another brilliant page 
to the history of seventy years of un- 
interrupted friendly Intercourse be- 
tween China and the United States." 

This governments action has created 
a most interesting International situa- 
tion and brings to the point the In- 
tentions of the five other powers, par- 
ties to the six-power loan negotiation 
from which the United States recently 
withdrew, announcing Its purpose to 
recognize China and urging the others 
to do the same. 

It is known that some of them, at 
least, required more than a mere or- 
ganization of a national legislature, 
between which and the provisional ex- 
ecutive serious friction already de- 
veloped, and that (hey were originally 
disposed to await the Installation of a 
president chosen by constitutional 
methods and with evident adequate 
support to maintain himself. 

On the other hand, the recent ac- 
tion of Yuan Shi Kal in concluding a 
loan for $125,000,000, with the five- 
power group is expected to prove a 
powerful Incentive to those govern- 
ments to support Yuan Shi Kal by 
joining in the recognition of China 
accorded today by the United States. 



F. A. .'-\anian of Eureka Springs, Ark. 
Robber'a Volee Trembled. 

The robber's voice trejnliled as he de- 
manded their valuables, but they of- 
fered no resistance and gave him 
money find jewelry amountirtflr to about 

1300, 

Preceded by (he frightened negro, the 
"•ohh«r thon.«,«tvr£d tl"^ 

I there were about 

all men. 
I "Hold up your hands," was the com- 
mand with which the robber greeted 
them. The passengers readily com- 
plied with his demand and he passed 
along collecting their money and jewel- 
ry, all of which he placed In a large 
pocket of his coat made apparently for 
the purpose. 

The robbery of the chair car was ac- 
complished within five minutes and the 
surprised passengers obeyed the final 
Injunction of the robber to sit down 
and remain quiet. 

The Pullman car was entered next. 
After robbing two passengers from 
whom he secured small amounts of 
money the robber came to the berth oc- 
cupied by Short. 

Shot ThruiiKh Curtain. 
"Give me your money," the robber 
demanded in a whisper as he shook 
the sleeping man. 

When awakened sufficiently to re- 
alize the Import of the command. Short 
handed over $1,000 in money and a 
large diamond stud. As the robber 
turned to leave, Short seized his re- 
volver and flrtd through the curtain. 
'I'he robber returned the fire and both 
men emptied their weapons, each 
shooting blindly through the curtain 
which was perforated by almost a 
dozen bullets. One bullet struck 
Short's forehead, another went through 
an arm and a third lodged in his knee. 
Short fell back In his berth and the 
robber fled toward the rear of the 
train. Passengers in other cars, 
aroused by the shooting, followed him. 
They saw him hack out the door of 
the observation car and drop from the 
train, which was just being brought 
to a stop. 

Left Trail of Illood. 
He left bloodstains In the aisles and 
on the car platform, and the passen- 
gers said he appeared to be badly 
hurt. 

C G. Gibson, conductor in charge of 
the train, when he heard the shooting 
seized a pistol and. accompanied by 
a porter, the brakeman and express 
messenger, started for the Pullman 
car. Before they could clear the aisles 
of passengers so they could use their 
weapons, the robber had leaped from 
the train. 

Engineer Charles Haag and Fireman 
Peter Slmmlan knew nothing of the 
robbery until it was all over. The 
police here were notified by a passen- 
ger who, dressed only in his niprht 
clothes, ran to a saloon a quarter of 
a mile away and telephoned the re- 
port. 

An ambulance was summoned to 
take Short to a hospital. Physicians 
there said that while his woxinds were 
serious, they did not consider them 
fatal. 

Short is one of the wealthiest mine 
owners of Jasper county, operating 
zinc and lead mines In that district. 
Six years ago he was a miner work- 
ing for wages. 

SUFFRAGISTS 

IN B IG RALLY 

(Continued from page 1.) 




NEW BULGARIAN 
RIBBONS 



In a grand assortment of new pal- 
terns in wide ribbons; worth .35c 
and 45c a yard; sale 
price, Siaturday, yard.. 



25c 




"WHERK VALUES REIQN SUPBEME" 

1km i ©0 



21 and 23 WEST SUPERIOR STREET 



$2.95 

^ BEDSPREADS 



In a fine Marseilles pattern — scal- 
loped all around — special sale 
price Satur- 
day 



$2.25 




Se lected Offering s for Saturday Selling! 

Tailored Suits 



f 



PISTOL D UEL IN PULLMAN 

(Continued from page 1.) 



lice early today from Grand View, Mo., 
by C. G. Gibson, conductor of the train, 
which continued on its way South, the 
total amount of loot obtained amount- 
ed to $1,100 in money and a $32 dia- 
mond. Of tills Mr. Gibson said Mr. 
Short lost $1,000, W. F. Scafe, Neck 
City. Mo., $65, and F. A. Seaman, Eu- 
reka Springs, Ark., $35 and the dia- 
mond stud. 

Conductor Gibson said the robber 
must have been wounded seriously as 
he left blood in pools in the Pullman 
aisle and on the platform from wliich 
he leaped. 

Had Good Chance. 

When daylight came the search for 
the robber went forward with double 
vigor. What in the dark was believed 
to be a trail of blood left after the 
bandit vanished witli the dawn and a 
dozen detectives who searched the rail- 
way right-of-way from a mile on either 
side the spot where the robber disap- 
peared found nothing to guide them. 
The escape was effected In a lonely 
region of switch tracks, mazes of box 
cars and market gardens, where a few 
minutes after notification the chances 
were all with the robber. 

Cowed Negro Porter. 

The train was just pulling out of the 
depot here when a tall man ran out of 
the darkness of the railroad yards and 
climbed up the stejis of the observation 
car. He had a handkerchief over the 
lower I'art of his face and carried two 
pistols. 

Oscar Allen, a negro porter, who saw 
him aboard the train, rushed out and 
ordered him away. The robber cov- 
ered him with a pistol and said: 

"I'm going to put over a trick here. 
You sit down there and be quick. I will 
need you." 

After the train had gone about three 
miles the robber ordered Allen to go 
ahead of him tlirough the train. In 
the sitting room of the observation car 
were W. .T. Srafe of Neck City. Mo., and 



Usual Selling Price $2.75 to $4.00 




Special Sale 
Price 




$1.25 

These beautiful Umbrella Holders are 
a beautiful Rookw(XKl brown, decorated 
on one side; they measure 18 inches 
high by Sj/^ inches in diameter. They 
are certainly a snap at only $1.25. 




Special Sale 



wtr 



5c 



Carpet Beaters 
Only 

This is really a good Carpet Beater at a very small price ; it is 
made of three pliable wires interwoven. Can't beat it for the 
price, only 5c. Worth several times the price. 



for the cause will deliver more ad- 
dresses. 

OutRident Pouring In. 

Delegations of women from neigh- 
boring states, many of national promi- 
nence, some coming by special train, 
with their own bands, began pouring 
into the city today to take part In the 
demonstration and It was estimated at 
national suffrage headquarters that 
more than 5,000 women from out of 
town would march in the parade. 

Large delegations from Connecticut, 
Massachusetts, New Jersey, Pennsyl- 
vania and the national capital are ex- 
pected. It Is said 2,000 men, twice the 
number last year, will march behind 
the banner of the Men's League for 
Woman Suffrage. Every state In the 
Union and Alaska will be represented 
in the parade by native daughters In 
greater or lesser numbers, with the 
nine suffrage states and Alaska given 
precedence in the order of the march. 

W^omen in all walks of life, from 
society leaders to scrub women, will 
fill the ranks, and some forty bands 
will furnish music. Miss Inez Milhol- 
land, mounted, will head the procession 
as color bearer, and Miss Josephine 
Beiderhasse will act as grand marshal. 
Xordlca a« "Freedom." 

Society women, actresses and opera 
singers will participate In tonight's 
pageant. Madame Nordica will take 
the part of Freedom. Forty-nine wom- 
en, picked for their statuesque beauty, 
and forty-nine men selected for their 
Adonis-like proportions will represent 
In couples the forty-eight states and 
Alaska. 

The pageant will follow the address- 
es of Col. Roosevelt and Miss Shaw, 
and an appeal for recruits to march 
in the parade. One hundred and sev- 
enty-five college women will act as 
ushers. 



In a Great Variety of the Season*s 
Latest Styles 

Made up in swell Bedford Cords, Diagonals, Eponges, 
Men's Wear Serges and lovely mixtures. The styles 
are strictly new and fetching. We are showing tomor- 
row extraordinary values in these late style suits — 
women's and misses' sizes — at €S^ 't F^ d\M\ 

$22.50, $19.50, $17.50 and ^ X O.UU 

Coats at Popular Prices 

More Children's Coats just 
received; made up in serge 
and fancy fabrics; clever 
styles, neatly tailored; three 
specials for Saturday at, 
$5.95, $4.95 and 

$3.95 



Snappy rew styles, made up 
in serges, Bedford cords, 
eponges, coverts, diagonals, 
and no\elties, in stripes, 
plaids, checks and mixtures; 
the linings and fashion 
touches ^vill strongly appeal 
to you. A. grand assortment 
on sale .Saturday, at $15.00, 
$12.50, 
$10.50, 
and 



$7.50 



Raincoats for Women and Misses 



A splendid variety of new sp.ring models; most practical 

coats for street, motoring, travel or gen- 
eral wear; very special values; on sale to- 
morrow at $7.50, $5.95, $3.50, $2.50 and 



$1.98 



Saturday's Rug 

and Curtain 

Specials 

$1.25 Velvet Rugs, size 27x45 inches, 
in floral and rag carpet effects; a 
good durable quality, i8^/» 

fringed; special tomorrow. . .OtJt' 

$2.00 Velvet Brussels Bugs, size 
27x54 inches; extra heavy quality; in 
Oriental and floral pat- d* "t QO 
terns; your choice at. . .•p JL ©O J/ 

$4.00 Royal Wilton Rugs, size 27x54 
inches, in beautiful colorings and de- 
signs; see these in ^^ OQ 
window, at •^^•J/O 

$6.50 Axminster Rugs, size 36x72 
inches, an exceptional quality, in 
handsome patterns, ^^ /?0 

at, only «/>0» l/%7 

|1.00 Muslin Curtains; ^^/* 

in yards long f OC^ 

$1.25 Muslin Curtains; d^f /|/1 
214 yards long %p ± • \J\I 

$1.50 Scrim Curtains; <!• f O/J 
lYz yards long %p±m^iJ 

$2.00 ready-to-hang Lace Curtains; 
2y2 yards long; at, <!• f fif^x 

only %P±»iJlJ 



Wash Dress 
Goods 

42-inch 69c quality white and black 
hairline stripe washable Wool 

yaT.":.'" 50c 

44 inches wide, 695 quality, heavy 
diagonal Worsted Dress Goods; spe- 
cially adapted for children's coats 
and separate skirts at, O Q ^^ 

per yard OJ^O 

32-inch 29c quality cream white 
washable Cottf-n Serge "t Q/« 

Suiting at, per yard X J/C*^ 

GET YOUR TUB SILKS 
TOMORROW. 

One yard wide, 59c quality washable 
hairline stripe Tub Silk A[ Q^ 

at, per yard ^OC* 

27 inches wide, 35c quality, Ratine 
Crepes, Tissues and 40-inch O /^^ 

Voiles at, choice, yard ^%J\0> 

32 inches wide, 29c quality, linen- 
finished Crash Suiting at, "t Ckg* 
per yard JL •^C' 

36 inches wide, 75c quality, Silk 
Ratine in Alice blue, champagne and 
old rose. A leader for ^0/» 

tomorrow at %3%^^ 

27-inch 18c quality Ramony Galatea 
for children's wear. Nothing bet- 

;;;/';..".': I2y:ic 



PEACE UP TO UNCLE SAM 

(Continued from page 1.) 



Special Sale of 

Umbrellas 

500 Umbrellas, made of good dur- 
able linen taffeta, Mi-ssion and fancy 
handles,26and28in. ti> ^ f\f\ 
— a great variety at^J^ j| « \J\J 

Children's Rompers; materials of 
chambray and heavy wash materials 
— neatly trimmed; reg- ^ ^r^ 
ular 39c value for ^tt^J^ 

Men's Hose — 15c quality Fine Hose, 
with white feet; three- -^ f\r^ 
thread heel and toe, pair. ^ \JC/ 

Children's 19c Fine Lisle Black 
Stockings; sizes 5 to 9^^, also white, 
tan and light blue, ^ BT^ 

per pair J OO 

Women's 50c Union Suits, wide 
knee, lace trimmed; a fine sheer 
quality ribbed fabric; 'JO/^ 

extra special value at %3 J^^ 



Big Specials in Millinery Needs. 

Sale of New Shapes 





Ostrich Plume Sale 



Almost 1,000 to select 
from. See show window. 
Also note the price. Of 
$1.75, $2.50 and $3.00 
shapes in small and larsre 
styles, pick 
your choice 
for only. . . . 



98c 



For real values in Ostrich Plumes our offerings are unsurpassed. You can buy 
both plain and shaded Ostrich Real French Pumes for less than HALF THEIR 
REAL VALUES. See the beauties on special sale at — 

$1.25. $1.95. $2.25. $2.75, $3.00 and up 

A very complete line of Fancy Ostrich and Numidi Feather Stick-ups from 75c to 
$2.00 and worth double the price we ask for them. 

Children's— Hats In a beautiful assortment of Trimmed Summer Hats, ^ O,^ 
worth up to $2.00 — your choice >/OC 




be the visible and audible conscience 
of the family of nations. The tribunal 
at The Hague must preserve national 
liberty and justice by confining thf 
national dogs of war to the kennel of 
international law. 

PredlctM Great Tribunal. 

"We have caught a vision beyond the 
permanent court of arbitration and the 
court of arbitral justice, of still a third 
Hague tribunal, which shall pos- 
sess all the strength and none of the 
weaknesses of its predecessors. This 
supreme court of the United States of 
the World shall have all the per- 
manence, all the power and prestige of 
precedent, and all the judicially repre- 
sentative character which have made 
the supreme court of the United States 
of Ameri:a so illustrious. To attain 
this destiny, its Judges must cease to 
be representative of the nations who 
arf- the suitors before the court, and 
must become truly representative of 
the family of nations, by whom the 
court is created and for whose life, 
liberty and pursuit of happiness It is 
de.otined to labor." 

Edwin D. Mean of Boston, In speak- 
ing of "The Pan-Teutonic Pledge of 
Peace." said nothing would help the 
cause of peace more than the united 
action of Great Britain, Oermanv and 
the United States to stop the rivalry in 
naval construction. 



It could accomplish Its purpose was 
the Democratic pirty. 'There are cer- 
tain things which we want dont,' the 
country said, 'not certain persons ele- 
vated. There are certain things we 
want demonstrated, such as that the 
government of the United States can- 
not be controlled by private Interests. 
Now the Democratic party Is going to 
have a try at making these things 
successful, and if not, we're going to 
have another try.' " 

The president applied his reference 
to the national flection to the situa- 
tion, indicating that if the Democratic 
party In the state did not redeem its 
pledges, including jury reform, the peo- 
ple might try another political party at 
the next election 



M ELLEN'S "$102,000 
PROFIT" ONLY REBATE 
ON POLITICAL GIFT 

(Continued from page 1.) 



JERSEY MEN 



HEAR WILSON 



(Continued from page 1.) 



WE SELL EVERYTHING FOR THE HOME. 



Toor 

Credit la 

Oo«d. 



Z02 and a04 BAST SL'PICHIon BTRECT, DULUTH. 



Campieta 

MonMe 
Fnratahrra. 



some of the members of the legi.«la- 
turc honestly opposed the jury reform 
bills In the last session of the legisla- 
ture because of objections to the form 
of the proposals. It was these whom 
the president sought to convince. 
Had Runy Dny Outlined. 

The president was due to meet to- 
day not only the Democratic members 
of the legislature and state partv lead- 
ers, but Acting Governor Fielder and 
Mayor Wlttpenn, rival candidates for 
governor In the approaching primary 
contest. His program for the late aft- 
ernoon was a short automobile ride 
for relaxation before making his last 
speech here tonight. He planned to 
leave at midnight for Washington. 

The president was greeted with 
cheers and enthusiasm as he faced the 
big crowds last night. 

"It made all my pulses beat," said 
the president In hlg speech at Newark, 
"to think that I was to come to this 
great county of Essex that wants to 
govern Itself but does not. I have 
come therefore, to speak, not to you 
but for you. ' 

An to National RIeptlon. 

"I want to say a few words about 
the Democratic party. I want every- 
body to realize that I have not been 
taken In by the results of the last 
national election. The country did 
not go Democratic In November. It 
was impossible to go Republican be- 
cause It could not tell which kind of 
Republican to go. The only hopeful 
and united instrument through which 



stock was treasury stock and had to 
be listed on the stock exchange In 
order to be sold to the public In 
order to list It, It was sold to me and 
I gave my notes to the company, which 
held the stock as collateral until sold. 
"Dona Fide Tranaactlon." 

"All these shares were sold at the 
best obtainable prices and the entire 
proceeds, togethei- with the dividends, 
paid to the comjany's treasury. The 
company received approximately $102,- 
000 more than the price at which the 
stock was sold to me. 

"The transaction was bona flde and 
was made without any expectation that 
any excess over the selling price to 
me would be realized. 

"Between the time of the sale to me 
and the closing of the transaction 1 had 
personally disbursed out of my own 
funds con.iiderabl(3 amounts, exceeding 



tggregate the sum of |102,000. 
[pendTtures I had made, not for 



EFFECTS OF 
POSLAM SEEN 
OVER NIGHT 



"Now you see It and now you don't," 
Is literally true of the magic worked 
by Poslam, the unequaled remedy on 
any affected skin. 

By taking a sir.all part of the skin 
where appear pimples, rash, blotches, 
etc., or which I3 unduly Inflamed, 
Itching or chafing, and applying there- 
to only a small (juantlty of Poslam, 
an overnight derionstratlon may be 
had of Us remarkable properties, and 
enough Poslam for the purpose will 
be mailed free of charge, tipon re- 
quest, by the Emergency Ijaboratorles, 
32 West Twenty -fifth Street, New 
York City. Eczemfi, acne, tetter and all 
Itching skin diseaaes yield to Pos- 
lam as to nothing else. 

POSI.AM SOAP Is the »oap of 
8oap8 for dally use, for toilet and bath, 
as a means of improving color and 
texture of the skin and assuring Its 
continued health. The beat sham- 
poo for dandruff. 

All druggists sell Poslam (price, 50 
cents) and Poslam Soap (price, 25 
cents). 



in 

These ex_ 

my own purposes or in any way for my 
personal advantage, but absolutely be- 
cause I was president of the New Ha- 
ven railroad. 

"At that time, 1904, corporate contri- 
butions to campaign funds were custo- 
mary and not illegal. Such contribu- 
tions have not been since 1904 by the 
New Haven railroad through me, or, 
.'o far as I know, through anybody else. 
Constralneil to Contribute. 

"In 1903 I contributed $50,000 to the 
iRepubllcan national campaign fund, 
and other sums for the Republican 
campaigns In New York, Connecticut 
and Rhode Island. Because I was presi- 
dent of the New Haven company, I had 
been constrained to make these dis- 
tributions out of my private funds, 
which, as a private individual, I never 
would have made. 

"On the closing up of the sale of 
these stocks, It appearing that an un- 
expected profit had been realized, my 
directors, who had been cognizant of 
my contributions for these purposes, 
thought proper to make me this allow- 
ance. 

"I never personally received or re- 
tained one dollar to my own profit or 
advantage. 

"All the transactions were full" ex- 
plained to the auditing committee and 
were satisfactory to them as expendi- 
tures In furtherance of the company's 
Interest and protection of its property. ' 
Not all for Politics. 

Replving to Commissioner Prouty, 
Mr. Mellen said that none of the 
money disbursed by the road had been 
used In an underhand way. He added 
that not all of the sum mentioned was 
used for campaign purposes, a part of 
It having been sj'Cnt in the acouisitlon 
of pier leases. Mr. Mellen next ex- 
plained several other note transactions, 
indicating that certain sums of money 
apparently unaccounted for were spent 
for pier leases and other transactions; 
"which were fully explained to the di- 
rectors and approved by them." 

Mr. Mellen was asked by his own at- 
torney to explain a transaction In Bos- 
ton & Maine stock by which J. L. Bil- 
lard of Merldan, Conn., appeared to 
have made a profit of |2,700,0O0. Ho 
said 

"Book values are not always the 
same as actiuil values. From Mr. 
Billards point of view, what he was 
receiving was worth what it would 
actually bring in the market if sold." 

Mr. Mellen appeared «s a voluntary 
witness, and Commissioner I'routy 
woulQ not allow him to be sworn or 
cross-examined lest the witness might 
later claim Immunity in Federal pro- 
ceedings now under way. 

Commenting on his purchases of 
street railway lines, Mr. Mellen de- 
clared that all of the New Haven's 
trolley properties would in 1913 pay 
the fievf Haven i per cent on their 
cost. 

NEW BILL ON 

ALIE N LANDS 

(Continued from page 1.) 



retary Bryan's mission and the prob- 
able passage of the land ownership 
bill by the California senate, has 
caused disappointment here and 
aroused popular sentiment again. 

At a meeting of the American- 
Japanese society the speakers neated- 
ly discussed the situation and pointed 
out the impotence of the Federal au- 
thorities as evidence of r.ice prejudice 
on the part of Callfornians In their 
determination, at any cost, to rum or 
drive out the Japanese residents. Com- 
mercial retaliation against California 
was advocated. 

The leading newspapers In Toklo 
express the belief that the last hope 
Is gone and that the only recourse is 
the submission of the question to the 
Hague tribunal. 

Should the bill be passed and signed 
the most Influential commercial firm 
assert that irrespective of the govern- 
ment's attitude, they will decline to 
exhibit at the Panama- Pacific exposi- 
tion and will decline to trade with 
California ports, directing everything 
to Seattle and Tacoma, without regard 
to cost. 



TURK ASSUMES 

AL BANIA N POWER. 

Athens, Greece, May 2. — A letter re- 
ceived here from Corfu etates that Es- 
saad Pasha, who was the Turkish 
commander-in-chief during the pro- 
longed siege of Scutari by the Monte- 



negrins, has formed a government at 
Tirana, where he has proclaimed the 
autonomy of Albania under the surer- 
ainty of Turkey, and hoisted the Tur- 
wish Instead of the Albanian flag. 

Essaad Pasha has also written a let- 
ter to the metropolitan of Durazzo, 
stating that the Albanian governmerit 
re.-ognlzes the authority of the ortho- 
dox church, to which It will offer Ita 
protection. 

This letter further states that the 
Albanian government Is In no way 
hostile to Greece, and that It recog- 
nizes the northern frontier of Eplrua, 
In accordance with the demands of 
the Greek government 

Tirana, where Essaad pa^ha has set 
up his rule. Is In a district full of 
reminiscences of ancient Albanian 
princes. 

It Is about fifty-four miles south 
of Scutari and within twelve miles of 
Crotla, where the famous Albanian 
prince. Scanderbeg. resisted for many 
years in the early fifteenth centurv the 
flowing tide of the Moslem Invasion 
of Europe. ♦ 



Field Meet at Cavalier. 

Cavalier. N. D., May 2. — (Special t» 
The Herald.) — The annual field meeting 
and declamation contest of Pembina 
county will be held here next Monday, 
and there will be representatives here 
from practically all of the high schoole 
in the county, 

Bathgate, Drayton, Pembina, Hamil- 
ton, Cavalier, Walhalla and two of 
three other cities will have teams. 



It is one thing to make soda 
crackers that are occasionally 
good. 



It is quite 
make them 



the strict provisions of the original 
Webb act, Is not viewed with favor by 
all of the majority party in either 
house. 

Governor Johnson said: 

"I told Mr. Bloodgood I had no ob- 
jections to any amendment that soft- 
ens the bill. BO long as It does not af- 
fect the big thing Involved, namely, 
the prevention of ownership by those 
who are Ineligible to citizenship." 



Japnaeae Bxelteil. 

Toklo, May 2. — The information con- 
tained In special dispatches from 
America reporting the failure of Sec- 



another thing to 
so that they are 
always better than all other 
soda crackers, always of un- 
varying goodness. 

The name "Uneeda^—stamped on 
every biscuit— means that if a million 
packages of Uneeda Biscuit were 
placed before you, you could choose 
any one of them, confident that every 
soda cracker in that i>ackage would 
be as good as the best Uneeda Biscuit 
ever baked. Five cents. 

NATIONAL BISCUIT COMPANY 




( 



12 



Friday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 




May 2. 1913. 



TDE DIJLUTB BERALD 

AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER 

Publlnhrd evrry evenlug except Sun- 
day by '»'•»*■ llernld Company. 

Both Telephones — Business Office. 324; 
Editorial Rooms. 



112*5. 



ofUco under th« »ct of con«rea« of Marcti i ini\i. 



OFFICIAL PAPER, CITY OF DILUTH 



SUBSCRIPTION RATES— By mail, pay- 
ablf in advanoe. one month. 3a cents, 
threw months, >1; six months I-: 
one vear, |4. Saturday Herald. |l per 
year'; Weekly Herald, $1 per year. 

Daily bv carrier, city and 9u»)urbs, 10 
.- \ week. 4r> cents a month. 

P r^ will confer ft fwor by mtkliig ttnown 

anv i::t of 8er»lc«. , 

WU.'ii rii4tijliig the «.ldreM nf y""r Paper, it la 

tmp'jrtaiii to gi»e bi)fh old and new addr<M»o * 

The Duluth Herald accepts adver- 
tising contract.s with the distinct euar- 
antv tliat It has th.> larg-'St circulation 
in iMlnnesota outside the Twin CitlcH, 



THE PUBLIC OTIUTY BILL. 

The questi'>n of state regulation of 
public utilities was left unsettled in 
Minnesota by the legislature, and it 
is a question of such high importance 
and tar-reaching scope that in the 
time between now and the convening 
of the legislature it should have the 
best thought and the best public 
spirit of the state. 

Nominally, the issue now rests with 
two committees oi seven members 
€ach, one from the senate and one 
from the house. In the membership 
of these committees, it is good to 
see, progressivism is the dominant 
note. 

These committees can. if they will, 
frame a public utility bill that will be 
fair, open and honest; that will con- 
serve the interests of the municipal- 
ities, of the state and of all the peo- 
ple. 

And nobody need expect that any 
other kind of a bill will be passed by 
the Minnesota legislature, with pub- 
lic interest and attention aroused as 
they have been by the controversy 
over this question. 

If the committees, acting jointly 
as of course they should, will do this, 
the legislature at an extra session, if 
one is called, can pass a proper bill 
in a very short time, and adjourn. 

And that's precisely what the leg- 
islature should do if an extra session 
is called, for no other legislation 
which there is reasonable hope of 
putting through in a reasonable time 
is pressing for consideration. 

Some of the members of the com- 
mittees are undoubtedly opposed to 
any state regulation law at all, l)ut 
these should not let themselves stand 
in the way of the creation of an hon- 
est state regulation bill. Let them 
fight as hard as they can any attempt 
to jui^gle with the question in the in- 
terests of the public utility corpora- 
tions. Let them insist that whatever 
bill is drafted shall rest solidly on a 
foundation of exact justice. But they 
should not play into the hands of 
those seeking more than justice for 
the public service corporations by 
drawing an issue between no state 
regulation bill at all and any kind of 
a state regulation bill. 

While it would be much better to 
have no public utility legislation at 
all than to have a bill which would 
deal less than justice to the people, 
if the committees do their duty there 
will be no danger of an unfair bill. 
There is a public demand for a bill 
that will provide a state commission, 
amply equipped with power and ex- 
pert assistance, which will act as a 
sort of supreme court in public util- 
ity matters. Such a commission can 
act for all the communities of the 
state, better than any of them can act 
for themselves. It can do this with- 
out violating the spirit of home rule, 
any more than the supreme court of 
the state violates the spirit of home 
rule when matters adjudicated in the 
local courts are sent up to it for re- 
view. 

There is plenty of time in which to 
draft a strong, effective, honest and 
abovehoard public utility measure, 
and if the committees that have been 
appointed will do this there will be 
no trouble in putting it through the 
legislature quickly and settling the 
issue permanently. 



that grow out of illicit practices. Not 
that one in five practices these things, 
but the infections that arise from 
them are spread by means of the use 
of common utensils, even those in the 
home. It is on record that parents 
have become infected through using 
the same bathtub that has been used 
by i'lfected children, though the chil- 
dren themselves had as yet no knowl- 
edge of or suffering from the infec- 
tion. Pure and innocent wives and 
daughters and sisters are made to 
suffer for the faults of husbands and 
sons and brothers and fathers, and 
fall victims to the most loathsome 
and terrible human diseases. 

This is the teaching of "Damaged 
Goods," the title in this case being 
applied to a young man who is 
everywhere regarded as of upright 
character and is welcomed in all cir- 
cles, though it is admitted that he 
has "sown his wild oats." The play 
shows the harvest that springs from 
that sowing. It teaches a lesson that 
should be brought home to every 
young man and young woman. 



quickly, a little smoke will be pro- 
duced. But that's not the evil the 
ordinance in question was aimed at, 
which is the automobile that pours 
out a constant reek behind it in its 
travels. There aren't many such, of 
course, but evidently there ate enough 
in Chicago to make it worth while 
passing an ordinance. 

And now that the ordinance has 
been upheld doubtless it will be en- 
forced, and doubtless other communi- 
ties will adopt the same kind of a 
law. 



Of course Ifs possible that the offl- 
olal objection to the use of the word 
"port" to designate one side of a ship 
Is due to the existence of a wine of 
that same name. 



The assessor'll get you ef you don't 
watch out. 



THE OFFICAL "CLEANUP" DAY. 

Monday has been fixed upon by 
Dr, H. E. Webster, director of pub- 
lic health, as a general "clean-up" day 
in Duluth. 

The purpose of the city authorities 
Is to make Duluth as nearly a "Spot- 
less Town" as possible, and that's a 
purpose which should appeal to every 
citizen. 

The Spotless Town is not only a 
clean town, but .a healthy town, a 
town attractive to visitors, a town 
made better to live in and to labor in. 

Most people, it is to be hoped, have 
not waited for official "clean-up" 
day, but have done their share to- 
ward the "Spotless Town" ideal al- 
ready. For those who haven't, Mon- 
day is a good time to begin, or to 
finish if a start has been made. 

To those who disregard the polite 
invitation of the health department 
to co-operate in this work, there is a 
polite intimation that what they fail 
to do voluntarily they will be com- 
pelled to do. 

It will be much pleasanter all 
around if everybody gets in line and 
leaves nothing to be done by com- 
pulsion. 



The State Legislature 




Preu Views on th* Session. 



AsrnceN With the CJovernor. 

Owatoniia Journal-Chronicle: ThiS 
Journal-Clu-onicle lor once agrees with 
Governor Kberhart on a public ques- 
tion, and that quastlon is as to the 
proper way to reg Jhite public utilities 
in cities. The governor favors a state 
commission of exrerts to wlxom shall 
be referred, and wlio shall have power 
to adjust, matters of dispute between 
citizens and public service corporations 
of all kinds excepting railroads, whlcli 
are a big enough proposition to have a 
commission to themselves. 



A TASK ON ITS HANDS. 

The British government has de- 
cided, in the matter of the suffra- 
gette movement, to shift from the 
defensive to the offensive. 

It was high time. The British suf- 
fragette has become a good deal of a 
nuisance. That's putting it mildly in 
describing a movement which has 
window-smashing, arson, destruction 
of mail, bodily assault, and other vio- 
lent tactics in its program. 

But probably the government has 
a big task on its hands. It must cope 
with a lawless spirit embodied in the 
sex which always has claimed and 
usually has received treatment more 
tender than that accorded to offen- 
ders of the sterner sex. This spirit, 
probably, is pathological rather than 
social. The thing that has come over 
British womankind is hysteria of an 
uncommonly violent type, if it is not 
a positive mania. It's a delicate task 
to bring the power of the law to bear 
upon a mass of women so afflicted, 
but if England is to have any win- 
dows left whole it must be done. 

We don't believe the suffragettes 
have accomplished much for suffrage. 
Certainly they have added no new 
dignity to womanhood. It will do 
no harm to the cause of equal suf- 
frage, and it will tend to preserve 
public respect for womankind as a 
whole, if the suffragettes can be put 
out of business. 

But we're glad it's the British gov- 
ernment, and not us, that is facing 
the job. 



Th« SatlHfiictory Plan. 

Grand Rapids Herald-Review: The 
Herald-Review believes that the course 
of Governor Eberliart in vetoing the 
Nolan bill, the pu-pose of which was 
to give every community the right to 
regulate the publl: service corpora- 
tions within its borders, will bo In- 
dorsed. The plan of state regulation 
has been found by far the most satis- 
factory where it has been employed. 



The Renl f^pendthrifti*. 

L.e Sueur News: Minne.sota Is a 
sptndthrift and the legislature makes 
it so, says the Anoka Union. The News 
doi'S not agree. It is the people at 
home, and not tlie legislature, who are 
to blame. We send men to the senate 
and house and gtuge their value by 
the approprlatlon.s they bring home to 
us. At least too Tiany of us do this. 
We forget their tfforts toward econ- 
omy. Forget that they labored to kill 
many appropriations and forget the 
members If they do not .sliow financial 
returns for the county. There are 
eighty-six counties, and total the 
amount brought home by the eighty- 
six and you have /our spendthrift. 



Legal Superstitions 



From Bench and Bar. 



A Notable ChanKe. 

Baudette Region: With senators and 
representative^ coming under the non- 
partisan basis we can elect men in- 
stead of partisans next year. 



Oh, yes, what about the Fourth? If 
wo insist on the klda not having fire- 
works, what are we going to give them 
In exchange? 



SHOULD BE A MATTER OF COURSE. 

When the St, Louis county board 
meets next week it will be asked to 
appropriate $1,500 a year for the em- 
p.loyment of a county agricultural 
agent, this being an essential to se- 
curing the state aid of $1,000 a year 
provided by the legislature at its re- 
cent session. 

This request should be granted as 
a matter of course, and in view of the 
public spirit shown by the county 
board in the past we haven't the 
slightest doubt that it will be granted. 

In providing state aid for this 
work, Minnesota has taken an ad- 
vanced stand for which the legisla- 
ture is highly to be commended. Pres- 
ently there will be government aid 
also, and a system of national, state 
and county co-operation in fostering 
efficient agriculture will result. 

St. Louis county should be one of 
the first counties of the state to get 
in line with this splendid work, espe- 
cially as the wise action of the legis- 
lature is due to the personal enter- 
prise of a Duluth man, Charles P. 

Craig. 

♦ 

If Dr. Sun Yat Sen Is really planning 
another revolution, he has at least got 
a good supply of material to work on. 



The man who builds castles in the 
air may be his own landlord, but he 
often finds that there's still the devil 
to pay. 



THE OPEN COURT 

(Readere of The Herald are Invited to make free 
use of tills column to express tlielr Ideas about the 
toplos of general Interest, but dUcu-taions of sectarian 
religious dlfferenees are barred. Lettore mu.st not ex- 
ceed 300 wotdfl— the shorter the Iwtter. They must 
be written on one sldo of the paper only, and tlity 
must be accompanie<l In every case by the name and 
addreaa of the writer, though these need not be pub- 
lished. A blgued letter l3 alwajH mure effective, how- 
ever.) 



THOSE VACANT LOTS. 



state Extravagance. 

St. Peter Free Press: The appropri- 
ations passed by our legislature for 
the next two ytar.s exceed the $21,000,- 
000 mark and have the earmarks of 
reckless extravagftnce In a number of 
instances. But while every taxpayer 
emphatically objects to this ever- 
giowlng extravagance he ujiconscious- 
ly gives It liis het.rty .support when it 
happens to benefit his own locality. 
This applies with particular force to 
members from sts.te Institution towns 
and makes it posiiible to form combi- 
nations directly responsible for so 
much waste of public funds. It is al- 
most unbelievable tliat a state with a 
little over 2,000,00!) people should need 
$1,000,000 per month to run Us busi- 
ness. And yet that Is the condition 
confronting us In Minnesota. And ihe 
remedy? A little more common se.ise 
business methods, applied with the 
same pain.staking way as Is done by 
successful buslncts men in their af- 
fairs at home. 






Statesmen, Real and Near 



By Fred C. Kelly, 



Humane Leeinlatlon. 

Fergus Falls Journal: The most 
humane piece of legislation ever adopt- 
ed In Minnesota was the mothers' pen- 
sion law passed at the session just 
closed. This lav provides that in- 
stead of sending dependent children to 
the state school at Owatonna, that the 
state give monthl ,' allowance to moth- 
ers, allowing them to keep them at 
home and properly educate them. And 
in order not to e icourage wife deser- 
tion, a supplementary law w^as adopt- 
ed, providing for the arrest of wife- 
deserters, compell.ng them to work for 
the county, and giving their compen- 
sation for the support of their chil- 
dren. 



Some of those people who are try- 
ing to amend the Underwood tariff 
bill In the house might just as well 
spend their time trying to solve the 
old problem of "How much wood 
would a woodchuck chuck If a wood- 
chuck would chuck wood," 



"DAMAGED GOODS " 

Nothing illustrated more forcibly 
the spread of common sense regard- 
ing questions of illicit practices among 
the people than the public production 
recently in New York city of Brieux's 
play "Damaged Goods." Less than a 
decade ago such a production would 
have been forbidden. Today it is not 
only permitted, but is welcomed by 
the press, and the people are urged 
to see that all their children of I2 or 
14 years of age and over are given 
an opportunity to see it. 

The play portrays the physical ef- 
fect upon men and women of the 
practice of the social evil. It illus- 
trates the horrors of disease that 
spring from the practice, and the way 
in which the innocent are made to 
suffer for the faults of those they 
love and who love them. 

According to students of this prob- 
lem, one in every five of our present 
population is affected by diseases 



THE SMOKING AUTOMOBILE. 

Little by little, the advance of reg- 
ulatoi-y measures is making it pos- 
sible for the humble pedestrian to 
live in streets full of automobiles with 
a fair degree of comfort. 

The Illinois supreme court has just 
upheld a Chicago ordinance which 
forbids the use of smoking automo- 
biles. 

And that's rather an important gain 
for the autoless public. 

It's not so important as the speed 
mania, perhaps, because that involves 
hazard to life and limb. But in check- 
ing the rampaging of the sj^d ma- 
niac the public is having the hearty 
co-operation of the automobile own- 
ers who can remember how it feels 
to be a pedestrian. 

Good air made rank and suffocating 
by the reek of greasy fumes from 
smoking automobiles is a pity, and 
it is unnecessary. That's why Chi- 
cago passed an ordinance forbidding 
it. Evidently somebody owning an 
automobile disapproved it, because 
the ordinance was carried up to the 
supreme court of Illinois, which up- 
holds it. 

It sounds like a good ordinance. 
Where an automobile smokes, it is 
due to carelessness. It comes from 
too much oil. If the lubricator is 
properly adjusted it won't happen — 
at least not in such a degree as to 
constitute a nuisance. Some smoke 
is inevitable, very likely. When a car 
stops at a corner, complying with 
reasonable precautions for the safety 
of pedestrians, and then starts up 



To the Editor of The Herald: 

The man who Is too busy or too 
lazy to cultivate hia vacant lot should 
not allow It to remain bare or grow to 
weeds. There are plenty of people In 
Duluth anxious to care for a garden, 
and every owner of a vacant lot should 
endeavor to have it cultivated. The 
school instructors need vacant lots for 
their demonstrations, and the home- 
croft society would undoubtedly be 
glad to find people willing to cultivate 
lots for which the owners have no use. 
The man who gives his vacant lot 
up for garden purposes gains In the 
value of the lot, for Its appearance 
will be improved and the soil will not 
suffer by cultivation. In this connec- 
tion, the members of the real estate 
exchange could do a great deal for the 
city. Every agent has clients who are 
holding vacant property for future re- 
turns, and a little correspondence 
might result In many people being 
given an opportunity to lower the cost 
of living by raising vegetables for 
their tables. M. E, C. 

Duluth, May 1. 

« 

Find the Good in People 

American Magazine: If there Isn't 
some good in everyone, what are they 
here for? 

Anybody can point out anybody 
id.se's bad qualities. If you want to 
distinguish yourself go around point- 
ing out good qualities. 

Pick out the man whom everyone 
dislikes. Select the one you feel could 
best be spared from your office, from 
your circle of acquaintances, from the 
community in which you live. Ask 
yourself if there isn't something good 
about him. 

Put him on a mental dissecting 
table. Cut him to pieces and see 
what's In him. Remember — you are 
looking for the good. Throw away 
the bad In him and forget It. Make a 
list of his good qualities. It will sur- 
prise you how many you can find. 

The next time you hear him criti- 
cized, tell people the things you know 
about him — the good things. You'll at 
least be difTerent and you'll find that 
it does you more good than It does 
him. 

How would you feel If you knew 
that people whenever they talked 
about you talked only about what was 
bad In you. You know It's there, 
plenty of It. but you'd rather not have 
It talked about. It's much nicer to 
have only your good opinions dis- 
cussed. 

Give the other fellow the kind of a 
deal you like yourself. If you can say 
notlilng good about him, say nothing. 

There are mighty few people In the 
world we can't eay something good 
about If we try. The trouble la, we 
don't try. 

And yet, the more good you find In 
other people the more good other peo- 
ple win find in you. 

Women, too, can make this experi- 
ment. 



Real ProgT^Hm. 

Sandstone Courier: Hereafter there 
will be no Democrat or Republican 
representatives or senators, or county 
officers In Minresota. Each office- 
seeker win have to stand on his own 
qualifications and fitness for office, 
rather than the indorsement of any 
political organization. This new plan 
Is being heartily Indor.sod in all parts of 
the state by all except a few of the old- 
time politicians and ward heelers who 
will hereafter be thrown out of a Job. 
Our law-making bodies will not be 
split Into two opposing political fac- 
tions and more real progress ought to 
be made. 



We hear much of the aup^r- 
atllldhs pertaining to certain forms 
of religion and of their some- 
what remarkable persistence In a 
materialistic If not skeptical age, a 
.survival that is but incompletely ex- 
plained by the difficulty of differen- 
tiating faith from credulity, or by the 
tendency — old as the human ra^'e — to 
attribute natural phenomena to super- 
natural causes and to magnify both by 
tradition. Though not so much dis- 
cussed, the law also has Its little su- 
perstitions notwithstanding the prev- 
alent conception of that science as 
cold, unemotional and severely logical. 
For Instance, what useful purpose Is 
served by Inserting In a bond, condi- 
tioned for the payment of money, a 
penal sum of twice the amount of the 
actual debt? Bonds have been thus 
drawn since the days 3f Lord Coke, 
and the printed forms In common use 
today contain the ancient penal clause. 
By the letter of such a bond the 
obligee is clearly entitled to recover 
the full penal sum on the obllger's de- 
fault In paying the sum specified In 
the condition. But has the obligee, for 
these two or three hundred years, ever 
been allowed to recover more than the 
actual debt with interest and costs? 

By another common practice deeds 
are made to recite that the grant is 
made "in consideration of the sum of 
$1, good and lawful money of the 
United States of America, to me In 
hand paid, the receipt whereof I here- 
bv acknowledge," or some equivalent 
formula. The Idea that a deed must 
express a consideration Is Ineradicable 
and equally fixed appears to be the 
superstition that a consideration of $1 
is quite as effective as ft consideration 
commensurate with the value of the 
estate granted. Lawyers learned In 
the law of real property know better, 
of course, but such is the popular no- 
tion. It is elementary that as between 
the parties a deed Is perfectly valid 
without any consideration at all; oth- 
erwise there could be no such thing as 
a conveyance by way of gift. 

Why do we begin a will with an in- 
vocation to the Deity and a recital 
that the testator Is "of sound mind 
and disposing memory?" Does the 
former aid the testator spiritually and 
does the latter furnish any evidence of 
his testamenta-y capacity? And why 
do we so often Insist on attaching a 
seal opposite the testator's signature? 
Our statutes do not require a will to 
be sealed, wherefore the seal Is wholly 
superfluous, as the law books have 
long advised us. 

Then there is the invariable custom 
of writing "as" after the venue of an 
afflilavlt or an acknowledgment. What 
legal efficacy do these two letters 
possess? How many lawyers even 
know what they mean? It Is only 
lately, we believe, that the painstak- 
ing author of a very useful little book 
succeeded, after much antiquarian re- 
search among the pipe rolls and other 
Interesting lore, In ascertaining the 
original significance of the abbrevia- 
tion, which is "scilicet." or "to wit." 
The omission of the letters Is now 
quite Immaterial. 

Many generations of lawyers learned 
In equity pleading have followed the 
ancient practice of concluding a bill of 
complaint with the solemn assurance 
"And thus your orator will ever pray, 
etc," Apparently no modern lawyer 
knew what the decaudated formula 
meant, until recently a well-known 
author ran the thing to its lair among 
the ancient rolls of the court of 
chancery and found that (before it lost 
its tail) it was a prayer for the health 
and longevity of the king! 

These are only a few of the guper- 
stition.s that have survived the days 
when the trial by battle and the crim- 
inality of witchcraft were finally elim- 
inated from that law which is our 
proud heritage and which has been so 
fondly praised as "the perfection of 
human reason." 



Twenty Years Ago 



Prom Th« Herald of ttits date. ISfS. 




The Race to Death 



Scrlbner'a: In 1904 England had 
202,000 tons of warships in the Medi- 
terranean aiid ncne In the North Sea. 

In 1907 England had 135.000 tons of 
warships in the Mediterranean and 166,- 
000 tons In the N^rth Sea. 

In 1909 England had 122,000 tons of 
warships in the Mediterranean and 
427,000 tons In the North Sea, 

In 1912 England had 126,000 tons of 
war.^^hlps In the Medlterraean and 481,- 
000 tons in the North Sea. 

At last accounts England had 50.000 
tons of warships In th»! Mediterranean 
and 500,000 tons in the North Sea. 

There ha« been a steady increase of 
the navy in Ge-many. In ll»00 the 
tonnage of warsliips and large crul.'^ers 
over 5.000 tons was 152,000; in 1911 it 
wa.s 823,000. The number of heavy 
guns in 1900 was 52; in 1911 It was 320. 
The horse power of engines in 1900 was 
160,000; In 1911 It was 1,051.000. 

The naval cre\i's In 1900 numbered 
28.326; In 1911, 5",S53; and in 1913 the 
German naval personnel will consist of 
3,394 officers and 69,495 men. Between 
1900 and 1911 the tonnage of the Brit- 
ish fleet increasfd from 215,000 to 
1,716,000; of the German fleet from 152,- 
000 to 829,000. 

In ten years British naval expendi- 
ture has Increasied from $172,o00,000 
to $222,500,000; In Germany the expen- 
diture has jumped from $47,500,000 to 
$110,000,000; in A-nerlca the increase is 
from $80,000,000 to $132,500,000. Out of 
these total sums Great Britain spends 
one-third, America one-flfth and Ger- 
many one-half on new construction. 



Triumph in Translation 



That NeRlocted Garden Plot. ■ 

Cleveland Plain Dealer: Thousands 
of city dwellers pursue their lives 
year after year without learning the 
advantages to be attained through a 
backyard garden. They are neglect- 
ing one of the things which make ur- 
ban life pleasurable and overlooking a 
health resource of Incalculable value. 

Leave thoughts of the counter, the 
bench and the lathe at quitting time 
and form the friendship of a keen 
edged garden tool. It will add years to 
your life and put cheer In your «oul. 



Why You Sink In Water. 

Outing: The non-swimmer, fenrlng 
the water, very naturally tenses his 
muscles as he struggles to keep liis 
head above the water, until he Is as 
hard as a rock, and like a rock he 
sinks. Whereas the swimmer having 
no fear, relaxes his muscles, and hence 
becomes buoyant. The explanation Is 
is a simple physical one. Tense, taut 
muscle.s Increase the specific gravity of 
the body and make It sink In water. 
Loose, relaxed muscles (given an ordl. 
nary supply of nlr In the lungs) will 
make the body float 



New York Post: A correspondent 
writes from the University of Wiscon- 
sin: 

The following letter, received by the 
college of agriculture at the Univer- 
sity of Wisconsin, may interest your 
readers. Not unnaturally, it was at 
first regarded as having been written 
In some strange European dialect and 
was passed on to my polyglot col- 
league. Prof. Prokosoh, who takes the 
writer to be a Czech living among Ger- 
man-Amerloan farmers. I transcribe 
literally: 

"Juplis Sintml lldlbet som kajn sit 
cum trajn tobaku sit Cebic sit Angens 
sit tomltos sit blc sit persin sit klober 
sit svit Corn sit Begl sit Flat tenap alt 
Cjun Cumbrlst sit. Jer (?) Trulli 

"ANTON ROTH. 

Bllack River Falls. R 7 Viss." 

The translation offers only slight 
difficulties as soon as one has grasped 
the fact that the letter is supposed to 
be English, transliterated by means of 
European vowels: 

"You please send me a little bit 
some kinds seed can try (1. e., for in- 
stance, perhaps) tobacco seed, cabbage 
seed, onion seed, tomato seed, beet 
seed, parsnip seed, clover seed, flat tur- 
nip seed, cucumber seed. Yours (tlie 
only word illegibly written, perhaps In- 
dicating, as Prof. Prokosch suggests, 
that In this ease he was willing to ad- 
mit a little uncertainty about his Eng- 
lish!) truly." 

Phonetically Interesting are "trajn" 
and "cjun," in both of which the "n" 
represents his attempt to convey the 
strong nasal of the American pronun- 
ciation; further, "lidl," as it is fre- 
quently spoken In these parts; "bet" for 
bit, because our "I" Is open, and "begl" 
for baga, also an unfamiliar sound to 
him. 



Washington, May 2.— (Special to The 
Herald.) — Senator Kenyon of Iowa Is a 
quiet, courteous person whose de- 
meanor Is usually marked by a spirit 
of much tolerance. But there are cer- 
tain things that get on Kenyon's 
nerves, and one of these is short- 
haired women lobbyists. 

Aa he waa about to enter the senate 
chamber the other day, one of these 
obstructed his path and began to talk 
to him about something that seemed to 
require a great deal of language to 
reveal its true self. 

Kenyon listened for just a moment 
and then said: 

"Madam, we can both .save a lot ot 
time if you will just tell me, in a sen- 
tence, what It is that you're after. 
Whatever it Is that you want, I can 
assure you that I shall be against it. 

Almost any afternoon, between » 
and 6 o'clock, one may see a bunch of 
ten or a dozen small youngsters hang- 
ing around a hotel near the capltol 
waiting for a man with a round, 
amiable face, and smoking a briar 
pipe. The youngsters make such a 
racket that the hotel people glare at 
them and try to frighten them away, 
but they won't go. The man they are 
waiting for Is Representative Frank 
T, O'HaIr, Uncle Joe Cannon's succes- 
sor. He got acquainted with the kid- 
dles In sauntering about the neighbor- 
hood with his pipe, and they like him 
because he always hands them picture 
cards and things, and has a drawling, 
plausible way of talking to them. 
• • * 
Senator Stone of Missouri has a pair 
of long thoughtful legs, and when he 
finds himself In a cramped space they 
become a great care to him. Not long 
ago Stone took his first ride on the 
monorail car that is operated In the 
subway between the capltol and the 
senate office building. There Is also 
an electric automobile, making fre- 
quent trips back and forth, and there 
Is little or no danger of a senator hav- 
l/ing to wait or walk. But what we 
started to tell about was Senator 
Stone's ride In the monorail car. The 
thing looked simple enough, but the 
seats face each other as In a Pullman 
car, and are so close together that 
they remind one of the seats In a the- 
ater balcony. Unless a man Is a human 
Jackknife he has absolutely no chance 
whatever. Senator Stone noticed this 
and got out of the car, pondering 
deeply over the grave difficulties of 
modern transportation methods. Then 
he took the elevator to the senate 
chamber and set to work drawing up a 
resolution to do away with the mono- 
rail system In the subway. 
• * • 
Representative Billy Kent of Cali- 
fornia was asked to make a .speech be- 
fore a convention of architects hold- 
ing sessions In Washington. Billy 
didn't pose as any savant on archi- 
tecture, but he took a chance and made 
a speech. Among other things, he 
handed them this: 

"Sometimes I think — especially when 
I note the architect^ure prevailing In 
Washington, where every precaution 
is taken to keep fresh air out of the 
homes — that the American Indian Is 
the wisest builder of all. He puts up 
a tepee that he can tear down in not 
to exceed a minute and a half. If he 
doesn't take it down, it soon wears out 
and falls down Itself. Wouldn't it be 
fine, though, If the buildings here in 
Washington were equally perishable?" 
« « * 
Col. T, Roosevelt possesses a dor- 
mant and unheralded talent as an imi- 
tator. As he and his party were head- 
ed for New Y'ork toward the close of 
the campaign last fall, his nephew, 
George Roosevelt, remarked that he 
would be glad to get back to the little 
old town in time to see the opening 
of the Metropolitan Opera house for 
the season. 

The colonel shook his head. "Mrs. 
Roosevelt persuades me to go to grand 
opera about once a year," he remarked, 
"and I might like It all right if It 
didn't take them so long to say or do 
anything. Somebody will discover that 
somebody Is dead, and. Instead of sim- 
ply saying that the king Is dead, he 
will say he is de-he-he-he-head, and he 
will go on saying It for twenty min- 
utes, after which one of the women 
singers will take up the line, and then 
they will both say It for a while." 

And the colonel went on to imitate 
just how they would do It. Those who 
heard him declare that imitations like 
he can do would be worth elght-blts 
of any vaudeville-goer's money. 
« « * 
Senator Brandegea of Connecticut 
has a half-savaga way of kidding his 
senatorial colleagues that keeps many 
of them wondering whether to laugh 
gayly or get mad. Brandegee is a 
bachelor and has a streak of cynicism 
In his talk that Is often coupled up 
with facts about those around him. 
One of the most frequent victims of 
his teasing Is Senator Stephenson. 

* * « 
The story Is that Governor William 

Sulzer of New York Is responsible for 
young Vincent Astor going Into the 
experimental farm business on a big 
scale. He fell into conversation with 
the young man one day, talked to him 
glowingly of the possibilities of be- 
coming a great humanitarian by the 
experimental farm route, and young 
Astor took his advice. 

• • * 
"A book agent." says Senator Kern, 

"struck Kokomo, Ind., and undertook 
to dispose of his wares. 

" 'Can't I show you a fine set of 
books?' he asked one victim. 

" 'No,' said the man, 'I've already got 
a book.' " 
(Copyrlglit, 1913. by Fred C. Kelly. All rigMa reaerred. ) 



•••The Mississippi river Is nearly 
fourteen feet above low water mark at 
.St. Paul, Nearly all of the West St. 
Paul fiat is now under water, and 
what Is known as the Bohemian flat l« 
entirely under water. 



•••At a meeting of the West Duluth 
council last night, the resignation of 
John Krey as village engineer wa.s 
tendered and accepted. Applications 
for the position were received from 
Messrs, Cooper, Cruickshank, Hessy 
and Edwards. A ballot was taken and 
A. S. Cooper, formerly city t-ngineer of 
West Superior, waa elected. 

•••On May 6 and 7. William H. 
Crane, one of the truly great Amer- 
ican comedians, will appear at the 
Temple, presenting -'The Senator" and 
"On Probation," in both of which he 
has been playing in New York for the 
past few weeks with great success. 



•••A marriage license has been is- 
sued to John P. Resen and Sophia J*- 
cobson. 



•♦•The Ice on Lake Superior, or this 
end of It, Is broken from the shores as 
far down aa Sucker river, and al- 
though there is a quantity of drift Ice 
about Two Harbors vessels will have 
no difficulty in making that port. Open 
water extends several miles this way 
to about abreast of Knife island, and 
the north shore floe had already moved 
out part way. but was blown back by 
yesterday's wind. 



•••Murphy & Dorr have concluded 
not to build a sawmill at Duluth this 
season. 



•••At a meeting of the Duluth city 
council la.st night, the nomination of 
Frank L. McDonald for member of the 
board of public works was rejected. 
H. C. Helm and J. D. Ensign were con- 
firmed as members of the library 
board Health Officer Goffe asked that 
I'.ls salary be increased to $2,000 and 
that of John Rossiter, superintendent 
of Inspection, to $1,200. 



•••Tomorrow evening Jacob Levlne 
of the Bell Clothing house will be 
married at the Leasing clubhouse In 
Chicago to Miss Stella Goldberff. 
daughter of Mr, and Mrs. D. Goldberg. 



•••H. H, Harvey Is back from a 
little trout fishing Jaunt to the Brule 
river. It was not much of a day for 
trout, but Mr. Harvey captured 147 fine 
fish. 



Her IdeaL 

His upper teeth protrude. 

His nose Is flat and red; 
He Is uncouth and rude. 

He has a bullet head; 
His ears hang out In space, 

His eyes are blurred and smallj 
Some men have manly grace. 

But he has none at all. 

His legs are bowed, the hair 

Is thick upon his hands; 
He works for wages where 

A wiser man commands; 
His speech Is coarse, his brow 

Is slanted back and low; 
He cares but little how 

Earth's glorlea come or go. 

The stars to him are bits 

Of distant light, no more; 
He chews a cud and spita 

Serenely on the floor. 
He is a brother to 

The silent, soulless clod. 
But there's a woman who 

Regards him as a god. 

— Chicago Record-Herald. 



Demand and Supply. 

Llppincott's: It had been a "habit" 
with Algy, who was now a senior, to 
approach the pater for extra money. 

"My father never gave me half as 
much as 1 allow you." aald the much- 
Imposed - upon parent angrily, one 
morning when his son's demands had 
been partlcularlj' excessive. 

"Were you satisfied?" 

"Certainly I was." 

"Then why should he?" 



A Conclunlon. 

Jud>?e: "Wha: finishing 8chr>ol did 
MlBs Bridge attend?" 

" 'The School for Scandal,' I should 
Imagine." 



Fatal AdnilHaion. 

Judge: A man who had been troubled 
with bronchitis for a long time called 
on a rather noted doctor. After a 
few questions, the doctor told him he 
had a very common aliment that would 
readily yield to troatident. , 

"You're so sure you can cure my 
bronchitis," said the man, "you must 
have had great experience with it." 

"Why, my dear sir." confided the doc- 
tor, "I've had it myself for over twen- 
ty years!" 



ParaphranlnK the ImmortalM. 

London Globe: Tennyson's "Brook" 
and Scott's "Lochlnvar" were recently 
set fi>r paraphrase at a girls' school. 
The conscientious students set to work 
with a dictionary: H^re follow speci- 
mens of the results: To bicker down 
a valley — "To have an undignified quar- 
rel In a low place among the hills." He 
staid not for brake — "He never stopped 
for a mechanical contrivance to re- 
duce speed by means of friction." 



The Baby. 

"A baby In the house " said she, 
"la like a new wave on life's sea." 
Sadly he answered. "1 should call 
This one of ours a sudden squall." 

fudge. 



Not !Meanlnir *** Knock. 

Judge: Mlas Cutting — So sorry I 
couldn't see you when you called, but 
I waa just having my hair washed. 

Miss Sharpe — And the laundries are 
ao provoklngly slow about returning 
things! 



AVhen In Doubt PasM a I^aw. 

American Magazine: When aome- 
thing happens th.at we do not like, 
what is the first thing we say? There 
ought to be a law against it. Every 
time! That Is the unconscious tribute 
we all pay to the queerest, the most 
naive and stupid superstition In a 
world where all superstition dies hard 
enough — that all you need to do to 
stop anything is to pass a law 
against it. 

No amount of experience, apparent- 
ly, win free the minds of men from 
the Incubus, the hoodoo, of this extra- 
ordinary superstition. No matter what 
the Issue! If you want to stop gam- 
bling, spitting, combinations of capital 
or of labor, prostitution, college fra- 
ternities, the high cost of living, arson, 
saloons, monopoly In restraint of trade, 
the turkey-trot, burglary, tips, walk- 
ing on the grass; whatever it Is. there 
Is only one thing to do — pass a law 
against It. Then everybody will be 
contented; everybody will believe that 
the offense will cease at once, or at 
least as soon as you have gotten a 
sufficient number of people in jail. 
Only get enough laws passed, and 
above all, if you can only get enough 
people In Jail, you have realized the 
average man's millennial hopes. 



"Honest Man" a Woman. 

Philadelphia Ledger: A wealthy 
man died In Brussels, leaving nearly 
the whole of his fortune to a young 
woman who was entirely unacquainted 
with him. 

He was a very eccentric man, and set 
Out, like Diogenes, In search of an 
honest man. His "tub" was an omni- 
bus, and his lantern a small coin. In 
the omnibus he took his seat near the 
conductor, and always showed himself 
very obliging, passing up the money of 
passengers and returning the change, 
but to the latter he always managed to 
add a franc, or a half-franc. Then he 
would watch those to whom it came. 
They would count it carefully; notice 
the extra coin, and Invariably slip it 
Into their pockets. No one thought of 
the poor conductor, whose meager sal- 
ary of three franis a day could ill 
spare such a loss. 

But at last a y.oung woman passed 
hers back with; "Conductor, you have 
given me half a franc too much." 

"Diogenes," delighted, followed her 
home, made Inqulriea, and as the an- 
swers were satisfactory, made his will 
in her favor, though he never gave her 
warning that her half-franc was going 
to bring her a million. 



No Need of §«vattinfc Them. 

Detroit Free Press: One way to save 
swatting the fly is to get the window 
screens up early. 



AMUSEMENTS. 



How Ohio Saved • Little Sloner. 

Farm and Fireside: The State of 
Ohio saved the tidy sum of $13,600 In 
one transaction by taking advantage 
of parcel post to send out the automo- 
bile tags for the present year. In- 
stead of an average coat of 12 V4 cents 
for each tag sent last year, the tags 
went this year for 8 cents each by par- 
cel post. 



NEW 



BothPhoiiMS4ie. 




THEATER 

Seoond Avtt. East and Supttrlor Street 



MATINEES 

DAILY 

10c& 



Nlfhta. lOe. 
SOt aad 7Sa. 



2Sa^ 



MelNTYREJt HEATH 


COOMBS AND ALDWELL 


ALBURTUS ANO MILLER 

MR. AND MRS. 

GORDON WILDE 


THE FOUR ROTTERS 


Q. 8. MELVIN 



Orphauai Concert Orchestra 
Thomas A. Ediaon'i falUng 
Moving Piatures. 



LYCEUM 



TODAY 



CONTINUOUS — 1 TO 5 P. M.| T TO 
11 P. M. 

NEW PROGRAM TODAY. 

KINEMACOLOR 

"Story of the Oranare." 
"Fifty Mllea From Tombatone." 



PRICHC, 10c AND 20c. 




f 



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»*r= 



s ^ 1 t m>0 ^fmmimm m I I ±rm ' 



Friday, 



THE DU^.UTH HERALD 



May 2. 1913. 



18 



Clears Face of 
Pimpl es, Blac kheads 

Wonderful ZEMO Also Stops Terrible 

Itching AT ONCE; Cures All 

Skin Troubles. 

Get a 260 Bottle of ZEMO Today. 

"At last! At last! Ono application 
t)f ZEMO the wonderful new treat- 
tnent, quickly put an end to those 
awful, humiliating pimples and black- 

feads. For the lirst time In months 
haven't been ashamed to go out In 
public." A trial of ZEMO will con- 
vince you of Its astonishins results 
In clearing the complexion. 




l)on*t Look this Way When ZEMO Will 

Cure Vott of PiiuplO!i and Itlotvhes. 

Surely and ^uii-kly. 

ZEMO is a clean, antiseptic solution, 
tiot a greasy paste or ointment. You 
pimply apply It on the afflicted part — 
your pimples, blotches and blackheads, 
*— all eczema sores and pains, prickly 
boat. rush, tetter Inflamod or reddened 

Skin, all disappear. It also cures dan- 
ru!T. which Is scalp eczema. ZEMO Is 
vuurnnteed to stop Itching immeUlutely. 
It Klves Instant relief. 

"I have had wonderful benefit from 
irour famous ZEMO for the skin. It 
lias cured my face completely." MlS3 
E. N., RuRby Place. St. Louis, Mo. 

Go to any flrst-class drug store and 
get a 25c sealed bottle of ZEMO, or 
•i>nt direct on receipt of price by E. W. 
ttodo Medlolna Oo.. St. Louis, Mo. 

Sold and guaranteed in Duluth by 
TV'inlis drug store. 



Health^Happiness 

BYDr.R. D. S 




FOR STEEL PLANT LOTS SEE 

STEEL PLANT INVESTMENT CO. 

C«ntnl SUt« Bftok bulldlnx. Tel«i>bonM. CalQ- 
xnM. 131. Col*. 34a -X. 

Be»t Lots, Easiest Prices, Lowest Terms 



THE PALM ROOM 

At the SPALDING 

MOST DELIGHTFUL AND LUXURI- 
OUS RESTAURANT IN DULUTH. 



BLIND MAW'S MEMORY. 

Recalls Voice He Had Not Heard for 
Twenty-Two Years. 

Vancouver, Wash.. May 2. — The abil- 
ity of Fred Lester, recently stricken 
blind, to recognize a man by his voice 
whom ho had not heard speak for 
twenty-two years, was demonstrated 
here. Having lived in the city for so 
many years. Mr. Lester goes about by 
Use of a cane. His eyes look normal. 

When standing at Fifth and Main 
Btref't.s he was addressed by Q. W. 
Holder, who had come to Vancouver 
for a short visit, after being away 
twenty-two years. Ha asked Mr. Lester 
if the car went past a certain point, 
and when Mr. Lester had answered the 
qufstlan. he added. "And, Mr. Holder, 
Z am pleased to greet you." It was 
not until then that Mr. Holder recog- 
nized his friend of long ago. 



lenics. 



Now that the facts of heredity are 
beginning to be worked out, a new 
science ha.s arisen, and is being rapid- 
ly developed. Tlii.s Is the science of 
eugenics, and the interest which is 
manifest would lead us to believe that 
mankind, for the first time, is seri- 
ously taking thought for the welfare 
of future generations. While men 
liave busied themselves for yoars in 
Improving breeds of cattle, horses, plKs 
and sheep, and In developing new and 
wonderful varieties of plant life; race 
culture, so far as humans are con- 
cerned, has been left pretty much to 
itself. In view of this fact, it is al- 
most surprising to students of eugen- 
ics, that the operation t)f natural selec- 
tion, almost entirely unassisted, has 
caused the race to develop as well as 
it has. In Darwin's "Descent of Man," 
la found the following paragraph, 
which years ago called attention to 
man's carelessness, so far as race cul- 
ture is concerned. 

"It is surprising how soon a want 
of care, or care wrongly directed, leads 
to the degeneration of a domestic race; 
but except in the case of man liimself, 
liardiy anyone is so ignorant as to 
allow his worst animals to breed. 

"With savages, the weak in body or 
mind are soon eliminated, and those 
that survive commonly exhibit a vig- 
orous state of health. We civilized 
men, on the other hand, do our utmost 
to check the process of elimination; we 
build asylums for the imbecile, the 
maimed and the sick; we Institute poor 
hiws, and our medical men exert their 
utmost skill to save the life of every- 
one until the last moment. Thus the 
weak members of civilized society 
propagate their kind. No one who has 
attended to the breeding of domestic 
animals will doubt that this must bo 
hlK-hly injurious to the race of man." 

The practice of eugenics may be 
either positive or negative; the first 
would encourage the parenthood of 
those worthy, while the latter would 
prevent, as far as possible, the mating 
and consecjuent parenthood of the un- 
fit; either physically or mentally so. 
It is in this latter field that the great 
opportunities lie for betterment of 
the race; and positive eugenics may 
be left to take care of itself, being 
constantly assisted by the Influence of 
natural selection. A few of our states 
are attempting to control the propa- 
gation of the feeble-minded, the in- 
sane, the epileptic and the criminal, 
by the enacting of laws prohibiting 
marriage of such; but, until there is 
a strong public sentiment aroused 
among the people these laws will 
have little effect In controlling the 
situation. The hopeful signs for the 
future are that so many people are be- 
^'lnning to Interest themselves in this 
new science, and that broad-minded 
altruism is on the increase. 

True, there Is a lot of energy being 
wasted rather foolishly by enthusiasts 
who have failed to grasp the bigness 
of this question of heredity, and would 
hope to better the immediately next 
generation by forcing ail candidates 
for marriage to pass a physical exam- 
ination. Anything that might tend to 
check the spread of venereal diseases 
is, of course, not to be scoffed at; but 
to dub such efforts as part of the 
practice of eugenics would appear 
ridiculous. On the other hand, the 
sterilization of criminals is a move in 
the right direction, provided the "born 
criminal" is carefully separated from 
the temporary criminal, through influ- 
ence of environment. In the latter 
cases the remedy is tlirough education, 
while In the former sterilization would 
appear the most humane and effective 
remedy. 

A few of the purely hereditary physi- 
cal and mental diseases should be a bar 
to marriage, when these are likely to 
result of the deterioration of the race, 
but these are rarely If ever disclosed 




DR. R. D. SCOTT. 




Take off your coat 



Wear a 

Summit 

Town and 
Country 

Shirt 



You'll be well dressed and thoroughly comfortable 
— no matter how hot the day. 

Why not enjoy comfort and be good natured. 

The soft attached standing collar is right on the 
shirt. 

GET YOURS TODAY 

To be had at all shops that sell shirts. 

GUITERMAN BROS. 

MAKERS 

ST. PAUL, MINN. 



Built to Protect Baby^ 
Sold to Protect You 

For Babj the Sidway Guaranteed is the roomiest 
carriage on the market, has the only spring that is 
adjustable to baby's increase in weight, and is 
designed for rain or sunshine. 

For You it has Special Fabrikoid Leather guar- 
anteed against craciiing, peeling or tearing; Real 
Rubber Tires instead of compo- 
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You will like this carriage the 
minute you see it, you will ac- 
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advantages end baby will always 
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carriage till you see a 

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1828-32 VVeat Superior Street. 




by a physical examination alone, and 
what is really needed more than a phy- 
sician's certificate is a certificate by a 
trained psychologist, before a marriage 
license is issued. The psychologist will 
discover more of the reajly transmissi- 
ble qualities which might be disad- 
vantageous from the race culture point 
of view in a half hour's conversation 
than the physician will be able to find 
out through the most searching physi- 
cal examination. 

We have not yet arrived, however, 
at a point where we can intelligently 
throw more restrictions about the mar- 
riage tie; and here it would be well 
to quote Mr. Galton, the founder of 
eugenics, on this question. He says: 
"The Institution of marriage as now 
sanctified by religion and safeguarded 
by law m the most highly civilized na- 
tions may not be ideally perfect, nor 
may it he universally accepted in fu- 
ture times, but it is the best that has 
hitherto been devised for the partle.«< 
concerned, for their children, for home 
life and for society." 

And it might be added that too much 
Interference with marriage will defeat 
the very purpose which it attempts to 
further. 



''Housecleaning." 



Spring housecleaning now confronts 
every careful housekeeper, and while 
this upheaval and clearing out of win- 
ter dirt is a health measure of first im- 
portance when done sanely, it may be 
made the starting point of much ill- 
health. 

It is, admittedly, disagreeable work, 
and in all such tasks the tendency Is 
either to slight It or rush it, and in 
either case as much harm as good 
vrlll result. The wise housekeeper will, 
however, try to avoid these extremes 
and while conserving her own health 
and strength will make riddance of all 
dirt which might carry the germs of 
disease. A little planning beforehand 
and apportioning of the work so that 
instead of doing It all in one day, a 
week is taken to cover the entire house, 
will result In a much cleaner and 
healihler home, without Injury to the 
workers, than the more frequent meth- 
od of tearing things to pieces In the 
morning and overworking every one in 
an effort to finish before nightfall. 

Soap and hot water, sunlight and 
fresh air are the germ-destroying 
agents which have proven the most re- 
liable; and It should be the germs hid- 
den away In the dust and dirt of dark 
corners that are made the objects of 
attack, and not so much the visible 
dirt itself. 

Make sure that all dark corners are 
thoroughly cleaned, and if anything 
must be slighted let It be the rooms 
where the greatest amount of sun- 
light and daylight Is available. To 
clean a house for the approval of 
chance caller.s. generally means clean- 
ing and polishing only the best light- 
ed and ventilated portion, and slight- 
ing the parts really ea.sentiai to the 
health and well being of the family. 

Housecleaning done at the expense 
of health, especially of the mother's 
health, is rarely a benefit to the fam- 
ily, and this is the point which re- 
quires emphasis and serves as an ex- 
cuse for discussing the subject in this 
column. Many a woman Is forced to 
consult a physician or lay up sick for a 
week after the annual scrub-out. Just 
because she neglected to do It sanely, 
and in rushing things disabled herself, 
and In all likelihood left much dan- 
gerous dirt undisturbed in her anxiety 
to finish before she dropped. The en- 
tire family, but especially the children, 
suffer on her account; and It Is ques- 
tionable whether more benefit or harm 
results from the work done. The sane, 
moderate way of doing things Is the 
easy, healthful way; and when all 
women learn this and attempt to carry 
it out, they will save themselves and 
families both trouble and discomfort, 
they will have cleaner and healthier 
homes, and spring housecleaning will 
cease to be a dreaded event. 

Questions and Answers. 

Nervou«ne«i» After ExercUe. 

J. B writes: 1 am troubled with a 
certain nervousness at times as fol- 
lows: After walking any distance, 
long or short returning to my home 
or elsewherV am all unstrung. My 
hands shake ^ great deal, am unable to 
handle a pen, and am also shortwlndcd. 
I cannot attribute it to anything in 
particular, except that there may be 
some heart affection. Have a good 
appetite, sleep well and have no pains 
whatsoever. Please let me have your 

advice. 

REPLY. 

Your symptoms suggest a fatty heart 
or general arterlo-sclerosls. Have a 
careful examination made of your 
heart and blood vessels by some care- 
ful physician who wll take time to 
study your case, and If organic heart 
disease Is present, put yourself in his 
care and follow implicitly his Instruc- 
tions as to diet and exercise. 
Pyorrhoea. 

C. E. D writes: Will you kindly say 
what is th.; cause of tartar formation 
around the teeth and gums. This is a 
yellowish looking subbtance and has a 
very offensive odor. What should be 
done for prevention or cure? 
REPLY. 

You describe a beginning case of 
pvorrhoea, and the sooner it Is put In 
the care of a good dentist for treat- 
ment, the better will be the chances for 
cure and the saving of the teeth. There 
Is no treatment which you could carry 
out at home with any success, and it is 
not the easiest condition to master, 
even when tackled by a first-class, en- 
ergetic dentist. 

BRID E IS D YING 

As Result of Effort to Have Three 
Hundred Dances. 

Beaver Falls, Pa., May 2. — Mrs. 
John Kuzlus Is reported to be dying as 
a result of her effort to establish a 
mark of 300 dances at |1 a dance at 
her wedding. She collapsed when 
within seven of her goal. 

In keeping with a Polish custom 
each male guest was permitted to 
dance with the bride after depositing 
a silver dollar In a hat. Two hundred 
and ninety-three dollars had been 
contributed and the bride was ex- 
hausted, but urged by friends to 
reach the 300 mark she made a doa- 
perato effort. 

She fell fainting while dancing with 
the 294th depositor. One of the men 
explained: 

"Julia was all right, but her legs 
wouldn't hold out." 



Af. ^i 



V iflflt 




WILLIAMSON & MENDENHAU 



Spring Hats 
$1.50 to $5.00 



Spring loves 
$1.00 to $2.50 



Slip-on Raincoats , 

$5.00 to $20.00 




WILLIAMSON & MENDENIALL 



Spring Neckwear 
50c to $1.50 




Green Hats 
$2.00 to $3.50 



Spring Shirts 
$1.00 to $3.00 



Saturday's the time for you to outfit in 

l^he Bi|^ Duluth's Clothes 

For Sprifi|» 



Suits and Overcoats $10 to $35 



The Big Duluth Special at $14.40 





RECIPROCITY 
IS INjAVOR 

Rural Districts of Western 

Canada Are Still Strong 

lor It. 



Victory of Sifton Govern- 
ment in Alberta Due to 
This Feeling. 



Ottawa, Ont., May 2. — The general 
election which has Just closed in Al- 
berta shows that the Sifton govern- 
ment has been returned to power by a 
large majority. In a house of 56 mem- 
bers the opposition will not at the 
most have more than 18 members, and 
the likelihood 1m that the number will 
be either 15 or 16. On account of the 
change in the dominion government it 
was thought t lat the Conservatives 
would have marie more of a gain than 
they did. The t?eneraily accepted rea- 
son for tills is that th« reciprocity Is- 
suo still lives in the west, no matter 
what may have happened to it in the 
east. That the pact played a strong 



Quick, Easy and Positive 
Cure for W\ Foot Torture 

The following is said to be the surest 
and quickest cure known to science for 
all foot ailments: "Dissolve two table- 
spoonfuls of Culoclde compound in a 
l)aHin of warm \fater. Soak the feet in 
this for fully Ifteen minutes, gently 
rubbing the sore parts." The effect Is 
reallj wonderful. All sore- 
ness xoes Instantly; the feet 
feel delightful. Corns and 
callouses can be peeled right 
off. It gives Immediate relief 
for Horc bunions, sweaty, 
smelly ami aching feet. A 
twen(y-ftve cent box of Cal- 
oclde is said to he sufficient 
to cure tlie worst fent. It 
work? through the pores and 
removes the cause of the trouble. Uon't 
waste time on uncertain remedies. Any 
I druggist has Caloclde comnoimd in 
; stock or he car get It In a few hours 
from hla wholeaale house. 




card In the contest Is shown by the 
constituencies which returned Liberals 
and those that returned Conservatives. 
All the cities, with tlie exception of one 
member returned in Edmonton, re- 
turned ConsorvatlVttS. Attorney Gen- 
eral Cross, who was elected In Edmon- 
ton for the Liberals, would have been 
returned on personal grounds no mat- 
ter what his political views, because he 
is immensely popular with the people. 
The cities are either opposed to reci- 
procity or indifferent, while the rural 
districts are strong for It. That being 
the case, the Liberals made almost a 
sweep among the farmers^ and grain 
growers, whose motto and battle cry 
are wider markets. 

The expected redtlctlon In duties 
upon goods entering the United .States 
has merely whetted the appetite of the 
Westerner for the whole bill of fare as 
arranged by the reciprocity deal. Un- 
der the deal he was to get free what 
he will obtain only under the decreases 
If they are finally put through, by 
paying 15 and 10 per cent, and 10 per 
cent on wheat is about high enough In 
most Instances to keep It out. 

Following the recent election in Sas- 
katchewan there is no denying the 
fact that reciprocity appears to be a 
trump card In the West for capturing 
votes. Some time ago the Sifton gov- 
ernment in .\lberta was about split in 
twain over local and personal quarrels. 
The chief l)one of contention was the 
question of constructing a railway to 
the northern country. The premier 
had to resign, and even lost his seat 
in the contest. Attorney General Cross 
also left the cabinet, and for a time It 
seemed that he was to take about halt 
the party with him. Hut when the 
Laurier government was defeated the 
Alberta Liberals saw that if they were 
not to share the same fate they would 
have to get together. That Is what 
was done. Mr. Cross entered the cai.i- 
net and pulled, with Premier Sifton, 
all the party in one fold, w'^h the ex- 
ception of Former Premier Rutherford, 
who shared the fate of a 1 solltarj 
kickers against the polilical machine^ 
Both parties put the steam ro ler to 
him and he disappeared with a big nria- 
Jority against him at the late contest. 
Canndlnn Oood Koadn. 

The minister of agrlcullure has in- 
troduced m the Canadian P'^'-l'j^'^®"^ >> 
bill to Improve the highways. "Tliis bll. 
was Introduced la.«<t session, but was 
amended by the senate in such a way 
that the government refused to pio- 
ceed further with It. The minister said 

the bill was to help «" ""^^IV^r mo?i 
of the farmer and th«^ Ketllet niore 
contented and happy. In this r«gard U 
would be on the same lines "«th« rural 
mall delivery service 'i"'^^,,^*^^ jfj'\,;^ 
aid argriculture throughout the do- 
minion'' The mln«''^'^'-/'^lL'''7Tf "^he 
no Intention of Interfering n the 
sllirhtest degree with provincial juris- 
diction There was no reason why the 
Two governments-dominion and pro- 

•Inclal-could not work in ha/"w Ur S 
a matter «>f that kind. Sir Wlltria 
LaiTrKr said that all P'^'' •^f,, ^^^',[f 
agreed as to the principle of the bill. 
The only difference was as to the man 
ner In which the money was to bo ex 
n^ndod The senate threw out the bill 
Cecau.'e the government would not a,- 
low the provinces to «pcnd the '""nay. 
tho minister wanted to control the ex- 



pendlture himself. While the minister 
said that the money was to be divided 
pro rata between the different prov- 
inces he refused to incorporate that in 
his bill. The senate did not kill the 
hill — It only amended it — and the gov- 
ernment killed It afterwards. Xa the 
bill stood, all the money could be given 
to one province. The money might be 
all voted in bulk. In the opinion of 
the leader of the opposition, tlie prov- 
inces should have the say. and the 
money should be voted to them direct. 



The minister said that the money 
would be voted to them separately in 
the estimates, to which Laurier replied 
that if such was the plan It should be 
so stated In the bill. 

» 

William Castleburv of Bartlesvilio, 
Okla., aged 90, Is celebrating the birtli 
of a baby daughter. .Mrs I'astlebury 
is 36. 

In 1911 there were 108 homicides in 
St. Louis. 



Wash your clothes with 

GOLD DUST 



Good soap washes clothes well — if you use 
enough elbow grease, but Gold Dust washes 
them more thoroughly — and with little or no 
rubbing. Gold Dust saves half your time, and 
spares your poor back. 

Another great advantage of Gold Dust — use any 
kind of water you like. Gold Dust softens the 
hardest water and ^ 
makes it soft as rain This Line is *RuSV 
water. ^ ^ 

Gold Dust is just a veg- 
etable-oil soap in pow- 
dered form, with other 
cleansing ingredients 
added to make it work 
more thoroughly and 
quickly than soap ever 
can. 



«• 




**Ut thm GOLD DUST TWINS 
do your work" 



THE N. K. FAIRBANK COMPANY, Chicatfa 



iwiWjiitwiiwi'ii'iiffiWiMHi»iiiliiiin 




jTViday, 



/ 




THE DULUTH HERALD 



May 2, 1913. 



WOMAN'S COUNCIL MEETING 



*><-»-' 



A proRram of artistic worth was 
thoroughly appreciated by those who 
heard Miss Sarah Ruth Bates, reader 
and Mrs. Charles Weyerhaeuser, so- 
prano, in their concert last evening at 
the assembly hall of the high school 
under the auspices of the classes 1» 
rnatluinatics of the school. 

Ml.«'3 Butts In her readings displayed 
a Versatility and understanding of hu- 
man nature remarkably true and her 
character numbers were especially en- 
' .,(]. -The Unexpected Caller,' ■ Mor- 

: . iitlun of the Fle.sh, ' "The Widow 
l)oodle'" and other character numbers 
were given with irresistible charm and 
a group of numbers read to musical 
accompaniment were equally as pleas- 
ing. Among those were "In May, 
"Cornsti^ck Fiddle" and others. Miss 
Bates also gave "Hiawatha's Wooing' 
to the musical setting arranged by 
Cole which was given with dramatic 
force a little over-strained.. 

Mrs. Wfverhaeuser who Is well 
known in musical circles here appeared 
first In a gioup of German songs given 
with delightful simplicity and ease and 
everv one was keenly enjoyed. She 
r.'spbnded to an enthusiastic encore 
with "The Pine Tree' and her second 
group of English songs included, "Four 
Years uld. * "My Star." an old English 
ballad, a lullaby given with such 
charm and sweetness that she was 
forced to repeat it and 'The Chimes. 

Mrs Charles Dudley Robinson of ht. 
Paul plaved the mu-sical accompani- 
ments for botli Mrs. Weyerhaeuser and 
Mi?s Bates in truly artistic and coni- 
prehenslve stvle making of the whole 
a delightful finish. 

The three artists are guests of Mrs 
E P. Towne at her home, Twenty-flrst 
avf-nue east and Jefferson street, and 
they will appear in a recital this eve- 
ning In Superior. Mrs. Weyerhaeuser, 
who is Mrs. Towne's sister, will be here j 
ftr a week. » 

AT CONVENTION. 

Miss Owens Delegate at Wash- 
ington Meeting. 

Miss Alta C'wens of loikeside is in 
Washington. D. C, this week attend- 
ing the International Kindergarten as- 
8t>clation meeting being held there. 
Miss Owens went as a delegate of the 
Duluth-Superlor branch of the associa- 
tion and will return the first of next 
week, the convention closing tomor- 
row. 



NEW YORK ILLUSTRATOR AND HIS 
NEW MODEL OF FEMININE BEAUTY 



Routine Reports of Committees Given— Suggestions 
Made for Improvement of School Ventilation— Re- 
port on Civic Welfare Exhibit. 




kind 
may 



Invited for Bridge. 

Mrs O. T. Wennerland of 2324 West 
Seeond street will entertain at a break- 
fast and bri.ige party for twelve 
guests next Thursday. 

• 

Card Party. 

Mrs. C. B. Aske and Mis.s Hazel Aske 
of 5726 East Superior street have in- 
vitations out for a bridge party to- 
•norrow afternoon at their home. The 
•?ame will be played at six tables. 



Freshman Hop. 



The members of the freshman class 
f the Central high school will enter- 
tain at the annual "Freshman Hop" 
this evening at the school house. The 
halls will be decorated with pennants 
and streamers of maroon and gold, the 
class colors, and La Brosse's orchestra 
will plav. The committee appointed 
by Qerald \fcCormlck. class president, 
consists of Margaret Hough, Beatrice 
Feller, Edna Lackore^ Clinton Johnson, 
Stanley Troyer and Gerald McCormlck. 
^ -. 

May Breakfast. 

Mrs fJilbert R. Clarke of 1622 East 
Fourth street was hostess at a May 
morning breakfast yesterday at her 
home at which covers were laid for 
eight. Little hand-made baskets fllled 



— Copyrighted by Oecrge Grautham Bain. 

JAMES MONTGOMERY FLAGG. 



Little of Importance was ac- 
complished at the regular meeting of 
the Woman's Council this morning and 
owing to a small attendance many 
committees were not heard from. Rout- 
ine reports were given of the work 
planned. 

Mrs. C. F. McComli. chairman of the 
poor farm commltt^ee, reported sev- 
eral visits made to that Institution and 
said that she coul(3 find nothing to 
criticize in Its manaijement. She took 
with her on her last visit papers 
printed in the Swedish language "which 
went like hot cakes," she said, and if 
any citizens want to do something 
wliich will be a real kindness to those 
who must live thero the donation of 
reading matter printed in toreign lan- 
guages will be especially welcome. Any 
who have reading inaterlal of any 
which they will send out there 
communicate with Mrs. McComb, 
London road, or may leave it at 
the downtown Abbe it drug store. 

Mrs. E. W. Matter spoke of plans 
for playground supervision during the 
coming season and reported -that tlie 
committee on education will have cards 
printed giving the tiuancy and curfow^ 
ordinances and other rules pertaining 
to the schools to be. hung In the school 
buildings next fall. 

Mrs. J. T. Watson also of the edu- 
cational committee, spoke of the sub- 
ject of ventilation lu the school build- 
ings, saying that she had visited the 
C. C. Salter school and that the method 
used there of shutting off the various 
rooms from the ventilating system so 
that the windows may be opened with- 
out spoiling the circ alation throughout 
the building has proven most satisfac- 
tory and can be pu ) in all the build- 
ings with practically no expense and 



dressed as boys an i girls of various 
periods, students appeared on the green 
In hundreds. The culmination of their 
gambols was the annual May pole 
dance with fie crowning of Miss Edith 
F. Jones of Los Anj.elea, the freshman 
president as the queen of May. 



This is the James Montgomery Flagg 
girl of 1913. Mr. Flagg, who is one of 
the most active and successful of 
young Illustrators, has created each 
year a new type of American girl. Each 
year he has found it more and more 
difficult to discover some new, rare 
and untried type of beauty. Each year 
he has triumphed over the difficulties 
which have confronted him and the 
magazine editors have breathed a sigh 
of relief as the malls have come to 
them weighted witli hundreds of 
Jamesmontgomeryflagg drawings, with 
which to fill up their advertising 
pages. 

This vear Mr. Flagg was hard put 
to it. His feverish fancy conjured up 
a face and figure transcending In love- 
liness all of those which had in the 
past made glad the hearts of millions 
of recipients of the calendars of hams 
and other choice works of the higher 
art. In desperation he left his studio 
one afternoon to find refuge from his 
own doubts and fears in the operation 
of his oO-horse power automobile. 
Driving out the Boston post road, Mr. 
Flagg was thrown suddenly from his 
equilibrium — not by one of the series 



with dainty little flowers were place 
favors for the guests. 



Win Prizes. 

Miss Isabel Patrick and Mrs. Jay 
Cooke Howard won the prizes at the 
second bridge party In the series be- 
ing given by Mrs. W. G. Baldwin this 
week at her home, 2615 East Fifth 
street. The game was played at six 
tables yesterday. At the first of the 



of large ragged holes which the ftate 
of New York has permitted to accumu- 
late but by the sight of a wondrous 
vision in the field beside the road. 
Hastily putting on his brake as he 
threw his clutch out of position, Mr. 
Flagg gracefully skidded his car across 
the ditch and almost to the feet of the 
beautiful girl who, bending over a 
dandelion patch, was wholly oblivious 
of his approach. 

With practiced control, Mr. Flagg In- 
troduced himself and broached the sub- 
ject of a motor ride. Having per- 
suaded her to trust herself to hie 
fatherly care, he turned his car about 
and drove madly, deliriously back to 
his studio. There he unfolded to her 
his desire to make her the Jamesmont- 
gomeryflagg girl of 1913. Coy at first, 
she finally consented. Since the dis- 
covery of this supreme type of fem- 
inine loveliness, Mr. Flagg has been 
deaf to all telephone calls. He has 
even been absent from a session of the 
Dutch Treat club. Already he has 
completed 157 drawings of his new 
scarecrow model and expressed them 
to editors. And he is still hard at 
work. 



series Wednesday afternoon the prizes 
were won by Mrs. E. G. Church and 
Mrs. John Mullln. 

The game was played at eight tables 
again today. 



MAY PARTY. 



"5^ 



'••»■ 



'<»: 



M 



\®i 






^^ • C « A • g> iP^- 



The'*tips*'outwear the gloves 



SILK 




V 



Three generations of American 
Women have set their "stamp 
of approval" upon "KAYSER" 
Gloves — and, for over a quarter 
of a century "KAYSER" Gloves 
have maintained their suprem- 
acy in the glove world. 

** KAYSER" Gloves are the result of a life- 
time spent in Silk Glove making — in striving 
for the attainment of that superlative degree 
of excellence that makes the "KAYSER" 
Glove the standard, by which all other Silk 
Gloves are measured. 

There is no excuse for accepting 
the "just 7i good" kind— "KAY- 
SER" Gloves " cost no more" and 
carry with them assurance of qual- 
ity and reliability. 

There's a way to tell the genuine — **look in 
the hem," if you find the name "KAYSER" 
you have the glove that " don't wear out" at 

the finger "tips." 

A guarzoitee ticket tn every pair. 

Short Silk Gloves, 50c, 75c, $1, $1.25, $1.50 




Tea at Endion Church a Success; 

The parlors of the Kndlon M. E. 
church were the scene of a charming 
May-liay party yesterday afternoon at 
which the members of the Qui Vive 
circle of that church were hostesses. 
Pussy willows, baskets of flowers and 
a doll's may-pole dance arranged for 
the centerpiece on the large serving 
table made the room attractive and 
small tea tables each with a center- 
piece of yellow Jonquils and Spanish 
daisies were placed about the room. 
Mrs. W. F. Ilovis, Mrs. C. H. Merritt 
and Mrs. C. C. Cokefalr received the 
guests assisted by Mrs. J. T. Melgln and 
Mrs. L.. N. Newton and presiding at 
the ser\'lng table were Mrs. W. H. 
Kingston and Mrs. E. C. Bradley. In 
charge of the small tables were Mrs. 
J. L. Strong. Mrs. R. B. Liggett, Mrs. 
F. B. Cronk, Mrs. George Hart and Miss 
Helen Harbison. 

During the afternoon piano solos 
played by Miss Wlnnlfred Hicks, Miss 
Lucy Wood and Miss Hortense Carr 
were much enjoyed as were also vocal 
solos by Mrs. Nell B. Morrison. 



AUDITOIRIUM "^ 

ROLLER rink" 

TONIGHT TONIGHT 

Skating and Daiielnsf Tarly. 

i^econd AnnlverKai-K of Thl»* Kink. 

BAND — 1.A BROSSE — B A. ->/!>. 

Skating 8:(M> to 10:30 p. m. 

UxincInK After lOiSO. 

AdinlMHiun 10 (enlM. 




Birthday Surprise. 

Miss Mary Holt was hostess at a 
Hurprise birthday party last evening 
in honor of Miss Sylvia Trudeau, at 
Garfield social hall. The evening was 
spent In music, dancing and games and 
refreshments were served to the guests. 
— ^ _ 

May-Day Revels. 

Wellesley, Mass., May 2. — Wellesley 
college's 1.300 girls carried out the 
time-honored revels yesterday. A par- 
ty of seniors, carrying pails of foam- 
ing Boap suds and dressed as scrub- 
women, In the morning, scoured the 
statues on the college grounds until 
they fairly shone. Later in the day. 



Miss Hickis Hostess. 

Miss Wlnnlfred Hcks was hostess at 
the first of two bridge parties this aft- 
ernoon at her home, 426 Twelfth ave- 
nue east. The game was played at 
five tables and Miss Hicks was assist- 
ed bv Miss Clara Stocker and Miss 
Maud" Mattson. Sh-- will entertain at 
five tables again tomorrow afternoon. 
<■ 

Dinner Party. 

The members of the Monday after- 
noon bridge club ^vill entertain tlieir 
husbands at a dlnrer this^evenlng at 
the home of Mr. and Mr». E. E. Ju'ler 
206 Winona street. Covers will be laid 

for filxteeen. 

.. 

Linnaca Branch. 

The Llnnaea branch will meet this 
evening at 8 p. m. s.t the home of Miss 
Nora Esse, 222 West Fourth street. 

Church Meetings. 

The Forward Guild of the First 
Presbyterian churcli will meet tomor- 
row afternoon at 3 o'clock at the home 
of Mrs. N. S. Mitchell, 14l7 East lirst 
street. The subje ;t will be "The 
Christian Holution of the City Prob- 
lems," with Mrs. Norman D. McLeod ( 

as leader. 

«. 

Personal Mention. 

Mr and Mrs. E. M. Morgan and little 
daughter, Roberta, of Minneapolis, are 
expected Saturday :o be the guests of 
Mrs. Morgan's parents, Capt. and Mrs. 
E. S. Smith, of Lester Park. 

• * • 

Miss Marie Stewart, daughter of Mr. 
and Mns. J. Stewart, 427 Forty-second 
avenue west, is HI at her home with 
typhoid fever 

• 4> • 

H. Johnson of this city Is in New 
York this week. 

• *i * 

Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Tischer of Grand 
Marais are guests at the home of the 
latters parents, 709 East Second street. 

* *■ • 

Mrs. W. H. Dempster and daughter, 
Miss Dorothy, of Lcs Angeles, Cal.. are 
visiting the former's sister, Mrs. C. W. 
Brldenthal, of 1429 East Fourth street, 
for about two w^eehs. 

* •< « 

Mr. and Mrs E. C. Kiley of Grand 
Rapids, Minn., were guests In the city 
yesterday en route from a trip to Min- 
neapolis. 

* •> * 

Mrs. Mary Daugherty of 311 Second 
avenue west has as her guest her sis- 
ter, Mrs. P. Boyce, of Menasha, Wis., 



very little work on the part of the 
Janitors. 

Mrs. Watson also spoke of the mat- 
ter of lighting the school rooms and 
the placing of seats so that the chil- 
dren's eyes may not be unduly 
strained. , ^. 

Mrs. Arthur Barnes, chairman of the 
committee of the civic study class of 
the Woman's Council, which had charge 
of the welfare exhibit recently held in 
Duluth, reported on th» expenditure of 
the money given by different organiza- 
tions for its support, and a vote of 
thanks was given the class for its 
arrangement of the exhibits and Us 
supervision. ^ ^ ., x. 

Mrs. Barnes reported that most of the 
details prepared and shown on charts 
at the exhibit will be gotten up in 
pamphlet form. 

Mrs. O. L. Mather of the streets and 
alleys committee reported that the city 
will sprinkle the streets with oil this 
summer and in urging the advantage 
from twis course asked the women to 
be patient with the first discomfort.s 
of having the oil tracked into their 
homes. , 

Miss Jean Poirier sent a communica- 
tion to the council urging that body 
to give its indorsement to the appoint- 
ment of Mies Eliza Evans ot Minneapo- 
lis who Is one of three women under 
consideration by Governor Eberhart as 
state inspector working under the min- 
imum wage act antl the matter was 
referred to the executive board of the 
council for investigation and action. 

Miss Poirier sent in her resignation 
from the council which was tabled as 
the members were unwilling to accept 
it without urging her to reconsider her 
decision. 

The Teachers' association was ad- 
mitted to membership and given the 
privilege of sending delegates to the 
council, and the Central W. C. T. U. 
was suggested for membership. 



who was called to the city on account 
of the illness of their mother. 

• « * 

Mr. and Mrs. G. M. Tallant of Wood- 
land avenue leave the first of the week 
for their farm, Pinehurst. near Nemadji, 
Minn., where they will spend the sum- 
mer. 

• * * 
Mrs. G. C Blackwood and daughters 

Edith and Clem, of 111 Park terrace 

have moved to 2324 Minnesota avenue 

for the summer. 

m * * 

Mr. and Mrs. Bruce Black of the 

Chatham flats have taken the camp 

"Fort Dodge" on Park Point for the 

summer. 

• * * 

Mr. and Mrs. H. L. Shepherd of the 

Ashtabula flats have gone to Park 

Point where they have taken a cot- 

I ' tage at Twenty-eighth street for the 

suTmmer. 

• • * 

Mr and Mrs. Albert Abraham of 
1429 East Superior street are in Chi- 
cago on their way to West Baden and 
St. Louis, Mo., where they will spend 
several weeks. Their daughter, Mrs. 
A, H. Schwartz of 1603 East Superior 

street is with them. 

• * * 

Mr. and Mrs. J. M. Giddlng are spend- 
ing a few weeks at French Lick, Ind. 

• * * 

Mrs. Clark and Miss Clark of Sarnla, 
Can., are here visiting Mrs. E. N. Mc- 
Giffert of 1611 East Second street, 
who is 111 at St. Luke's hospital. 



LOYAL vo iii:a rjn"'!MT:R, 

Youth's Companion: Katherine had 
been brought up to believe that tale- 
bearing was despicable, but there were 
times when her greedy twin strained 
her principles to the snapping point. 

"Katherine," said her mother one 
day, "is it possible that you and How- 
ard have eaten that whole bag of pep- 
permints that I meant to take to 
grandmother. Just because I left the 
bag on the table?" 

"I didn't take one of them, mother," 
said Katherine, Indignantly, "but How- 
ard — well, I shan't tell tales, but you 
Just .smell him!" 





By PEGGY PEABODY 






WILL INHERIT 



MANY MILLIONS 



rfl 




for 





i^i^^j^aj^^WI^^JM 


!^<* 




^^M 




Ml 


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i: t^ 


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Better Protection Is Needed 
Girls in the Cities. 

Placarding every 
railroad station in 
New England witb 
Information that 
shall furnish the 
country girl com- 
ing to the city 
with a means of 
protection is the 
aim of the Young 
Travelers' Aid so- 
ciey of Boston. 

Efforts to pro- 
tect the young 
women strangers 
In the cities should 
be redoubled ow- 
ing to the numerous suspicious disap- 
pearances that have recently oc- 
curred. 

Probably the average country girl 
who seeks to earn her living In the city 
is amply protected against Its evils on 
her arrival. Usually there are rela- 
tives or friends formerly residing in 
her home village to whom she can 
turn. They meet her at the station 
and see that she is safely and com- 
fortably settled. In addition, the 
bonaflde country girl is doubly in- 
trenched behind her mother's warnings. 
She is not the ignorant trusting little 
girl, fat as butter and smelling of new 
mown hay, who accepts the advances 
of any smiling stranger, after the cus- 
tom of the Innocent country girl of 
the story book. 

Not Bhe. The pitfalls of the rail- 



way station, the handsome, ingratiat- 
ing stranger and her ignorance of the 
city are usually taken into considera- 
tion before she lea^ es the home nest. I 
don't suppose she ?oes astray once In 
ten thousand times when she leaves her 
home for the city for the purpose of 
earning her living Country mothers 
and fathers are nov unacquainted with 
the dangers, and I have no doubt that 
the large maJorit\- not only prepare 
their daughters* minds for their self- 
protection on entering a strange city 
for the first time, but arrange as well 
for their reception. 

It is after they get there that they 
need the supervision of some kindly 
and not too critical friend and adviser; 
some one to make a business of over- 
seeing ever so tacnfuUy their mode of 
life, their friends, their work, health 
and pastimes. 

The moment the interests of frienda 
abates she begins to have the home- 
sick feeling and her spirit craves 
companionship and sympathy; then, 
unless she is particularly well hem- 
med In by true aid tried friendships 
and the conventions, the greatest dan- 
gers of the city bt;slege her. 

There ought to be a society or so- 
cieties into which the young girl and 
the young man entering the city life 
for the first tlmt are gathered and 
carefully Instructtd and guided until 
friendships and haaits of life under the 
new conditions aie formed. It isn't 
getting there that Is fraught with the 
greatest danger. It Is finding the 
right environment aftar one arriveo. 



MRS. M. M. VAN BEUREN. 

Mrs. Michael M. Van Beuren is a 
daughter of John D. Archbold of Stand- 
ard Oil and will Inherit a large part 
of his millions. She is the wife of 
M. M. Van Beuren, a broker in Wall 
street. This picture of Mrs. Van 
Beuren wa.s made when she christened 
Mr. Archbold's new yacht "Vixen" a 
few days ago. 



To make a 
perfect bisque 
with CampbelFi 
Tomato Soup, 
just f oflow the 
easy directions 
on the label 



Use only a small pinch of bak- 
ing-soda. Use fresh sweet milk, with 
only a little cream in it, if any. ^ After 
you mix the soup and the milk let 
them come to boiling-point; but do 
not let them boil. 

Preparing this delightful bisque , 
or **cream-of-tomato" as it is often 
called is very simple. And you could 
not serve a more tempting and satis- 
fying dinner-course. 



<♦ • 



J 




C!l TOMATO 

OOUP 



10c 



a can 



Look for the red-and-white label 



I 



Those Kayser Gloves 

ADVKRTISED elsewhere on tills page ean be bought by muU — by phone 

or at tlie Glove Department of 

COMPLETE NEW SPRING ASSORTMENTS NOW READY. 




Draughtsmen, Artists, 

bookkecper.s, cashiers, account- 
ants, shipping clerks and all who 
use stationery and office essen- 
tials, give unstinted praise to the 
supplies furnished by us. because 
of the high quality and conven- 
ience, while the prices always finJ 
favor with the man who pays the 
bills. Do we supply you? 

EDWARD M. STONE 

THE BOOKMAN. 
221 W. Superior St., Duluth, Minn. 



'4 



BABIES NOT TO WALK TOO SOON. 

Philadelphia Inquirer: The preven- 
tion of childish abnormalities, euch as 
curvature of the spine and bow lege, 
were discussed by Dr. Dudley Morton 
at the weekly mothers' clinic of the 
Children's Homeopathic hospital a lew 
days ap:o. 

"While many mothr.r.s are proud of 
the child that" can toddle around the 
room when 10 months old," said Dr. 



Morton, "they should do everything to 
keep it from walking at that age. It is 
too young and the bones of the leg 
and back are wtak. Bow legs and in 
some cases spinal curvature always re- 
sult to the lifelong reKrt-t of the moth- 
er. Many mothers take the child that 
Is just beginning to walk and exhibit 
It to the neighbors and relatives. The 
occasion is one of rejoicing, but dlra 
results are sure to f«>llow if the child 
has been permitted to walk too soon.' 



THe kind 0)3 1 
sparkles 




t 



The purest, sweetest and 
best of cup sugars 

In 2 and S Pound Sealed Pack- 
ages—Full and Half -size Piece* 

THE AMERICAN SUGAR REFINING COMPANY 

New York atf 



,v-.---r SUGAR 



TKlfc»««»^ 



Ca«w 



DonWS, 



Sugar 



iliiill! 










^^i^^^smma 



<anlh 



Friday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



V 



May 2, 1913. 



15 






IMITATIONS ABOUND 

Every one shows the dealer a larger profit, but 
none possess the flavour of 




or give the same satisfaction to the tea drinker. 

Black, Mixed and Green. Sealed lead packets only. 



WEST END ' 

HRRAI.n nilANCHi 
Hrrtnnn OIbub, UluiiuRer, IN^a Went Superior Streei. 



BIG CELEBRATION PLANNED 
FOR MIDSUMMERS DAY 



Vuluth, Jifinn. 



Chicago, III. 



Danville, III. 



Clinton, Iowa 



oyalClqakQ 



"^nAfil^h^^^GO&Or Cl^OTMCS'^ 



7 We$t Superior Street— Xear Lake Ave. ''The yexa Stored ' 

SPECIALS WORTHY OF YOUR 
NOTICE AND INVESTIGATION 

SUITS AT $17.50 AND $19.75 

Regular $22.50 and $25.00 Values. 

SILK CHARMEUSE DRESSES, just re- m.\ eiQ 75 
ceiveJ; regular $35 values; specially priced ^* ^'Iw. I W 

SILK DRESSES AT $7.85 

Manv pretty and attractive models to select from. 

SERGE DRESSES AT $10.85 

Regular $lL'.pO and $15.00 values. A very complete and sat- 
isfactory showing of styles and shades. 

WAISTS AT 98c 

Regular $L25 and $L50 values, many different and dainty 

styles to choose from. 





j^ 



Muffins 
and Gems 



Light, tender and 
elicious— the kind 
at melt in your 
mouth— if made 
with Rumford Bak- 
ing Powder. 

It raises the dough thoroughly and in just the 
right manner at just the right time. See how 
much better to-morrov/'s baking will be if made with 






THE WHOLESOME 

BAKING POWDER 



LOUIS LEVIN, 
President. 

Preparations are well under way by 
the SwedLsh-Anierlcan National league 
for lioldlng a monster celebration of 
Midsummer's day on June 24. The 
principal features of the celebration 
will bo a parade through the city 
winding- up at Lincoln park and a pic- 
nic with a program following at the 
park. 

The program will commence at 9 
o'clock with the parade. The speaking 
will take place beginning at 10:30 
o'clock In the park. The program 
committee Is now in communication 
with Well known Swedl.sh speakers 
and It is expected to know within 
a week or two whether tliey will be 
here to take part In the program. 

The afternoon's program will In- 
clude a baseball game races and varl- ! 
ous feature sports, such as tug-of-war, I 
egg races, sack races and many ladles j 
contests. Band music will also feature j 
the entertainments. 

Louis Levin is president of the as- i 
sociatlon. The other officers are: C. J. I 
Carlson, vice president; C. E. Johnson, 
secretary, and O. W. Olson, treasurer, i 
Elglit Swedish organizations are rep- 
resented in the association. Each has 
a committee of tive members. The or- 
ganizations and their representatives 
are as follows: 

Lodge No. 170, O. of Vasa — Otto Gaf- 
vert, C. F. Forsell. C. E. Johnson, O. 
VV. Ol.son, B. Well berg. 

Lodge No. 12, S. H. & E. F.— Carl 
Hogstrom, Carl Edgren. Charles Bos- 
irom, Louis Levin, C. J. Carlson. 

vSwitiod Order — Adolph Hellgren, N. 
Xordlund, Gunner Granlund, John 
Edlund, Oscar Carlson. 

Svea Glee Club — Hellmer Ogren, 
Geoigo Anderson. Iver Holmberg, C. 
H. Pearson, Jack M'allln. 

North Star Lodge. I. O. G. T.— 
Charles G. Carlson, O. Walfrid Olson. 
(~!uat Hjerpe, Edward Sundquist, Otto 
.Sh ogren. 

Zenith City Band — Relnhold John- 
son, John Hanson, Ernest Mandel- 
holm. H. E. Magnuaon, Ben Gefford. 

Lodge No. 243, Order of Vasa — Mar- 
tin W^-dln, Carl Ek, Carl Oskllnd, 
Fred .vnderson. Axel Strom. 

Morning Star Lodge, I. O. O. T. — 



C. J. CARLSON, 
Vice President. 




ohtireh this evening. A program 
music will also be given. 

WesTEnTBrJefs. 

Mrs. G. A. Lindsay of Nashwauk is 
n. gue.Mt at the homo of her brother, 
A O. Anderson, 1!512 West Fifth 
.street. 

The Adams Alumni association has 
poHtnoned its meeting for this evening 
uiittl a later date. It was planned to 
make preparations for the annual ban- 
• lUPt and reception for the graduating 
class. The meeting will probably be 
h^ld in about two weeks. 

•Miss Alice Brethorst, a mlsHlonary 
to China, who is spending her vacation 
in this country, will speak Sunday eve- 
ning at the Grace Methodist ciuirch. 
Twenty-second avenue west and Third 
street. 

John Lat. a laborer on the ore dock, 
suHtaln.'d alight injuries at the place 
yesterday. He was taken to St. Mary s 
hospital, where his wounds wero Iress- 
ed by Dr. Sukeforth. 

A repoi-t to the effect (hat a man 
was killed on the Northern PacKle 
tracks yesterday afternoon could not 
be verified. Coroner McComb and Chief 
of I'ollce Trover investigated the scene 
of the alleged accident, but found the 
rumor unfounded. 

George M. Jensen, 2117 West First 
street, left yesterday for a few days' 
business trip to the Twin Cities. 

FAIR WEATHER" 

DURING APRIL 



O. W. OLSON. 
Treasurer. 



children who wish to ralf*© the berries 
with the plants at 1 cent each. This I 
believe is just what they 'coBt the com- 
mittee." 

The children are taking a great 
deal of interest in t?ardentng. In all 
parts of the West en 3 they can be seen 
after school hours digging up the gar- 
den and planting the seeds, ^n some 
instances seeds planted a few days ago 
are already beginninjf to sprout. 

Dr. Oredson said ;:hat any informa- 
tion regarding the securing of free 
seeds or the strawbtrry i)lants can be 



„ „.. .. _. ^^ had by Inquiring of the committee. The 

Relnhold Scarf, Maurltz Ek. Axel other members are L. A. Simonson and 

.Mattson. Waldemar Dahlberg, Andrew James Maghan. 

Nelson. 



NEGROES SAVE 

LOUISIANA LEVEE. 

New Orleans, La.. May 2. — A dozen 
negro men took the places of sana 
bags and checked the wash over the 
top of the Poydras levee, thirteen miles 
south of here, until sand bags were 
obtained. Last night 1.000 men, work- 
ing by the light of torches and bon- 
fires, bull'; a new seml-clrcular levee 
behind what threatened to be a dls- 
astrou.i crevasse. The engineers ex- 
pect to avert a break. 

A ."Stream two Inches deep was flow- 
ing over the levee, of which large sec- 
tions had sloughed away, when the 
danger was discovered, and 2,000 bags 
of -■•and were -sent for. but the 10- 
mlnute wait would have been too long. 
so the dozen negroes risked their llve.s 
by lying on boards so placed as to 
prevent the wash until bags were 
brought. A moment after they left the 
earthwork sllpr>ed Into the river. 

MAN DECLARED 

DEAD RETURNS. 

Topeka. Kan., May 2. — After an ab- 
sence of more than seven years, dur- 
ing which time the courts had declared 
him legally dead and had given his 
wife judgment for a $3,000 Insurance 
policy on his life. W. H. Caldwell came 
to Toptka yesterday to testify for the 
insurance company In an application 
for a re-hearlng of the case. Caldwell 
has been declared legally dead on the 
testimony of Jane Caldwell, his wife, 
who said her husband mysteriously 
left home and that all efforts to locate 
him had failed. 

In a deposition, Caldwell said he 
quarreled with his wife before leaving 
Topeka. He has been in the duck 



hunting business since In California, 
he saia. 



SHOWS $5,000 

RO LL; JVI URDERED. 

JoUet, 111.. May 2.— Michael Kane, a 
barber, displayed in a saloon Jo.OOO, 
which he had Inherited from his fath- 
er's estate. Next day his body, with 
the -skull crushed as by a stone, was 
taken from the Des Plalnes river Clews 
unearthed by the police Indicate that 
Kane strug.<led furiously with two men 
who assaulted him near the river bank 
and that one of them dashed his brains 
out. 



FILIPINOS KEEP 

SLAVE SYSTEM. 

Washington. May 2. — Whether hu- 
man .slavery e::ists in the Philippines is 
a question asked by the senate of Sec 
retary Garrison. Senator Borah read a 
letter from Secretary Don C. Worcester 
of the Philippine government saying 
slavery did exist In Manila but that the 
Philippine as.sembly had declined to 
pass remedial legislation. 

. « 

Campbell Xomlnated. 

Washington, May 2. — Edward K 
Campbell of Birmingham, Ala., has 
been nominated by President Wilson to 
be chief justice of the United States 
court of claims to succeed the late 
Justice Stanton J. Peele. Mr Camp- 
bell, who Is a native of Washington 
county. Virginia, has been a lifelong 
friend of Representative Underwood 
the Democratic house leader, and Iden.' 
tlfied with all of the Underwood polit- 
ical campaign.^. He headed the Un- 
derwoo<l marching club at the national 
convention last year. 



Conimltteen. 

The following are the various com- 
mittees appointed to have charge of 
the details: 

Program — C. E. Johnson. Carl Bos- 
trom. Carl Carlson. George Anderson, 
Charles G. Carlson, Ernest Mandel- 
holm, Cnarles Ek, Waldemar Dahl- 
berg, Charles Forsell. 

Decorations — Charles Bostrom, C. J. 
Carson. Ernest Mandelholm. Helmer 
Ogren, N. Nordlund, Jack Wallin. 

Eentertalnment — Adolph Hellgren. 
John Edlund, Iver Holmberg. Relnhold 
Scarf. Axel Mattson. 

Refreshments — Carl G. Carlson, 
Maurltz Ek, Gust Hjerpe, Andrew 
Xel.son, Gunner Granlund, Carl Edgren, 
Carl Ockllnd, Martin Wedin, Axel 
Strom, Oscar Carlson, C. E. Pearson, 
Edward Sundquist, Otto Shogren. 

Tickets — C. J. Carlson, O. VV. Olson, 
C. E. Johnson. 

Press — Otto Gafvert, George Ander- 
son, C. E. Johnson. 

Badges — Elmer Ogren. Carl Carlson, 
E. Mandelholm. 



TROUT FRY FOR 
- MtUER'S CREEK 



GEHINGGRAY? JUST APPLY 

A LITTLE SAGE TEA TONIGHT 



Sage Mixed Wifh Sulphur Re- 

siores Natural Color and 

Lusire io Hair. 



Why suffer the handicap of looking 
old? Gray hair, however handsome, 
denotes advancing age. We all know 
the advantages of a youthful appear- 
ance. 

Your hair Is your charm. It makes 
or mans the face. When It fades, 
turns gray and looks dry, wispy and 
scraggly just a few application.^ of 
Sf ;e Tea and Sulphur enhances Its 
appearance a hundred fold. 

Either prepare the tonic at home 
or get from any drug store a 50 cent 
bottle of "Wyeth'a Sage and Sulphur 



Hair Remedy," ready to nsa; but lis- 
ten, avoid preparations put up by 
druggists as they u.'»ually use too much 
.sulphur, which makes the hair sticky 
Get "Wyeth's" which can always be 
depended upon to darken beautifully 
and Is the best thing known to re- 
move dandruff, stop scalp Itching and 
falling hair. 

By u.slng Wyeth's Sago and Sul- 
phur no one can po.s.sibly tell that 
you darkened your hair. It does It 
so naturally and evenly — you moisten 
a sponge or soft brush, drawing this 
through the hair, taking one small 
.strand at a time which requires but 
a few moments. Do this at night and 
by morning the gray hair disappears; 
after another application or two its 
natural color Is restored and It be- 
come* glossy and lustrous and you 
appear years younger. Max Wirth. 



Old Trout Stream Will Be 

Restocked This 

Year. 

Miller's creek will be stocked with 
trout fry, according to Information 
just received by lovers of trout fish- 
ing in the West end. Several gallons 
of the fry will be sent to local game 

wardens to be dumped into the creek 
this month. 

Charles Mork. F. H. De Vohn and 
Joseph Olson recently communicated 
with the state game and flsh commis- 
sion asking that the creek be stocked. 
The letter received a reply stating that 
the matter would be taken up Immedi- 
ately and that within a short time a 
supply would be sent to Duluth for 
that purpose. 

Miller's creek was at one time well 
patronized by lovers of fishing. In re- 
cent years the fish have disappeared, 
although occasionally one is caught 
in the upper part. It is proposed to 
dump the fry Into the creek about a 
mile or two north of the Fourteenth 
street and Piedmont avenue crossing. 

STRAWBERRY 

PLANTS CHEAP 



Dollar Social. 

The annual "Dollar" social given by 
the Tabltha Society of the Bethany 
Swedish Lutheran church was held last 
night at the home of Miss Victoria An- 
derson. 1514 East Fifth street. A fea- 
ture of the meeting was that each 
member of the society told how she 
earned $1 for the organization. The 
following program was also given: 

Piano solo 

Miss Mabel Samuelson. 

Vocal solo 

Miss May Morlund. 

Recitation 

Miss Gertrude Fahrman. 

Piano solo 

Miss Alfreds Benson. 

Vocal solo 

Miss Edith Nelson. 

Reading 

Miss Hlldur Wallin, 

Piano solo 

Miss Lydia Johnson. 

Brotherhood Meeting. 

"The Relation o!' Husband and 
Wife" will be the subject of discussion 
this evening at the meeting of the 
Brotherhood Club of the Central Bap- 
tist church. Twentieth avenue west 
and First street. Pev. Milton Fish, 
pastor of the church, will lead In the 
di.»»fiussion. 

The meeting of the Brotherhood will 
be thrown open to the women of the 



Only Nine Days on Which 

Sun Did Not 

Shine. 

Duluth had unusually fair weather 
In April, according to the monthly sum- 
mary of we.ither conditions issued by 
the weather bureau. 

Only nine days were entirely cloudy, 
fifteen being clear and six partly 
cloudy. Snow fell on four davs and 
rain on four, the total preciiiitation 
being 1.75 inches, compared with 2.58 
Inches last year, and a normal precipi- 
tation for the month of 2.14 Inches. 

The mean temperature for the month, 
40 deg, was above the normal for the 
month, 38.4 deg. The warmest day 
was April 15, when the temperature 
went to 79 deg., and the coldest was 
April 7, with a temperature of 23 deg. 
The snowfall was 4.5 inches, and the 
greatest precipitation In any twenty- 
four hours was on April 2 and 3, when 
.07 Inches of precipitation occurred in 
the form of snow. 

The prevailing direction of the wind 
was northeast and the greatest velocity 
occurred April 10, when the wind blew 
at the rate of forty-nine miles an hour 
from the northeast. There were thun- 
der storms on April 2 and 22. 

STUDEN TS 'ho ld FAIR. 

Kansas University Has Something 
Unique, It Is Claimed. 

Lawrence, Kan., May 2. — Opening 
the first biennial Kansas university ex- 
position today by pressing a button In 
his office at the state capltol in Topeka, 

flovernor George H. Hodges caused to 
unfold a large scroll that delivered a 
message fruin him formally beginning 
the "Jayhawker fair." 

The Kansas university exposition is 
an innovation In college affairs. The 
buildings contain exhibits of the work 
done by the students In the class 
rooms. 

The exposition Is also a mlnature 
"world's fair," with a "Pike," where 
booths are managed by various student 
organizations. McCook field will be the 
scene of a constant whirl of athletic 
contests during the two days of the 
fair. The campus is a vast spread of 
flags and bunting. 

•The display of the work of the 
students Is the primary attraction. 
Among other features will be the May 
fete tomorrow, conducted by the Y. W. 
C. A. of the university. A May pole 
with quaint and picturesque dances by 
gaily attired girl students and led by 
the Queen of the May, the "most pop- 
ular girl on the hill,' but whose Iden- 
tity has been kept secret, will add 
charm to the affair. A circus will be 
held in the gymnasium tonight. Every 
one of the 2,500 students has a part in 
the exposition. 

HOUSE IS STRUCK 




WALK-OVER Shoes are made not merely 
to sell, but rather .|o give you right 
service after you buy them. Stylish, 
shapely, attractive, reliable in materials and 
workmanship. Fitted in a way that insures 
the utmost comfort possible. No "breaking 
in;" easy and right from the first wearing. 

If you want the best footwear possible to 
buy; the most perfect fitting service known; 
you'll get both by coming here for your next 
needs. 



Prices for Men and Women — 

$3 up to $7 



WALK-OVER BOOT SHOP 




DURING STORM 



Duluth had Its first severe electrical 
storm of the spring last night. Light- 
ning fiashed. thunaer rolled and the 
rain came down in great volume. 

Lightning struck the home of Frank 
Johnson, 1915 Last Sixth street, short- 
ly after midnight, knocking off the 
chimney and went out under the roof. 
Some of the bricks fell out on the 
floor, but no damage was done In the 
living rooms. The bolt was not fol- 
lowed by fire. 



FOOL T HEIR F RIENDS. 

Former Michigamme Girl and Butte 
Sweetheart Wed Quietly. 

Michigamme, Mich., May 2. — Local 

friends of Miss Eleanor N. Dower, 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Edward Dow- 
er, of this city were pleasantly sur- 
prised this week by the announcement 
of Miss Dower's wedding at Butte, 
Mont., where she has lived several 
years with an aunt and Is cashier for 
the Montana Independent company, to 
.Toscph Armstrong, mining engineer at 
the Blackrock mine in Butte. Accord- 
ing to a Butte paper the couple gave 
their friends the slip when they quiet- 
ly motored to St. Joseph's chuixh and 
were married by Fatiier McCornilck, 
after which they left fur the coast on 
their honeymoon. 

"Both the bride and groom laid their 
plans well," says the Butte paper. "Not 
even the bride's aunt, Mrs. Kate Earls, 
624 South Montana street, with whom ' 



she made her home, knew anvthingr 
concerning the nuptials. Miss bower 
left home ostensibly to spend the aft- 
ernoon with girl friends. Stvlishly tai- 
lored, she met her intended husband 
and their attendants up town and 
from there went quletlv to the church 
The priest was in on the secret and h« 
held his peace, while friends who later 
in the day got wind of the affair were 
."currylng hither and yon .lust for on« 
meager crumb of Information. 

"Mr. Armstrong Is a surveyor at the 
Black Rock mine and was formerly 
connected with the citv engineer's of- 
fice. He is a graduate" of the Missouri 
College of Mines at Holla. Mi3.«i Dower 
Is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Ed- 
ward Dower of Michigamme. Mich." 
« 

Fanro Cnrpenter*' DpmandM. 

Fargo, N. D.. May 2. — (Special to The 
Herald.) — Contractors of Fargo will be 
asked to pay member.s of the Carpen- 
ters' union 45 cents per hour for work 
this summer. A committee of the 
builders and traders will consider the 
matter at an early date. 



iL l igaJl:. 



We Sell 

ESTATE 
Gas Ranges 

Easy on the 
Gas Bills 




FOI^MERLY 

AndersonThoorsell 
Furniture Co. 



2I3IAVC.W.A 
SUPERIOR ST. 



We Sell 
WAGNER 
Go-Carts 

Handsomest 
and Best 



Superfluous 

Truths 



Shmi 



.r-^j^x 



imcfe 

The Cheapest in the End 



Will Cost West End Chil- 
dren Only One Cent 
Apiece. 

Those school children who have en- 
tered the garden contest and Intend 
raising strawberries will not have to 
worry about getting plants. Dr. O. A. 
Oredson. chairman of the committee 
announced yesterday that the commit- 
tee had made arrangements for sup- 
plying the plants to the children at 
1 cent each. 

"The plants are recommended to be 
of the best and hardiest variety," said 
Dr. Oredson. "We will supply those 



•If you use a simple toilet prepara- 
tion and It proves to be worthless, you 
only lose money. "When you use a 
questionable depilatory, however, It 
Is a very serious matter because you 
not only lose money, but you take the 
grave risk of permanent disfigure- 
ment. 

- // Yoa Value Your Face 

use De Miracle, the one safe, perfected 
hair remover of proven merit. Re- 
member, the Injury caused by the uso 
of doubtful hair removers will either 
result In permanent disfigurement or 
cost you many dollars because It will 
take months or possibly years to gain 
control of hair groii^ths that have 
been stimulated by the use of such 
preparations. 

Only Guaranteed Hair Remover 



i: 



Others advertise "Qi 
give no guarantee. D 
only depilatory that 
guarantee In each p 
permanent dlsfigurem. 
substitutes offered by 
ers merely for a ft 
profit. If your dealer 
you, send $1.00 dli 
formation how to d' 
depilatories are harm 
less sent In plain, seal 
New trtiths in n 



uarg.ntocd," but 
e Miracle Is the 
has a binding 
ackage. Avoid 
mt by refusing 
dishonest deal- 
:w cents more 
will not supply 
ect. Free In- 
termlnd which 
ful and worth- 
ed envelope, 
oxt advt. 



Bargains Extraordinary! 

We are not much on using big words, but ^'EXTRAORDINARY*' is not 
too strong to convey the most unusual values 
thrown out in this sale of parlor sets. 

Our leading offer Ls six distinct patterns in three-piece sets, f!vo 

in golden oak, one In mahogany, all with genuine leather seats. 

They are not so elaborate as the above picture shows, but are, 

nevertheless In styles of the so-called "massive" order. The seats 

are "plain" upholstered. Choice at Twonty-throe, Slxty-flve. 

Regular Values Run from $40.00 to $45.00 



De Miracle Chemical Co., New York 




Three-Piece Parlor Sets 

These sets nre not heavy, but the design Is quite 
pleasing. Sents are of gonuliie leather — unusual 
for sets at this price. Most stores put Ijnltatlon 
leather In their* inexpensive 
sots. We believe In real leath- 
er. The frames are finislied in 
mshogany. We shall sell only 
a limited number of sets at 
this special figure. Come late 
and perhaps get left 

Would Be riienp «< faO.OO. 



Three Piece Parlor Sets 

Four different patterns In mahogany, styles more 

like picture above, with genuine leather upholstere,) 

seats and backs. The styles 

are x>t a kind that "take" well 

with o\ir customer.s, and you 

will say that never before have 

you seen such value. Not very 

many of these sets left — this 

Is u hint to come early 

Valiim 9R>.00 to HS'^.OO. 



W^T 



Owing to the figures at which these sets are sold, we ought to have 
the cash on the spot. However we will consider short term payments 
to good payers as a special accommodation. 



+ =»-«>' 



i 

i 

•J! 



p I 




Friday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



May 2, 1913 



ATTENTION ! IF YOU'VE MILLINERY TO BUY 

We Have Solved the Eternal Question " Where Can I Get the 
Right Millinery at the Right Price f ' ' Here Is the Answer : 

For Saturday We Announce a Sale of 
Trimmed and Untrimmed Hats 





Values up to $12.50 and $16.00, 
On Sale at $3.95, $5.00, $7.45. 

Reserved for tomorrow's selling are two 
hundred Huts, which will be placed on sale 
fur the tirst time. These hats are in the new- 
est style and colorings, trimmed with fancy 
feathers, flowers and ribbons — special — 

$3.95, $5.00, $7.45 

HUNDREDS OF UMTRiMMEO HATS 

A largo assortment of real Hemp, 
Milan and French Chip shapes, in 
all colors and all new styles; valuta 
up to $2.95 and $3.05, at only — 

$1.98 

Untrimmed Velvet Faced Hemp 
Hats, special — 

$2.95 

A large ui^surtment of fancy 
feathers, small and large effects, 
specially priced, and 
Huiulredg of biint-hes of all kinds 
of beautiful assorted flowers, also 
roses In the newest shades, and 
foliage In all varieties and colors; 
values up to $2.50, Saturday only — 

25c and 69c 

There's Youthful Charm and Cunning Style in Our 

CHILDREN'S TRIMMED HAT DEPARMENT 

All the latest shapes in Milans and hand-made Hats of silk braid 
^ 'i^ ''^nd lace, trimmed with ribbon, flowers, etc. 

VL^ Hats marked $1.75. S aturday. 75c , Hats marked $2.45,_Saturday^$1.45 
"'^ ^n^r;;;;;^^ Sl.OS^ajurday^c ! Hats marked $ 2.95,jaturday,jlj5 





The 

Leading 

Millinery 

Store of 

Duluth 



Jidk^'J^&€!nA€^^ 




1 05 and iOt West Superior ::itrict 



The 

Leading 

Millinery 

Store of 

Duluth 



OUTLOOK IS 
VERYBRIGHT 

Development Association Di- 
rectors Pleased With Im- 
migration Movement. 

-4 

Figures Shov/ That Northern 

Minnesota Is Settling 

Rapidly. 



ruliiiRs. The case was tried before 
Judge Fesltr. 

Demurrer I« Sustained. 

.Tiulf?e DaiKir has sustained a de- 
murrer which has l)een iutt-rposfd by 
Kltornoys for the defense in tiie law- 
suit whirl) Geortre Ht. GeorRe, admin- 
l.strator of the cstato of Max Donni, 
has utr.iinst the Mulkry-Mononald 
laimber (.onipany. The action involves 
a oluini for wroiifcMul death and is 
brouKht for the benefit of Elizabeth 
Donni a;.fi-d 41i. widow and two daugli- 
ters, \luiv and Flort-nco. 

The complaint states that Donni and 
a fellow worker were engaged In the 
work of unloadinf? logs from loaded 
nat oars and tliat a stake gave away, 
allowing the load to fall on them. Both 
suBtained fatal Injuries. The court 
held, In ruling on the demurrer, tliat 
tht' eomplaint did not clearly allege 
that the company was to blame lor 
this condition, and as such did not 
state a cau.se of action. The demurrer 
was- overruled, but the plaintiffs were 
given an opportunity to file an amend- 
ed eomplaint. 




f 



SAYS STOCK IS 

NOW WORTHLESS 

W.D.Callan Claims He Was 
Victimized in Consoli- 
d